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Superintendent Hayes

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Superintendent Hayes

Post by Karen on Sun 5 Aug 2012 - 8:51

Superintendent Hayes was mentioned on page 124 of the book "Jack the Ripper: An Encyclopedia."

SAD SUICIDE AT WINDSOR.

At the Windsor petty sessions, on Monday, William Aylett, a coachman, about 40 years of age, was charged with threatening the life of his wife Sarah. The latter did not appear, and the prisoner was accordingly remanded for a week. The case was of a very distressing character. The accused had been living for a time in the service of a gentleman at Leamington, while his wife and children remained at Windsor. On returning recently to his home in Victoria-street, his jealousy would seem to have been aroused, and he is said to have repeatedly threatened his wife, who at last apparently became seriously alarmed at the violence of his demeanour. On Thursday Aylett, who is believed to be irresponsible for his actions, was arrested at the instance of Superintendent Hayes, and removed to the Windsor police-station to await his examination before the borough magistrates. About half-past two o'clock on Sunday afternoon Mrs. Aylett, whose age is 36, told the boy to bring her a pen, as she wanted to write a letter, but just at the moment a friend came in, and asking her visitor to mind the children, she rushed excitedly from the house. Believing that Mrs. Aylett intended to commit suicide, Superintendent Hayes made inquiries in the district without avail, while Mr. Collier, a neighbour, and others also went in search of the missing woman, who had been seen near the Thames at Clewer, and subsequently in the village churchyard, where she obtained some sprigs of rosemary, about a quarter-past four o'clock in the afternoon. After that nothing was heard of her till half-past seven o'clock on Monday morning, when William Whiting, a gentleman's servant, while walking along the river brink discovered the body of Mrs. Aylett lying in the shallow water on the east of the weir.
Mr. Field, deputy-coroner for Berkshire, held an inquest on Tuesday at Old Windsor on the body of Sarah Aylett. - Elizabeth Lyle, of Rathby, Leicestershire, sister of the deceased, identified the remains, and deposed that Mrs. Aylett had been living in Victoria-street, Windsor, with her husband, William Aylett, who was coachman in the employment of Mr. Gubbins, of Leamington. Witness had been staying for some time with her sister. Her husband had been living at Leamington for several months, and came home on the last day of June. Witness last saw deceased alive about eight minutes to two o'clock on Sunday afternoon. She went to see Mr. Sims, the relieving officer, and afterwards returned home. She thought the trouble was too much for her sister, who had to decide whether her husband should be kept at home or sent away. He had come home in an excited state, and accused her of being unfaithful, and she thought the anxiety had caused her to commit suicide. She heard that deceased had been found drowned on Monday afternoon.
Police-constable Tomline stated that the husband was in custody upon the charge of threatening the life of his wife.
William Whiting, a gentleman's servant, living at the Ham, Old Windsor, said on Monday morning he was near the weir and found the body of the deceased woman in the Thames.
Jane Henton, housemaid at Windsor Castle, deposed that she last saw the deceased alive about half-past two o'clock on Sunday afternoon, at her residence in Victoria-street. Witness asked her how her husband was, and she replied, "Bad. I've got to go out. Will you mind my children?" Deceased either said she was going or was about to go to Mr. Sims. Witness heard nothing more of Mrs. Aylett till she was told her body had been found. Deceased had told witness that her trouble - her husband accusing her wrongfully - was too great for her to bear. That was the only sign of insanity she had shown. Her husband had accused her of unfaithfulness, for which she was quite positive he had no grounds whatever.
By the Foreman: Deceased had seen her husband since he was taken into custody on Thursday for threatening her life. She saw him at half-past nine o'clock on Saturday night. Deceased told witness he seemed better.
The jury returned a verdict of "Found drowned."
William Aylett, who remains in the custody of Superintendent Hayes at the Windsor police-station awaiting his examination before the borough magistrate, was not informed of the death of his wife till Tuesday afternoon, when the sad intelligence was communicated to him by a relative. The prisoner, who is believed to be insane, was greatly shocked and distressed at her untimely fate, and exhibited the most profound grief at his unexpected bereavement. He has four children, the youngest, it is said, being scarcely 12 months old.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, September 16, 1883, Page 7


Last edited by Karen on Mon 13 Aug 2012 - 6:40; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Superintendent Hayes

Post by Karen on Sun 5 Aug 2012 - 9:05

THE QUEEN.

It is understood that the Queen has altered the date of her departure from Windsor for Mentone to Tuesday next, and this arrangement may again be altered to Wednesday. Her Majesty will leave by special train about noon from the Great Western Railway Terminus at Windsor, and travel to Kensington and Clapham, where the train will be shunted on to the South-Western Railway for Gosport, where it is expected it will arrive about three o'clock. The Princess Beatrice, who will accompany Her Majesty, has not yet thoroughly recovered from the nervous trepidation she received on Thursday, when she said she saw the prisoner Maclean point and fire the pistol at the carriage. Telegrams from all classes of people continue to come through the private wire to the palace; messages from private individuals from all countries having been received. The answering of these entails a large amount of work on Her Majesty, and her Secretary, Sir Henry Ponsonby, as Her Majesty, it is said, insists upon answering each one in succession. The answers to the Foreign Government officials are all sent through Lord Granville, her Majesty inditing the messages to the Foreign Monarchs with her own hand.
Superintendent Hayes has received a number of letters setting forth that the writers knew the man Maclean to be a lunatic at different times, and gave instances of the extraordinary things he had done to their knowledge. Mr. Hayes left Windsor this morning, for Reading, where he had an interview with the prisoner, who, according to the latest reports, is well, and appears quite unconcerned about his serious charge. He has communicated with a solicitor; but an impression appears to be gaining ground in Windsor that he will not be sent before a jury, there being such an accumulated mass of evidence as to his being a lunatic.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday March 7, 1882, Page 3

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Re: Superintendent Hayes

Post by Karen on Sun 5 Aug 2012 - 9:14

A SQUABBLE ABOUT BEES.

At the Windsor County Court, on Thursday, Mr. Thomas Knowles brought an action against Mr. Chief Superintendent Hayes, Sergeant Fleet, and Police-constable Ogilvy, of the Windsor Police force, for alleged false imprisonment, and claimed 50 pounds damages. On Sunday evening, June 3, it was stated, the plaintiff had his attention directed to a swarm of bees which had settled upon the palings of a Mr. Maslin, in Grove-road. Mr. Knowles, who was accustomed to bees, hived the swarm with Mr. Maslin's approval, and took them home. While on his way he was stopped by Sergeant Fleet, who accused him of stealing the bees, and later in the evening the sergeant and police-constable went to the house and arrested the plaintiff. Mr. Knowles informed Mr. Chief Superintendent Hayes that he had been authorised to remove the bees, and he was thereupon immediately discharged from custody. Plaintiff, through his solicitor, Mr. Brummell Smith, demanded an apology and compensation from Mr. Hayes, who declined both. Evidence having been heard, the jury gave a verdict of 1s. damages for the plaintiff. His Honour said the verdict was, in effect, for the defendants, and refused plaintiff's costs.

Source: The Farmer's Gazette, November 17, 1877, Page 5

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Re: Superintendent Hayes

Post by Karen on Sun 5 Aug 2012 - 9:18

THE WINDSOR ELECTION PETITION.
(By Electric Telegraph.)

(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)
WINDSOR, Tuesday, 11:45 a.m.). - Mr. Baron Bramwell arrived at Windsor about eleven o'clock, to try the petition against the return of Mr. Richardson Gardner. He was met at the South Western Station by the Mayor, and rode in a carriage to the Guildhall, escorted by Mr. Chief Superintendent Hayes and a posse of police as javelin men. Crowds assembled in the streets to see his progress. The hearing is proceeding.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday April 21, 1874, Page 4

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Re: Superintendent Hayes

Post by Karen on Sun 5 Aug 2012 - 9:26

HOUSE OF COMMONS. - FRIDAY.

ROBBERIES AT SOUTH KENSINGTON MUSEUM. - Mr. Forster, replying to Mr. Beresford Hope, said the statement made by Superintendent Hayes at the Westminster police-court on Tuesday, that it required the greatest vigilance to protect the valuable property at the museum, that recently three robberies had been committed there by the use of some instrument of force, and that robberies were frequent at the museum, was very much exaggerated.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, March 24, 1872, Page 7

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Re: Superintendent Hayes

Post by Karen on Sun 5 Aug 2012 - 9:30

WINDSOR.

This afternoon Princess Christian, who started a fund for the relief of the poor of Windsor, gave upwards of two hundred persons a substantial supply of plum-pudding and soup at the Town Hall, and will continue the charity during the inclement weather. Mr. Superintendent Hayes also gave soup and warm milk to over one hundred persons from his fund, and will continue to do so as long as the funds come in.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday February 16, 1886, Page 3

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Re: Superintendent Hayes

Post by Karen on Sun 5 Aug 2012 - 9:37

A SOLDIER'S BRUTALITY.

At the Windsor Town-hall, on Monday, James Humphries, a private in the battalion of Coldstream Guards, was charged with assaulting Elizabeth Crouch with intent to do her grievous bodily harm. The woman was an unfortunate, and had met the soldier on the Long-walk. Upon her refusal to comply with his demands the prisoner had dreadfully maltreated her. Mr. Chief Superintendent Hayes said the complainant had had her leg broken, and was then in the Windsor Royal infirmary. In all probability it would be six or seven weeks before she would be able to leave. The Bench remanded the prisoner.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, February 5, 1871, Page 12

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Re: Superintendent Hayes

Post by Karen on Mon 6 Aug 2012 - 20:21

MUSIC AND DANCING LICENCES.

