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Carlo Sesicovich alias Charles Grandy

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Carlo Sesicovich alias Charles Grandy

Post by Karen on Wed 2 Jun 2010 - 18:48

LAW AND CRIME.

THE CHELSEA MYSTERY.

On Monday last, the adjourned inquiry into the death of Mrs. Lydia Chapman, alias Porter, who was found dead on the 13th ult., at 46, Maud-grove, Chelsea, was brought to a conclusion. Dr. Thomas Stevenson, of Guy's Hospital, stated that, having subjected the stomach of the deceased to a searching analysis, he had failed to discover any trace of either mineral or vegetable poison. As, however, other evidence had tended to show that chloroform had been administered with a view to robbery, the jury returned a verdict of "Wilful murder" against William and Louise Wallace, and the Coroner's warrant was accordingly issued for their apprehension. On Saturday last the police made a thorough search of the house, No. 46, Maude-grove, where Mrs. Chapman died, for some property which it was supposed had been concealed; but they found nothing. The parish have, it is stated, declined to take charge of Mrs. Chapman's children, on the ground that they are not destitute. They have been in charge of their cousin, but Miss Rye and another lady have offered to take them. A notice has been distributed by the police giving a description of the property missing and also of the Wallaces, with their aliases. The man is described as Carlo Sesicovich, otherwise Charles Grandy, otherwise William Wallace, otherwise Howard Adams, alias John Howe, alias The Dutchman, thirty-two years of age. The woman is described as "Louise Wallace, thirty-seven years of age, short, very dark hair, squints, wears spectacles. French by birth, but speaks English fluently.

Source: The Penny Illustrated Paper And Illustrated Times, Saturday May 06, 1876, Page 767

Note: If you take a close look at Carlo Sesicovich's aliases, you will see that they are the exact same ones that Charles Legrand/Grandy used. Also, it has recently been reported that Charles Legrand would have been 35-40 years of age in 1888 (as admitted by a "Ripperologist"). Since Grandy was 32 years old in 1876, that means that he was 44 years old in 1888. It seems that someone does not even know the age of their suspect, which does not bode well for a non-fictional piece of literature. Clearly, Charles Grandy's real name is Carlo Sesicovich and since Legrand used the same aliases, then Charles Grandy (Carlo Sesicovich) is Charles Legrand. Also, Legrand/Grandy/Sesicovich's partner was a French woman and Legrand's female partner in crime was also French (Marie Pourquoi) who also used many aliases, like Louise Wallace and Marie Pourquoi. The facts speak for themselves. Just read the newspaper articles that were posted by Tom and Deb. The aliases are identical. Charles Grandy/Legrand is Carlo Sesicovich!!!

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Re: Carlo Sesicovich alias Charles Grandy

Post by Karen on Mon 11 Mar 2013 - 14:59

THE BROMPTON MYSTERY.

