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Inspector Richard Webb

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Inspector Richard Webb

Post by Karen on Sat 21 Jul 2012 - 11:12

Inspector Webb is mentioned on page 132 of the book "Jack the Ripper: An Encyclopedia."

VIOLENT ASSAULTS.

At Lambeth today Reuben Pope, 30, labourer, living in Chatham-street, Walworth, was charged with violently assaulting Inspector Webb in the execution of his duty in Rodney-road, Walworth. - The Inspector, shortly before one o'clock in the morning, was talking to Mrs. Elliston, of Rodney-road, when the prisoner, without a word of the slightest provocation, rushed up to the Inspector, struck him a violent blow on the mouth, cutting his lips, and causing him to fall backwards and severely hurt his head. They afterwards had a struggle, the prisoner again assaulting him and hurting his right leg. After a deal of trouble the prisoner was conveyed to the station. - It was further shown that the prisoner had been previously convicted for assaulting a constable, and sentenced to one month. - Mr. Chance said it was a most cowardly assault, and sentenced the prisoner to two months' hard labour.

Source: The Echo, Wednesday May 16, 1883, Page 3


Last edited by Karen on Mon 23 Jul 2012 - 15:00; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Inspector Richard Webb

Post by Karen on Sun 22 Jul 2012 - 8:57

ALLEGED ATTEMPTED MURDER.

On Thursday, at the West Ham police-court, Harriet Ann Shakerley, aged 20, a domestic servant, described as living at Campden-villa, Knox-road, Margery-park, Stratford, was brought up in custody for the sixth time, and charged with feloniously assaulting Mary Ann Kirchen, her mistress, at Campden-villa, with intent to murder her, on April 26th.
Mr. Atkinson, for the prisoner, said he should like to know what course the prosecution intended this morning to take.
Inspector Webb: I have again to ask for a remand, your worship.
Mr. Atkinson: How long is this tyranny to last, and the charge to hang over the head of my client? Mr. Atkinson then said he had tried to expedite the course of justice in this case, and with that object he had sent a letter to Mr. Kirchen asking to be allowed to have a medical examination of his wife, and that gentleman curtly replied that he could not comply with the request.
Mr. Kirchen: May I explain this matter?
Mr. Phillips: No, no; sit down.
Mr. Atkinson said he understood that it was not so much the health of Mrs. Kirchen as her reluctance to get into the witness-box and be subjected to cross-examination that prevented her attendance.
Mr. Kirchen rose excitedly to make a remark, but was beckoned down.
Mr. Phillips (to Inspector Webb): What is the doctors' opinion as to the state of Mrs. Kirchen?
Inspector Webb: The injured woman is progressing favourably, but slowly; the doctors say she is not able to sit up in the bed longer than five minutes at a time.
Mr. Atkinson: My instructions are that she was seen walking about in her garden a few days since.
Mr. Kirchen (very excitedly): What! out in the garden? She has not, and the man that says she has is a liar.
Mr. Atkinson: My information comes from a source I have no reason to suspect.
Mr. Phillips: Sit down, Mr. Kirchen.
The magistrate then refused bail, and the prisoner, a most respectable-looking girl, was then remanded for another week.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, June 4, 1882, Page 3

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Re: Inspector Richard Webb

Post by Karen on Mon 23 Jul 2012 - 4:36

MURDER BY A MOTHER.