The Middlesex magistrates met on Thursday at the Sessions house, Westminster, for the purpose of hearing applications for the annual renewals of music and dancing licences. Captain Morley presided.
Major Lyon intimated his intention of opposing every licence which might be applied for in the course of the day when the police or other evidence showed that the places for which renewals were asked for were the resorts of bad characters. - Captain Morley said all opposed licences would come on for consideration on Friday.
On the application of Mr. John Henry Jennings for a renewal to the Oxford music-hall being brought forward, Major Lyon asked Inspector Crook, of the E division, whether the place was the resort of bad characters. The inspector said that he had seen women of the class referred to there, but he could not say that it was the resort of bad characters. Major Lyon opposed the renewal, and the case stood over.
Mr. Montagu Williams said that he was instructed on behalf of Lord Mostyn and others to oppose the renewal of a licence to the Quebec institute.
On the application of Mr. George Conquest for a renewal of the licence for music and dancing to the Eagle and grounds, City-road, Major Lyon asked whether or not the place was frequented by disorderly women. - Inspector Glass, N division, said the place was most respectably conducted, and that conspicuous notices were posted intimating that women of the class referred to were not admitted. In order the more securely to guard against their admittance, Mr. Conquest had engaged a number of pensioned constables familiar with the district to watch the various entrances. - Mr. Poland said that it was almost impossible to exclude such persons from places of public amusement; they were to be seen at every theatre. - The Bench unanimously granted the renewal.
Renewals were granted without comment to the following places: - The Music hall, Store-street, Bedford-square; the Mogul music hall, the Royal music hall, Holborn; the Holborn restaurant, the Freemasons' tavern, the Wellington music hall, the Royal Polytechnic institution, Lord's Cricket Ground, St. George's hall, the Langham hall, the Bedford music hall, Westbourne hall, the Metropolitan music hall, the Sir John Falstaff music hall, Deacon's music hall, Myddelton hall, the Agricultural hall, the Wellington hall, the Foresters' hall, the Cambridge music hall, the Shoreditch Town hall, the Assembly rooms, Hackney; the Albion hall, the Foresters' music hall, the Beaumont institution, Lusby's music hall, the Bow and Bromley institute, the Town hall, Poplar; Kensington hall, the Alexandra palace, the Manor house, the Old Welsh Harp, Hendon; the Royal Aquarium, the Grosvenor club, the Egyptian hall, the Royal Academy of Music, the London Pavilion music hall, St. James's hall, Willis's rooms, the Criterion, Exeter hall, Gatti's music hall, and Evans's rooms, Covent-garden.
On Friday the magistrates proceeded to hear the opposed applications. Captain Morley presided.
Mr. John Henry Jennings applied for the renewal of a licence for music to the Oxford music-hall. - Mr. Poland said there was no doubt that the hall was better conducted than most of those to which the renewals of licences were granted on Thursday, and that being so, the court was now asked to take away the licence. The premises had been licensed since 1869, and Mr. Syers, the late proprietor, died in 1876, leaving a widow and children, who were benefitted under his will in respect of the hall. In order the more fully to carry out the intention of the magistrates the Court of Chancery had sanctioned the appointment of Mr. Durkin, and ex-superintendent of police, at a salary of 200 pounds a year, to assist in the orderly management. - Mr. Inspector Crook, of the E division, was examined. - Major Lyon stated that he had opposed the renewal from the most conscientious motives. He ridiculed the idea of licences being granted to places which were known as the resort of women of ill-fame, whilst a licence had been refused to a building to which ladies of the highest respectability went. - After a most animated discussion, the matter was put to the vote, and the licence was renewed by 26 votes to 11.
Mr. Poland applied for a renewal to the Quebec institute, now known as the Steinway hall, and amongst other testimonials read one from the American Minister, Mr. Hughes-Hughes, who at first opposed the renewal, stating that he was perfectly satisfied with the explanation given, and withdrew his objection. The licence was then unanimously renewed.
Mr. Williams applied for the renewal of a music licence to the Sun music-hall, Knightsbridge. - Mr. Poland and Mr. Lewis appeared in support of the application, and Mr. Montagu Williams opposed. - Mr. Montagu Williams said that the place was not frequented by people resident in the neighbourhood, but that it attracted a number of the lowest classes from other quarters. - The Rev. Teignmouth Shore, one of the chaplains to her Majesty, said on one or two occasions, when returning home between 11 and 12, he had heard persons coming from the Sun singing and making so great a noise, that it was impossible for anyone to sleep in Montpelier-square, where he lived. - Mr. Williams, the proprietor, said that his hall was frequented by the working classes of the neighbourhood, and there had been neither drunkenness nor misconduct with his knowledge. He had embarked 25,000 pounds in the property. There were nearly 500 residents within a quarter of a mile of the hall who had signed a petition in favour of the renewal of the licence. - Mr. Superintendent Hayes said that he had frequently visited the hall, and he did not think that there was a better managed hall in London. On being put to the vote, the licence was renewed by 25 votes to 16.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, October 13, 1878, Page 3

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Re: Superintendent Hayes

Post by Karen on Mon 6 Aug 2012 - 21:01

A POLICE-CONSTABLE CONVICTED OF AN ASSAULT.

Michael Bennett, a police-constable 243 B, surrendered to his bail to answer an indictment for assaulting and occasioning actual bodily harm to Thomas Jones. - The assault in this case was alleged to have been committed by the prisoner and another constable named Davis, 361 B, who was at the time acting as serjeant, on the prosecutor so far back as Saturday, the 27th of March last, the morning following Good Friday. Mr. Jones, the prosecutor, is an inland revenue officer, residing at 22, Hanover-street, Pimlico, and on Good Friday spent part of the day at the Agricultural hall. He returned to Pimlico at night, and about half-past one or two in the morning left his house to go to his sister's house in Bond-street. On his way he called in at a beershop in Prince's-row, Pimlico, called the Youthful Queen, kept by a person named Hazell. There, he said, he found Davis, the prisoner, and some other persons. Some sparring had been going on before he went in, and it was about to be renewed, when he remonstrated with Davis, who was unbuttoning his coat to take part in it. Mr. Jones paid for some ale for the constables, and Davis went out. Mr. Jones followed close after him, and Davis asked where he was going. He replied he was going home. Davis then asked him who he was, and on Mr. Jones refusing to answer, seized him by the collar, pressing his knuckles into his throat. Mr. Jones asked him what he was going to do, and Davis said he had known him for years as a rogue and vagabond. Mr. Jones replied, "You are mistaken; I am a respectable man;" and Davis, still keeping hold of his collar with his left hand, struck him with his right a violent blow on the eye, saying, "Take that!" Mr. Jones applied to the prisoner Bennett for assistance, but Davis told him to take hold of the prosecutor, and Bennett did so. They then took him along Brewer-street, and he asked where they were taking him. They made no reply, but continued striking him in the face. They turned into Vauxhall-road, and dragged him along about 150 yards, when the prosecutor begged for mercy, and asked them to give him a chance. Davis said he would let him go if he would fight him. The prosecutor pretended to agree to this, and, being released, ran off, in the direction they had brought him, to the top of Allington-street. At the corner of Stockbridge-terrace five or six men were standing, to whom he appealed for help, but the two constables came up at the moment and the men did not interfere. They then dragged him along the Wilton-road, and at the corner of Hindon-street, by the Warwick Arms, he sank from exhaustion, and called "Murder" as loud as he could. As he was on the ground they began kicking him, and kicked him at least three times. Davis said if the prosecutor did not get up and hold his noise he would use his staff. He was dragged along Hindon-street, and on meeting another constable he called to him that they were killing him. This constable let them pass, and kicked him in the back and struck him in the back of the neck, knocking his hat off, and Davis and the prisoner kicked it along in front of them, like a football. They pushed him into Warwick-street and left him there, saying that was the way they treated vagabonds like him. The prosecutor at this time was covered with blood, and so exhausted as to be scarcely able to walk. He returned to his home in Hanover-street, and on the way met in Gloucester-street a constable, to whom he complained, and whose number he took down in his pocket book as 211 D. On getting home, a little before four, he spoke to Mr. Glasier, a friend, of what had happened, and Dr. Chambers, of Sutherland-street, was called in to attend to him. Mr. Glasier went to the Warwick Arms, and saw traces of blood on the pavement from that house in the direction spoken to by Mr. Jones. Mr. Jones, when able to leave his room, went to Rochester-row and complained, giving a description of the men. All the constables on duty in that neighbourhood that night were mustered, and Mr. Jones picked out Davis and the prisoner. The case was investigated before Mr. Selfe, who committed both Davis and the prisoner for trial, after separating the cases, so as to allow each of them to give evidence for the other. Three weeks after the committal for trial Davis absconded, and has not since been heard of. For the defence, Mr. Hazell, of the Youthful Queen, and a person named Carpenter, who was working for him at the time, were called, and swore that no police were in the house that night, and Carpenter also stated that Mr. Jones was the worse for liquor. It appeared also that 211 D was on duty that night at Paddington, and 211 B, who was on duty in Pimlico that night, was called and swore that the prosecutor made no complaint to him of having been illtreated. There was also evidence that Davis wore no other cape than the one shown to the prosecutor, and that on this night he went out without his cape, and constables were called who were on duty at the time and spoke to seeing Davis on his round as acting-serjeant about the time of the alleged assault. - Superintendent Hayes and Inspector Holmes gave the prisoner and Davis good characters, and said that Davis was acting as serjeant on this occasion, as he was on the list for promotion. - The jury returned a verdict of "Guilty" of a common assault, and recommended the prisoner to mercy on the ground that he had acted under the control of his superior. - The Assistant-judge ordered him to enter into his recognisances in the sum of 40 pounds to keep the peace, and if he proved a good member of the force he would hear no more of it.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, July 11, 1869, Page 4

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Re: Superintendent Hayes

Post by Karen on Tue 7 Aug 2012 - 18:32

POLICE BLUNDER.
Officer Arrested at a Theatre as an Ex-Convict.

THE YARD APOLOGISES.

An amazing police blunder, for which Scotland-yard has since made a very full apology, was made on Tuesday night, Major H.J. Selwyn, a well-known Volunteer officer, and son of the late Lord Justice Selwyn, being arrested as he was leaving the London Pavilion music-hall and taken to Vine-street in mistake for a notorious criminal.
Mr. Selwyn, who is a major in the Worcestershire Yeomanry, a former master of the Dulverton Foxhounds, and has large interests in Indian indigo fields, dined with a lady on Tuesday, and then went to the Pavilion. As they were leaving at the end of the performance he was jostled by a frock-coated man, who whispered something about "failing to appear," and added: "You must accompany me to the police-station." At the same time a uniformed officer seized his other arm, and he was taken off to Vine-street police-station.
"I was in evening dress, and there were crowds of people about at the time," Major Selwyn says. "I heard several people who evidently knew me say, "Hullo! What on earth has Jaspar Selwyn been doing?" The lady who had accompanied me came perilously near to being arrested also.
"On the way a military friend hailed me by name and followed me to the station, and he also was threatened with arrest for obstruction, although he was in the rear. On arriving at the station the man who first accosted me said, "Now I suppose you will stop this fooling, and admit that you are _____."
"I was then asked to put everything I had on a table. I did so, and then all my pockets were searched. My name and my crest were on my gold watch, and this should have satisfied the police of my identity. This was all done in the presence of a gang of insolent officials, both in and out of uniform. My friends had meanwhile been hustled into an adjoining waiting-room and warned to keep quiet.

Sneered at by the Officer.

"The man who arrested me (a Scotland-yard officer) was very free with his sneers and gibes, putting his face quite close to mine to give vent to them. I then said to Superintendent Hayes (who was in charge of the station), "You take a long time to help me; I will do whatever you tell me," upon which he said, "Then you step along," and I was conducted to a cell, the noisome smell of which will remain with me for many a long day.
"Directly after I was put in the cell the little trap-door was opened, and two men, apparently police officers, peered through. One said, "Hullo! ______; you here again?" I made no reply. After a few more gibes they left. At last I heard the door rattle, and I was asked to leave the cell.
"I returned to the charge-room, where I found my lady friend and two lady cashiers from the hotel where I had been living for some years. My identity had evidently been established by the officer who effected my arrest. He made a mumbled apology.
"I went to Scotland-yard on Wednesday with Mr. Lowe, my solicitor, and after seeing two officers I saw Inspector Froest, who expressed the greatest regret. Later, I saw Sir Melville MacNaghten, the Assistant-Commissioner, who again expressed the greatest regret. I had been pointed out to the police, he said, as the ex-convict, and they had acted on the information. Later in the day I received a letter from Sir Melville in which he referred to the "hasty and ill-advised" action of the police officer by whom I had been arrested "by a most unfortunate mistake."
"The police explained to me that the ex-convict was known to be a desperate man, but that was no justification for the shameful way I was treated even if I had been a real malefactor."
In all, Major Selwyn was detained two hours, which, he complains, was quite unjustified, as the hotel at which he has lived for many years is only a few minutes' walk from the station.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly News, October 27, 1907, Page 10

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Re: Superintendent Hayes

Post by Karen on Thu 9 Aug 2012 - 21:12

WIFE MURDER AT WINDSOR.