The inquest on the body of Mrs. Lydia Chapman, who, under circumstances of considerable suspicion, was found dead in her bed, at her residence, 46, Maude-grove, Fulham-road, on the evening of Thursday, the 13th inst., was resumed on Wednesday by Dr. Diplock, at the Wetherby Arms, Chelsea.
The Coroner said he had received a letter from Dr. Stevenson, of Guy's hospital, to whom the stomach had been sent for analysis, stating that he could not possibly complete his examination for a day or two.
The first witness called was Alfred Clift, the landlord of the house at 46, Maude-grove, Chelsea, who said he was a joiner by trade. He had the letting of some houses in Maude-grove, and he let 46 to Mrs. Porter on the 24th of last June, and saw her frequently during the time ensuing up to the present. Deceased took lodgers in November, he thought, which he believed were the first lodgers she had. Deceased never spoke to witness respecting the lodgers. He thought they went away from the house about the 20th of February last.
When did the next lodger come? - I should think a little over two months ago. She asked my opinion as to taking them in, and I advised her on the subject.
Did she speak of having known them? - As friends, yes. I said to her, "Take my advice, and don't take them in. Friends are best apart." That is all I know about the affair. She spoke to me about getting rid of them some three weeks back. She did not give any reason for wishing to do so. I said, "You know what to do. Give them proper notice." The remark she made was, "For certain reasons I cannot."
You know no more, then, until you were called in on the day of her death, the 13th inst.? - No. The two servants came running down my area, and called my wife. They said, "Do come in, I think my mistress is dead!"
Did you go in? - My wife went in first, with the two girls, and I went in afterwards. My wife said, "Oh, go and fetch the doctor; Mrs. Porter has gone." I fetched the doctor, and we both went back together to the house. The doctor examined the deceased, and pronounced her dead. I asked the doctor whether I had better fetch the charwoman, and he said, "Yes." When I came back with the charwoman the doctor had left, and while the deceased was being laid out one of the servants remarked, "Why, where is mistress's rings? She had them on this evening." This remark was addressed to the charwoman. In the meantime the doctor had returned, called me on one side, and said, "This is a suspicious case; I can't give you a certificate." We both went then to the police-station and told the police of a sudden death and suspicions of robbery. The serjeant of police said to a constable, "You had better go and see what it is." We then went to 46, Maude-grove, and had the girls up in the dining-room one at a time and asked them questions. The constable then left. On the next morning I sent one of the girls to a relative. I left my house at about eight o'clock on the evening when the death took place, and as I did so I looked back and saw the right hand window of the top-floor open, and someone having put their head out quickly, pulled it in and shut the window down.
Did you see who it was? - No, I did not.
Had you observed the rings spoken of? - Yes; I have seen them on the hand of deceased while talking to her.
Were they valuable rings? - Yes, by every appearance.
By the Foreman of the Jury: There was a considerable time elapsed between the time I heard of the death and the time the policeman left. I made an application for the protection of the house. The police afforded me every information and assistance.
An argument here arose between the foreman and the witness as to whether the police had done their duty in the matter.
The Coroner said it did not come under the powers of the Court to go into such a subject, as what appeared in the newspapers was nothing to do with the court. He then read the evidence of the doctor, who stated that it was 11 o'clock at night before he was called.
Examination continued by the jury: Deceased had never told him what were the reasons which prevented her from giving Wallace notice to leave. When deceased took the house he made every possible inquiry as to her character and respectability.
Mrs. Julia Clift, wife of the last witness, was then examined: She said she saw a good deal of Mrs. Porter since she had lived at Maude-grove.
Did she ever speak to you of these lodgers of hers, the Wallaces? - Yes, sir; after they had gone in.
In what way did she speak of them? - She seemed to dislike them very much, and to want to get rid of them; in fact, she spoke of letting her house, but she did not give her reasons. They appeared to be respectable.
Did you see her at all on Thursday or Wednesday? - I saw her on Wednesday going by the house to give her orders to the shops as usual, I suppose. I did not speak to her. On Thursday I heard she was poorly, and in the evening I called to see how she was. The servants told me that she had been poorly, but was rather better. I told the servants to say that I called. At about half-past nine or 10 both the girls called to me and said, "Do come in; I believe mistress is dead." I rushed upstairs and tried to raise her, as I did not think it was possible for her to be dead. About two months ago she was ill, and I thought it was a similar attack. When I found she was really dead I sent immediately for my husband, who went for the doctor. He came, and the next thing we did was to send for a woman to lay her out. While she was being laid out the rings were missed. I did not go to the station.
