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Elizabeth Cooney

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Elizabeth Cooney

Post by Karen on Mon 9 Dec 2013 - 17:02

Someone private messaged me asking if I could find any information on Elizabeth Cooney. Unfortunately, this is all that I could find in the newspapers:

PEMBROKESHIRE.

SCHEDULES of FEES, FINES, FORFEITURES and PENALTIES, paid or payable to the Treasurer of the County of Pembroke, from Epiphany Quarter Sessions, 1881, to Easter Quarter Sessions, 1881.

HUNDRED OF ROOSE.

Names                                              Sums Paid                                

Elizabeth Cooney                            0 pounds  9s.  0d.


Source: Pembrokeshire Herald and General Advertiser, 6 May 1881, Page 4

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Re: Elizabeth Cooney

Post by Mr Hyde on Tue 10 Dec 2013 - 1:10

Thanks for that Karen and for opening the thread.

 I am looking for records that tie the Cooney family to St.Leonards Church,Shoreditch.

 en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Leonard's,_Shoreditch

 The family at the 1881 Census was....

 John Cooney 27
 Elizabeth Cooney (nee Smith) 25
 John Cooney 4
 Elizabeth Cooney 2
 Michel Cooney (son) 8 months

 54 Flower and Dean Street.

 Their cousin "Marie Lloyd" was Christened at St.Leonards as Matilda Alice Victoria Wood on 20 March,1870.
 
 Basically looking for BMD.

 Not in a situation to pursue it myself,for the moment.

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Re: Elizabeth Cooney

Post by Karen on Sat 21 Dec 2013 - 1:08

Not so much about Elizabeth Cooney, but here are a few more articles pertaining to various other Cooneys. This first one is particularly interesting because there is a Michael Kelly mentioned along with it.

JOHN COONEY:

A BANGOR SENSATION.
IRISH HARVESTER'S SHOCKING DEATH.

A DIFFICULTY AS TO THE BURIAL.
ROMAN CATHOLICS FEEL INSULTED.

FATHER RATCLIFFE SAYS THE MATTER WILL BE BROUGHT BEFORE PARLIAMENT.

Mr. Pentir Williams, the North Carnarvonshire Coroner, on Friday evening held an inquest at Bangor Station touching the death of Michael Kelly in Bangor East Tunnel the same morning. The body was in a frightfully mangled condition, and the Coroner expressed his sympathy with the jury
in being compelled by law to view such a revolting spectacle. He said that, though efforts to abolish the compulsory viewing of bodies made in the past had failed, he had little doubt that an Act making the viewing of bodies discretionary would ere long be passed. The jury then proceeded
to view the body, with the exception of Mr. T.G. Williams, who refused to go as a protest against compulsory viewing.
John Cooney, of Ballingstack, County Galway, said the deceased and himself had been working at the harvest in Norfolkshire, and from there they went to Manchester. Leaving there on the previous night, witness booked for a place called Donamon, whilst the deceased, witness thought, had
booked for Ballymore. Witness and deceased had six or seven glasses of beer during Thursday, but were not drunk when they entered the train. Witness fell asleep soon after leaving Chester, and was awakened after a time by Kelly shouting, "Come on; we shall be too late for work." He woke
up, and saw deceased walking through the open door. Witness went to the door and looked down, but, seeing nothing of Kelly, after a quarter of an hour shut the door.
By the Coroner: He knew nothing about the communication cord, though he had been told about it since. The train was going full speed at the time.
By Superintendent Harris: He had two small bottles of whisky when he left Chester. He partly drank one of them, but what became of the other he could not tell. Perhaps Kelly had taken it. He and deceased were perfectly friendly, and had no words in the train. He had slept with the deceased for the
last four months, but, though deceased used to have "drames," witness never knew him to walk in his sleep.
William Frost, guard of the train, saw the deceased and last witness enter the train at Chester. They both seemed sober. Witness locked them in, as far as one side of the carriage was concerned. The door on the other side would not be locked. Cooney was quite cool and unexcited when he reported
Kelly's disappearance. The train was travelling at 45 miles an hour at the time of the accident.
Stationmaster Hughes, Bangor, handed in a telegram from Holyhead, replying to his inquiry as to whether the carriage showed signs of a struggle. The reply was no.
Evan Williams, carriage examiner at Holyhead, said he examined the carriage as soon as Cooney reported the affair, but there was not the slightest sign of a struggle. The self fastening door-handle was in perfect order, and would not open of itself.
Inspector Shepherd said he found pieces of the body of the man scattered all over the line in the tunnel. Shepherd's description of the mutilated remains was terrible.
Stationmaster Hughes said four trains had passed up and two down after the deceased fell out, and it was possible that all had more or less mangled the body.
The Coroner, in summing up, said that Cooney had impressed him as a man telling a true story (hear, hear), and it seemed that the jury could have little difficulty in coming to a conclusion as to the cause of death. It was possible, and even probable, that Kelly had taken the missing bottle of whisky and drank
it. At any rate, it was clear from Cooney's evidence that Kelly was quite mixed when he woke Cooney up and stepped out of the train, and there was not the slightest evidence of foul play.
The jury returned a verdict of "Death by misadventure."

