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More Missing Girls

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More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Mon 11 Jun 2012 - 22:30

Elizabeth Maria Lawrence

MISSING.

At the Thames police-court, on Tuesday, Mrs. Stone, of 9, Chicksand-street, Spitalfields, applied for publicity respecting the disappearance of her husband, Elias Stone, an independent gentleman. About three weeks ago he and applicant quarrelled, when he left home. His description was as follows: - Aged 64, middle height, complexion fair, hair and eyes gray, little beard; was dressed in grey suit, black overcoat, high hat, and sidespring boots. He took away with him his three children - Julia, aged 12; Abraham, aged 10; and George, aged 8 years.
A woman named Lawrence, living in Tyers-street, Vauxhall, stated, at Lambeth police-court, on Tuesday, that her daughter, Elizabeth Maria, aged 16 years, was last seen at 10 o'clock on the night of the 6th inst., at Vauxhall-cross, and in company with a man. The missing girl was described as 5ft. 6in. high, complexion fair, hair dark, and blue eyes. She was dressed in a long black cloth jacket, black dress with flounces, black straw hat trimmed with black velvet and beads, and button boots.
Alexander Lindsay left his office in the City, on the evening of April 17, and has not been heard of since. His friends know of nothing whatever to account for his disappearance. His description is as follows: - Age 49, height 5 feet 6 inches, fair complexion, grey eyes, brown hair, turning to grey, high bald forehead, moustache, and close-cut beard, quite grey. Anyone who can give information respecting the above is requested to kindly communicate with the editor of the Shipping Gazette, 54, Gracechurch-street, E.C.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, May 13, 1888, Page 3

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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Mon 11 Jun 2012 - 22:36

Annie Eliza Burt

A working man, who said he was a painter and house decorator, living at 2, Grove-passage, Mare-street, Hackney, stated at Dalston police-court, yesterday, that his daughter, Annie Elizabeth Burt, aged 17, had been missing from her home since Saturday, Sept. 29. There was no reason why she should go away. She had had a sweetheart, but had "broken" with him about 10 days before she disappeared. There had been no quarrel, so far as applicant knew, as she came home singing and light-hearted. He gave the following description of the missing girl: - Age 17, looking older; about 5ft. 2in. in height; dark hair, thick eyebrows, grey eyes, round full face, stoutish build. When she was last seen she was wearing a cream straw hat, turned up on the left side and trimmed with cream ribbon and flowers to match; black outdoor jersey jacket, with braided front; navy blue stuff dress, with a very narrow red stripe, the bodice trimmed with figured silk, a grey skirt, and a red flannel petticoat (underlinen marked "A." or "A.B." in red cotton), brown stockings, and blue cloth-top button boots; steel earrings, and brooch in shape of star, and white silk handkerchief round neck. She also had with her a black dolman and an umbrella with a hooked handle.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, October 14, 1888, Page 7

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A MISSING GIRL FOUND.

We are pleased to be able to record that the young girl, Annie Eliza Burt, of Grove-passage, Hackney, whose disappearance we announced in our last Sunday's paper, has been discovered, through the publicity given, at Islington. The description published led the people in whose house she was lodging to communicate with her friends.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper, Sunday October 21, 1888


Last edited by Karen on Sat 16 Jun 2012 - 0:44; edited 2 times in total

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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Mon 11 Jun 2012 - 22:49

Ellen Ward

MISSING.

A working man named Arthur Chambers, residing at 97, Drury-lane, applied to Mr. Bridge at Bow-street police-court, on Monday, for advice as to his wife and two daughters, who had been missing since Saturday August 25. The following is a description of the missing family: - The mother, Margaret Chambers, a native of Ireland, is 40 years of age, of slight build, with dark brown hair, and a cast in her eye, and dressed in black. The eldest daughter, Mary, is eight years of age, with light hair cut rather short, and large blue eyes, and she was dressed in coarse white straw bonnet trimmed with red, dark plaid frock, and laced boots. The younger child, Beatrice, is 20 months old, unable to walk or speak. They are thought to be somewhere in the country, possibly near Birmingham. The mother is just arrived from America, and will most likely talk a great deal about that country.
At Bow-street police-court, on Tuesday, Mrs. Ward, respectable working woman, of 2, Cottage, 30 Royal street, Lambeth, informed the magistrate that her daughter Ellen, aged 15, had been missing eight weeks when she left her situation in Euston-square, saying she was going to another, the whereabouts of which she did not mention. She was last seen in Medway-street, Westminster, where she left a message to the above effect for her parents. The missing girl has dark hair, a pale face with a scar on the left side, a mole on her throat, and was wearing a long black jacket.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, September 23, 1888, Page 3

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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Mon 11 Jun 2012 - 23:01

Winifred Egan

A MISSING GIRL FOUND.