Did you notice what kind of rings they were? - No. I suppose they were diamonds.
By the Jury: No one had access to the rooms until the doctor was present. Sophia Harvey, the girl, first noticed the rings were gone. She was a very delicate woman, and thought nothing of being in bed the best part of the day. The stones were set as an ordinary stone ring usually is, but I never noticed particularly.
Did you see anything disturbed in the room? - No, nothing at all.
Did you see two letters on the bed? - Sophia Harvey did, and handed them to me and I gave them to the doctor.
Elizabeth Rance was the next witness. She is a nurse, and would have been seven weeks on Friday in Mrs. Porter's service. She came in on the 10th of March. On Thursday, the 13th, at two p.m., her mistress rang the bell to have the baby brought up to her, as he was crying down in the kitchen. Her mistress got out of bed, and came to the top of the stairs and screamed. She asked what baby was screaming for. Both Mrs. Porter and the baby screamed. Witness said that the baby wanted some bread and butter. Her mistress took baby from her and went back to her bed, and witness left them together. She did not appear to be dangerously ill, but said she had the headache. Witness did not know whether Mr. and Mrs. Wallace were in or out of the house then. She next saw her mistress about six o'clock, when she rang to have the baby taken away. Mr. Crosby, the father of the deceased, was then in the room, and Mrs. Porter had her hand out of the bed playing with the baby, and she had her rings on then. Witness saw no more of Mrs. Porter till she had taken Willie (the other boy) up to bed. He is four years old. Mrs. Wallace was then in the room giving Mrs. Porter medicine. Mrs. Wallace asked if it was nice, and Mrs. Porter said it was not very bad. Witness put Willie to bed and went down again. A few minutes after the bell rang again. Witness went up to answer it, and Mrs. Porter asked witness to help her father on with his coat. Mrs. Porter told her to go down and bring up a parcel for him. As witness went down, Mrs. Wallace stood at her door, which was just ajar, inside, and, seeing witness, looked outside her door and asked if the old man were about going. Witness said he would not be long. That was all that she saw of Mrs. Wallace just then, and she saw nothing of Mrs. Porter any more till she went upstairs and found her dead. It was about a quarter-past seven when the father went away. Witness remained in the room with Mrs. Clift afterwards and saw Mrs. Clift raise deceased. The boy Willie was in bed with her then. He had told witness that his uncle Wallace romped with his momma, and pulled her hand, and pulled a ring off his mamma's finger, and that his aunty Wallace gave him an apple and took him down and put him in her own bed - that his uncle took him up again and put him in his mamma's bed. Witness did not notice the rings were missing till after the other servant noticed them when the body was being laid out. Mr. and Mrs. Wallace and Mrs. Porter lived happily together, but once Mrs. Porter had angry words with Mr. Wallace. That was one night when Mrs. Porter had a few friends, Mr. Clift and others, and did not ask Mr. and Mrs. Wallace.
William Farnfield, of 5, St. George's-terrace, Moore park-road, Fulham, cab-driver, was the next witness. He was called to 46, Maude-grove, in the evening of Thursday the 13th of April. He took a female and a male, and a large box and a bundle, and a small bag inside. He drove straight to Charing-cross railway station. They got out there. The porter said they were too late for the train. He left them there. It was raining hard and snowing. The box they had outside was very large and heavy, and the man asked witness to go and help him to bring it for him. Witness went upstairs for it, and said, "The man who made the box ought to carry it." The man wanted to have it inside and was vexed when witness said it must go outside. The woman came to the door and said they should be too late. They said he was to make haste, but that is general and made no difference. They paid him the fare he asked - half a crown.
The coroner had previously read a letter from Mr. Clift suggesting communication with the husband of the deceased through the Foreign office with a view to the children and the property being taken care of. He also received a letter from Miss Rye offering to take charge of the two children of the deceased. The coroner said they had better be allowed to become chargeable to the parish, which would then take what property the children might be entitled to. As for the house, it would not be advisable to take it out of the hands of the police.
The inquest was then adjourned till Monday.