Mr. Wyatt inquired at Camberwell on Tuesday into a sad case of child murder. The inquest related to the death of the female child of one Agnes Hampshire, a single woman, of 19, who then lay in the Newington infirmary. - Mrs. Jane Monk, wife of a gasfitter, living at 10, Holmby-street (the Albany), Camberwell, said that the girl Hampshire was her daughter by a former marriage. Until about eight or nine months ago she was a bright, cheerful girl. Then she was employed as a servant at a hotel in Piccadilly, and witness knew that she had a sweetheart. One day after leaving her situation she came home and burst into tears, saying, "Oh, mother, I have been deceived. He is a married man." Witness did not take much notice of the remark at the time; but henceforward her daughter's life was changed. She became morbid and melancholy, and would sit for four days without speaking. She got work as a charwoman at the Trinity Mission hall, Albany-road, but occasionally she was unable to go, and witness went for her. She complained of fearful pains in her head, and was most strange in her manner. When witness questioned her as to her symptoms she threatened to drown herself, so as little as possible was said to her about her illness. On Thursday she appeared very ill, but declined to go to a doctor; but witness asserted, with every show of truth, that she then had not the slightest idea as to her daughter's condition. At night, when she went to bed on the chair bedstead in the kitchen, she moved about as though in great pain. Witness heard her about in the night, but next morning she got up and went out to her work as usual, although she looked as if she "had been ill for six months." After she had gone, witness, from what she saw about the room, was induced to look into her daughter's box. She was horrified to discover there the body of an infant with its head severed from its body. - Police-constable 248 P was called in, and he went to the mission hall and arrested the girl. He took her to Rodney-road police-station, where she was charged by Inspector Webb with murder and concealment of birth. She replied, "I did it; there was no one with me." - Dr. Williams, of Camberwell-road, said he had made a post-mortem examination. The child had undoubtedly lived, and death was due to decapitation, which had been effected by two or more incisions with some sharp instrument, probably the knife produced. It was very probable that the girl was insane when the child was born. - The jury commented on the sad nature of the case, but said they could come to no other conclusion than to return a verdict of "Wilful murder" against Agnes Hampshire.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, September 1, 1889, Page 11

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Re: Inspector Richard Webb

Post by Karen on Tue 24 Jul 2012 - 3:41

MURDER IN CAMBERWELL.
LATEST DETAILS.

The shocking murder of the boy Sidney Pierpoint, at Neate-street, Camberwell, has created unusual excitement in that locality, and a feeling of great indignation is expressed toward the father.

STATEMENT BY A FELLOW LODGER.

This morning Emily Barnes, who lives at 158, Neate-street, where the alleged murderer lodged, made the following statement to our reporter: "Pierpoint, the father of the dead boy Sidney, has lodged here for many months past - considerably over a year, I should say. He is a blacksmith by trade, but has been out of work a good deal. "Like all working-men,"

HE TAKES A DROP OF DRINK

at times, but is not what you call an habitual drunkard. When in drink he is excited - sometimes "jolly." You can always tell when he has had a little. Poor Sidney, with his fair hair and long curls hanging over his forehead! Many a time have I seen the father play with the child, "Come here, my little sonny," he would say; and then he would

STROKE THE BOY'S HAIR

and romp with him in the back yard here. It ain't a large yard! It's the only place they had to play in. And to think now that the father could have killed him! Well, it must have been the drink. I believe his mind was a bit queer at times. On Saturday, before he went out, he was so quiet. This affair will almost kill the mother. When she left here the boy was as bright as possible. She had a baby in arms. Those are the only two of her family - the one alive, and the other dead at the hospital."

WHAT THE DOCTOR SAYS.

Dr. W.T. Partridge, of Albany-road, Old Kent-road, was interviewed by our representative this morning. Dr. Partridge said: - "The boy Pierpoint was brought to me about ten minutes past ten on Saturday night by a patient of mine, who also lives in Neate-street. She told me that the father had dashed the child to the ground. I examined the little fellow and found that he was suffering from

COMPRESSION OF THE BRAIN,

and probably fracture of the skull. He was quite unconscious. I then said that the child would probably not live more than an hour, but that it had better be sent to the nearest hospital. It really then had no home, as the mother had left Neate-street, with part of her furniture, for Bermondsey, and told her husband to follow on with the remainder. Until the child was dead the mother did not know anything of the occurrence."

"WERE THE INJURIES VERY EXTENSIVE?"
was asked of Dr. Partridge.
"Very," was the reply. "There was an effusion of blood under the skin of the head - the head was twice its usual size from the blows. There was no external flow of blood. The boy had a well-nourished frame, and had all the appearance of having been tenderly looked after. The father was seen shortly after in a public-house in the district here, where he tried to jump over the bar when the police went to arrest him. I personally know little of the man's history, but I am told that he had a sunstroke while in India. That may account for his conduct. The neighbours tried to lynch him when he was arrested."

PRISONER AT THE POLICE-COURT.