A young girl, Winifred Egan, who suddenly disappeared while on a journey from Birr to Manchester, has been found, and has furnished a statement respecting her movements. She left Birr on the 5th of May, and travelled to Dublin, where she arrived on the same day, intending to continue her journey to Manchester on the following day. She was met at the station by a lady friend of her mistress, Mrs. Harding, while in whose service she had adopted the Protestant faith. The next morning a strange lady brought her a letter, which she said was from her mother, who expressed a desire that she should remain in Dublin until the end of the week. Believing it to be her mother's wish that she should remain in Dublin, she agreed to take a situation there. She was engaged by a Miss Hickson, who, on the 21st of May, took her to London, and having placed her in a house left her and never afterwards returned. Two or three days later she was taken to Bournemouth, and was first of all provided for at an hotel and then afterwards at the private house in which her mother found her. Mrs. Egan denies having ever written to her daughter requesting her to stay in Dublin, nor does she know anything of other letters which were from time to time read to the girl as being from her.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, June 5, 1887, Page 2

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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Mon 11 Jun 2012 - 23:17

Alice Ives

A LOST DAUGHTER.

Mrs. Ives, a widow, living at 71, Ainsty-street, Rotherhithe, applied to Mr. Montagu Williams, at Greenwich police-court, on Wednesday, concerning the disappearance of her daughter, Alice Ives, aged 22. She said that on March 14, a neighbour asked her daughter to accompany her to Westminster, to see her brother in the hospital, and to the infirmary at Newington, where her husband was lying. The girl said she could not, as her boots were bad, whereupon the neighbour lent her a pair. The girl did not come home all night, and applicant saw the neighbour, who expressed surprise, and said she had to sit up with her father all night, and the girl left her to return home. According to applicant, however, the neighbour afterwards made other statements as to the circumstances under which the girl left, and it was false that her brother was in Westminster hospital. A day or two later applicant received a letter, purporting to be from her daughter, and saying she was at Clapham, but giving no address. She said she did not believe her daughter wrote the letter. She had been to the police, but they had failed to trace her. Applicant described the missing girl as 5ft. in height, dark, hair cut short at the back; wearing black dress, light brown jacket, black hat with brown ribbon and cream lace.

Down to last evening no trace of the young woman Alice Ives had been obtained. The mother has been to many places in search of her, and the police have instituted a number of special inquiries. The woman in whose company she went away now admits that she took her to a house at Bow to tea; but states that she last saw the girl by the Bermondsey Town hall, about half-past four in the afternoon, when the girl left her to speak to some woman she knew. Some letters, alleged to have been received from the girl, are being inquired into.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, April 10, 1887, Page 7

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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Mon 11 Jun 2012 - 23:33

Pleasance Brinnilloy

ALLEGED KIDNAPPING BY NUNS.

Mr. R.S. Wright moved, before Mr. Justice Wills and Mr. Justice Grantham, on Thursday, on behalf of Mr. and Mrs. Pinder, of Nottingham, and Miss Taylor, the matron of the Midland orphanage, in the same town, for an order nisi calling on Canon Douglas, of St. Barnabas's cathedral, Nottingham, to show cause why a writ of habeas corpus should not issue requiring him to bring up Pleasance Brinnilloy to be handed over to her relatives. The child's father was in early life an Italian Roman Catholic, but came to this country and married a Protestant, bringing up his children as Protestants. Both parents were now dead, and the child in question, a girl of seven years, had been placed by her elder sister in the Midland orphanage, a Protestant institution. Lately, while the child was being taken home with other children from some entertainment by the matron, counsel said, she was violently abducted and kidnapped by certain nuns acting under the instructions of Canon Douglas, who alleged that he had been appointed testamentary guardian by the father on his death-bed. The will of the father had not been proved, and Mr. Wright said he had been unable to see it; but he submitted that such a violent proceeding on the part of the reverend gentleman was not justifiable, even if he were testamentary guardian. - The court granted an order nisi.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, June 3, 1888, Page 5

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

SINGULAR ABDUCTION CASE.

In the Queen's Bench division, on Monday, before the Lord Chief Justice and a special jury, the case of "Douglas v. Pinder," known as the Nottingham abduction case, came on for trial. It was an action brought by the Rev. Canon Douglass, of the Roman Catholic Church, officiating at the Roman Catholic cathedral, Nottingham, to try the question whether the plaintiff was the testamentary guardian of a child named Pleasance Brinniloy, the daughter of an Italian organ-grinder, whom the defendants, a sister of the girl and the sister's husband, had removed from a Roman Catholic to a Protestant institution, and who had since been brought back to the guardianship of the plaintiff by another sister, who was in a convent. The defendants disputed the validity of the will under which the plaintiff claimed to be a guardian, alleging that the testator was not of sound mind at the time when the will was executed.
On Tuesday Jemima Brinniloy, the second daughter of the deceased, called on behalf of the defendants, stated that she had been attending the Wesleyan chapel for some considerable time. She did so with her father's knowledge during his lifetime, and he never made any objection. Her father attended Welford parish church, and did not, to her knowledge, go to a Roman Catholic place of worship during the last year of his life.
His lordship observed there were two facts which were worth more than any evidence of this kind. The deceased sent one of his children to Northampton and another to Birmingham, and in both instances to Roman Catholics.
Ultimately the jury found that the deceased knew and approved of the contents of the will, and intended the document to operate as a testamentary appointment. They also found that there was no fraud or undue influence, and that Brinniloy was not of unsound mind.
This was a verdict for the plaintiff, Canon Douglass.
His lordship certified for a special jury, but judgment will be given by the Divisional court.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, July 22, 1888, Page 2


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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Tue 12 Jun 2012 - 10:03

Clara and Annie McDonald

THIS DAY'S NEWS.
TWO SINGULAR GIRLS.