After a great deal of research and inquiry, the police authorities have been able to ascertain the exact connection that existed between the deceased woman, Mrs. Chapman, and her lodgers, the Wallaces, which, it appears, is of long standing. The man, whose real name is Carle Sesicovich, but who has at various parts of his career passed as Charles Grandy, Howard Adams, John Howard, and William Wallace, formerly kept a billiard and drinking saloon in Twenty-third-street, Fifth-avenue, New York, and his wife, Louise, first became known to him at a French restaurant in Mercer-street in the same city. He was, in the name of Adams, together with J.B. Chapman, alias Joe Maguire, alias Bristowe (husband of the deceased), Jos. Charles Hulbert, alias Jourdan, and John Becker, alias Merkle, convicted of forgery in Smyrna, and was sent from there to Constantinople to undergo his sentence. While there a plan was concocted to enable them to escape, and Mrs. Wallace, duly furnished with funds for the purpose by Mrs. Chapman, went to Constantinople with a view of carrying it out. She was so far successful as to obtain the release of three of them, but the husband of the woman who had found the money for the venture, J.B. Chapman, was left in prison, and still remains there. Since that time, until the night of the death of Mrs. Chapman, Wallace had been living upon her, but he was also in the habit of visiting a lady in the neighbourhood, almost within a stone's throw of the house, to whom he represented himself as a single man. He was there on the morning of the 18th inst., the day on which the inquest was held. He had been in the habit of calling upon her daily, and on Tuesday he came as usual, and ordered breakfast to be got ready for him. While it was being prepared, the conversation turned upon the death in Maude-grove, and she referred to a paragraph that had appeared in the newspapers that morning with reference to it, and asked him if he knew any of the particulars. He replied that he did not trouble himself much about other people's affairs. After this she left the room, and while she was away he tore out that portion of the paper containing the account of the death, and on her return he made the remark that he had no appetite for his breakfast, and immediately left the house, since which time he has not been seen. After he left she discovered that he had torn the paper, and her suspicions being aroused, she immediately sent for another copy, which resulted in her finding out that he was suspected of having murdered Mrs. Chapman. Inquiries show that on the night of the death Wallace and his wife, on arriving at Charing-cross station, put their luggage into the cloak-room, but again fetched it in a few minutes, and putting it in a cab, drove away. Inspector Druscovitch, having obtained the photographs of the four men convicted in Turkey, submitted them to the examination of the servants at the house and the neighbours, with the result that Wallace was immediately recognised. On placing them before the little boy of Mrs. Chapman (aged five years), he instantly identified three of the four, viz., that of Chapman his papa, that of Sesicovich as his uncle Wallace, and that of Becker, whom he called Mr. Hutman. Upon this evidence a warrant for larceny was obtained against Wallace and his wife Louise. Upon searching the house nothing of any importance was discovered, with the exception of three blank Bank of England cheques, which, on inquiry, turned out to have been stolen from an English gentleman in May, 1874, at the Paris station of the Great Northern of France railway. Communication was at once opened with the British Consulate at Constantinople, and Chapman has been informed of the affair, and questioned with reference to it. He states that his confederates showed much revenge to him, but believes that plunder was the object in this case. He also says that his wife was possessed of valuable diamond earrings with pendants, gold watch and chain, and other articles that have been before mentioned. On some points he, however, maintains a great reticence, not being perfectly confident as to the motives that actuate those who are questioning him. A full description of the missing individuals has been sent to all the outports. When last seen Wallace had had his beard shaved off, his whiskers were cut short, and he was wearing a dark grey Ulster coat. The description in other respects has already been published, but his one great peculiarity is the fact that he has lost the first and second fingers of the left hand at the second joint. He is also tattooed on the breast with a ship in full sail. His age is 42, his height about 5ft. 10-1/2 in., his complexion dark.
The police have received some information relating to the deceased. If this is to be believed, she was discharged for improper conduct from a school in Bethnal-green, in which she was employed as a pupil teacher, and was afterwards, some 10 or 12 years ago, prosecuted at Shoreditch police-court on suspicion of being concerned in a garotte robbery attendant with fatal results, which was committed in a passage leading from Boundary-street to Shoreditch. According to this account she was in prison some weeks, and then was known by the alias of Lydia Hartley. After a long series of examinations and remands she was discharged, though it was thought she was connected with those who committed the crime.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, April 30, 1876, Page 2