Today, at the Lambeth Police-court, William Alfred Pierpoint, 31, hammerman, living in Neate-street, Camberwell, was charged with the wilful murder of his son, Sidney Gilbert John Pierpoint, aged one year and ten months, by dashing him on the ground at Neate-street, on Saturday night. Mr. H.J. Sydney defended.

ARREST OF PIERPOINT.

Police-constable 598 P stated, from what he was told he went with a Mrs. Howells to the Little Wonder beerhouse, Neate-street, Camberwell, at half-past ten o'clock on Saturday night. She pointed out the prisoner, who was with some thirty other men, and said, "I think that's the man." Witness asked her if she was certain when she went a little way. Afterwards witness took the prisoner into custody. He had left the beerhouse after the woman went away. Witness heard a loud shout that he had escaped over the wall. Witness went into Albany-road, and there saw the prisoner running. The prisoner was stopped, and witness said, "I shall take you into custody for assaulting your child"; and he said, "All right." On the way to the station the prisoner said, "We had notice on Tuesday to leave, and I have been out of work and had a lot of trouble. Our bed has been stopped by the landlord. I had no intention of doing such a thing."

HE WENT QUIETLY TO THE STATION.

He had been drinking, but knew well what he was about.
Cross-examined - There was a great commotion in the street. He did not say he had been ill-used by the crowd, and that he went into the house to get protection.
Inspector Webb said about eleven o'clock on Saturday night the prisoner was brought to the station. The constable said he had brought him for violently assaulting his child. The prisoner said, "No one saw me do it."

"THE CHILD FELL OFF MY ARM."

The prisoner was the worse for drink. Two women, named Sarah Stoor and Eliza Howell, came and made a statement. Stoor said - "About ten o'clock I was standing at my door with Howell. I saw that man (the prisoner) come along carrying a child. We spoke to him.

HE TOSSED THE CHILD UP

and caught it by the legs and let it drop to the ground." Howell picked up the child and took it to Dr. Partridge, who said it was suffering from concussion and depression of the brain. The witness sent the constable to Guy's Hospital with the child, when it was ascertained it was dead. The prisoner was in the dock at the station, and heard that. Witness then told him he would be charged with causing the death of the child by dashing it to the ground, and he again said, "The child fell off my arm."
Eliza Stoor, living in Neate-street, Camberwell, said on Saturday night, about half-past ten o'clock, she was standing at her door when she saw the prisoner a few doors off, with the child in his arms. As he passed she said, "What's the matter up there?" and prisoner made some remark about his furniture.

HE SEEMED IN GREAT TROUBLE, AND CRIED.

She thought he had a drop too much. Witness urged him to let his wife go back and fetch the bed. The prisoner's wife, who came up, then went for the bed. The prisoner lifted the child up, and, laying hold of its legs, said,

"YOU SHALL BE THE VICTIM,"

and then dashed it down on the ground.
Cross-examined - The street at the time was clear. Had only known the prisoner by sight. She knew him to be very kind to children.
Eliza Howell, living in Neate-street, corroborated the evidence of the last witness, and added that the child's head struck the kerb.
Cross-examined - At the station she heard the prisoner say, "I let the child fall."
By Mr. Biron - He did not let it fall, but dashed it to the ground.
Other evidence was given with a view of showing that the prisoner was greatly upset through having been turned out of his lodging.
Police-constable 530 P said, by direction of Dr. Partridge, he took the child to Guy's Hospital, where it died in a short time.
Mr. Biron ordered a remand for the attendance of the medical gentleman.

Source: The Echo, Monday May 28, 1888, Page 4

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Re: Inspector Richard Webb

Post by Karen on Tue 24 Jul 2012 - 4:48

WOMAN SHOT DEAD BY A NEPHEW.
Shocking Murder at Walworth.

