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Inspector George Izzard

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Inspector George Izzard

Post by Karen on Sat 21 Jul 2012 - 10:49

Inspector Izzard is mentioned in the book, "Jack the Ripper: An Encyclopedia," on page 125.

GUILDHALL.
THE USE OF A CHIN IRON ON HORSES.

James Hatch, 22, Wilson-street, Stepney, omnibus driver, badge 5,310; and Samuel Willstead, 138, White Horse-street, Stepney, the proprietor of omnibus 964, were charged with cruelty to a horse by working it with a chin iron.
John Pegg, 365, said that on Thursday evening, about five o'clock, he saw Hatch driving an omnibus in Newgate-street, and he noticed that the off horse had a chin iron about 2ft. 7in. long fastened by a strap to the harness and the upper part was strapped to each side of the bit, so that every time the omnibus stopped the pole chain, which was also fastened to the chin iron, threw the horse's head back and must have hurt it considerably. He told Hatch that Inspector Izzard had seen the horse working with the chin iron, and had told him to caution him (Hatch) that if he persisted in using it to take the horse to the station. He reminded him that he had cautioned him a fortnight ago, and therefore he took him to the station. - Hatch denied that there was any cruelty. The mare was thoroughbred, in good condition, but a kicker, and the chin iron held up her head, and prevented her kicking. The lower part of the iron was loosely strapped to the harness and had considerable play. The pole-chain was not fastened to the chin iron, nor was the chin iron buckled to the bit, but to the nose piece above it. It was used only for about three-quarters of an hour or an hour occasionally, and when she got into work she did not require it, and it was taken off. - Pegg said that he unbuckled the iron from the bit. - Mr. William Sangster, veterinary surgeon, Long-lane, Smithfield, said that he had examined the mare, and there was no excoriation about the mouth or tenderness either. The chin iron was used for vicious horses, to prevent their biting, and if put on properly it would not be cruelty to use it. - Alderman Gray said that he was of opinion that there was no cruelty in this case, and none intended, and therefore he dismissed the case.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, January 27, 1884, Page 12


Last edited by Karen on Mon 23 Jul 2012 - 15:00; edited 2 times in total

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Re: Inspector George Izzard

Post by Karen on Sat 21 Jul 2012 - 11:04

ATTEMPTED BURGLARY.

At Marylebone today, James Clark, 53, a labourer, giving his address as 75, Langford-road, Kentish-town, was charged with being concerned, with another man not in custody, in burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mr. Edward Mayer, No. 2, Carrol-road, Highgate-road. - At a quarter before two o'clock this morning Inspector Izzard and a sergeant and constable were passing No. 2, Carrol-road, Highgate-road, when they heard a noise proceeding from the back garden, and directly afterwards the prisoner and another man came over the railings, and ran off. A constable followed the prisoner, and caught him, and asked him what he was doing in the garden, when he said "I was not there. I have just come from Holloway." He was taken to the station, on the way whither he tried to get away, and the premises were afterwards examined, and marks of an instrument were found on the back door. In a churchyard adjoining the house a jemmy and a dark lantern were found, and the marks on the door corresponded with the jemmy. On the prisoner were found a chisel, a skeleton key, and a piece of rope. It appeared that the occupants of the house were not aroused by any noise, and they had to be awakened by the police. - Police-Sergeant Martin, of the S division, proved a former conviction against the prisoner for burglary. - The prisoner denied that he ran away. - Mr. Cooke committed him for trial.

Source: The Echo, Friday November 15, 1878, Page 3

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Re: Inspector George Izzard

Post by Karen on Sat 21 Jul 2012 - 14:39

SHOCKING SUICIDE IN A CAB.