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Re: Carlo Sesicovich alias Charles Grandy

Post by Karen on Tue 12 Mar 2013 - 0:49

THE BROMPTON MYSTERY.

The police as yet have made no arrest in connection with the mysterious death of Mrs. Chapman, and there seems to be now no doubt that the Wallaces have not quitted London. They certainly did not do so on the night of the discovery of the murder, as was supposed, but were in London, not far from Mrs. Chapman's house in Maude-grove, up to Tuesday, the 18th, the day of the inquest. On the Thursday the luggage was left for a few minutes at Charing-cross Station, in the cloak-room. Then it was taken out, and another cab was engaged. The driver of this cab has not been found. Wallace was in the habit of visiting a person in the neighbourhood, to whom he represented himself to be an unmarried man. After the death of Lydia Chapman he called every day. On the morning of the 18th he came as usual and asked for breakfast, as he was in the habit of doing. Up to that time he appears to have been unaware that any public notice had been taken of the death; but while breakfast was being prepared his companion alluded to the mysterious occurrence at 46, Maude-grove. Wallace soon afterwards said to her that he had no appetite for breakfast, went away, and has not been heard of since. It is supposed he is in private lodgings in London. When last seen he had no beard, but had whiskers cut short, and was wearing a dark-grey Ulster coat. The fingers of his left hand which are mutilated are the first and second fingers. They are taken off at the second joint. He is tattooed on the breast with a ship under sail. He speaks with the accent of the Western States of America, although he appears to be by birth a Russian or a Pole. In the records of the British Consular Prison at Constantinople he is described as of Austrian extraction. Besides the name of William Wallace, he has gone by the following aliases: - Howard Adams, John Howe, Charles Grandy, Carlo Sesicovich. The last name is thought to be that to which he is entitled. He formerly kept a billiard and drinking saloon in Twenty-third-street, Sixth-avenue, New York. Here he became acquainted with "Mrs. Wallace," the companion of his flight, who is a Frenchwoman, and was then in a restaurant in Mercer-street, New York. His photograph, taken in Constantinople by Abdullah Freres, gives him a forbidding aspect. His identification is due to Inspector Shore. Four American forgers were tried at Smyrna two years ago by the American Consular Court according to the Treaty with Turkey, which gives citizens of the Unites States the right to be tried, like the subjects of other Christian countries, by their own Consul. They were sentenced to three years' imprisonment, and removed to Constantinople, where they were confined in the British Consular Prison, for the convenience of the American Consulate. One of the men was Joseph B. Chapman, then known as James Maguire, alias Bristowe, the husband of the deceased. The others were Sesicovich (Wallace), John Becker, alias Merkle, alias Hutman, and J.C. Hulbert, alias Jordan. Mrs. Wallace went to Constantinople with money supplied (it is believed) by Mrs. Chapman, and contrived the escape of the three men; but Wallace, had, according to one of the telegrams from Constantinople, cherished in prison much enmity against Chapman, and Chapman was left behind when the others escaped. Although he now says that the others were "base traitors," he is very reticent, and believes, as the telegrams state, that the whole affair is got up by the police for the purpose of extracting information from him. If the murder was committed, however, he says it was committed for the sake of plunder. Our Consul-General in Constantinople is in communication with Scotland-yard. The photographs of all the four men have long since been circulated throughout Europe, the three men who have escaped being "wanted" by the American detective Pinkerton. It was suggested by Inspector Shore to show the photographs to the dead woman's boy. He at once recognised "Papa," "Uncle Wallace," and "Hutman." The servants and neighbours also identify the photographs of Wallace. Wallace knows England and other parts of the United Kingdom well. The precise history of the blank Bank of England cheques found in the house, and known to have been stolen in 1874 from a gentleman at the Northern Railway Station in Paris, has not yet been traced.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday April 25, 1876, Page 3

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Re: Carlo Sesicovich alias Charles Grandy

Post by Karen on Tue 12 Mar 2013 - 2:22

THE BROMPTON MYSTERY.