On Monday afternoon a terrible case of wife murder was discovered at Windsor. It appears that on the second of October a short, hump-backed man, named Joseph Shill, about 34 years of age, and a tailor by trade, was sentenced by the Windsor magistrates to two months' hard labour for beating his wife Maria, a very respectable woman, slightly younger than himself. Mrs. Shill had been living at 37, Victoria-cottages, the tenant of which is a working man named Grimdale. Shill returned home at the close of his imprisonment on the 1st inst., and since then several complaints had been made to Police-superintendent Hayes with reference to the man's behaviour. On Sunday, about half-past twelve o'clock, two of Mrs. Shill's brothers and a woman went to the police-station and stated that as Mrs. Shill had been missing since Friday morning they were afraid she had made away with herself. Mr. Superintendent Hayes accordingly sent a description of the woman to the police along the Thames and the lock-keepers, but heard nothing till about two o'clock on Monday afternoon, when he was informed that the dead body of the woman had been seen under the bed by a little girl. Proceeding with Dr. Norris to the front parlour of 37, Victoria-cottages, the superintendent discovered the remains of the deceased. The back part of the woman's head had seemingly been battered or crushed by a poker or some other blunt weapon, and the body, which was dressed, was concealed from view beneath the bedstead. The remains were at once conveyed to the public mortuary, where a post-mortem examination was made by Drs. Norris and Humphreys. The examination showed that the woman had received a wound at the back of the left ear, the bone being driven into the head, two and a half by one and a half inches. There was a second wound on the right upper forehead an inch long, breaking the skull, and another on the back of the head, grazing the bone under the scalp, the principal of these injuries being sufficient to cause death. Mrs. Shill's brothers had an interview with the husband in the very room where their sister's corpse was lying, but were unaware of the proximity of the mangled body of their relative. Mrs. Holt, a neighbour, likewise went into the apartment and fetched the baby from Shill, who has three little children and seems to have lived in the place since the fatal occurrence till about half-past eight o'clock on Monday morning, when he was missed for the first time. Shill was arrested at Egham at seven o'clock the same evening and charged with the murder of his wife.
The prisoner was brought up at the Windsor police-court on Tuesday, when Sir Joseph Devereaux asked him when he had last seen his wife, and he replied, after much fencing with the question, that he saw her on Friday when he went home. He also stated that on missing her he went on Saturday to Mrs. Bargent's, at whose place in Eton the deceased worked, to see if she was there, but not finding her he returned home. On Monday he visited his friends at Chertsey. Shill also alleged that he could not make the matter out, and did not know how it occurred. The prisoner was then remanded. After the accused had been removed to the cell, Mr. Marlin, the coroner, and Mr. Superintendent Hayes, proceeded to 37, Victoria-cottages, and made a further examination of the front parlour and its contents. A flat-iron was discovered on which were some bloodstains and a few hairs, and this was believed to be the weapon used in the commission of the crime.

INQUEST AND VERDICT.

Mr. H.A. Martin, coroner, held an inquest on Wednesday at the Windsor police-station on the body.
Jane Holt stated that she lived at 37, Victoria-cottages, Windsor, and was a widow, keeping house for her son, George Grimsdale. Her son let the deceased woman a room, and she continued to occupy it till her death. Her husband came out of prison at the beginning of the present month and took up his abode with his wife. Shill did some work which he obtained from Mr. Sharpe at the house. Witness last saw Mrs. Shill alive on Friday morning, about 10 o'clock. On the evening of that day, about a quarter to nine o'clock, witness, hearing Mrs. Shill's baby cry, tried to open her room, but could not do so, and went out to fetch a policeman, and he forced back the hasp and opened the window. She looked in and saw the husband lying across the bed, and the baby was standing up near him. The policeman tried to rouse Shill, but could not, and then asked if she had a little child who could get in and push the window up, so that he could reach the baby. Witness accordingly put in a little girl, aged five years, daughter of the deceased woman, and the child handed the infant to the policeman. Witness took the baby into her room, and kept the other two children for the night. The policeman looked inside with his lamp. Witness left him outside, and did not know what he did afterwards. Witness did not go to bed, but remained up all night, as she thought the wife had not returned, and that the husband was drunk. When witness came down on Saturday morning she knocked at the door, between eight and nine o'clock. She called Mr. Shill, and asked him for some breakfast for the children. She went out of the house for a few moments, and when she returned she found some breakfast for the children in his room. Witness remained at home on Saturday; and at the time she asked him for the breakfast she partly opened the door of his room, and also asked him if he had heard any tidings of Mrs. Shill. He replied that he had not, and could not account for it. During the day she saw Shill two or three times, and each time she asked him if he had heard any tidings of his wife he said "No." On Sunday Shill went out and returned between eleven and twelve at night, saying that he had come home by the last train. He made no remark about the deceased. On Sunday night Mr. Shill gave witness the child. That was the last time witness saw Shill till Tuesday. He gave the children some breakfast on Monday morning, and went away between eight and nine o'clock. On Monday, about 12 o'clock, her grand-daughter, aged nine, who was brushing up Mrs. Shill's room, came to witness, and said that Mrs. Shill's shawl was under the bed, and that there was also something hard there. Witness sent for her son. He looked under the bed, and exclaimed, "Good God, mother; what shall I do?" They sent for Serjeant Hayes, and the police took charge of the remains. Witness never heard a cross word pass between the husband and wife since Shill came out of prison.
Mr. George Hayes, superintendent of the Windsor Borough police, stated that on Monday, at a quarter past two, Grimsdale, the tenant of 37, Victoria-cottages, came to the police-station and reported that Mrs. Shill had been found dead under the bed. Witness procured the assistance of Dr. Norris, and went with the latter to the house. The deceased was then lying on her back near where she had been found, and he had the remains removed to the mortuary. Witness knew the deceased and her husband (the prisoner) in consequence of the wife communicating to him about her husband's bad conduct towards her in September. The prisoner was apprehended for threatening his wife, and attempting to set his house on fire. The prisoner was brought before the magistrate on the 2nd October, and bound over to keep the peace, and in default of finding sureties was sent to prison for two months. He was at that time living at Bridgwater-terrace, Windsor. He was liberated from Reading gaol on the 1st of the present month. The deceased had stated that on a previous occasion the prisoner had thrown her out of bed and broken her collar-bone. The deceased had made two complaints to witness since her husband had been out of prison. After the body was removed to the mortuary he had examined the room and found marks of blood about the fireplace. He also discovered what appeared stains of blood on the door near the fireplace. There was blood on the prisoner's trowsers. Witness had a padlock placed on the door. He at once telegraphed to the police at Egham, and sent Serjeant Fleet there in a fly, and the prisoner, after being arrested, was conveyed to Windsor police-station. After being cautioned, he said: "Her two brothers and a man named Williams said that I had used her so that she had committed suicide; that she had drowned herself, and that I knew they came to the King's Head (a public-house at Egham) last night; that Williams, a tailor, struck me in the room. I think that's all I wish to say now." He was then searched. A purse, a penny, and a letter from Eleanor, a sister of Mrs. Shill, were found on him. There was blood on the left leg of the prisoner's trowsers and on the left boot.
Dr. Norris said that on entering the room he saw deceased on the floor with her face downwards. She had been dead three or four days. Her arm was bent up; the left side of her face was smeared with blood; the left ear was lacerated in several places; there was a wound perceptible at the back of the left ear. At the mortuary he, with Mr. Humphreys, of the Windsor infirmary, made a post-mortem examination. They found nothing internally to cause death. On examining the head, he found the hair matted with blood, and on removing it six scalp wounds were visible. There was a depressed fracture of the skull 2-1/2 inches long by 1-1/2 inch broad. On the flat-iron mentioned he found portions of hair adhering to the handle resembling the hair of the deceased, and human blood on the handle. He also examined the boots and trowsers of the prisoner, and there were spots of blood on both legs, and also on both boots. Deceased was a small woman, healthy and well-nourished. Death was certainly caused by the fractures on the skull, and it was his opinion that the flat iron was the probable instrument with which they were inflicted. In the hands of a weak man it would be more formidable than a little weapon, because the weight of the iron would add to the force of the blow. The evidence of the struggle was by the fireplace, and there were blood stains where the deceased was found under the bedstead. Any one of the blows on the head would have stunned the woman, and rendered her incapable of resistance.
At the close of the evidence, the coroner asked Shill if he wished to say anything, to which the prisoner replied, "I know nothing whatever about it."
The jury returned a verdict of "Wilful murder" against the accused, and he was accordingly committed to the assizes, to take his trial.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, December 28, 1884, Page 8

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Re: Superintendent Hayes

Post by Karen on Sat 11 Aug 2012 - 9:15

ATTEMPT TO SHOOT HER MAJESTY.
ARREST AND EXAMINATION OF THE MISCREANT.

An attempt was made to assassinate her Majesty on Thursday afternoon. The Royal train taking the Queen, Princess Beatrice, and the Court from London, arrived at Windsor station at 25 minutes past five, where a large crowd of spectators, including Eton boys, townspeople, visitors, and others had assembled. The Queen having walked across the platform to a Royal carriage, which was just outside the waiting-room, her personal attendant mounted to his seat behind the carriage, when a miserable-looking man, who was standing at the entrance of the station-yard, amidst a number of other spectators, deliberately pointed a pistol at her Majesty and discharged it. The shot did not take effect. Her Majesty was at once driven to the Castle, but before she had passed the man he had been seized by Mr. Chief Superintendent Hayes, of the Borough police, who was standing close by. The pistol was seized by someone in the crowd, and the man himself was taken into the High-street, and conveyed in a cab to the station-house, followed by a large crowd of people.
Further details show that, punctually at 25 minutes past five o'clock the Royal train arrived at the platform at Windsor, and was quietly drawn up to the crimson velvet carpet laid across the floor of the waiting-room. Sir H. Ponsonby was the first to alight. All that went on inside the station was not observable outside of the barrier where the man who subsequently fired the shot was located. Mr. Fraser, her Majesty's special guardian, an inspector of long service in the police force, had previously stepped out and examined the crowd. But everything seeming to be satisfactory, he returned again within the station. The Queen's wraps being handed out by John Brown from the Royal carriage, and he having himself alighted, Sir Henry Ponsonby came forward, and, after a slight delay, escorted her Majesty on his arm through the waiting room to the close carriage. Immediately the outriders started to clear a way for the Royal carriage, Maclean placed his hand within his breast. A sharp little Eton boy, his gaze on her Majesty having been disturbed by a sudden pull the man gave to his arm, when he saw the pistol uttered an alarming cry, which instantly brought all eyes to bear on the man. Without hesitation, three of the bigger Eton boys threw themselves on the would-be regicide, and in catching his arm lowered the level of the pistol, which went off, pointed towards the hind-hoof of the near horse drawing the carriage, the carriage at the time being about 11 yards distant. Happily the bullet sped without any damage, striking the stones of the yard and ricocheting over a luggage waggon on to the railway line. The man was instantly over-powered, before he could again use the weapon. The Queen drove on, little alarmed seemingly at what had taken place; not so Princess Beatrice, who uttered a loud scream and turned to her Majesty to inquire if she was injured. She turned extremely pale, but seeing the Queen so composed, recovered. The Queen, as soon as she had seen no one was hurt, in answer to the heartfelt cheers, bowed her gracious acknowledgements as if nothing had happened. The castle was reached shortly afterwards. Having recovered, the Queen instantly telegraphed to all the Royal family in England, explaining that she was not hurt, and was in no way the worse for her fright. Her Majesty also sent an equerry to the station to inquire if any of the spectators had been injured. The Queen's dinner party was held as usual, and her Majesty appeared to possess her ordinary calmness.
After the Royal carriage was taken to the mews an examination was made by the officials, but no bullet marks could be traced on any part of it.
The report of the pistol was a sharp one, and the man appeared to intend firing another shot, when the revolver was knocked out of his hand by a photographer named James Burnside, of Helena-road, Windsor, who picked it up and gave it to the superintendent. The revolver seemed to be a new one. A number of Eton boys who were present were desirous of lynching the man, who was with great difficulty protected from their violence. The ladies-in-waiting who were behind were more alarmed at the excitement which prevailed. The event created the most profound sensation in the town and in Eton, as the act became known. Sir Henry Ponsonby went to the police-station to make inquiry, and on obtaining further information there telegraphed to Mr. Gladstone informing him of the occurrence.
A press representative called at Marlborough house, and learned that the first news of the dastardly attempt upon the life of her Majesty came direct from the Queen. Shortly after six o'clock the following telegram was received at Marlborough house: - "From the Queen, Windsor castle, to the Prince of Wales, Marlborough house, - In case exaggerated report should reach you, I telegraph to say that as I drove from the station here, a man shot at the carriage, but, fortunately, hit no one. He was instantly arrested. I am not the worse." Immediately upon the receipt of the telegram by the Prince a message was returned to Windsor on behalf of the Prince and Princess of Wales, expressive of their thankfulness upon the happy escape of the Queen. The news at once spread through the metropolis, and the callers at Marlborough house were exceedingly numerous. Messages were received from the members of the Cabinet, and from many other illustrious personages. The prisoner's name is Roderic Maclean. He is about 27 years of age, stands five feet seven inches in height, and is rather shabbily dressed. At the Windsor police-station, where he was charged by Mr. Superintendent Hayes, of the borough police, he stated that he was a clerk out of employ; that he was a native of Ireland; and that he had come from Southsea, and had only been in Windsor a few days. On searching the accused several cartridges, a purse containing three halfpence, a comb, and two clay pipes were found in his pockets. The revolver was of German manufacture, with six chambers. Two chambers were still loaded.
A Windsor correspondent says the prisoner was taken to the Borough police-station, where, in the presence of Mr. H.L. Simpson, one of the justices, he was charged by Mr. Superintendent Hayes, with shooting at the Queen, with intent to do her grievous bodily harm. The prisoner averred that he would not have committed the act had he not been suffering from hunger. He walked from Portsmouth to Windsor, where he had been staying for a week. The Mayor of Windsor (Mr. Joseph Devereaux), Mr. H. Darvill (town clerk), General Sir H. Ponsonby, Viscount Bridport, and Colonel Sir J.C. McNeil were present in the charge room while the prisoner was being searched. Later on he was examined in the cell by a medical gentleman, who pronounced him sane. After the prisoner had been searched by Mr. Inspector Fraser and Mr. Chief Superintendent Hayes, the weapon, a medium-sized six-chambered revolver, of German make, was examined. It was found that two of the chambers still remained loaded, and two had been recently discharged, while the other two were empty. A paper containing 14 ball cartridges, several papers, and several valueless articles were also discovered upon Maclean, who said he should make no defence, but should reserve what he had to say till his examination. It appears that Maclean, when he tried to shoot the Queen, was slightly in advance of the Royal carriage, and fired the revolver as it was approaching him.

