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Detective Marriott

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Detective Marriott

Post by Karen on Tue 17 Jul 2012 - 21:39

THAMES.
CAUTION TO PERSONS VISITING THE TOWER.

Emma Earl, a well-dressed young woman, was charged with stealing a purse containing one sovereign and three foreign coins, belonging to a lady at present unknown. - James Stephens, detective, H division, said on Monday afternoon he was in company with Detective Marriott on Tower-hill. There were about 500 persons present waiting to enter the Tower. The prisoner was busily engaged in pushing among the female visitors, when he saw her put her left hand in a lady's dress and leave. He followed and caught her. He asked her what she had got in the purse, to which she replied 5s. He took her to the station, when she produced a purse which he found to contain one sovereign and three foreign coins. The female searcher found five-pence halfpenny, a knife, a farthing, a small piece of paper with a name on it, and some buttons. Owing to the great crowd that prevailed he was unable to find the person to whom the purse undoubtedly belonged. - Mr. Lushington remanded the prisoner.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, April 25, 1875, Page 4

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Re: Detective Marriott

Post by Karen on Tue 17 Jul 2012 - 21:57

AN INGENIOUS PRISONER.

At the Thames Court Edwin Taylor, 26, was charged with assaulting Albert Brown, 2, Victoria-street, Shadwell, and also with attempting to steal his watch. He was further charged with assaulting Constable Bond.
Prosecutor, who stated he was a seafaring man, was that morning on his way to the London Docks. When in Albert-street Taylor came up to him, and attempted to steal his watch from his pocket. He then scratched prosecutor's hands, and attempted to steal the rings from off his fingers. He called out, when a constable came to his assistance. - The prisoner cross-examined the prosecutor in a very ingenious manner, and tried to prove he simply stopped the prosecutor, as he was under the impression that he had done something.
Constable Bond 365 H saw Brown being held by two women and the prisoner. When he took Brown into custody, he became very violent, and tripped him up. Constable 331 H came to his assistance, when the prisoner said, "If you let me go for a minute I will do for you."
Mr. Saunders: What have you to say about stealing the watch?
Taylor: I beg your pardon; I am simply charged with the attempt to steal.
Detective-sergeant Marriott stated there were about twenty previous convictions against the prisoner, and he had been under police supervision.
Mr. Saunders sentenced him to two months' hard labour.
Taylor: Good luck to you, Sir; may you live long, and die happy. Two months! I can do that on the heel of my boot. Good-bye, Sir. (To a detective): Good-bye, you fat-head.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday April 27, 1886, Page 4

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Re: Detective Marriott

Post by Karen on Tue 17 Jul 2012 - 22:05

Police Intelligence.
THAMES.
MONDAY. - Before Mr. Saunders.

ALLEGED HIGHWAY ROBBERIES BY LADS. - Henry Lapworth and John Smith, two lads, were charged with assaulting Richard Wanstell, a baker, living at 8, Gold-street, Stepney, and attempting to steal from him. - The prosecutor, an aged man, was walking along Clark-street, Stepney, on Saturday afternoon, when the prisoners and another youth not in custody suddenly attacked him, felled him to the ground, and one of them put his hand over his mouth to prevent his raising an alarm, while another one felt in his pockets, but, owing to being disturbed, the prisoners and their companion decamped. - George Day, 35 H, captured the prisoners, but the third lad escaped. - A second case was then entered into against the prisoners, of stealing a gold chain, value 5 pounds, from Levi Sheard. - Sergeant Marriott said there would be other charges preferred against the prisoners, and Mr. Saunders remanded them for a week.

Source: East London Press, November 8, 1884, Page 5

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Re: Detective Marriott

Post by Karen on Tue 17 Jul 2012 - 22:13

EAST LONDON PRESS.
TUESDAY OCTOBER 9, 1883.

DARING GARROTTE ROBBERY.

William Purcell and William Legg, both of whom are well known, the latter having been already convicted and punished for highway robbery, were charged at the Thames Police-court, on Saturday, with being concerned with two others not in custody in assaulting August Carlden, a foreign sailor, and stealing from him 4 pounds, 10s. in gold, and a silver watch and gold chain.
On Wednesday afternoon, about 5:30, the prosecutor was in St. George's-street, when the prisoners and two other men set upon him; two of them held his arms, a third held him back by the throat, whilst Legg took his purse and money; one of them also took his watch. They then threw him into the gutter and ran off. The affair was witnessed by a man named Stone, and he gave information to the Police. On Friday night, Detective-Sergeant Marriott arrested the prisoners from a description furnished by Stone, who afterwards identified them and picked them out from others at the Leman-street station.
Mr. Lushington remanded the prisoners for committal.