"A MYSTERY ATTACHING TO THEM."

Two young women of ladylike address, who at first refused any account of themselves, but afterwards gave the names of Clara and Annie McDonald, and described themselves as governesses, were charged before Mr. Partridge, at Westminster, today, with sleeping in the open air, and having no visible means of subsistence. - Several questions were put to the defendants as to whether they had friends, and where they had lived; but they made no answers except to acknowledge that they were sisters, and had lived at a private hotel in Praed-street. The elder sister at length said they positively declined to disclose anything relating to their past, except that every outrage had been perpetrated on them by the London Stipendiaries.

"WE'VE BEEN ABDUCTED SEVERAL TIMES."

Mr. Partridge: Have you been charged on other occasions before a Police Magistrate?
The elder sister: Yes. We have been abducted several times.
Mr. Partridge asked if she was in her right mind.
Prisoner: A detective has been employed to follow us about. What have I said that suggests my not being in my right mind?
The police evidence, which was then taken, was to the effect that for several nights the defendants had slept together on a door-step in Castle-lane, Westminster, and that they both declared that they would sooner go to prison than the workhouse.
Detective Mott, of the A Division, said he had known the defendants for about five years. They were young women of good education. There was a great mystery attaching to them. It was, however, said that they came from Wakefield, and that they were the daughters of a chief officer of police of that town.

SEVERAL TIMES CHARGED WITH VAGRANCY.

They had been (he added) several times charged with vagrancy, and the younger sister had been sentenced for breaking windows at a jeweller's shop in Regent-street, and a club house in St. James's-street, a gentlemen she knew being in the latter at the time. The defendants were inseparable when at liberty. Mr. Partridge sentenced them to a month's hard labour each. As the elder was removed, she exclaimed, "I hope God will curse you for this brutal outrage."

Source: The Echo, Thursday May 3, 1888, Page 4

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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Tue 12 Jun 2012 - 10:20

Martha Jane Mason

The mother of a boy named W.H. White, living in Hyde-lane, Battersea, informed the magistrate, at Wandsworth police-court, yesterday, that he was missing from his home. She said she had received a letter from him, stating that he intended to commit suicide off Putney-bridge. The following is a description of the boy: - Age, 15; of medium height; complexion fair; blue eyes; dressed in a black overcoat, with velvet collar, tweed trowsers and vest, lace-up boots, and a helmet-shaped cap.
We have been requested to state that Annie Branch, 37 years of age, suddenly left 36, Gloucester-gardens, Hyde-park, on the afternoon of January 16, and has not since been heard of. Lately she has been suffering from depression. The woman is described as of dark complexion, with dark hair, turning grey; in height about 5ft. 8in.; and was dressed in a sealskin jacket, green stuff dress, black bonnet with red flower in front; and new buttoned boots.
Mrs. M. Thomas writes us from 104, Well-street, Mare-street, Hackney, in some distress concerning her son William (called Harry), who has been missing since last June. He was 13 years of age, had rather a feminine face and slender build, with black hair, large eyes, and large ears. His mother is a laundress, and he has two sisters and one little brother.
A respectably-dressed, elderly woman reported at West Ham police-court, on Wednesday, the mysterious disappearance of her daughter, Martha Jane Mason, aged 19. Mrs. Mason stated that her daughter was formerly in service at the house of Miss Philpott, No. 2, St. Philip's-road, Surbiton. During the second week in December Mrs. Mason received a letter from her, saying that she would be home at Christmas-time, as she was leaving on account of some missing money. As the girl did not come home to Stratford, Mrs. Mason made inquiries, and then discovered that her daughter had left her place on Dec. 14. Miss Philpott said the girl did not seem quite right in her mind, and she was glad to get rid of her. All inquiries made since have been futile - the person who carried the box to the station could not be found, and though detectives have been employed, no clue of the girl, after she left the house, had been found. Mrs. Mason described her daughter as 5ft. 4in. high, stoutly built, fair complexion, blue eyes, and light hair. She has a scar on her right chin and a contracted finger on her right hand. She was probably dressed in a black dress and hat and black knotted cloth jacket.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, January 29, 1888, Page 7

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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Tue 12 Jun 2012 - 23:14

Mary Ann Heath

SINGULAR ABDUCTION CASE.

