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Sergeant Kerby

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Sergeant Kerby

Post by Karen on Thu 12 Jul 2012 - 19:14

Sergeant Kerby is listed in the book, "Jack the Ripper: An Encyclopedia" on page 126:

THE SUPPOSED MURDER IN WILD STREET.

This morning Dr. Lankester, coroner for Central Middlesex, held an inquest at the King's Head Tavern, Broad-street, Bloomsbury, on the body of a child, the supposed offspring of an uncle and niece, who, together with the wife of the former, lived at No. 37, Wild-street, St. Giles's. This case will be remembered as one in which some shocking statements have been made, resulting in the discovery of the body of the child alleged by the mother to have been burnt. Inspector Thompson, of the F Division, attended to watch the case on the part of the police.
Sergeant Kerby said that hearing of the absence of a child, of which the woman Mary Pullen was the mother, he went there and made some inquiries, which resulted in his finding out she had had a miscarriage, but she denied saying that the child had been burnt. He searched the house, and on Saturday found the body of a male child under a stone in the cellar. The body was covered with lime, and the stone had been recently removed. Since the woman had been present, she said I am sorry I did not tell you the truth in the first instance, as I ought to have done. She had been told by Dr. Bennett that the child had been found.
Dr. Bennett said when the child was brought to him it was in a most horrible state of decomposition, caused mainly by the action of the lime. The woman had told him that she delivered herself, and put the child where it was found.
After some further evidence the inquiry was adjourned.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday August 17, 1869, Page 5

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Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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Re: Sergeant Kerby

Post by Karen on Sat 14 Jul 2012 - 0:40

THE SUPPOSED MURDER IN WILD-STREET.

Yesterday morning Dr. Lankester, coroner for Central Middlesex, held an inquest at the King's Head Tavern, Broad-street, Bloomsbury, on the body of a child, the supposed offspring of an uncle and niece, who, together with the wife of the former, lived at No. 37, Wild-street, St. Giles's. This case will be remembered as one in which some shocking statements have been made, resulting in the discovery of the body of the child alleged by the mother to have been burnt. Inspector Thompson, of the F Division, attended to watch the case on the part of the police.
Sergeant Kerby said that hearing of the absence of a child, of which the woman Mary Pullen was the mother, he went there and made some inquiries, which resulted in his finding out she had had a miscarriage, but she denied saying that the child had been burnt. He searched the house, and on Saturday found the body of a male child under a stone in the cellar. The body was covered with lime, and the stone had been recently removed. Since the woman had been present, she said, "I am sorry I did not tell you the truth in the first instance, as I ought to have done." She had been told by Dr. Bennett that the child had been found.
Dr. Bennett said when the child was brought to him it was in a most horrible state of decomposition, caused mainly by the action of the lime. The woman had told him that she delivered herself, and put the child where it was found. The body was at the full period. The lungs had not been inflated entirely, and witness's opinion was that it had not been fully born alive.
The Coroner remarked that the opinion brought their labours to a close, as they could not interfere with the matter before the police.
The inquiry was then adjourned for a month.

Source: The Echo, Wednesday August 18, 1869, Page 2

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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