Source: East London Press, Tuesday October 9, 1883

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Re: Detective Marriott

Post by Karen on Wed 18 Jul 2012 - 23:33

EXTENSIVE ROBBERIES.

George Bedford, 23, James Mears, 25, and James Wedge, 25, were charged with stealing six sides and a cushion of bacon, the property of Charles Bone, the master of the said James Mears. - The prosecutor is a provision merchant and bacon drier at Whitechapel-road, and Mears was in his service and was in charge of a part of the premises. Bedford was in the habit of going to these premises for the purpose of purchasing cloths in which the bacon was wrapped, and the other prisoner, Wedge, was often seen in his company. On the occasion of Bedford's visits it was noticed that the whole of the prisoners usually adjourned to a public-house together. On the 24th of October Edward Hunt, clerk to the prosecutor, counted out four dozen wrappers for Bedford, who was then in the warehouse with Mears. Bedford paid 7s. for the wrappers, and Mr. Hunt went away, leaving Bedford and Mears together, near the bacon stored in the yard. While this was going on two constables named Marriott and Gosling were on the watch, and they observed Bedford and Wedge with a horse and barrow, and the barrow was taken down the prosecutor's yard. In about 10 minutes afterwards Bedford and Wedge came out of the yard with the barrow, apparently full of wrappers. Bedford was questioned about what he had got in the barrow by Gosling, and he told him that he should search and see what he had got. Bedford then said he did not know anything about the horse and barrow, and that they did not belong to him. Detective Forster came up and searched the barrow, and between the wrappers found six sides and a cushion of bacon, all of which the prosecutor identified as his property from certain branded marks upon it. Bedford and Wedge were taken into custody, and afterwards Forster went to prosecutor's and there took Mears, who, in answer to the charge, said that the other prisoners had stolen the six sides while he was hanging up some bacon. - The jury found the prisoners "Guilty." - Mr. Serjeant Cox said that Bedford was not only a thief himself, but had induced others to become so, and the sentence upon him was 12 months' hard labour; and Wedge and Mears to be each kept to hard labour for nine months. - The prosecutor said he believed that these robberies had been going on for 12 months, and that he had been robbed to the extent of about 400 pounds. These robberies might have gone on longer had his attention not been called by an anonymous letter.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, November 19, 1876, Page 4

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Re: Detective Marriott

Post by Karen on Wed 18 Jul 2012 - 23:37

ALLEGED THEFT OF WATCHES.

At the Guildhall Police Court today Pelham Walter Barnes, an assistant to Messrs. A. Syther and Co., of Milton-street, pleaded guilty to stealing some 118 watches from the office of his employer.
Detective Marriott deposed as to the arrest, and to finding a number of blank cheques and counterfoils upon the defendant. It is in respect of these that a remand was granted.

Source: The Echo, Friday October 17, 1902

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Re: Detective Marriott

Post by Karen on Thu 19 Jul 2012 - 0:01

MIDDLESEX SESSIONS.
Tuesday - Before Mr. J.D. FLETCHER.

Robert Norwood, 22, was indicted for stealing 2s. from James Walker, and also for assaulting and beating him. - Mr. W.J. Abram, in opening, said this was a very serious case, and would require the attention of the jury. It arose from a number of men who were waiting for work at the entrance of the London Docks. On the 12th of February Mr. Walker, the contractor, required the services of eight men, when the prisoner rushed at him and asked him what he had done that he had not given him a ticket, and at the same time put his hand into Walker's pocket and took from it 2s. He seized the prisoner, when he struck him, knocked him down, and the prisoner and his brother kicked him when he was down, and about 60 men rushed through the barrier, and a cry was raised "Throw the ______ into the dock," he at that time being only about seven feet from the basin, which was full of water. In consequence of the violence of the mob he was obliged to seek refuge within the dock, and had to be protected until a late period in the day for fear of personal violence. The prisoner was then taken into custody, and charged with robbery and assault. - As these facts were proved in evidence, and after a long consideration, the prisoner was found Guilty. - It was then stated that these disturbances had been going on for a considerable time past, the prosecutor being desirous to employ married men with families, and these disturbances were created by young fellows, who assembled round the gates. The prosecutor did not desire that the prisoner should have a severe punishment, but was very anxious that an end should be put to these disgraceful disturbances. - Mr. Fletcher sentenced the prisoner to five months' hard labour.
John M'Evoy, 19, described in the calendar as a labourer, was indicted for stealing a watch and chain, value 3 pounds, from Richard Smart, a Scripture-reader, living at 125, St. Dunstan's-road, Stepney. - The prosecutor was going to the Shadwell railway station from Leman-street, Whitechapel, last Tuesday, and as he got to the corner of Cornwall-street, St. George's-in-the-East, he was violently assaulted by four young men. Two of them held his arms behind him while the other two rifled his pockets, one of them taking his snuff-box from his right hand trousers pocket and the other took his watch out of his waistcoat pocket and then violently snatched at the guard, getting possession of them. - After very much difficulty Detective-sergeant Marriott, H division, apprehended the prisoner. - The jury found a verdict of guilty against the accused, who called witnesses in defence. - His lordship asked Sergeant Marriott if he knew anything of the prisoner's antecedents.
Marriott: The last time he stole a watch it was from a very stout person, but he was cleverer in running than the prisoner.
The prisoner: Why, Marriott, you are always getting at me; the last time you had me, you know I brought witnesses that I did not do it.
Marriott: You, you are right; your mother got the witnesses, as she has done now.
His lordship ordered the prisoner to undergo 15 months' hard labour, and highly commended the officers Marriott and Smith for their conduct.
Detective Marriott (who had been recommended for his vigilance by the grand jury) thanked the Court on behalf of himself and his brother officer.