Cornelius Wilder, 44, a labourer, was charged before the Westminster Magistrate, on a warrant, with taking away a girl named Mary Ann Heath, of the age of 14 years, from the care and custody of her mother. - Elizabeth Ames said she lived in Berwick-street, Pimlico, and the prisoner was formerly a lodger in her house. He went away, she believed, with her daughter, who was 14 last birthday, and she (witness) communicated with the police. - In cross-examination by Mr. Duerdin Dutton, the witness denied the authenticity of letters written in her first married name of Heath, alleging the seduction of her daughter by a person in whose service she was said to have been. She never authorised anyone to write the letters, nor were they her daughter's. - Detective-sergeant Richardson said he arrested the prisoner in Waterford-road, Walham-green, and when the warrant was read he said, "I did not take the girl away by force. She came with me of her own free will, and I am looking after her. This is all through her mother, but she will never part us." - Evidence was given that the prisoner and the girl jointly occupied a room in Portobello-road, Notting-hill, from Saturday until Tuesday last. - The girl, Mary Ann Heath, who cried, and would not give evidence against the accused, when pressed admitted that she knew a person of the name to whom the letters previously put in evidence were addressed. One of the letters was put in her hand, and she then said, "I don't know him now, when I come to look at it. I thought you meant a pawnbroker of the same name."
Mr. Partridge: You disclaim all knowledge of the letters?
Witness: Yes.
The accused was remanded, but the Magistrate said he would take bail.

Source: The Echo, Thursday, November 1, 1888, Page 4

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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Tue 12 Jun 2012 - 23:38

A girl named Davy

THE ALLEGED ABDUCTION OF A GIRL.

Mr. Arthur Newton, solicitor, renewed an application to Mr. Partridge, at Westminster Police-court, today, respecting a girl named Davy, under the age of 14 years, who, he alleged, had been sent out of the country by a person (to whom she was apprenticed to learn the trade of a milliner and dressmaker) without the consent of the mother. - Mr. Newton reminded his Worship that when process was first applied for it was alleged that the girl had been sent to Italy with an improper motive. Whether this was so or not, he contended that it was an offence provided for by the Offences against the Person Act to send a child away and deprive a parent of its custody. - Mr. Partridge said a statement had been publicly made to him by a gentleman to the effect that his mother had interested herself in the child, and that by an arrangement with the French Consul Madame Davy renounced the care and custody of her daughter. - Mr. Newton said this was not the case. The mother always reserved the right to see her child when she thought fit, and for some reason or another she had been deceived. She was informed that the girl had been sent to a convent school at Erith, whereas, in fact, the child at that time was in Italy.
Mr. Partridge: But it has been over and over again suggested that the child was taken away for an immoral purpose. - Mr. Newton said it was difficult to get evidence of that, and for the purposes of his argument he would abandon it. He submitted that the false representation made to Madame Davy brought the person who had the child within the section of the Act, which said whoever shall by "force or fraud" take away a child under 14 shall be guilty of felony. - Mr. Partridge said he was quite sure that Cardinal Manning, who took such an interest in the passing of the Criminal Law Amendment Act, would at once institute an inquiry, if he thought that an injury had been done to the child. He (the Magistrate) must be very careful how he interfered, because the sworn information laid before him did not, in his opinion, disclose an offence. The other day papers were produced, signed by the French Consul, and it was said that the child was being well cared for.
Mr. Newton: All I can say is that the mother had no notice whatever of the removal.
Mr. Partridge: You can apply to the Court of Chancery, if you like; but I cannot intervene. It is also competent for you to go to Scotland-yard. - Mr. Newton thanked his Worship, and handed in an additional information sworn to by the mother of the child.

Source: The Echo, Thursday November 10, 1887, Page 4

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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Tue 12 Jun 2012 - 23:43

Mary Ann Took

THIS DAY'S POLICE.
A MISSING DAUGHTER.

A woman named Took came before Mr. Biron, Q.C., at the Lambeth Police-court, today, and stated that her daughter, Mary Ann Took, between 15 and 16 years of age, had been missing since 31st December. Although every inquiry had been made she had not been traced. She had been in service some time at 37, Bond-street, Vauxhall. She was described as about 5ft. in height, dark complexion, and having a cast in the right eye. When last seen she was wearing a blue skirt, black bodice trimmed with velvet, black jacket, and button boots.

Source: The Echo, Monday January 9, 1888, Page 4

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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Wed 13 Jun 2012 - 16:57

Margherita Perroni

THE RECENT CHARGE AGAINST A PRINCE.

Madame Saurel, who charged Prince de Chandenagor, who resided in Coningham-road, Shepherd's-bush, with the abduction of her daughter, attended at the Thames police-court yesterday, with her, to make an application to the magistrate. Police-constable Baum, who acted as interpreter, stated that Madame Saurel had an engagement to sing, but she could not fulfil it, as the prince retained possession of all her music. Mr. Curtis Bennett inquired the value of the music, and was informed 14 pounds. He said he would send an officer to the prince, and grant a summons if he still refused to give up the music to Madame Saurel.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, July 15, 1888, Page 7

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

THE CHARGE AGAINST A PRINCE.

