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Inspector William Causby

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Inspector William Causby

Post by Karen on Fri 3 Aug 2012 - 6:49

Inspector William Causby who is mentioned on page 122 of "Jack the Ripper: An Encyclopedia."

RIVAL UNEMPLOYED "LEADERS."
THE FIGHT ON TOWER-HILL.

WAITE BEFORE THE MAGISTRATE.

At the Thames Police-court, this morning, Henry Waite, 39, who described himself as a labourer, living at 3, Dove-court, Fetter-lane, City, was charged with disorderly conduct and using obscene language on Tower-hill.
Chief-inspector L. Vedy said yesterday afternoon he was at a meeting of the unemployed on Tower-hill. There had been a dispute between the Anarchists and Socialists, and a man, named Sullivan, pushed defendant down. The latter then seized Sullivan by the legs and pulled him off the wall. When witness took him into custody there were cries of "Don't let him be taken," and "Rescue him." At one time six or seven persons were fighting. After a rush from the crowd defendant went quietly to the station.
Defendant - You know perfectly well I made no resistance. Sullivan was the aggressor, and he should be in my place.
Witness, in cross-examination, said defendant was nearest, and he caught hold of him. There was a crowd of about 300, and there was a general skirmish amongst the lot. Witness was not the inspector who "knee'd" him in the back. He caught hold of defendant by the collar. No undue violence was used. Witness saw defendant strike Sullivan. Half-a-dozen men were striking one another.
Constable Leisons, 155 H, said he saw defendant, who was addressing the meeting, pushed off the wall by another man. They then commenced to fight. He heard defendant say, "I'll give it to you now."
Inspector Causby said defendant and Sullivan were on the parapet. They attempted to address the meeting at one time, after which a free fight took place. The meeting was then dispersed by the police. During the day defendant used very bad language. He said, "The parson is thought to be an angel, but I can tell you he is a black-spotted angel." Witness did not ill-use defendant.

THE DEFENCE.

For the defence, James Walsh, living at 6, Wellington-street, West Ham, said he was one of the unemployed. Sullivan pushed defendant down, but Waite did not push Sullivan, who overbalanced himself and fell. The police then seized defendant before he could say anything, and it appeared to be a pre-arranged plan. It was like a "lightning flash."
Alfred Holdam, of 48, Peckham-rye, said he had no religious belief, and affirmed. He did not see defendant strike any blows, or use bad language.
William O'Shea, a carman, out of work, and residing in Stoney-street, Borough, gave similar evidence, as also did William Oddy, an unemployed painter.
Defendant said he was standing at the end of the parapet when Sullivan pushed him from the wall. The other man was talking about dynamite bombs, and forced himself on the platform, and it was after he (defendant) had said they were opposed to Anarchists that he was thrown off the wall. There was no fighting. The other man should have been charged. He was as honest as the police.
Mr. Dickinson said it was possible the other man ought to have been charged, but that had nothing to do with the case. He had no doubt the police evidence was true, and defendant would have to find two sureties in 25 pounds to keep the peace for six months, or be imprisoned for one month.

Source: The Echo, Saturday February 4, 1893, Page 3


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Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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Re: Inspector William Causby

Post by Karen on Fri 3 Aug 2012 - 6:57

EXTENSIVE ROBBERY.

John Burkett, 23; and John Ward, 29, porters, were indicted for stealing five cases of dress material, of the value of 350 pounds, the property of Mr. Charles Hook. - On the 28th ult. the prosecutor directed a carman to remove the cases from Milton-street to Australian-avenue. At the latter place a man met the carman, and, after signing for the packages, directed the carman to take them to premises in Milton-street, where they were delivered. Information as to the robbery had reached the police, and Inspector Causby and Serjeant Burden were on the watch. The officers saw the two prisoners and three other men in the act of removing the goods. - Humphreys, a sessions officer, proved a long series of convictions against Ward, including a sentence of eight years' penal servitude. A conviction was also proved against Burkett. Both men were known to belong to a very expert gang of thieves, and the Common Serjeant sent Ward to 10 years' penal servitude, and Burkett to seven years'.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, July 30, 1893, Page 5

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Re: Inspector William Causby

Post by Karen on Fri 3 Aug 2012 - 7:10

POLICE AND THE CARETAKER.
ALLEGATION AGAINST AN INSPECTOR.

At the Thames Police-court, this morning, Henry Cooper, 49, caretaker, of 25, Plough-buildings, Plough-street, Commercial-road, surrendered to his recognisance on a charge of being drunk and interfering with the police. - The evidence of Sergeant 11 H was to the effect that at half-past one yesterday morning he was with Inspector Causley, when Cooper came up and twice abused the inspector. As he refused to go away he was arrested.
Cooper, in answer to the charge, said he simply asked the inspector to have a cup of coffee, but he refused, and the sergeant then abused him. He went to the station and made a complaint, when Inspector Causby kicked him and ran him out of the station into the street. The sergeant then arrested him.

A DENIAL.