OFFICIAL ACCOUNT.

Subjoined, from the Court circular, is the official account of the attempt on the life of the Queen: -

"WINDSOR CASTLE, March 3.

"The Queen, accompanied by Princess Beatrice and attended by the Dowager Duchess of Roxburghe and the equerries in waiting, arrived at the castle at half-past five p.m. yesterday from London.
"As the Queen left the station at Windsor in a close carriage a man who was standing in the crowd fired a shot from a revolver at her Majesty and was instantly secured.
"The Queen heard the report, but did not see the occurrence, though Princess Beatrice, who was sitting on that side of the carriage, perceived the man raise his hand and fire.
"The Queen, who was not alarmed, drove on to the castle, and sent to make inquiries whether anyone had been hurt.
"Her Majesty is very well today, and has not suffered from the shock.
"Prince Leopold, attended by Captain Waller, arrived at the castle at two p.m. today from London.
"The Representatives of Foreign Powers have inquired in person after her Majesty at Windsor castle today.

STATEMENT OF AN EYE-WITNESS.

From an eye-witness of the attempted assassination, we learn the following details: - While the crowd awaited her Majesty's arrival, outside the station yard, a suspicious-looking man was observed forcing his way in front of the Eton boys, who, as usual, occupied the foremost position, and while her Majesty was being assisted into the carriage by John Brown, this man was seen to be fumbling in his pocket, and was unable to release his arm owing to the pressure of the Eton boys. Immediately on her Majesty giving the order to start, he withdrew his hand quietly from his side, and placing it on his breast, quickly pushed himself further to the front. A moment had not elapsed ere he raised his hand on a level with the Queen's carriage. It was then seen that the man held a pistol. A sharp little Eton boy - his gaze on her Majesty having been disturbed by the sudden jerk the man gave to his arm - when he saw the pistol uttered an alarming cry which brought all eyes to bear on the man. Without hesitation, three of the bigger Eton boys threw themselves on the would-be regicide. Catching his arm lowered the level of the pistol, which went off pointed towards the hind hoof of the near horse drawing the carriage, which at that time was about 11 yards distant. Happily the bullet sped without any damage, striking the stones of the yard, and ricocheting over the luggage-waggon on to the railway line. The man was overpowered before he could again use the weapon. Inspector Fraser had in a moment dashed over and snatched the revolver from his hand. The Queen drove on, little alarmed outwardly at what had taken place. Not so Princess Beatrice, who uttered a loud scream and turned anxiously to her Majesty to inquire whether she was injured. She turned extremely pale, but seeing the Queen so calm at once recovered. The Queen, as soon as she had seen that no one was hurt, and in answer to the heartfelt cheers of those assembled, bowed her gracious acknowledgements as if (says the eye-witness) nothing had happened.

DISCOVERY OF THE BULLET.

Inspector Noble, of the Great Western Railway company's police, and Inspector Turner, of the Locomotive department at Slough, arrived at Windsor at half-past seven on Friday morning, and commenced a search of the yard, for the purpose of discovering, if possible, the bullet fired at Her Majesty. After a search which lasted about an hour and a quarter, Inspector Turner found a small bullet embedded in the ground. It bore marks of having first struck some other object, and was right in the direction of the carriage. The bullet weighed about a third of an ounce, being conical in shape. Upon inspection it was seen that it was slightly grazed, and had some red paint upon it, showing that it had struck a railway truck. The distance from the spot from which the bullet was fired to where it was found was 29 yards. The bullet was placed alongside the other bullets found on Maclean, and exactly corresponded in size, weight, and appearance.
An examination made by Mr. Superintendent Hayes, of the borough police, at the Windsor police-station, shows that after the first discharge of the revolver, the prisoner had turned the barrel to a second loaded chamber, but was prevented from discharging it by the weapon being knocked out of his hand.

EXAMINATION OF THE PRISONER.

On Friday Roderic Maclean was driven to the Town hall in an open fly at half-past one, in charge of Superintendent Hayes, and a plain-clothes officer. He had a very wretched look, and is a man very much of the Lefroy type. He looked unclean and unshaven, and had a slight black moustache. He was immediately taken before the bench of magistrates, the Mayor of Windsor presiding. - Mr. Stevenson, solicitor to the Treasury, prosecuted on behalf of the Public prosecutor. - In reply to the Mayor, the prisoner said, in a most off-hand manner and in a firm voice, that his name was Maclean - Roderic Maclean.
Mr. Stevenson said the prisoner would be charged with shooting at her Majesty, with intent to murder. He intended to produce evidence to justify a remand. He also stated that two letters had been written by the prisoner, which would be put in as evidence.
Superintendent Hayes stated that her Majesty arrived at Windsor station at 5:25 p.m. on Thursday afternoon. She was accompanied by the Princess Beatrice, and Mr. Brown was sitting behind the carriage. After the carriage had started and had got half way to the gate, he heard a report, looked to the left, and saw the prisoner in the act of presenting a pistol at her Majesty. He did not hear more than one shot fired. The prisoner was about 15 yards from the carriage. When he first saw the prisoner he was holding the pistol straight out in the direction of the carriage. He immediately sprang on him, and seized him by the collar and neck. He stopped to take the pistol from him, when a young man named James Burnside got possession of the pistol, and handed it over to witness, and he put it in his pocket. He put the prisoner against the wall, and was assisted by Inspector Fraser and others. The prisoner said, "Don't hurt me; I will go quietly." A little Eton boy came up and gave him a blow on the head. He then took the prisoner to the police-station. When there, he asked him his name and address. He gave his name and address, and said he had been in Windsor about a week. On the way to the police station in the cab the prisoner said, "I was starving, or I should not have done this." At the station, when charged, he said, "Oh, the Queen." He saw the pistol. It was a German pin-fire revolver. It had two empty cartridge cases in it - that was to say, exploded cartridges. There were four whole cartridges and two chambers empty. He drew the cartridges and produced them. He searched the prisoner, and on him found 14 other cartridges of the same make; they were in a piece of rag. He found other articles of no value, including a pocket-book, a knife, &c. Amongst other things a letter was found. It was taken from him by Inspector Fraser, and was not directed to any person. Mr. Stevenson read the letter, as follows: -

I should not have done this crime had you, as you should have done, allowed the 10s. per week instead of offering the insultingly small sum of 6s. per week and expecting me to live on it. So you perceive the great good a little money might have done, had you not treated me as a fool and set me more than ever against those bloated aristocrats ruled by the old lady, Mrs. Vic., who is an incensed robber in all senses. - RODERIC MACLEAN.
March 2, 1882, Waiting-room, G.W.R.

The witness further said that at half-past ten that (Friday) morning, the prisoner said he wished to make a written statement, and stated he had a complete answer to the charge. The prisoner then handed to the witness the following document: -

Police-office, Windsor, March 3rd, 1882. - I am not guilty of the charge of shooting with the intention of causing actual bodily harm. The object was, by frightening her Majesty the Queen, and alarming the public, and with the intention of having my grievances repealed - viz., such as the pecuniary straits in which I have been subjected. All the circumstances tend to prove this statement. Further, had I desired to injure the Queen, I should have fired at her when she was quitting the railway carriage. Quite on the contrary, I pointed the pistol on a level with the wheels, but as I felt a slight kick, doubtless the contents would have lodged in one of the doors. If her Majesty will accept this explanation, I allow the words, "with the intent of intimidating others," instead of "causing grievous bodily harm," to be inserted in the indictment. On that event I will offer all the assistance in my power to bring the charge herein speak of to a speedy issue. I hope her Majesty will accept the only consolation I can offer - namely, I had no intention whatever of causing her any injury. - RODERIC MACLEAN.