Source: East London Press, February 28, 1885, Page 8

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Re: Detective Marriott

Post by Karen on Thu 19 Jul 2012 - 0:11

AN ALBUM OF FOREIGN STAMPS.

At the Guildhall police-court yesterday, before Mr. Alderman Simmons, Frederick Thomas Woodward, 26, a newsagent, of 124, Queen's-road, Dalston, was charged with stealing an album containing about 3,000 stamps, and other stamps, to the total value of between 40 pounds and 50 pounds, belonging to Mr. Ambrose Turner, a stamp dealer, of 21, Coleman-street.
The prosecutor said in December last he let a portion of his shop to the prisoner, who carried on a newsagent's business. In January he missed a large quantity of foreign stamps, in consequence of which he communicated with the police. On Friday he gave the accused into custody.
Detective Marriott stated that on Friday afternoon he went with the prosecutor to a stamp dealer's in Finsbury-pavement, where a large quantity of stamps were produced which Mr. Turner identified as his property. Later on he gave the accused into custody at 21, Coleman-street, when the latter said, "I took the album and sold it, but at that time I was in partnership with Mr. Turner." At the police-station he remarked, "I have been trying to buy the album back, and am willing to pay double what I got for it last January."
Prisoner: I was a partner with Mr. Turner, and part owner of these stamps. I want a little advice, your worship. Can I give him into custody?
The Alderman: You must see the police about that. I shall adjourn the case in order that I may see your agreement, but I will let you out on your own bail.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly News, April 29, 1906, Page 3

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Re: Detective Marriott

Post by Karen on Thu 19 Jul 2012 - 0:42

A PUBLICAN'S HORSE AND TRAP STOLEN.

At the Guildhall Police-court on Tuesday, Thomas Walsh, 24, was charged before Mr. Alderman Strong with stealing a horse and trap, value about 80 pounds, the property of Joseph Cane, licensed victualler, of the "Telegraph," 19, Hawkins Street, Stepney.
Prosecutor said that about half-past twelve o'clock on the afternoon of the 2nd August he left his Stratford cart and grey mare in charge of a man named M'Masters. He was away about forty minutes, and on his return missed his horse and cart. He valued his mare at fifty guineas, and the cart and harness, etc., at 20 pounds. M'Masters told him something and he communicated with the police.
Henry M'Masters, horse porter or handy man, said on the 2nd inst. the prosecutor gave him his horse and cart to mind. Shortly afterwards the prisoner, who was a stranger to him, came up to him and said, "It is all right, I have seen the governor. We shall be back in a minute or two."
By the Clerk: There was a woman with the prisoner, and they jumped in the cart and drove away. Mr. Cane was in a public-house at the time. The witness next saw the prisoner with others at Moor Lane Police-station.
Edward Prevost, fishmonger, of 227, Well Street, Hackney, said he knew the accused by sight. On Friday the 2nd inst., he saw the prisoner in Well Street, driving the Stratford cart, grey mare, and silver plated harness. There was a female with him. He was driving towards Lea Bridge Road. The witness nodded to him.
Police-constable 268 H deposed that at two o'clock on Monday afternoon he was called by the last witness and Mr. Cane's brother to take the accused in custody. Prisoner was outside Stapleton's Repository in Commercial Street. Prisoner said, "I know nothing about it." Witness conveyed him to the City, where he was charged.
Detective Marriott deposed to prisoner being charged. In answer to it he said, "I know nothing about it. I was away at the time."
A number of independent witnesses swore to seeing the accused and a woman driving in the Stratford cart at a smart pace in Lea Bridge Road.
The Clerk: Is there any likelihood of recovering the horse and cart?
Detective Marriott: I'm afraid not at present.
Mr. Alderman Strong granted a remand for eight days.