THE PRIEST INDIGNANT.
DISAGREEABLE CIRCUMSTANCES.

A singular and disagreeable incident has occurred in connection with the Irish harvester whose death through falling from a railway carriage was inquired into by the Bangor coroner on Friday. The body, which was literally cut into pieces, was kept in an outbuilding at the railway station. The railway authorities disclaimed
responsibility for burial, and the remains were removed to the public mortuary. The city Sanitary Committee, the parish overseers and the relieving officer decline any responsibility in the matter, and up to Saturday night the difficulty yet remained unsolved.
The incident has created considerable indignation at Bangor. "It has moved our people very much," said Father Ratcliffe to a reporter. "They deem the affair not only insulting to themselves, but to their country and to their religion, and in order to prevent a repetition of such a scandal we are communicating the facts to one
of the Irish members to bring the matter under the notice of Parliament. The Home Secretary will also be informed. The relieving officer would not move without an order from the clerk, who must receive instructions from the guardians, who do not meet for a fortnight. Such a thing is quite ridiculous. A deputation of Protestants
came to me with regard to the incident, and they joined the Roman Catholics in protesting against such a state of affairs."
Father Ratcliffe added that his congregation defrayed all the funeral expenses, and, moreover, attended the funeral, at which all the ritual of the Roman Catholic Church was observed, crossbearers, thurifiers, holy water bearers, and acolytes being present. The principal mourner was the father of the unfortunate young man.

Source: Weekly News and Visitors' Chronicle For Colwyn Bay, 8 September 1905, Page 3


Last edited by Karen on Sat 21 Dec 2013 - 1:12; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Elizabeth Cooney

Post by Karen on Sat 21 Dec 2013 - 1:08

JOHN COONEY:

RAILWAY FATALITY AT BANGOR.
IRISHMAN CUT TO PIECES.

EVIDENCE AT THE INQUEST.