Walworth has been the scene of a painful tragedy. At 52, Deacon-street, there lived an old lady named Hienzbule and her nephew, a man named Eastwell. The latter - who had hitherto been an abstainer for many years - had been drinking heavily for the last few days. Upon returning home last evening and reaching the apartments occupied by his aunt and himself, he drew a revolver and deliberately fired at the old lady. Her screams brought the landlord to the spot. He saw that the unfortunate woman was in a dying state, and immediately sent for Dr. Waring, of Walworth-road. Shortly after the police arrived the woman expired. Police-constables 524 and 495 P then ascended to the upper floor, and found Eastwell lying down and apparently unconscious of what he had done. The motive which actuated the crime - if there is a motive - is surrounded with mystery; in fact, the whole circumstances preceding and attending its commission were witnessed by no one but Eastwell himself, and that he should remember anything regarding his rash act is very improbable, inasmuch as he was apparently irresponsible from the effects of drink. The only person who is acquainted thoroughly with the subsequent incidents to the tragedy is Mr. Tanner, who carries on business as a confectioner in the lower portion of the premises, 52, Deacon-street, Walworth, in which house deceased occupied the top floor. Mr. Tanner states: - "I heard nothing unusual until shortly after seven o'clock, when I heard what I thought to be a smashing of glass. Immediately afterwards I was called by the deceased, and on going up stairs I met her coming down. She had been shot in the side, and was evidently dying. I immediately fetched the police and Dr. Waring. When the police entered the room the accused was lying on the bed. After saying where the revolver was, he inquired of me, "What have I done?" I said "You will know very soon." He was taken into custody. The woman, who, I believe, is of French nationality, died about five minutes after she called for my assistance. She was, I should think, about 65 years of age. Her nephew is about 38 years of age, and is, I believe, employed in the pianoforte trade. He is a very respectable young man, but was very reserved in his manner. He had been an abstainer for fifteen months, but lately, I believe, he has been indulging to excess. He gave no reason for firing the revolver. He was lying on the bed apparently unconscious of what had happened. I believe the bullet or bullets entered the left side near the heart. The revolver was apparently a six-chambered one, and I have since heard that two of the chambers were empty." Eastwell was, of course, at once arrested and taken to Rodney-road Police-station, and charged with murder. He will be brought before the Magistrate at Lambeth today - that is, if he is sufficiently recovered from the delirium from which he is evidently suffering.

EASTWELL AT THE POLICE STATION.

Writing this morning, a Walworth Correspondent states: - All through the night a strict watch was kept on the prisoner in his cell at Rodney-road Police-office, but it is stated that he made no remarks with reference to the murder. He was very sick at times, and shook violently from head to foot. When placed in the dock at the police-station last night it was apparent that he had been drinking heavily - in fact, he seemed to be in a state bordering on delirium tremens. In reply to the charge he said, "I did not do it." Late last night the revolver with which the murder was committed was found in a cupboard in the house by Inspector Webb. It contained a couple of empty cartridges, and they appeared to have recently been discharged. Dr. Waring states that the unfortunate woman was shot through the heart.

EASTWELL IN THE DOCK.

Alfred Eastwell, described as an ivory-cutter, was charged before Mr. Biron, Q.C., at Lambeth, today, with the wilful murder of Theresa Heizenbuzzle, at 52, Deacon-street, Walworth.
Inspector Webb conducted the case for the police authorities. The prisoner was evidently suffering very much from drink, and apparently did not at all realise the seriousness of his position.
Inspector Webb said he should only call one witness this day, and then ask for a remand.
George Henry Tanner, 52, Deacon-street, a confectioner, said the prisoner had lodged in the same house about 3-1/2 years with the deceased, who was his aunt. They occupied the top floor. About a quarter-past seven o'clock on Friday night he heard a noise as of glass smashing. He took no notice at first, but hearing a woman's voice, and the words, "I am shot!" or "He's shot me!" he ran up the stairs. He then found the deceased on the landing, bleeding from the mouth. He carried her downstairs to his room, and then ran for Dr. Waring, who came back with him. The woman was dead when they arrived. He was not away more than about five minutes. He next fetched two constables. On going upstairs they found the prisoner lying on the bed. He seemed to be very drunk. He afterwards saw one of the constables with a revolver, which he had brought from one of the rooms occupied by the prisoner and the deceased. - Mr. Biron, in remanding the prisoner, said he was not in a fit condition to allow of the case proceeding.

Source: The Echo, Saturday May 10, 1890, Page 8

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