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A.C. Batchelor

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A.C. Batchelor

Post by Karen on Wed 2 Jun 2010 - 19:54

ASSISTING THE POLICE.
And Its Reward.

[We have received the following communication from a regular reader of "P.I.P." who a short while ago rendered valuable assitance to the police in capturing a notorious burglar in Holborn. The moral of our contributor's experience is very obvious, and needs no emphasis. - Ed. "P.I.P"]

Two men being found at 10:30 p.m., or thereabouts, on some premises in a back street, running parallel with Holborn, and behind the warehouse of a large firm of silversmiths in that thoroughfare, one of the occupiers, a young woman, went and gave information to the police. When the police arrived and asked questions of these men, their answers not being satisfactory, they were being taken down to the station.
As they passed my house, at the door of which I was standing with a friend, one of the prisoners knocked one of the policemen almost senseless and escaped. The second prisoner then threw the other policeman to the ground, and was overpowering him when I, who had witnessed the whole affair, summoned assistance to him by blowing my whistle.
I then pursued the escaped prisoner up a badly lit court into the main thoroughfare until he was recaptured by other policemen.
It took eight policemen to take them down to the station, followed by a hostile crowd.
On inquiries being made by the police, it was found that both men were most desperate and well-known criminals, one of them, out of his many convictions, having served five years for shooting at a policeman.
Eventually they went to the Old Bailey, and got terms of seven and eight years respectively - not for what they had done on this particular night, for they were disturbed, but for their previous bad records.
The local police appearing to want to keep my part in the affair quite out of view, it occured to me to write to Scotland Yard, giving them the above facts.
In a day or two I received an acknowledgment of receipt of my letter, and after an interval a C.I.D. man called to see me. After a further interval of some days I received a tame letter of thanks.
However, I wrote them again, and pointed out to them that my age was near sixty, and also the risk I ran in going after this man up a dark court, and the opinion of their own men who knew these miscreants, that had this man been armed he would not have hesitated for a moment to have shot me down. But it was fortunate that both prisoners had left their burglars' paraphernalia down a lavatory on the premises on which they were found. The result of this correspondence was a final letter, saying they would not feel justified in giving me a pecuniary reward.

A.C. Batchelor
10, Red Lion Street, London, W.C.

Source: Penny Illustrated Paper, Saturday January 14, 1911, Page 44

Note: If you look carefully at the above article, you will kindly note that Mr. Batchelor summoned assistance to the policeman by blowing on his whistle. It was pretty well a standard at the time for private investigators to carry whistles instead of truncheons. If the police also did not want the public to know that Mr. Batchelor had assisted them in taking down a prisoner, it could be because that individual was an amateur detective and this would make the police look incompetent or ineffectual. Also, this Mr. Batchelor was nearly sixty in 1911, which means that during the Ripper murders, he would have been approximately 35-37 years of age. Could this A.C. Batchelor be the individual, who with Charles Grande (not Grandy) paid a visit to question Matthew Packer for information?

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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