On Friday evening, Mr. Pentir Williams, North Carnarvonshire Coroner, held an inquest at Bangor Station, touching the death of Michael Kelly, in Bangor east tunnel that morning. In view of the mangled condition of the body, the Coroner expressed his sympathy with the jury in being compelled by law to view such a spectacle, and
said that though past efforts to abolish the compulsory viewing of bodies had failed, he had little doubt that an Act making that discretionary would ere long be passed.
John Cooney, of Ballingstack, County Galway, said deceased and himself had been working at the harvest in Norfolk, and from there they went to Manchester. Leaving there on Thursday night witness booked for a place called Dinaman, whilst deceased, witness thought, had booked for Ballymore. Witness and deceased had six or seven
glasses of beer during Thursday, and were not drunk when they entered the train. Witness fell asleep soon after leaving Chester, and was wakened by Kelly shouting, "Come on, we shall be too late for work." He woke up, and saw deceased walking through the open door. Witness went to the door, and looked down, but seeing nothing of Kelly,
after a quarter of an hour, shut the door.
By the Coroner: He knew nothing about the communication cord, though he had been told about it since. The train was going full speed at the time.
By Superintendent Harris: He had two small bottles of whisky when he left Chester. He drank part of one of them, but what became of the other he could not tell. He and deceased were perfectly friendly, and had no words in the train. He had slept with deceased for the last four months, but though deceased used to have "drames," witness never knew
him to walk in his sleep.
William Frost, guard of the train, saw deceased and last witness enter the train at Chester. They both seemed sober. Witness locked them in as far as one side of the carriage was concerned. The door on the other side would not be locked. Cooney was quite cool when he reported Kelly's disappearance. The train was travelling at forty-five miles an hour
at the time of the accident.
Evan Williams, carriage examiner at Holyhead, said he examined the carriage as soon as Cooney reported the affair, but there was not the slightest sign of a struggle. The self-fastening door handle was in perfect order, and would not open of itself.
Inspector Shepherd said he found pieces of the body of the man scattered all over the line in the tunnel.
Stationmaster Hughes, Bangor, said four trains had passed up and two down after the deceased fell out, and it was possible all had more or less mangled the body.
The Coroner, in summing up, said Cooney had impressed him as a man telling a true story, and it seemed the jury could have little difficulty in coming to a conclusion as to the cause of death. It was possible, and even probable, that Kelly had taken the missing bottle of whisky. It was clear from Cooney's evidence that Kelly was quite mixed when he woke
Cooney up, and stepped out of the train. There was not the slightest evidence of foul play.
The jury returned a verdict of death by misadventure.

Source: North Wales Express, 8 September 1905, Page 3


Last edited by Karen on Sat 21 Dec 2013 - 1:12; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Elizabeth Cooney

Post by Karen on Sat 21 Dec 2013 - 1:09

PATRICK COONEY:

THE CRONIN MURDER.
Extraordinary Revelations.

CHICAGO, Thursday. -  A man named Biggs, a prominent member of the Clan-na-Gael, has been arrested here charged with complicity in the murder of Dr. Cronin.
The Times second edition publishes a telegram from Chicago stating that Attorney Baker, with Burke's extradition papers, which have arrived here, leaves for Winnipeg tonight, reaching there on Friday. Investigation of the cottage at Grove-avenue, Postal-station, Chicago South, shows that Patrick Cooney, on May 15th, sent 10 dollars by money-order to Burke, at
Juliet, Illinois, Cooney saying he could not write, but got the clerk to fill up the application. The clerk remembers the case, and says the man gave the name of Patrick Cooney, and seems to answer to Cooney's description. When Simonds bought the furniture that was found in Carlson cottage, he also bought a satchel, saying he wanted one large enough to carry a complete
suit of clothes. This was delivered with the furniture. The Winnipeg police have found on Burke a small flat satchel, the key of which has been sent to Chicago. It tallies with the keys of similar satchels in the shop where this was supposed to have been bought. The theory is that Cronin's clothes, which have never been found, were put into this satchel with the intention to send them
to England and to dress with them a disfigured corpse, which would be placed in the Thames, thus confirming the tale which the conspirators circulated that Cronin went to England to testify before the Special Commission, and was murdered there as a spy. The finding of Cronin's body stopped this scheme, and the finding of the satchel is regarded as an important clue.

Source: Cardiff Times, 29 June 1889, Page 4

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Re: Elizabeth Cooney

Post by Karen on Sat 21 Dec 2013 - 1:10

ERNEST COONEY:

BOY-VOLUNTEER'S SUICIDE.

The shocking suicide of Ernest Cooney, the 16 year-old private in the 3rd Volunteer Battalion Royal Fusiliers, who recently shot himself in a railway carriage near Clapham Junction, has been reported upon by Colonel Long, commanding the battalion, who ordered a board of inquiry to be held. At the inquest Cooney's mother said he was a very good boy until he went into camp at Pirbright.
There, she said, he learned to play cards. "I have lost heavily at card-playing," he said in a letter to his mother. "I have lost all the money I had. Upon counting up my book I found I have lost close upon 18 pounds during the past two months." He was a tobacconist's packer, and earned 12s. a week. The inquiry, which was presided over by Lieutenant-Colonel T.E. Carey Bates, did not bear out the
suggestion that there had been card-playing in camp.