The witness was cross-examined by the prisoner, with a view of showing that he had not fired at the Queen's carriage. The prisoner spoke with a somewhat stammering utterance, but yet used the utmost care and persistence. He asked if some time must not have elapsed before the superintendent noticed the pistol in his hand, and whether he might not have changed the position of the pistol? - Witness said this could not have been, as there was not time.
The prisoner asked, was witness ready to swear on his oath that his arm was not inclined downwards?
- Witness said it was in a straight line with the carriage. - The prisoner: A direct line from my arm would point to the top of one of the carriage wheels. Remember, I am a short man. Lend me the pistol, and I'll show you how I held it. - Witness: No, thank you. - The prisoner then held out his arm, and hung his hat on the extended hand in order to show how the pistol was held.
The prisoner said he had made the written statement on the understanding that the charge was not to be a capital one. - Witness continued, in reply to Mr. Stevenson: Prisoner asked, "Was the Queen hurt?" and would he be charged with the capital offence of murder? Witness said, "Certainly not." Then he gave him the letter.
A magistrate asked whether the prisoner was told that any statement he made would be used in evidence against him? - Witness said, "No." He had said nothing one way or the other.
James Burnside was then called, and corroborated the evidence as to taking the pistol from prisoner.
Mr. Turner, inspector of the permanent way of the Great Western railway, spoke as to picking up the bullet in a direct line with the place where the Queen's carriage was and the place where the prisoner was standing. It had evidently struck a truck which was standing near, and which had since been taken away from Windsor. - Witness was cross-examined by the prisoner as to the elevation of the mark on the truck. He (the prisoner) said he should like evidence on this point at the next examination. The witness added that the bullet fitted the revolver found in the possession of the prisoner. The bullet was sent to Paddington station.
James Burnside, recalled, cross-examined by the prisoner, said he saw the prisoner's arm at the carriage in a straight line. The prisoner must have fired a little too soon.
Mr. Stevenson here applied for a remand, and the magistrate remanded the prisoner until Friday next at 11 o'clock. - The prisoner: On what charge? - The Mayor: On the charge of shooting at the Queen with intent to murder. - The prisoner: I made the statement I have made on the understanding that the charge was to be with intent to intimidate other persons. That was my intent and meaning. - The Mayor said they had nothing to do with that.
The prisoner was then removed, and driven to the police-station, followed by a large crowd.

SOME ACCOUNT OF THE PRISONER.

Roderic Maclean, it appears, recently stayed temporarily at Southsea. On Thursday week he left Cecil-grove, where he had rented a bedroom for a fortnight, intending to walk to London. He had walked from Brighton to Southsea, and was to have stopped at the latter place three months, but his friends threatened to withdraw his allowance. He stated that they had supported him for eight years, and that two were in independent circumstances, one of his brothers having, according to his representation, married the sister of the lessee of one of the principal London theatres. He declared that his father had been proprietor of Fun, but was ruined by the failure of a bank. He was most eccentric in his behaviour, and his landlady thought he had "a tile loose," as she phrases it. He professed to be a literary man, and claimed to have once induced the Home Secretary to pass a law in favour of the rights of the poor. He spoke French, and explained that he had once held the appointment of a commissioner at Boulogne. He talked often about lunatic asylums, and once stated that, if he could not get into a workhouse, he could into prison, by breaking a window, alleging that a policeman gave him that hint. When at Southsea he had inquired whether members of Royalty often visited the place, and, being told that her Majesty was at Osborne, asked many questions about that Royal residence, as to whether he could get in the grounds, whether the Queen walked out alone, whether he would be permitted to sketch scenery, and whether her Majesty would speak to him if he raised his hat to her. Before he left he learned that the Queen had proceeded from Osborne to prepare for the Duke of Albany's wedding, and in reply to further interrogatories he ascertained that the Royal nuptials would be celebrated at Windsor. He had money when he started from Southsea, having received a remittance, and also sold his concertina and a scarf. A letter from Croydon, enclosing, it is thought, another remittance, arrived at his lodgings after his departure. On arriving at Windsor the prisoner lodged at the house of Mr. Knight, an operative baker, at 84, Victoria-cottages. He arrived there about six o'clock on Saturday evening, Feb. 25, and engaged a bedroom, for which he undertook to pay 2s. 6d. a week. The landlady, Mrs. Knight, told him that her custom was to receive a week's payment in advance, whereupon the man, without saying where he came from, stated that he was short of money, and could only pay 1s., which she accepted. He told her he was out of employment, but had a situation in view at Eton, and, besides, had some independent means, adding that a letter with money was to arrive on the following Wednesday, but no letter or other message of any kind came for him. After breakfast each morning he went out and remained absent the greater part of the day, returning in the evening in time for tea. No one in the house where he lodged saw a revolver in his possession or observed anything peculiar in his manner. They described him as a quiet man.
The Scotland-yard detectives have been occupied inquiring into Maclean's previous career. They are said to be in possession of information that the prisoner was incarcerated in a lunatic asylum in Dublin for many months.
It is reported that Maclean was brought up at Dover police-court in August, 1874, charged with inciting John Cheeseman to place stones on the rails of the London, Chatham, and Dover railway at Ewell, near Dover. At the time Maclean was stated to be 18 years of age. Both prisoners were committed to the assizes at Maidstone, but were dismissed, the evidence not being sufficient to show a felonious intent on the part of the prisoner. It appeared from the evidence then given that Roderic Maclean gave Cheeseman money to go and place stones on the metals, with intent, it was alleged, to upset the boat express. Fortunately, however, the act was frustrated in time to save the train being wrecked.

EXPRESSIONS OF SYMPATHY.

The Prince of Wales, accompanied by a numerous suite, witnessed the performance of The Manager at the Court theatre on Thursday evening. On Mr. Clayton reading to the audience the paragraph from the evening paper referring to the attack upon the Queen and her Majesty's safety, the whole audience rose en masse and remained standing until the Prince had bowed his acknowledgements, and the National Anthem was played amidst the loudest demonstrations of approval.
A meeting of representative Irishmen from all parts of the metropolis, held in London on Thursday evening to arrange for a great national demonstration on St. Patrick's day, passed a resolution repudiating and deploring the attempted assassination of the Queen. At St. Mary's mission hall, Bermondsey New-road, during the usual Thursday evening service, the Rev. William Dodge, the mission clergyman, at the close of his sermon, alluded in feeling terms to the dastardly attempt. Instead of the usual closing hymn, the National Anthem was heartily sung.
Telegrams have been received from various foreign potentates, including the Emperor of Germany, the Emperor of Austria, the Emperor of Russia, the King of Italy, and the Pope, congratulating the Queen upon her escape from injury. The Hon. James Russell Lowell, the Ambassador from Washington to the Court of St. James's, also, on the part of the American nation and of American residents in the United Kingdom, forwarded, immediately after the event took place, a most feeling inquiry to Sir Henry Ponsonby.
The feeling of loyalty evoked by the escape of the Queen has been universal, and congratulatory addresses have been passed by the public bodies in all the chief towns.
At the Lenten Friday service at St. George's chapel, Windsor, in the morning, a prayer for the safe deliverance of her Majesty from peril was read. Afterwards the Rev. Mr. Edwards, Minor canon, gave a lecture, finishing by saying that the moment could not be passed over without some allusion to the dastardly outrage attempted on her Majesty, after which special prayers were read. Contrary to any precedent, Sir George Elvey, organist, at the conclusion, played the Royal anthem.
Today (Sunday) the Mayor and Corporation of Windsor will attend Divine service at the parish church at the morning service, which will be of a special thanksgiving character. The vicar, the Rev. Canon Gee, D.D., will preach with reference to the recent attempt on the life of the Queen.
The Archbishop of Canterbury requests the clergy to remember in their churches today (Sunday) the duty of offering thanksgiving to Almighty God for the deliverance of her Majesty from recent danger.
The Empress of Austria will visit the Queen tomorrow (Monday), and will personally convey to her Majesty the great grief with which the Emperor and people of Austria heard of the attempt, and of their happiness at the escape.

FORMER ATTEMPTS ON THE QUEEN'S LIFE.

The first attempt on the Queen's life occurred on June 10, 1840, a few months after her Majesty had been married. The assailant was Edward Oxford, a potboy. The Queen and the Prince Consort were driving from Buckingham palace by the gate opening into Constitution-hill, when Oxford drew a pistol, and deliberately aiming at the Queen, fired. Both the Prince and the Queen appear to have heard the whiz of the bullet as it passed close to them. The Prince rose in the carriage, when Oxford fired again, but missed his aim. At his trial the criminal was acquitted by the jury on the ground of insanity, but ordered to be confined in strict custody during her Majesty's pleasure. He was confined first at Bethlehem hospital and thence removed to Broadmoor, and finally was set at liberty in 1868 on condition of his going abroad.
The next attack was two years later. On May 30, 1842, John Francis fired at the Queen when within seven feet of her carriage. In this case, too, the outrage took place on Constitution-hill. Francis was sentenced to death, the sentence afterwards being commuted to penal servitude for life. Only two months later a deformed lad, of the name of Bean, levelled a loaded pistol at the Queen as her Majesty was driving from Buckingham palace to the Chapel Royal, St. James's. The weapon missed fire.
In May, 1850, only four weeks after the birth of the Duke of Connaught, a most cowardly attack was perpetrated on the Sovereign by Robert Pate, an ex-lieutenant in the Hussars. As the Royal carriage was emerging from the gate of the Duke of Cambridge's residence in Piccadilly, Pate deliberately struck the Queen with a stick, leaving a mark on the cheek and crushing her bonnet over the forehead. On his trial a defence of insanity was set up, but was rejected by the jury, and the prisoner was sentenced to seven years' transportation. The youth Arthur O'Connor, on the last day of February, 1872, pointed a rusty old pistol, with flint and steel lock, at the Queen as she was entering Buckingham palace.

LATEST PARTICULARS.

Her Majesty drove out again on Friday afternoon with Princess Beatrice, and received everywhere a welcome of indescribable enthusiasm. In the evening the Queen had the gratification of receiving a long telegraphic message from President Arthur, in which was expressed abhorrence at the attempt and congratulations on the part of the American Government at the happy escape of her Majesty. The Queen, immediately after her drive, devoted her attention to sending answers to the various telegrams that have been received.
A telegram received from Windsor yesterday morning, states that the Queen is in her customary good health and has not abated in any way the outdoor exercise she has been wont to take. Her Majesty walked in the Castle grounds about eight o'clock in the morning, and looked very well, not appearing in the least to have suffered from the nervous shock to which she was subjected on Thursday evening. Yesterday afternoon her Majesty took a long drive, accompanied by the Princess Beatrice. Hundreds of visitors lined the roads.
As an illustration of the narrow escape of her Majesty, it may be mentioned that a man was placed on the spot from which the shot was fired and another at the place where the bullet was picked up, Sir J.C. M'Neil indicating the exact position of the Queen at the moment. It was at once evident that her Majesty was immediately in the line of fire, the opinion being that the bullet must have passed in the rear of the rumble or under the carriage, the latter being considered the more probable hypothesis.
Chief-inspector Noble, of the Great Western railway, in company with Inspector Turner, of the Permanent Way department, went to Reading, and on examining the truck which was standing on Thursday in the siding at Windsor, at the spot where the ball was found, discovered on a white figure seven, being the last figure of the number 21377 a graze of about three inches, with an indentation and a corresponding bruise on the wood of the vehicle where it was struck by the missile.
Inspector Hayes was ordered to Windsor castle yesterday morning, to give her Majesty, through the Duke of Connaught, all information about the outrage, and as to how the prisoner behaved himself.
The man Maclean was again examined by Dr. Holderness on Friday morning, who still pronounces him to be sane. He had passed a sleepless night, but had not been in any way troublesome.
A correspondent states that about a month since a man giving the name of Roderic Maclean made application to the relieving officer of No. 8 district, St. Saviour's union, Walworth, stating that he slept at one of the lodging-houses in the neighbourhood of the Walworth-road, and asking for admission to the infirmary. He was examined by the medical officer, when it was found that there was nothing to warrant his being placed in that institution. The medical officer advised the relieving officer to send the applicant to the workhouse, but Maclean declined to take the order, and began to curse the Queen, saying that she would suffer for it.
Maclean is reported to have said he felt tired after the day's exertions. He had no fears about his fate, and was indifferent thereto, believing all would turn out well. Maclean is well educated, and is a fair linguist, speaking German fluently. It seems that he is subject to delusions.
After his examination before the Windsor borough magistrates, the prisoner Maclean had an interview with a solicitor from London, by whom he will be defended at the remand on Friday next. The prisoner continues to display the utmost unconcern, and has even been heard singing in his cell.
The revolver with which Maclean attempted to shoot her Majesty was purchased at a pawnbroker's shop at Portsmouth for 5s. 9d.
The prisoner has been photographed in nine different positions.
Two letters addressed to the prisoner have been forwarded to the police authorities. They are both from his sister, who lives at Croydon, one being addressed to Southsea, and the other to his lodgings at Windsor. It seems that Maclean's statement that he is in receipt of a small weekly allowance is true, and it is believed that the letter addressed to Windsor contains money.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, March 5, 1882, Page 7

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Re: Superintendent Hayes

Post by Karen on Sun 12 Aug 2012 - 12:17

THE PIMLICO MURDER.
EXAMINATION OF THE ACCUSED THIS DAY.