Eugene Courjon, who was styled Prince de Chandernagor, residing in Coningham-road, Shepherd's-bush, was charged on remand, at Hammersmith police-court, on Friday, with the abduction of Margherita Perroni, a young unmarried woman, under the age of 18, against the wish of her mother. - As Mr. Montagu Williams had not heard the case previously the whole of the evidence was read over. - Matilda Perroni, the mother, in her evidence, stated that her professional name was Saurel. She came from Paris, accompanied by her two daughters and the prince, who offered to assist her to obtain a situation as a music teacher or an opera singer. The prince, whilst he was in Paris, offered to marry her daughter Margherita, and she consented. - On the evidence of Nellie Deeks being read, Mr. Besley called attention to that part in which she stated that the prince directed her not to bring the girls to her residence, and said it was most important. - Mr. Besley proceeded with the cross-examination of the mother, and said the prince was charged with the abduction of the daughter with the intent to have unlawful carnal knowledge. He would show they were engaged to be married, a quarrel, a reconciliation, and that there was no intent, except to protect her from her mother's violence. - Letters were put in showing that they had been on very friendly terms, the mother expressing her gratitude for the favours of the prince. - In cross-examination, Madame Perroni said she tore up her daughter's certificate of birth in a rage. The certificate was obtained for the marriage. He asked for her daughter's hand, and she then said, "Prince, do as you promised." It was with regard to the marriage settlement. There was a scene, and he threatened her with a dagger. It was 12 days before the children were away. She denied having stated that she wished her daughters to sell flowers in streets where old gentlemen could be found. - A letter written by the daughter, in French, addressed to the accused, and received that morning, was put in and read. It was in effect expressing sympathy with the prince, and being sorry to see him in the sad position, suffering for loving her, and praying that he would return. - After hearing the witnesses, Mr. Montagu Williams dismissed the case. - The accused was then liberated.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, July 8, 1888, Page 4


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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Wed 13 Jun 2012 - 17:05

Bessie Stevenson

REMARKABLE ABDUCTION CASE.
LOCKING A GIRL IN A TRUNK.

Our Dublin Correspondent telegraphs: - At the County Tyrone Assizes, Samuel Brown, aged 30, a married man, was tried for abducting Bessie Stevenson, a girl under eighteen. The pair, it appeared, eloped to Canada, but returned after three months. The girl wanted to make known her return to her friends, but Brown refused her request, and hid her in an old barn on her father's property. Here she remained for ten weeks, Brown supplying her with food, which he pushed through a hole made in the side of the barn. On several occasions the barn was occupied by men, and then Brown placed the poor girl in a large trunk which they had used on the voyage, locking her in until the men had withdrawn. Finally the prisoner took the girl to a neighbouring village, and then deserted her. The police, on searching the barn, found crusts and remnants of food which the girl had been supplied with. Brown was convicted, and sentenced to twelve months' imprisonment.

Source: The Echo, Wednesday March 7, 1888, Page 4

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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Wed 13 Jun 2012 - 21:25

Elizabeth Mary Hoy

THE WOOD GREEN ABDUCTION CASE.

At the Central Criminal Court, today, before the Recorder, William John Pallett was charged with the abduction of Elizabeth Mary Hoy, an unmarried girl under the age of 18, with intent to commit a criminal offence. - Mr. C.F. Gill prosecuted, and Mr. Paul Taylor defended. - The case was taken under the Criminal Law Amendment Act. The prisoner was a small shopkeeper at Wood-green, where the girl Hoy lived with her parents. The prisoner and the girl's father were, as the learned counsel for the prosecution said, both engaged in religious work, and by that means became intimate. The prisoner was a married man with five children. He engaged the girl to go to his house to look after the children; but in the course of a short time the prisoner's wife, not being satisfied with the conduct of her husband in regard to the girl, was induced to go away from him, he allowing her 10s. a week. The girl remained at the house. The prisoner was afterwards seen walking out with the girl with his arm round her waist. She was then taken away from his house, and sent to a Mrs. Pleasaunce's, in the neighbourhood. There, however, the prisoner saw her on several occasions. He was severely remonstrated with by her parents. The girl suddenly disappeared, and so did the prisoner, and four days afterwards the father received a letter, with the Stockwell post-mark, saying his daughter was in the service of "a Christian family" in Brixton. After much search the pair were found living as man and wife at Runton-street, Holloway. The prisoner then said that he and the girl would do as they liked, and that he did not are a snap of the fingers for them. The facts were spoken to by witnesses. It was added that the prisoner had known the girl for three or four years; that she was only 17 years of age last July.

Source: The Echo, Thursday November 3, 1887

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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Thu 14 Jun 2012 - 0:10

Ethel Roe

THIS DAY'S NEWS.
THE ABDUCTION OF A WARD IN CHANCERY.

SUPPOSED LETTER FROM THE MISSING GIRL.
A STRANGE STORY.

The Freeman's Journal professes to clear up the mystery of the disappearance of the girl Ethel Roe, a ward of Chancery. It says: - We received the following letter from Ethel Roe herself. Its authenticity, to our mind, is beyond a question. The envelope bears the postmark "Metz" and the date "22.2.87" The address is written in a child's handwriting, and there are lines faintly ruled in pencil on the envelope, evidently intended to aid the child in writing the address. The letter is written on paper with a water-line ruling common on the Continent, and both address and letter are upon the usual thin foreign paper.

To the Editor of the Freeman's Journal,
Metz, Germany.

Sir, - I was very much amused on reading the various accounts of my departure from 27, Pembroke-road. The tale is an extremely simple one. I left of my own free will, as a child naturally, and very rightly, wishes to be with her mother. I, therefore, profited of the first opportunity afforded me to escape, and was accompanied by a faithful friend to my present destination. I need not add how delighted I am to be in my home with my mother, sisters, and brothers, whom for the last four and a half years I earnestly longed to join. I should also express a hope that all advocates of liberty of conscience will approve of the step I have now taken, as it will afford me an opportunity of practising the Roman Catholic religion, in which I always believed, and which of late years I have been always taught to execrate. - Truly yours, ETHEL ROE.