Source: Rhyl Record and Advertiser, 13 October 1900, Page 3

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Re: Elizabeth Cooney

Post by Guest on Sat 22 Mar 2014 - 18:37

Karen, can you confirm that Mary's lodging house was called Cooney's and not Cooley's?

It's written both ways.

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Re: Elizabeth Cooney

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Mar 2014 - 2:49

Hi Maybea:

Yes, I can confirm that the lodging house in which Mary resided at one time was indeed called Cooney's lodging house, as per this 1881 Census entry. As you can see there are quite a few residents listed as lodgers which more than likely makes this address a lodging house. Also notice the names O'Brien and Cooney. The Cooney lodging house was said to be in Flower and Dean Street

1881 census transcription details for:  54, Flower And Dean St, Spitalfields
Print Close
National Archive Reference:
[th]RG number:[/th][th]Piece:[/th][th]Folio:[/th][th]Page:[/th][th]Reg. District:[/th][th]Sub District:[/th][th]Parish:[/th][th]Enum. District:[/th][th]Ecclesiastical District:[/th][th]City/Municipal Borough:[/th][th]Address:[/th][th]County:[/th]
RG11
435
50
36     
Whitechapel
Spitalfields
Spitalfields
54, Flower And Dean St, Spitalfields
London, Middlesex
[th]Name[/th][th]Relation[/th][th]Condition[/th][th]Sex[/th][th]Age[/th][th]Birth Year[/th][th]Occupation , Disability [/th][th]Where Born[/th]
O BRIEN, James AustinHeadMarried M351846Bricklayers LabourerCheshire
O BRIEN, SarahWifeMarried F401841Clothes PresserHampshire
O BRIEN, AlfredSonSingle M81873ScholarGt Yarmouth, Norfolk
MUN?SY, SusanLodgerSingle F231858Dress MakerSpitalfields, Middlesex
COONEY, JohnLodger HeadMarried M271854SalesmanSt Lukes, Middlesex
COONEY, ElizabethLodger WifeMarried F251856Dress MakerSpitalfields, Middlesex
COONEY, JohnLodger SonSingle M41877Spitalfields, Middlesex
COONEY, ElizabethLodger DaughterSingle F21879Spitalfields, Middlesex
COONEY, MichelLodgerSingle M01881Spitalfields, Middlesex
TEECHAM, SamuelLodger HeadMarried M751806TailorSpitalfields, Middlesex
TEECHAM, Mary ELodger WifeMarried F761805TailorSpitalfields, Middlesex
TEECHAM, ElizabethLodger DaughterSingle F421839TailorSpitalfields, Middlesex
TEECHAM, Flora SLodger DaughterSingle F231858TailorSpitalfields, Middlesex
CALLON, PatrickLodger HeadMarried M501831LabourerIreland
CALLON, CatherineLodgerMarried F401841HawkerYork

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Re: Elizabeth Cooney

Post by Guest on Tue 25 Mar 2014 - 18:41

Karen wrote:Hi Maybea:

Yes, I can confirm that the lodging house in which Mary resided at one time was indeed called Cooney's lodging house, as per this 1881 Census entry. 
The Cooney lodging house was said to be in Flower and Dean Street

Was there another one on Thrawl Street because some books and sites say she was living at Cooney's on Thrawl when she met Barnett?

Catherine Eddowes was the one they say stayed at Cooney's on Flower and Dean.

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Re: Elizabeth Cooney

Post by Mr Hyde on Mon 17 Nov 2014 - 20:39

16 and 17 Thrawl Street was owned by John Cooney.

 Mary Nichols lived at 18.
 So did Emma Davis.(Red Herring).
 James Hague was the Lodging House Keeper and Chandler Shop Prop.

 Suspect 21 and 22 were the corners of Mission Hall Court.

 Small world!

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