On Saturday Mr. Langham held an inquiry at St. Bartholomew's Hospital on Mr. Walter Foss-Smith, aged 42, a solicitor, of No. 5, Bedford-row, Bloomsbury, who shot himself in a cab in Holborn. Mr. Ryle, solicitor, identified the body, and said the deceased was his partner. He resided at Penywern-road, South Kensington. Since last August he had been ill, and had been partially incapacitated from business. He had consequently been extremely melancholy and depressed. He had, however, nothing to embarrass him either at home or in business. He seemed to get worse week by week, and at length he was placed under the supervision of an attendant. He had several times threatened to destroy himself. William Miller, deceased's attendant, said the latter had overtaxed his strength, through a too frequent indulgence in horizontal bar exercise. On Wednesday deceased dismissed witness, telling him he was no longer required. Witness however stayed in the house during the night and slept in an adjoining room to that occupied by the deceased. Early in the morning he found that he had got up and left the house. The next thing he heard was that he had shot himself. James Small, a cabman, deposed that on Thursday morning deceased engaged him in Holborn, and told him to drive him to Liverpool-street Station. He spoke perfectly rational. He had a black bag in his hand. He got in the cab, which was a four-wheeler, and witness drove off, but they had not proceeded very far before witness heard a report. This caused the horse to start off, and when he brought the vehicle to a standstill he found the deceased lying in the bottom of the cab bleeding from a wound in the head. The panels of the cab were smashed, and a bullet was found embedded in the wood. Witness called out for assistance, and a police-constable came and assisted to take him to the hospital. A shopman in the service of Mr. E.M. Reilly, gunmaker, Oxford-street, said on Thursday morning deceased purchased a bull-dog revolver and forty cartridges, which witness now identified as the weapon produced. He appeared perfectly calm and collected when he made the purchase. Police-constable Manton, 36 E, deposed to going to the assistance of the cabman at the corner of the Gray's-inn-road. Deceased was alive, and he ordered the driver to go direct to the hospital. On the seat witness found the revolver produced, and a box of cartridges. Inspector Izzard said the weapon was handed to him. Four of the chambers were loaded with ball cartridge, and the fifth had evidently been just discharged. Mr. Murry, house surgeon, said deceased had a gunshot wound on the side of the head. The bullet had evidently entered on the right side and passed out of the left. In spite of that, however, he lived for two hours. A verdict of "Suicide while temporarily insane" was recorded.

Source: The Centaur, Saturday June 6, 1885

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Re: Inspector George Izzard

Post by Karen on Sun 22 Jul 2012 - 2:13

CITY POLICE SUMMONS COURT.

SUNDAY MORNING TRADING. - William Motum, landlord of the King of Denmark public-house, Old Bailey, was summoned for serving drink during prohibited hours.
Inspector George Izzard deposed that on Sunday morning, at a quarter-past 12, he visited the defendant's house. The side door in Bishop's-court was standing open. He went in and saw about 20 persons there drinking malt. He said, "Gentlemen, I shall want your addresses," He knew three persons who lived within three miles of the house. - George Mew, Richard Miller, and William Rampton were summoned for being on the said premises, not being bona-fide travellers. Mew, in answering a question from the defendant, said, "I will tell the truth; you never asked me whether I was a traveller. Miller said he did not think he was doing wrong; it was not the first time he had been in the defendant's house. - Rampton pleaded guilty. Mr. Motum did ask him if he was a traveller, and he said that he was. One of the defendants said he had been working all night. - Mr. Motum, in reply to the charge, said he knew the other defendants, and though he usually asked if persons were travellers, yet he did not do so when he knew them. He had kept the house for three years, and had carried on the business in the same way, and so had his predecessor. The door was open, and the police - who could look in - passed it every quarter of an hour. Most of the men there were from the railway.
Alderman Waterlow said the defendant had not taken sufficient precautions - though he did not think he intended to contravene the Act. He should impose a fine of 20s. With regard to the other defendants, no doubt it was hard that they could not get refreshments, but he must deal with the Act as he found it. They were then each fined 1s.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, December 9, 1883, Page 3

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Re: Inspector George Izzard

Post by Karen on Sun 22 Jul 2012 - 9:13

MISADVENTURE IN THE CITY.

John Arthur Frailing, 29, barman, was charged on remand, at the Mansion House police-court, today, before the Lord Mayor, with having caused the death of Ernest Harry Baker. The facts of the case have appeared. The defendant, who was on bail, was barman at the Skinners' Arms, Cannon-street. The deceased had been ejected from the Skinners' Arms, and the allegation was that he was followed some distance from the house and knocked down. He sustained injuries from which he died, and the Coroner's jury found that death was due to misadventure.
Chief Inspector Izzard said that under the circumstances the City Police offered no further evidence against the defendant. - The Lord Mayor discharged Frailing.

Source: The Echo, Monday June 26, 1893, Page 4

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Re: Inspector George Izzard

Post by Karen on Sun 22 Jul 2012 - 9:35

Inspector Izzard has summoned two conductors before Mr. Alderman Walker, who after going through the case, gave them to understand that such an offence could not be permitted in the City. He imposed a nominal fine of 3s. and costs as it was the first offence. That does not mean the first time they ever done such a thing, but the first time they were summoned for it.

Source: The Centaur

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