The Freeman's Journal then explains the modus operandi: - It is manifest she had friends able and determined to rescue her from what was practically a bondage most irksome to the girl herself. A plain working man, not connected with the plan at all, but influenced by a strong sense of duty, asked her plainly whether she desired to be free from thraldom and restored to her mother. She then stated that she was most anxious to escape if she got an opportunity, and that she would avail herself of the first chance she had for that purpose. It was then arranged by the girl herself that on the Saturday morning in question she should walk out of the house and meet the faithful friend to whom she refers in such grateful terms. She did walk out of the house early in the morning, clothed only in her nightdress and flannel petticoat, and her shoes and stockings. A warm overcoat, a soft hat, and a pair of trousers were quickly supplied, the long fair hair was cut off, and Ethel was transformed into a boy. To a faithful woman servant, who had been let into the secret, Ethel was immediately confided, and together the three proceeded, without interference or molestation, to the Great Northern Railway Station at Amiens-street, and there had to wait for a couple of hours. By the mail train leaving Amiens-street at twenty-five minutes to seven o'clock Ethel, having taken leave of her deliverer, with the faithful domestic, started for Belfast. The domestic referred to had no connection with Mrs. Roe's establishment. Belfast having been reached, the pair proceeded to Greenock, from Greenock to Edinburgh, from Edinburgh to Leith; and from Leith they took a steamer for France, and landed on French soil. The fugitives travelled through the country without delay, and Ethel Roe is now in Metz, with her mother, her brother, and sisters, happy and contented. It is added that these particulars come from a source which is considered perfectly reliable; and Mrs. Roe, says the Freeman's Journal, will have to content herself with the knowledge that Ethel is well and happy, and reconcile herself to the fact that she is not a child to be proselytised. The story is in many ways remarkable, but in none more remarkable than in the devotion and self-sacrifice shown by humble working people, who had no other motive in this matter but one of pity for the child, and a desire to rescue a human soul.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday March 1, 1887, Page 4

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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Thu 14 Jun 2012 - 0:45

Elizabeth Aspey

AN OFFICER CHARGED WITH ABDUCTION.

On Friday, Lieut. Colin W. Young, of the 2nd Surrey regiment, stationed at Dover, was charged at Bow-street police-court, on a warrant, with the abduction of a girl named Elizabeth Aspey, aged 18. - The complainant, a prepossessing young woman, said her name was Elizabeth Aspey. She lived with her stepfather, Mr. Wyatt, proprietor of the Royal Mail hotel, Dover. Her mother was alive. Prisoner had been a customer at the hotel for 12 months, and she was introduced to him there. He first made overtures to her a month since. He asked her to go away with him. On Sunday, the 1st inst., she went to the South Eastern railway station, and met the prisoner by appointment. He had given her some money and a wedding-ring the night before. Her parents had no idea she was going. She was 17 on the 23rd of last March. On that day the prisoner made her a present of a basket of flowers. He was told it was her seventeenth birthday. At the railway station she met prisoner, and he told her to get her own ticket. She did so, and accompanied him to London. She stayed at the London and North Western Railway hotel as his wife. They went by the 10 o'clock train that night to Liverpool, and stayed at the Sessions House hotel. They afterwards went to the Exchange hotel. She was entitled to 600 pounds on attaining the age of 21 years. Prisoner was aware of the fact of her being entitled to a fortune. She had a conversation with him about it at Liverpool. He said, "Do you think if you went to America, if you wrote to your mother and the other executors they would let you have 400 pounds, if you let them have the other 200 pounds?" He told her before she left Dover that he had no income. At Liverpool he said, "I have no income. I had 84 pounds when we left Dover, and we shall only have 40 pounds when we get to America." She understood before they left Dover that he had only 84 pounds, but that he would be entitled to 60 pounds a year.
By Mr. Bridge: If he had told her before they left Dover that he had no income, she did not think she would have gone.
Examination continued: He said, "If my wife does not sue for a divorce, my uncle will on her behalf." They had arranged to go to Boston from Liverpool. At Liverpool they passed as Mr. and Mrs. Henniker. (The receipt for a deposit on account of the passage money to Boston was put in.) On Tuesday they were on the landing-stage at Liverpool about to embark for Boston, when she saw her uncle and returned with him.
Mr. Bridge made an order for the prisoner's removal to Dover.
Yesterday the accused was charged at Dover. - Elizabeth Aspey deposed that before they left the prisoner said they should go to his uncle's home at Southampton, where he would give her a situation at about 600 pounds a year. At the least it would be 400 pounds. That was three weeks or a month ago when he first asked her to go away with him. When the appointment to go away with him was made she said she would meet him, adding, "But I shall really regret going - your proper place is at home with your wife; but I have given you my word, and I won't break it." He said in reply, "If you don't come I shall go to London and blow my brains out." He had often told her that if she did not go he would blow his brains out. She had a conversation with the prisoner one day last week with reference to her fortune. The prisoner said, "What is the exact amount of your fortune, Lizzie?" She replied that it was about 600 pounds. When they got to London he asked her what jewellery she had brought with her, and suggested that they might want to make money on her watch if they were short. When she told him that she had not brought her rings, as they were in her mother's room, he said, "Why you could have got your mother's rings also if you liked?" She said, "Yes; but I would not bring anything away that did not belong to me." The prisoner said, "The piano is yours, and you also have a gold watch and chain and jewellery belonging to your father." He then said, did she not think when they got to America that she could get them to let her have money in consideration of the piano? When they got to Charing-cross the prisoner told her not to walk with him. He took a cab from the yard, avoiding taking one near the station. She asked him why he was doing this, and he said it was to escape detection, and added, "If I were caught with you I should get two years' imprisonment." The witness said she could never return to her home if he were taken prisoner. He told her that they were going to America, and that before he left Dover he had engaged passages by an Inman Line steamer. When they got to Liverpool the prisoner said, "I may as well tell you, Lizzie, I can never return to England. I owe the regiment about 50 pounds, and some one else in the town a similar amount, besides a great many other accounts." He also said he should be taken for desertion. Up to last Sunday she had been under the control of her mother, living at her house. Her mother knew nothing whatever about her going away. The cross-examination of the witness was deferred.
Annie Wyatt said she lived with her husband, William Wyatt, at the Royal Mail hotel. The prosecutrix was her daughter. She was 17 on March 23 last. She was entitled to 600 pounds on attaining the age of 21. The prisoner became acquainted with her through being a customer. The prisoner knew that the girl would have some money when she came of age. The prisoner was remanded in custody till Monday.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, May 8, 1887, Page 7