On Monday the adjourned inquiry into the cause of the death of Mrs. Lydia Chapman, alias Porter, late of 46, Maude-grove, was resumed at the Weatherby Arms, King's-road, Chelsea, before the coroner, Dr. Diplock.
Sophia Harvey, one of the domestic servants at 46, Maude-grove, recalled, said that it was some time after the Wallaces had left that she went upstairs and found the deceased dead. Witness and her fellow-servant did not examine the room after the deceased was laid out. She was in the room during the time she was being laid out, and found upon the bed two letters (produced). The following morning she found another letter in a dress-pocket of the deceased. The former she gave to Mrs. Clift, the wife of the landlord of the house.
The coroner remarked that it was scarcely necessary to read the letters, as they were dated some time back. One was from the Consular office, Constantinople, and the other addressed to Mrs. Maguire - one of the aliases by which the deceased was known - and commenced "My dearest wife." These letters were not on the bed earlier in the day, and the question was, how did they get there?
Witness continued: One of the deceased's boxes was by the side of the bed, and the other was beneath the dressing-table. The keys of her boxes were usually kept under her pillow, and they were there early in the afternoon, but could not be found when the Wallaces had gone. The box by the side of the bed was then unlocked; it was the custom of the deceased to keep it locked.
By the Jury: Before they left Mrs. Wallace gave witness and her fellow-servant a bow and silk pocket-handkerchief each. No promise of future presents was made. They took the whole of the property belonging to them away with them. She did not know they were doing so at the time, but she afterwards found everything had gone. Mrs. Wallace said she was coming back again. The medicine prescribed by Dr. Whitefield for deceased was taken in by Mrs. Wallace.
The summoning officer, in reply to the coroner, said the keys of the boxes had not since been discovered.
Mr. Joseph Davis, stationer, 270, Fulham-road, deposed that he knew the Wallaces by sight. On the Monday or Tuesday before Good Friday they called at his shop and asked to see some book on family medicine. He showed them one entitled "The Family Doctor." Mrs. Wallace had the book to look at for some five or six minutes. Then she said it did not contain what she wanted, and she would not purchase it. They afterwards left the shop.
Dr. Stevenson, from Guy's hospital, said: On April 21 last I received from the hands of Dr. Whitefield, surgeon, the following articles carefully sealed, the seal being unbroken, and bearing the impression of "W.," viz.: A glass bottle containing a human stomach and part of colon (large intestine); a jampot containing a turbid fluid, the contents of stomach; a marmalade-pot containing six ounces of liver (apparently human). Also I received a brown paper parcel containing a basin and dessert spoon, with some fluid. The whole of the above I have subjected to a minute examination and analysis, with the view of detecting the presence of poison. I cannot detect mineral or vegetable poisons or noxious substances of any kind in any of the viscera, nor in the contents of the stomach. And although I made special analyses for the detection of chloroform, or volatile compounds of a like character, I could not find them. Two days had, however, elapsed between the death of the deceased and the post-mortem examination, and during six days more the viscera were retained in vessels. This would permit of the escape of such volatile substances as chloroform. The negative evidence respecting the presence of these substances is by no means conclusive as to their non-administration. I have myself detected chloroform in the body of a person 24 hours after death from the administration of that anasthetic; but I am not aware whether it has ever been discovered in a dead body when many days have elapsed between the death of the person and the analysis. The basin and spoon contained a small quantity of adherent food, which was free from poisonous substances. The food consisted of bread or toast, soaked in beef tea. The viscera presented no appearance which would enable me to state the indubitable cause of death. Nor did the stomach present any appearance not met with in persons who have died from natural causes.
The coroner said this concluded the evidence it was proposed to call. They had heard that the Wallaces lodged with the deceased, who had valuable jewellery, some of which was seen on her hands a short time before her death. This jewellery was estimated as worth 1,500 pounds. One of the servants had said that when she first entered the room in which deceased lay dead there was a strong smell of chloroform. She recognised the smell again when a handkerchief slightly saturated with the mixture was passed to her. Dr. Whitefield found a mark by the side of the deceased's nose, and forming his opinion upon the various indications which he saw, he stated his belief that she died from suffocation engendered, as the mouth and nose showed, by chloroform. Dr. Stevenson had been unable in his analysis to detect any poison, and they had to fall back upon the question whether death was owing to the state of the heart, which was so much diseased, or whether it was caused by administration of chloroform. They had no direct evidence as to what did take place; but Mrs. Clift and the servant had told them what the little boy - deceased's son - had said. The boy was only four years of age, and was too young to be examined. What he said could, of course, only be taken as confirmatory. He said uncle Wallace romped on the bed with his mother, and that he took her rings off. This, taken in connection with what the servants had stated, led to the inference that chloroform was given; while the finding of letters on the bed, the keys of the deceased's boxes being gone, her watch missing from beneath the pillow, the boxes being opened, and the things taken out and put back again, seemed to point to the conclusion that she was assaulted with it for the purposes of the robbery. Death resulting from an assault of this kind constituted murder, unless some circumstances existed which would reduce it to manslaughter, or death from misadventure. They (the jury) had to consider whether those mitigating circumstances existed.
Mr. Froggatt suggested that the evidence given by Dr. Whitefield as to the indications which led to his opinion that death resulted from suffocation, should be read over to Dr. Stevenson in order that it might be known whether he corroborated it or not. This was done.
Dr. Stevenson said a person with the diseased heart described by Dr. Whitefield was liable to death from shock of any kind. The forcible administration of chloroform would be likely to produce death from shock or syncope. From what he had heard shock in this case probably caused death. He did not think the deceased died a natural death.
The jury expressed a wish to hear Dr. Thurston, who was present with Dr. Whitefield when he made the post-mortem examination.
Dr. Thurston was examined, and generally corroborated the evidence given by Dr. Whitefield.
Dr. Whitefield, recalled, said he did not detect the odour of chloroform when he was called to see the deceased, as the windows had been opened and there was a strong smell of gas.
The jury, after a quarter of an hour's consideration, returned a verdict of "Wilful murder" against William and Louisa Wallace.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, May 7, 1876, Page 4