Source: The Mercury, Saturday August 17, 1901, Page 5

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Re: Detective Marriott

Post by Karen on Thu 19 Jul 2012 - 20:31

EXTRAORDINARY CAREER OF ROBBERY.

Thomas James Earle, 38, clerk, and of superior education, was indicted yesterday, the stealing the respective sums of 21 pounds 17s., 10 pounds, and 23 pounds 5s., received by him for and on account of John Longstaff, his master. There were two other indictments, charging him with stealing other large sums of money, but the total amount was stated to be about 700 pounds.
The prisoner pleaded guilty to the whole of the indictments.
The prosecutor is a coal merchant, the prisoner had been for about nine years in his service as book-keeper, and being a trusted servant it was his duty to receive money from customers who came to the office, and to enter the sums so received in a cash-book supplied to him for that purpose. It was also his duty to pay over all sums he received either to the prosecutor or his brother within twenty-four hours of their receipt. The prisoner had received a total sum of about 700 pounds, which he had not accounted for, and had appropriated to his own use.
Mr. Montague Williams said this was a very serious offence, for during the short period of nine months the prisoner had embezzled no less a sum than 700 pounds. He was considered a very trustworthy servant, and had a salary of 186 pounds a year. The prisoner absconded, and a description of him was given to the police. The matter was placed in the hands of Detective-Sergeant Marriott, who apprehended the prisoner.
Detective-Sergeant Marriott was called, and in answer to questions as to the prisoner's antecedents, said that he was a married man with a wife and six children. During the past twelve months he had spent little of his time at home, devoting the greater part of his leisure to a woman he was keeping in expensive apartments, allowing her 2 pounds a week, and providing her with a servant. Sergeant Marriott further stated that Earle had left his wife and family in a most deplorable state of poverty. Before the wife's marriage with the prisoner she had received the education of a lady, and but for a little property of the annual value of 20 pounds, left to her by a lady, the only home for her and children would have been the workhouse.
Mr. Prentice said that this was a very serious case indeed, and he had been considering whether it was not his duty to send the prisoner into penal servitude; but as there was no previous conviction proved against him, under the circumstances he should not go to that extent, and sentenced him to be imprisoned and kept to hard labour for one year and eight months.

Source: The Clerkenwell Press, Saturday January 28, 1882, Page 3

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Re: Detective Marriott

Post by Karen on Thu 19 Jul 2012 - 20:45

WAREHOUSE ROBBERY.

Charles Jennings, 19, of Rushmore Road, Clapton, and Stephen Alfred Cook, 23, of Emmott Street, Mile End, were charged on remand at the Guildhall, on Tuesday, with breaking and entering the warehouse, 12, Falcon Avenue, E.C., and stealing there-from a large quantity of rolls of cloth, cashmere, and silk, grosses of linen underwear, silk scarves, shawls, etc.
The arrests were made by Detective-Sergeant Stewart and Detective J. Marriott, who were successful in recovering the greater portion of the stolen property. Both men pleaded guilty.
Mr. Rudolf Woolf, who had a wareroom on the premises, deposed to losing about 20 pounds worth of cloth from his part of the building.
Mr. Jackson, an electrical agent, said he missed about 10 pounds worth of electric globes after Jennings left his employment.
Cross-examined: Did you not buy those globes at the rate of a farthing each?
The Witness: That has nothing to do with the matter. I can sell them for 9d. and 1s. each.
Detective Marriott further stated that he found a large quantity of electric globes and appliances at the addresses of both the prisoners, and they had recovered a lot of electrical goods at various pawn-brokers'. The witness found at Jennings' address a large bunch of keys, two of which had been filed down to fit the locks at 12, Falcon Avenue.
Some five charges were gone into. In order that the magistrate might deal with the matter summarily the prosecutors withdrew the charge of breaking and entering and left the cases of larceny to be dealt with by his worship.
Jennings received a good character, and Cook was said to be in very straitened circumstances. They were both sentenced to four months' hard labour.

Source: The Mercury, Saturday April 2nd, 1904, Page 7

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Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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