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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Thu 14 Jun 2012 - 1:52

Mrs. George Montel and son

MYSTERIOUS DEATH AT SHADWELL.

Mr. Wynne E. Baxter held the resumed inquiry at the Vestry hall, Shadwell, on Tuesday, respecting the death of George Montel, aged five years, the son of a tailor, living at 40, Gerrard-street, Wardour-street, Soho, whose body was found floating in the Thames off Shadwell basin, on the 12th ult. The father stated that on the evening of April 27th his wife said she was going for a walk, and would take the boy, who she was very fond of, with her. She left home at half-past six, saying they should be back in about an hour, but they never returned, and nothing further was heard till the body of the child was discovered. Inspector Burke, C division, deposed that every inquiry had been made with regard to the missing woman; but up to then she had not been traced. He had ascertained that the family lived on the most friendly terms. The coroner said he was afraid that it was one of those mysterious deaths which at short intervals occur, and are never solved. The jury returned a verdict "That the deceased was found drowned, but how, when, or where he got into the water there was no evidence to show."

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, June 3, 1888, Page 11

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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Thu 14 Jun 2012 - 2:14

Girl named Smith

THIS DAY'S POLICE.
ELOPING WITH THE LODGER.

At the Hammersmith Police-court, today, Alfred Axton was committed for trial for the abduction of a young girl under the age of eighteen. It was alleged that the prisoner, who lodged with the girl's parents in Prince's-place, Notting-hill, was seen to kiss the girl, whose name was Smith, by her mother. The latter at once ordered him out of the house. He went, and the girl followed, the couple being apprehended at Maidstone.

Source: The Echo, Wednesday June 13, 1888, Page 4

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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Thu 14 Jun 2012 - 19:28

Alice Jane Cole

THIS DAY'S POLICE.
A GIRL LOST.

A woman named Cole informed Mr. Biron at Lambeth, today, that her daughter, Alice Jane, aged 17 years, had been missing since Christmas night. The girl was in service in Heygate-street, Walworth, and on Christmas night went on an errand and never returned. She was described as about 5 feet 4 inches high, hair cut short, and was wearing a black ulster, black skirt, lace-up boots, and black felt hat.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday January 11, 1887

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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Thu 14 Jun 2012 - 19:36

Elizabeth Rason

MISSING.

Amongst the applicants at West Ham, on Tuesday, was George Rason, a cordwainer, of 4, Maria-terrace, Carisbrooke-road, Walthamstow, who had missed his wife, Elizabeth, aged 34. On the 10th inst. she went out at 10 o'clock in the morning, presumably to bring in some food, but she was never again seen, and the following note was found at home by her husband: "My dear husband - baby, God bless you; my poor head is so bad. Good-bye." The missing woman is described as 5ft. 4-1/2in. high, with grey eyes, dark complexion, and auburn hair; she had a mole on the lower part of her neck, sloe-coloured, and the thumb of her right hand has been cut open, and had a bone taken out. She was wearing a black skirt velvet body, brown felt hat with velvet trimmings, long gold earrings, diagonal cloth jacket, and sidespring boots. Once before she left her home in a similar manner, and had been then found and brought back.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, March 6, 1887, Page 7

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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Thu 14 Jun 2012 - 19:43

Ellen White

MISSING.