Frederick Treadaway, 20, a well-dressed young man, giving his address at 2, Eastwood-terrace, Hornsey-road, and his occupation a clothier's salesman, was brought before Mr. Woolrych, at Westminster Police-court, this morning, charged with feloniously killing and slaying William Collins, at 99, Stanley-street, Pimlico, by shooting him with a revolver; and he was further charged with attempting to murder Blanche Collins, at the same time and place.
The circumstances connected with the speedy capture of the prisoner have been so fully detailed that it is needless to further dilate on them here, further than that, with only twopence in his pocket, the murderer wandered, without aim or purpose, through Kentish-town as far as St. Alban's before he laid down to rest, and then found his way to Isleworth, where he was apprehended by a constable, who was well acquainted with him, he having a cousin living in the village, and also having been well acquainted with a publican named Wiggins, who, however, had retired from business. He was brought under cover of the night to Rochester-row station, and was very restless and uneasy until his father and mother visited him in the afternoon, and the interview, which was a very painful one, over, he became more resigned, ate well, conversed freely on the topics of the day, and slept soundly during the night. He particularly requested that he should not be made a "show" of, and the instructions of Mr. Hayes, the superintendent of the B division, were very strict on the subject; but when the court was opened there were many strangers in court, eager to catch a glimpse of the unfortunate young man.
The prisoner, who is rather over the middle height, is a handsome young man, twenty years of age, with an intellectual countenance, open brow and pleasing expression.
Mr. Superintendent Hayes watched the case on behalf of the Commissioners of Police; and Colonel R.L.O. Pearson, the District superintendent, was also in the building.
In consequence of the late hour at which the magistrate took his seat the prisoner was not put into the dock till precisely 12:30.
The prisoner when put in the dock sat down and appeared to faint, but he quickly recovered himself as Mrs. Collins was put into the box, but she was taken suddenly ill again.
Mr. Reader, for the prosecution, said he proposed to give a slight narrative of the facts, and said the prisoner had only been once before the tragedy into the house of Mr. Collins, and was better known to Mrs. Collins than to Mr. Collins. He was engaged to a niece of the deceased, and seemed to have called on him on the Thursday for the purpose of borrowing a 10 pound note, but he did not do so, and he appeared to have slept out all the Thursday night, and on the Friday came and had dinner, and appeared as rational as possible. He sat talking to the deceased. Between three and four Mrs. Collins heard the report of a pistol, and went to the front room, where she was met by the prisoner, who struck her in the mouth, struck her in the face with the pistol, and fired a shot, but it could not be found. He then pummelled her head on the stones in the area, and ran up the steps. She went to the top and called "Murder!" and he was pursued, but escaped, but owing to the vigilance of the police, was soon captured, at Isleworth on Saturday night. He could only conceive that the motive was plunder, for the deceased never banked, kept a considerable quantity of money in the house, and carried money in a belt, which was found disturbed after the tragedy. He should only call three or four witnesses today, and then ask for a remand.
Mrs. Blanche Collins said she was the widow of the deceased. She was very deaf, and the questions were put by Mr. Webb, the second usher. She said the prisoner was courting one of her nieces. He came to the house at a quarter to one on Thursday last, and she saw him, and left him in conversation with Mr. Collins, when she went across the Park to Paddington, and when she returned he was gone. He came at 10:30 on Friday morning, and Mr. Collins was not at home. The area door was open, and she answered him from the area when he knocked at the door, and he went down the area steps. He said he was tired, and she gave him a couple of pillows on the sofa to rest on, and then she asked him for the letter from Selina (the niece) making an appointment the day before, which was the reason of his calling, and he said no; he hadn't it. He hadn't been at home; he'd been walking about all night. He remained sitting in the easy chair till Mr. Collins came home. He came home in a few minutes, or shortly afterwards. They were in the front kitchen or breakfast room together, and they sat there and continued talking together until she got dinner ready. Mr. Collins asked if he had had his breakfast, and he said, "Yes." He was still there when she began to get the dinner. That was somewhat after 11 o'clock. As soon as Mr. Collins came in he had gone to get the meat. The dinner was ready about half-past one, as near as she could remember. Prisoner was sitting in the armchair, and the deceased in an ordinary chair, while she was preparing the dinner in another room. She didn't hear the conversation, and didn't notice what they were talking about. When the dinner was ready Mr. Collins asked him if he would have some, and he sat down in the arm-chair while Mr. Collins had a basin of broth, and had a glass of ale. Whether he ate anything or not she could not say, but she saw Mr. Collins carve something for him. (Here the witness was obliged to have stimulants.) After dinner she cleared away the things, and then went into the back kitchen, and left Mr. Collins and the prisoner together. That was about two o'clock; she could not tell exactly; she was busy in the back kitchen, but not for long. She went into the front kitchen after that many times, passing in and out. He stopped a considerable time after she had cleared away the dinner things; she should say till some minutes past three. She never heard any high words; the conversation went on as before. While in the back kitchen she heard a shot fire, and rushed to the front, and met the prisoner. She turned round momentarily to see what it was. She went, and met the prisoner at the doorway leading out of the kitchen into the passage, and said, "What was that?" and he said, "I don't know."
Mr. Foinett here said he did not think she could give her evidence. She was too ill.
Mrs. Collins said she would go on, and would prefer to give her evidence now.
In answer to Mr. Woolrych she said he had scarcely spoke before he fired the pistol at her, and she felt the blow, and the blood trickling down. After that he went to the area door, as quick as he could; he flew to the door, and she followed him, and seized him by some of his clothes. She was going to cry "Murder!" when he put his hand over her mouth and the other below the ear, and held her by the throat, and threw her down on the flag-stones, just outside the area stones, and beat her head on the floor, and then she released one of his hands and caught hold of him somewhere again, and she got to her feet in the struggle, and then he loosed her and ran up the area steps. She ran up the steps after him as quick as she could, and begged of the people in mercy to fetch a doctor, and asked some to stop him and to send for a policeman to stop him, and then she came down the steps and went into the breakfast-room.
The witness here again broke down, and restoratives had to be applied.
She continued - She flew to her husband and begged him to speak, and said, "What has he done?" She knelt beside him, and saw that he was dead. He didn't speak, although she saw a very slight quiver of the lips. All the people then came, and the doctor, and she scarcely knew what followed. She felt a blow on the head, and was so ill she scarcely knew what happened. Dr. Folwell was still attending her. She had known prisoner about eight months.
Mr. Woolrych asked if the prisoner had professional assistance.
Mr. Foinett said he would have assistance on the next occasion.
Mr. Woolrych asked the prisoner if he had any questions to ask.
He replied faintly, "No," and then fainted away.
Mr. Richardson, the Second Clerk, then read the deposition to the witness, and she signed it.
The prisoner having now recovered from the fainting fit.
Mr. Foinett said the next witness he had to call was John Edwards, the man who had seen the prisoner run away, and had followed the prisoner, but lost him.
Dr. William Folwell made an application to have his evidence taken next. He said he was a physician and surgeon, and lived at No. 55, Gloucester-street, St. George's-square. He was called to 99, Stanley-street, at twenty-five minutes past five on the afternoon of Friday last. A young man in the road fetched him. He had known the deceased for several years. He went down the area steps into the basement, as the gate was open. The deceased was lying on the floor quite dead; his wife was kneeling by his side. There was a small mark on the forehead, which might have been produced by a bullet wound, on the left side of the frontal bone. There was another mark at the back of the head from the bullet making a blow against the bone internally, and partly from falling on the floor. Very little blood had flowed from either of the wounds; only a few drops that had sprinkled over the front of the shirt. There were no other marks on the body. Witness tried to pour some brandy down his throat, but it was of no avail. He left him, and proceeded to attend to Mrs. Collins, who was bleeding from the left ear. She had received a severe blow under the left ear.
Mr. Woolrych asked what sort of a blow.
The Doctor said with a fist or hard instrument; the handle of a pistol might have done it. She had also finger-marks on the front of the throat of attempted strangulation. They were distinct, for there were places where the skin had been scraped off with the finger-nails, and there was bleeding at the same time from the interior of the mouth, from scratches and excoriations, from the mucous membrane and the back of the tongue. It might have been done by the hand, or the action of four false teeth on a plate which had been forcibly removed from the gum. She was still under his care.
By Mr. Woolrych - She had also several bruises on the back of the head, which might have been caused by bumps on the flagstones outside the area door. There were no other marks of violence. The bleeding from the ear did not proceed from any external wound, though haemorrhage occurred from the blow under the ear, the pressure of the vessels of the throat, and the rupture of small vessels, occasioned by the blows on the back part of the head. He had been in constant attendance. She was improving very nicely indeed. He had not made the post-mortem, but would do so in the course of the day. He was of opinion that the bullet was lodged in the skull, and was the cause of death.
In answer to the Magistrate, the prisoner said he would reserve his defence, and ask no questions.
John Edmonds, 136, Queen's-road, Pimlico, a labourer, said he was at work at a building at the corner of Sussex-street and Stanley-street, for Messrs. Howard and Gantlett, the builders, and was about twenty yards off the house, No. 99. He saw a young man coming from 99, but took no notice then of him. Mrs. Collins came up the steps. Could not say if the man had left 99. At that time the fugitive was forty or fifty yards ahead of him, and he followed him. At the corner of Clarendon-street the witness fell, and lost sight of the prisoner. Did not see the face of the man. He had a low Oxford hat in his hand, and hid it under his coat. The man had a black coat on (frock), similar to that worn by the prisoner. He was a slim-built young man, and, judging by the view, he could not say it was the prisoner in the dock.
Thomas Wort, 431 T Division, said he was stationed at Isleworth. On Saturday morning last he received instructions, and at 6:30 in the evening he went to the house of John Wiggins, in Worton-lane, Isleworth, and waited till the prisoner arrived, at 7:40. He wished him good evening, and some conversation ensued, and the prisoner sat down and smoked. Witness went across to him, and told him he was a police officer, and should take him into custody. Prisoner said, "What for?" and witness said he would explain the charge when they arrived at the station. He said, "Very well; I'll go with you;" and witness asked if he had any unlawful weapon about him, and he did not answer, and witness felt, but did not find anything in his pockets. At the station, a mile off, he searched the prisoner carefully, and found hanging to the brace on the right side of the trousers inside a six-chambered revolver.
Mr. Woolrych asked if it were loaded.
Mr. Foinett said no; the charges had been drawn, and it was locked.
Witness continued - He found several other articles, among them a pair of spectacles (old make). He examined the revolver, and found it quite empty.
Mr. Woolrych asked what he said at the station.
Witness said he made a statement to the sergeant on duty. He was charged with the wilful murder of William Collins.
Mr. Reader said the proper name was John Collins.
Witness said on the way to the station he said not a word to witness nor witness to him.
Sergeant George Edbrook, 9 T Division, said he was at the station at Isleworth, and saw the prisoner partially searched at 8:15 on Saturday, and took the charge and read it over. On the way to the cells he asked for a handkerchief which had been taken from him. Witness said he should not let him have it, and he said, "Nonsense; Had I contemplated suicide, I could easily have accomplished it, being armed. What I have done was in a moment of madness." He left the prisoner in a cell with the door open, in charge of a constable, and at 12:15 Inspector Foinett and Inspector Sayer arrived, and then he was charged with the attempted murder of Mrs. Collins and taken up to London at 1:15.
Thomas Foinett, Chief Inspector, B Division, said shortly after twelve on Saturday night he went to Isleworth with Inspector Sager, and the prisoner was brought from the cell and charged with the attempted murder of Mrs. Collins by shooting and strangulation. When told that charge he took no notice; he seemed stupefied, and then said, "I don't know how I came to do it; it seems a blank to me." He was then put in a cab, and came to town. He spoke to Inspector Sager about the dirty state of the Park, and the prisoner said he came that morning to see Mrs. Wiggins. He several times said he must have been mad to do it, and asked him about the revolver, and he said he bought it on Thursday morning at a pawnbroker's in the Seven-sisters'-road, and intended to use it on (or for) myself. Things were very miserable at home, and I was out of employment. On the morning after the affair he went away, not knowing where he was going or what he was doing. He only had twopence, one penny of which he spent in a newspaper to read about the affair, and the account is all wrong. He never took a cab to go to Victoria, and then to Dover; he had no money. The other penny he spent in returns (tobacco). When he left Pimlico he walked towards Hyde-park, and across Regent's-park, to Kentish-town. He stayed with a friend in Castle-road, Kentish-town. The name of the friend was Milton. On the morning after the affair he took the North-road, passing through Finchley, Barnet, and on to St. Alban's; and on finding out that I was at St. Alban's I retraced my steps; wishing to see Mrs. Wiggins once more, and I didn't wish to be apprehended in London. On reaching Kentish-town on his return he found a pair of spectacles in the road, and put them on, and wore them through Kensington and Hammersmith. He was placed in the cell, and saw his father and mother. He then said he had spent the night of the murder in Castle-road, Kentish-town, that he had reached there about half-past four, and remained till ten on the Saturday morning. He asked for pens, ink, and paper, to write a letter, but witness said he should read what he wrote before it was sent. He said he knew that; he only wanted to write to Mrs. Newton, to explain to her why he cut off his whiskers at her place, as this seemed to surprise her. Witness told him he had better not write the letter; that he would send to Mrs. Newton.
The letter was not written.
The prisoner was remanded till December 26.