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Re: Carlo Sesicovich alias Charles Grandy

Post by Karen on Tue 12 Mar 2013 - 2:33

CRIME IN ENGLAND.
A WOMAN MURDERED FOR HER JEWELERY - A STRANGE STORY.

LONDON, April 21. - The Times this morning, referring to the murder of Mrs. Porter, at No. 46, Maude-grove, Chelsea, on the 13th inst. supposed to have been perpetrated by one William Wallace, and his wife, said to be Americans, who, it was stated, had left for Belgium, says: "Wallace and his wife were in London as late as April 18. Wallace appears to be by birth a Russian or Pole, and his true name is probably Carlo Sesicovich. He has also gone by the aliases of Howard Adams, John Howe, and Charles Grandy. He formerly kept a billiard and drinking saloon on the corner of Sixth avenue and Twenty-third street, New York. The woman known as Mrs. Porter, whom he is suspected of murdering, is the wife of Joseph B. Chapman. Sesicovich, Chapman, Joseph Hulburt, and John Becker, with various aliases, were tried for forgery at Smyrna two years ago, as Americans, before the United States Consular Court, and sentenced to three years' imprisonment each. They were removed to Constantinople, where all except Chapman escaped. It is believed that all three lived at Mrs. Chapman's expense until her means were exhausted, when the Wallaces murdered her for her jewelry, of which she was known to have $8,500 worth. Photographs of all four of the men have long been circulated among the Police authorities of Europe, the three who escaped from Constantinople being watched by Pinkerton's Agency. The detectives are confident that the Wallaces will shortly be captured.

Source: The New York Times, Tuesday April 25, 1876

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Re: Carlo Sesicovich alias Charles Grandy

Post by Karen on Tue 12 Mar 2013 - 2:37

The London Commissioner of Police has offered a reward of 100 pounds for the apprehension of the Wallaces, against whom a verdict of wilful murder was returned by the coroner's jury which inquired into the death of Lydia Chapman, alias Porter, at 46, Maude-grove, Chelsea, on the 13th of April last. The accused are believed not to have left the country.

Source: Staffordshire Sentinel

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Re: Carlo Sesicovich alias Charles Grandy

Post by Karen on Wed 13 Mar 2013 - 14:33

THE BROMPTON MYSTERY.