Inspector Causley now attended, and said at the time mentioned he saw Cooper with a coffee-stall at the corner of High-street, Whitechapel. He asked witness to have some coffee, a cigar, or some whiskey. He replied, "He did not want any," and walked away. Cooper followed, and said, "______ old Causley." When witness got to the station subsequently, he saw Cooper, who complained of being assaulted in his (witness's) presence. He told the defendant to come and make his complaint when he was sober. - In answer to the defendant, the inspector denied that the sergeant touched him. Two constables stoutly denied that Cooper was touched at the station. He, however, repeated the statement he had previously made, and stoutly denied being drunk. - Mr. Lushington said there was no doubt defendant, who was a decent man when sober, was very drunk on this occasion. Owing to defendant's statement he had fully inquired into the case, and found there was no truth in it. - Defendant would have to pay a fine of 20s., or fourteen days' hard labour.

Source: The Echo, Friday April 6, 1888, Page 4

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Re: Inspector William Causby

Post by Karen on Thu 9 Aug 2012 - 18:43

POLICE SERGEANTS' DINNER.

The K Division police sergeants, from West Ham, Limehouse, and Bow, were far from duty on Thursday evening, when the sixth annual dinner took place at the Town Hall, Stratford. A company of nearly 300 officers and gentlemen sat down to a repast served by Mr. E.F. Shirley, of Old-street, E.C.
Supt. C. Wells presided, and Sergt. Dicker occupied the vice-chair. Among those present were: Supt. Dodd (H Division), Sub-divisional Inspector Bantick (Plaistow), Sub-divisional Inspector Causby (Bow), Inspector Meaton (West Ham), Ex-Detective-Inspector Wildey (formerly of West Ham), Sergts. Orpwood, Bolding, Carter, Roskelly, Davis, Juby, Maynard, Goss, Det-Sergts. Forth, Golding, Duck Cooper, Read, A.R. Trew, P. Briggs, G. Walker, F.C.D. Fenn, C. Smith, Alderman White, J. Bowen, Fred George, A. Bullion, F. Langman, S. Smith, G.W. Evans, Hooper, Coverley, Abrams, W. Payne, H. Ward, Chandler, Barwick, Bodkin, Sheppard, Davis, Young, Wheeler, Bugler, Jacobs, Chatterton, Ives, Metcalf (2), Waterhouse, and many others.
After dinner the toast of "The Queen" was honored, as the Chairman said, by a body of men than whom there are none more loyal.
Supt. Wells next proposed "The Commissioners and officers of the force," saying that in Sir Edward Bradford they had a gentleman who took the greatest possible interest in the service. (Hear, hear.) Efficiency was the first thing, and the general welfare of the force the other. (Cheers.) He did all he could for them, supported their charities, and helped them all round; and the same thing could be said of all the superior officers of the service. (Cheers.) - The toast was cordially drunk.
Sub-division Inspector Bantick (Plaistow), who replied, remarked that the Commissioners and chief officers, it was well understood, could not be present, but they were with them in spirit, and showed their interest and desire to see the men happy by permitting so many of them to gather together. (Cheers.) He thanked them for the hearty manner in which the toast had been proposed and received. (Applause.)
The Chairman gave "The sergeants of the K Division," amid applause. He observed that when he took charge of the division three years ago it was suggested that the sergeants should continue to have an annual gathering. He thought it would be a nice thing - (hear, hear) - and agreed to it. The dinner that year was held at Bromley Vestry Hall, and was a great success. The next year also proved successful, and this year they seemed to have desired a larger building for the accommodation of their guests, whom they were all very pleased to see. (Cheers.) - The toast was drunk to the accompaniment of "They're jolly good fellows."
Sergt. Dicker, who replied, thanked the chairman for his flattering words. It was a source of great pleasure and gratification to them to know that they did their work in such a way as to merit the support of their superior officers and the public. He hoped they would continue to merit it, as it would be their aim to do in the future. (Applause.)
The Chairman submitted "The Visitors," and mentioned Supt. Smith, of the West Ham Fire Brigade, and Supt. Dodd, Mr. Archibald Trew, humorously remarking that he could go on and mention many more.
The toast was received with musical honors.
Mr. Archibald Trew was the first to respond. He said it had given him the greatest pleasure to be present, and more particularly to meet the chairman as president of that assembly. He had known Supt. Wells for a long time as a perfect gentleman in every shape and form, and he was to be congratulated on the very efficient body of men he had under him. As a tradesman he could honestly say he had never received more courtesy in his life than he had from the men whom Supt. Wells had under him. (Applause.)
Supt. Smith, also replied, and took the opportunity of thanking the officers, sergeants and constables of the K Division for their great assistance and cooperation with him and his staff in the fire brigade during the 12 months. He trusted that this would continue, and that there would never be a disagreement between the K division and the West Ham Fire Brigade. (Cheers.)
Supt. Dodd, who made a few remarks in response to the toast, said the sergeants were the backbone of the service, and as long as they did their duty as in the past the Metropolitan Police would command every respect from the inhabitants of the district. (Cheers.)
"The health of the chairman," proposed by Sergt. Dicker, concluded the list.
At intervals songs and recitations were rendered. One of the best items was "42K," by Inspector Bantick; while Messrs. C. Young, H. Willmott, A. May, C. Truscott, L. Linwood, F. Wheeler, H. Dyne, Fred Say, and several others contributed to the evening's enjoyment.
The arrangements for the dinner were carried out by a committee consisting of Sergeants Berrett, Dicker, Allchurch, Hazell, Cooper, and Shagler, Sergts. Taylor, Grigg, Corney, Leonard, and Read, acting as stewards. Sergt. Martin (West Ham) ably discharged the secretarial duties.

Source: The Express, Saturday January 19, 1895, Page 5

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Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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