Source: The Echo, Monday December 18, 1876, Page 3

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Re: Superintendent Hayes

Post by Karen on Wed 15 Aug 2012 - 20:26

THIS DAY'S NEWS.
THE ATTEMPT TO SHOOT THE QUEEN.

MEDICAL EXAMINATION.
STATEMENTS BY EYE-WITNESSES.

FINDING OF THE BULLET.

As stated in our late edition last night, an attempt to shoot the Queen was made upon her arrival at Windsor from London yesterday evening. The Royal train conveying the Queen and Princess Beatrice, General Sir H. Ponsonby, Viscount Bridport, Colonel Sir J.C. M'Neill, and the ladies-in-waiting, arrived safely at the Windsor Terminus at 5:25, a number of the residents having assembled on the platform to welcome them upon their return to the Castle. Her Majesty and Princess Beatrice had a most enthusiastic reception, and were loudly cheered as their carriage, drawn by a pair of grey ponies, left the waiting-room. Just as the carriage was about to pass through the gates of the station yard on its way to the Palace, a man, poorly dressed, who was standing in the road, pointed a revolver at the Queen and Princess Beatrice, and deliberately fired, just as the cheers were subsiding, the report being distinctly heard throughout the terminus. Mr. Chief-Superintendent Hayes, of the borough police; Mr. Inspector Fraser, Sergeant Jackson; and Police-constable Alexander were close at hand, and the would-be assassin was arrested in a moment before he could fire again.
The dastardly nature of the attempt upon the Sovereign's life naturally created the most intense indignation among the spectators. There was a general rush towards the man. Colonel Sir J.C. M'Neill, General Sir H. Ponsonby, Viscount Bridport, who at the time were waiting to enter their carriage, ran to the vicinity of the Queen's equipage, when it was ascertained that her Majesty had received no injury, the shot from the revolver having missed its aim as the vehicle was driven rapidly out of the yard. Her Majesty and the Princess continued their progress to the Palace, followed by the ladies of the suite in the remainder of the carriages, and while the Royal party were on their way thither the would-be murderer was conveyed to a fly which was obtained in Thames-street, by Mr. Inspector Fraser, Mr. Chief Superintendent Hayes, Sergeant Jackson, Constable Alexander, and Mr. Superintendent Blake, of the county police. The act was not accomplished without some difficulty owing to the crowd, who manifested the greatest indignation at the crime. Once in Thames-street the prisoner was driven rapidly through High-street in the custody of the officers named to the borough police-station, where, in the presence of Mr. H.L. Simpson, one of the justices, he was at once charged by Mr. Superintendent Hayes with shooting at her Majesty the Queen with intent to do her grievous bodily harm.

LATEST PARTICULARS THIS DAY.

A Windsor correspondent, telegraphing, says: -
Upon inquiry early this morning at Windsor Castle, it was stated that the Queen had passed a good night, and had not suffered in health from the nervous shock of yesterday evening. Her Majesty walked early on the terrace today, accompanied by Princess Beatrice.
The man Maclean, who is in custody charged with the outrage, and who comes from Croydon, has during this morning been again examined by Dr. Holderness, who still pronounces him to be sane. He has passed a sleepless night, but has not been in any way troublesome. He will be brought up at a special sitting of the Windsor Borough Justices this afternoon at the Town Hall, when the testimony will be taken of the railway servants and others who saw the outrage committed.
The Royal borough is in a highly excited state, owing to the dastardly attempt having been made within its precincts, and meetings will be held in order to convey to her Majesty the loyal sentiments of her faithful subjects.
During the night telegrams have been received from various foreign potentates, including the Emperor of Germany, the Emperor of Austria, and the Emperor of Russia, congratulating the Queen upon her escape from injury. The hon. James Russell Lowell, the Ambassador from Washington to the Court of St. James's, also, on the part of the American nation and of Americans resident in the United Kingdom, forwarded, immediately after the event took place, a most feeling inquiry to Sir Henry Ponsonby.
A strict examination has this morning been made of the Royal carriages which were yesterday in waiting at the Windsor Railway Station, but no trace of a bullet can be found. At the station itself, Mr. Higgin, the traffic superintendent of the Great Western Railway, who reached Windsor this morning from London, has detailed a body of workmen to look for the bullet in the station yard. A quite fresh mark immediately above the Queen's waiting-room is apparent, but it has no such indentation as a bullet would effect; and it is believed that it was made last week when the painters were working at the roof.
An eye-witness who was at the station, and near the Royal carriage at the time of the outrage, states that he heard a most uncommon sound, like, as he describes it, beer in a bottle, followed by a little crack, as of a rook rifle, and he then saw the crowd surge towards Maclean. From what this witness states it is most probable that the shot ricochetted, or in other words, rebounded from the ground, either in front of or underneath the carriage; the bullet, by the noise it made, seeming to travel very slowly.
Another eye-witness gives the following details:
While the crowd awaited Her Majesty's arrival outside the station yard a suspicious-looking man was observed forcing his way in front of the Eton boys, who as usual occupied the foremost position, and while Her Majesty was being assisted into the carriage by John Brown, this man was observed to be fumbling in his pocket, and was unable to release his arm owing to the pressure of the Eton boys. Immediately on Her Majesty giving the order to start he withdrew his hand quietly from his side, and placing it on his breast quickly pushed himself further to the front. A moment had not elapsed ere he raised his hand on a level with the Queen's carriage. Mr. Fraser, the Special Inspector on duty, examined the crowd, but finding all satisfactory, returned within the station. The Queen's wraps being handed in by John Brown, Sir Henry Ponsonby came forward, and, after a short delay, escorted Her Majesty on his arm through the waiting-room to her carriage. It was then seen that the man held a pistol. A sharp little Eton boy - his gaze on Her Majesty having been disturbed by the sudden jerk the man gave to his arm - when he saw the pistol, uttered an alarming cry, which instantly brought all eyes to bear on the man. Without hesitation three of the Eton bigger boys threw themselves on the would-be regicide. The effect of catching his arm lowered the level of the pistol, which went off pointed towards the hind hoofs of the near horse drawing the carriage, which at that time was about eleven yards distant. Happily the bullet sped without any damage, striking the stones of the yard, and ricocheting with a fiendish whistle over the luggage waggon on to the railway line. The man was instantly overpowered before he could again use the weapon. Inspector Fraser had in a moment dashed over and snatched the revolver from his hand. The Queen drove on, little alarmed outwardly at what had taken place. Not so Princess Beatrice, who uttered a loud scream, and turned anxiously to Her Majesty to inquire whether she was injured. She turned extremely pale, but, seeing the Queen so calm, at once recovered. The Queen, as soon as she had seen that no one was hurt, and in answer to the heartfelt cheers of those assembled, bowed her gracious acknowledgements, as if, says the eye-witness, nothing had happened. The would-be assassin gave his name as Rhoderick M'Lean, 27 years of age, a native of Ireland, and living at Victoria-cottages, Windsor, and of no other settled abode.
Inspector Noble, of the Great Western Railway Company's Police, and Inspector Turner, of the Locomotive Department at Slough, arrived at Windsor at half-past seven, and commenced a search of the yard for the purpose of discovering, if possible, the bullet. After a search which lasted about an hour and a quarter, Inspector Turner found a small bullet embedded in the ground. It bore marks of having first struck some other object, and was right in the direction of the carriage, having probably passed over the horses' heads.
The bullet weighs about a third of an ounce, being conical in shape. Upon inspection it was seen that it was slightly grazed, and had some red paint upon it, showing that it had struck a red railway truck, and, being spent, had fallen in the truck. The distance from the spot from which the bullet was fired to where it was found is 29 yards. The bullet is now in the hands of the police, and has been placed alongside the other bullets found on Maclean, and exactly corresponds in size, weight, and appearance.
An examination by Mr. Superintendent Hayes, of the Borough Police, at the Windsor Police-station, shows that after the first discharge the prisoner had turned the barrel to a second loaded chamber, but was prevented from discharging it by the revolver being knocked out of his hand.
Her Majesty has so far recovered from the effects of the excitement attendant upon her narrow escape yesterday that it has not been thought necessary to send any further messages on the subject to members of the Royal Family residing in London. On inquiry at Marlborough House this morning we learn that the Prince of Wales has received no news except in confirmation of the reassuring telegram of last night, and neither at Buckingham Palace nor Clarence House is there anything new to report.
The Home Secretary arrived at Windsor shortly before noon, and drove up to the Castle. The right hon. gentleman brought down to Her Majesty the congratulations of the Government on her happy and miraculous escape, and the abhorrence with which the news was received by the whole House of Commons and Her Majesty's subjects throughout England. Sir William Harcourt had an audience with Her Majesty, who gratefully received the kind message of her people. Count Munster, at the request of the Emperor of Germany, came down to Windsor and conveyed personally the Emperor's deep grief at such a horrible attempt, and his deep-felt sympathies and joy that nothing serious had occurred. This communication was exceedingly grateful to the Queen, and Her Majesty sent back a message by Count Munster, thanking the Emperor for his kind and considerate inquiry.
From an early hour this morning there has been a succession of calls made by distinguished personages at Buckingham Palace. In the absence of Her Majesty, however, no visitors' book is kept, and consequently no cards or names have been left with the officials in charge. Great sympathy and interest was manifested by everyone who called at the Palace respecting the Queen's health. The Duke of Albany, who is at present staying at the Palace, this forenoon received a telegram from the Queen in which it was stated that she was quite well. Among those who drove to Buckingham Palace today to make inquiries was Prince Lucien Bonaparte, who also made inquiries on behalf of the ex-Empress Eugenie.
At Marlborough House there have also been numerous inquiries. Nearly all the members of the present and the late Ministry have called and left their cards. Among the more distinguished callers were Sir Bartle and Lady Frere, Cardinal Manning, Archbishop of Canterbury, Mr. Alfred Tennyson, Sir Henry and Lady Holland, Earl and Countess Sefton, and Marquis and Marchioness of Headfort.
The Lord Mayor has forwarded the following telegram to Sir Henry Ponsonby: - "Will you kindly convey to Her Most Gracious Majesty the earnest congratulations of the Lord Mayor and citizens of London on her providential escape from the wicked attempt made upon Her Majesty yesterday, and express the assurance of the unabated loyalty and affection of the citizens to Her Majesty."
The Rev. Arthur Robbins, rector of Holy Trinity Church, Windsor, chaplain to the Queen, the Prince of Wales, and the Household Brigade, held a special thanksgiving service for the fortunate and marvellous escape of the Queen. The service was largely attended.
At the Glasgow Stock Exchange this morning, before commencing business, the members gave expression to their loyalty by singing the National Anthem. The chairman addressed the members, and expressed his indignation and abhorrence at the dastardly outrage, and his sentiments were heartily echoed by the gentlemen present.