The man Wallace and his wife (according to the Home News) seem to defy the vigilance of the police, in spite of the various rumours that have been circulated, especially in the North German Gazette, which stated that the Wallaces had fled to Berlin. According to the account of a person engaged in the case, the man Wallace was seen in the West-end of London last week. The rumour that he had also been seen in Chelsea a few days after the death of the woman Chapman has been considerably strengthened, and all the endeavours of the police to trace the jewellery have proved fruitless, although the servants' boxes and the house have been minutely searched. With regard to the convict Maguire, the rumours that he had been liberated from prison at Constantinople, and that he was on his way to England, are entirely unfounded. The English Government have made no attempt to apply to the Porte for a remission of the sentence, and it will only do so in the event of the apprehension of the Wallaces, when Maguire would be liberated in order to be prosecutor for the alleged larceny of the jewellery in the event of the indictment for murder failing. Should the accused have escaped to the Continent or America they could be sent back on the warrant for larceny alone, as the coroner's warrant for murder could be executed abroad, such mandates not being included in the Extradition Treaty. In connection with this case, it is now stated that the Commissioners of Police have offered a reward of 100 pounds for the apprehension of the Wallaces. The woman Louise Wallace is thirty-seven years of age, short, very dark hair, has a cast in her eye, wears spectacles; is French by birth, but speaks English fluently. The suspected parties are still at large.

Source: The Auckland Star, Monday July 24, 1876

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Re: Carlo Sesicovich alias Charles Grandy

Post by Karen on Thu 14 Mar 2013 - 9:46

THE MYSTERIOUS DEATH AT BROMPTON.

On Saturday, from information received at Scotland yard as to some property which had been concealed, and which the Wallaces had not been able to find, Chief Inspector Druscovitch, accompanied by Inspector Shore and Inspector Keller, visited the house No. 46, Maude-grove, and made a thorough search.
The carpets were removed and some boards were pulled up, with the result that the supposed hiding place was discovered, it being, however, empty. The cash box, empty, was handed to the police by Mrs. Ashwood, the cousin of the deceased, it having been discovered in another part of the house. No trace
was found of any other property whatever. Chief Inspector Druscovitch gave instructions for an auctioneer to take an inventory of the property, and hand over the children to the parish, which will at the same time, be able to take charge of the furniture and other things, so as to reimburse the
expenses which may be incurred. It is understood that the relieving officer has refused to take charge of them, on the ground that they are not destitute. At present they are in charge of their cousin, but Miss Rye and another lady have offered to take them. Mr. Froggat, who has been instructed by
telegram from Constantinople, will, probably, on behalf of the father, make an application as to the children at the Westminster Police court. No arrest has yet been made, but a notice has been distributed by the police almost through the civilised world, giving a description of the property missing
and also of the Wallaces, with their aliases. The missing articles are: - Two 20 dollar pieces, gold; a gold necklace, thick link pattern, pale triangular amber pendant, gold fringe; a lady's gold hunting watch, engine turned, gold double linked neck chain attached; a wedding ring; a half hoop ring,
three small diamonds set in gold; a plain gold ring diamond in centre; a coral brooch; a pair of gold ear drops set with small diamonds; and about 200 pounds, (supposed to be in sovereigns). The description of the parties for whom the warrant has been issued is Carlo Sesicovich, otherwise Charles
Grandy, otherwise William Wallace, otherwise Howard Adams, alias John Howe, alias The Dutchman, 32 years of age, 5 feet 10 inches high, dark complexion, hair and whiskers, shaved under chin, slight black moustache, brown eyes, has lost first and second fingers of left hand up to second joint; dressed
in dark frock-coat, vest and trousers, ulster overcoat (badly fitting), and felt hat; last seen in London on the 18th ult. And Louise Wallace, 37 years of age, short, very dark hair, squints, wears spectacles, French by birth, but speaks English fluently. They had with them a large box, of American
make, and a black Gladstone bag.

Source: Pembrokeshire Herald and General Advertiser, 5 May 1876, Page 4

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