PRISONER BEFORE THE MAGISTRATES.

The examination of the prisoner Roderick Maclean commenced in the Town Hall, Windsor, about half-past twelve o'clock today, where there was a crowded attendance. Much anxiety was shown by the crowd outside to obtain admission. As the prisoner was conveyed in a cab from the police-station by a police-constable in private clothes many in the crowd recognised him, and there was some hissing, but his removal was more quietly managed than had been anticipated, as it was understood that the examination would not begin until three o'clock, and few expected that it would commence at an earlier hour.
The Magistrates upon the bench were the Mayor (Mr. Devereaux), who presided, Mr. Pooley, Mr. Chamberlain, Mr. Wellman, and Sir James Ingham.
The prosecution was conducted by Mr. Stevenson on behalf of the Treasury.
The prisoner at first stood behind the table provided for reporters, but was afterwards allowed a chair to sit upon. He is a man of medium height and dark complexion, with moustache, and short-cut hair brushed down over his forehead. He listened with close and watchful attention to the opening statement for the prosecution, and also to the evidence, but was not so impressed with the seriousness of his position as to refrain from smiling when Superintendent Hayes deposed as to the circumstances of the arrest, and especially when the witness described how an indignant Eton boy had beaten the prisoner with an umbrella.
Mr. Stevenson intimated that he did not intend to call more evidence today than would justify a remand, inasmuch as it was necessary that the police authorities should have time to complete their investigations.
Mr. Hayes, superintendent of the borough police, was then called, and, in reply to Mr. Stevenson, said that the occurrence took place about half-past five o'clock at the Great Western Railway Station. A pistol was discharged about 10 or 15 yards from Her Majesty's carriage. The shot was discharged after Her Majesty entered the carriage.
Mr. Stevenson - Who was in the carriage besides Her Majesty? - The Princess Beatrice.
Anyone else? - I did not notice anyone else.
I mean, of course, inside the carriage? - I only saw the Queen and Princess Beatrice.
Now tell us in your own words what you saw. Did you know the prisoner? - I had seen him between the waiting-room and the Queen's carriage. As soon as I saw the train arrive and the carriage pull up I signalled to my sergeant. We were all engaged in stopping the traffic so as to allow the Queen's carriage to pass. You, of course, know what I mean by that.
The Prisoner - Am I allowed to ask this gentleman any questions?
The Chairman - When we have heard his statement you may ask him any question you please.
Mr. Hayes, in continuation, said he heard a report as of fire-arms, and, signalling to his sergeant, he turned to the left, and then saw the prisoner, whom he had not seen before that day to his knowledge.
Mr. Stevenson: What was he doing? - He was presenting a pistol in the direction of Her Majesty's carriage.
Did you hear the report? - I ought perhaps to say that the smoke more attracted my attention, and on the instant I turned round I saw the prisoner with a pistol in his hand.
Was any second shot fired? - I did not hear one.
How far was the prisoner standing from the carriage when the shot was fired? - I should say about fifteen yards.
When you say you saw the prisoner presenting a pistol, do you mean at the carriage? - Do you mean that he presented it a second time? - No. I only saw the pistol levelled at the carriage once, and that was just after the shot was fired.
How was he then holding the pistol? - Straight in the direction of Her Majesty's carriage, and at arm's length. When I saw him it was immediately after the shot had been fired.
And what did you do? - I collared him by the neck at once, and, with assistance, prevented his escape. The prisoner gave me the pistol he had in his hand, which I now produce, and it has been in my custody ever since.
Did you examine the state of the pistol? - Yes; afterwards, at the police-station.
Has it been in your possession ever since? - Yes.
What was the result of your examination? - I was assisted by Inspector Fraser and others, the prisoner saying, "Don't hurt me; I will go quietly." A little boy hit him over the head with an umbrella, but he was at once removed to a close cab, and taken to the station-house. When we got to the station I asked him his name and address, and he gave his name as Roderick Maclean, of 84, Victoria-cottages, Windsor. I charged him with shooting at the Queen in the Great Western Railway yard, with intent to do grievous bodily harm: The prisoner simply said, "Oh, I know." On the way to the police-station, when in the cab, he said, "I was starving, otherwise I should not have done this." I examined the pistol. There were two empty cartridge-cases in it and two loaded chambers, the other two being empty. It was a six-chamber revolver, of German pin-fire arrangement. I produce the cartridges which were taken from the pistol, and fourteen other cartridges of the same description which were found upon the prisoner.
Did you find the cartridges loose in his pocket? - They were in a piece of rag with other articles, including a pocket-book, a bunch of keys, a comb, a newspaper, &c.
All these you have, and of course will keep? - Certainly. I produce a letter which was taken from the prisoner when he was searched by Inspector Fraser, written by the prisoner in pencil. In that letter he states that he should not have done this crime "had you, as you should have done, allowed the 10s. a week instead of 6s."
The Mayor asked if the letter was addressed.
Witness - No, Sir, it is not; but it is dated March 2nd, 1882, and must have been written before the outrage was committed. This morning the prisoner said he wished to make a written statement, and he handed to me the following document: - "Police Office, Windsor, March 3, 1882. - I am not guilty of the charge of shooting with the intention of causing actual bodily harm. The object was by frightening Her Majesty the Queen and alarming the public, and with the intention of having my grievances repealed, viz., such as the pecuniary straits in which I have been subjected. All the circumstances tend to prove this statement. Further, had I desired to injure the Queen I should have fired at her when she was quitting the railway carriage. Quite on the contrary, I pointed the pistol on a level with the wheels; but, as I felt a slight kick, doubtless the contents would have lodged in one of the doors. If Her Majesty will accept this explanation, I allow the words, "with the intent of intimidating others," instead of "causing grievous bodily harm," to be inserted in the indictment. In that event I will offer all the assistance in my power to bring the charge herein spoken of to a speedy issue. I hope Her Majesty will accept the only consolation I can offer - namely, I had no intention whatever of causing her any injury. - RODERIC McLEAN."
Mr. Hayes, further examined, said - The bullet found this morning was shown to me by Inspector Turner. I fitted it to one of the empty cartridge cases taken out of the pistol, and also to the barrel of the revolver. It fitted both. There were two dents or small holes on the side of the bullet. One of the empty cartridge cases smelt as if it had been recently discharged.
Asked whether he had any question to ask,
The prisoner replied that he had, and proceeded to examine the witness with a somewhat stammering utterance, but with the utmost care and persistence.
The prisoner: On which side of me were you standing? - On your left at the gateway.
Were you facing Her Majesty's carriage? - No; when I heard the report of your shot my back was towards the Queen's carriage.
Facing me, then? - No; my left side was towards your left side.
You say that you saw me discharge the pistol? - No; I said that I heard the report of the shot, and instantly looked round, and saw the pistol in your hand.
Pointed at the wheel? - Pointed in the direction of the Queen's carriage.
But at the time you saw me the carriage was in motion? - Yes, but very gently; and I forgot to say you were a yard or so in front of the other people.
After some further evidence as to the arrest of the prisoner and the finding of the bullet, Maclean was remanded till Friday next.

SOME ACCOUNT OF THE PRISONER.

A Portsmouth correspondent telegraphs that inquiries in that town show that Roderick Maclean recently stayed temporarily at Southsea. Yesterday week he left Cecil-grove, where he had rented a bedroom for a fortnight, intending to walk to London. He had walked from Brighton to Southsea, and was to have stopped here three months, but his friends threatened to withdraw his allowance. He stated that they had supported him for eight years, and that two were in independent circumstances, one of his brothers having, according to his representation, married the sister of the lessee of one of the principal London theatres. He declared that his father had been proprietor of Fun, but was ruined by the failure of a bank. He was most eccentric in his behaviour, and his landlady thought he had "a tile loose," as she phrases it. He professed to be a literary man, and claimed to have once induced the Home Secretary to pass a law in favour of the rights of the poor. He spoke French, and explained that he had once held the appointment of a commissioner at Boulogne. He talked often about lunatic asylums, and once stated that, if he could not get into a workhouse, he could into prison, by breaking a window, alleging that a policeman gave him that hint. When at Southsea he had inquired whether members of Royalty often visited the place, and, being told that Her Majesty was at Osborne, asked many questions about that Royal residence, as to whether he could get in the grounds, whether the Queen walked out alone, whether he would be permitted to sketch scenery, and whether Her Majesty would speak to him if he raised his hat to her. Before he left he learned that the Queen had proceeded from Osborne to prepare for the Duke of Albany's wedding, and in reply to further interrogatories he ascertained that the Royal nuptials would be celebrated at Windsor. He had money when he started from Southsea, having received a remittance, and also sold his concertina and a scarf. A letter from Croydon, enclosing it is thought another remittance, arrived at his lodgings after his departure.
On arriving at Windsor the prisoner lodged at the house of Mr. Knight, an operative baker, at 84, Victoria-cottages. He arrived there about 6 o'clock last Saturday evening, and engaged a bedroom, for which he undertook to pay 2s. 6d. per week. The landlady, Mrs. Knight, told him that her custom was to receive a week's payment in advance, whereupon the man, without saying where he came from, stated that he was short of money, and could only pay 1s., which she accepted. He told her he was out of employment, but had a situation in view at Eton, and, besides, had some independent means, adding that a letter with money was to arrive on the following Wednesday, but no letter or other message of any kind came for him. After breakfast each morning he went out and remained absent the greater part of the day, returning in the evening in time for tea. No one in the house where he lodged saw a revolver in his possession or observed anything peculiar in his manner.
They described him as a quiet man.

Source: The Echo, Friday March 3, 1882, Page 3

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