Mr. John White, residing at 24, Mellish-street, Millwall, stated at the Thames police-court yesterday morning that his sister, Ellen White, had been missing since Whit Monday. She was last seen with the young man with whom she had been keeping company on Streatham-common. Her description was as follows: - Age 17, height 5ft.; complexion fair, grey eyes, fair hair. There was a scar underneath the right cheek from abscess. She was dressed in brown dress, loose brown jacket, black hat with red feathers and red wing tipped with black, and low shoes.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, May 27, 1888, Page 3

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MISSING SINCE MONDAY.

This is the description given by Mr. John White, of 24, Mellish-street, Millwall, of his sister, at the Thames Police-court, today: - "Age, 17; height, 5 feet; complexion fair, grey eyes, fair hair. There was a scar underneath the right cheek from abscess. She was dressed in a brown dress, loose brown jacket, black hat with red feathers and red wing tipped with black, and low shoes." She has been, said Mr. White, missing since Whit Monday. On that day she received a day's holiday, and was last seen with a young man, with whom she had been keeping company, on Streatham-common.

Source: The Echo, Saturday May 26, 1888, Page 4


Last edited by Karen on Sat 16 Jun 2012 - 0:16; edited 1 time in total

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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Thu 14 Jun 2012 - 19:47

Louisa Jolly

MISSING.

Mr. Jolly, of 32, Collingwood-road, Dalston, stated, at Dalston police-court, on Monday, that his daughter, Louisa Jolly, aged 14, but looking older, had been missing for a week. She was about the average height, of fair complexion, and blue eyes, and light hair. When last seen she was wearing a navy blue dress, with red collar and trimmings, high black straw hat, and button boots.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, June 10, 1888, Page 3

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ANOTHER GIRL MISSING.

Louisa Jolly, aged 14 years, but looking older, has been missing from her home at 32, Collingwood-road, Dalston, since last Monday. Her father, Mr. Jolly, applied to Mr. Horace Smith, at the Dalston Police-court, today, to obtain publicity to the fact. He said the missing girl had never been away before, and he had no idea where she had gone. She was, he said, about an average woman's height, of fair complexion and blue eyes, and light hair. When last seen she was wearing a navy blue dress with red collar and trimmings, high black straw hat, and button boots.

Source: The Echo, Monday June 4, 1888, Page 4


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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Thu 14 Jun 2012 - 20:00

A girl named Ford and Rosa Martha Williams

MISSING.

Much excitement has been occasioned at Newport, Monmouth, by the disappearance of the Rev. George Lewis, curate of St. Matthew's Mission church, Barnardston. On April 28 Mr. Lewis appeared as a witness in the prosecution of an alleged clerical impostor named Evans. After driving home to tea he returned to Newport, and from that time he has not been seen. His worshippers, who assembled on the Sunday morning, dispersed in a painful state of uncertainty as to his fate.
Mrs. Ford, living in Buxton-street, Mile-end, stated at Worship-street police-court on Friday, that her daughter, aged thirteen years, had disappeared from her home. The girl was tall and stout. She had left her home to go to school - in Buxton-street - but never reached there, and had not since been heard of. She was described as of dark but rosy complexion, with brown hair and eyes. Hair cut short. Had on a white dress of oatmeal cloth, and black jacket trimmed with astrachan, striped stockings, and button boots. The police have been able to trace the girl.
Mrs. Williams, of 45, Malvern-road, Kilburn, applied at Marylebone police-court, on Friday, in regard to her daughter, Rosa Martha Williams, aged 17, who had been missing since Wednesday. She left her father at the cab rank, near the Red Lion public-house, Harrow-road, to go home. The girl was of weak intellect, and last year was in an insane ward. She said she was 5ft. high, of dark complexion, with blue eyes. She was wearing a bottle green skirt, grey bodice, long black jacket, springside boots, black hat, trimmed with black velvet and chenille, with a flower in front. Her hair was in paper in front, and hung loose at the back.


Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, May 20, 1888, Page 3

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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Thu 14 Jun 2012 - 20:11

Emma Adams

A SERVANT'S WHIT MONDAY OUT.

Emma Adams, 24, servant, who left her situation at Thornton-heath on Monday, was charged, on remand, with wilfuly damaging a lilac tree in Birdcage-walk. - The prisoner was seen by a constable on Wednesday afternoon to break a quantity of blossom from a tree, and evidence was given that the damage done amounted to half-a-crown. - It transpired that the prisoner had been in service at Hastings, where her mother was now living, and that she had only been in a situation near Croydon about a week previous to Whit Monday, when she was allowed out for a week, and never returned. She was circulated as missing in the police information, and of course identified when taken into custody. - Inspector Walters, A division, said that prisoner's master had been communicated with; but as she had gone off without permission, and remained out, he was indisposed to take her back again. He had communicated with her mother. - Mr. Partridge sentenced her to seven days' imprisonment in default of paying a fine, and she exhibited the utmost indifference when taken to the cells.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, May 27, 1888, Page 12

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Re: More Missing Girls

Post by Karen on Thu 14 Jun 2012 - 20:20

Elizabeth Annie Butt

ANOTHER "MISSING" CASE.

At the Thames Police-court yesterday, Mr. William Butt, of 73, Pekin-street, Poplar, asked Mr. Hannay's advice respecting the disappearance of his daughter, Elizabeth Annie Butt, who had been missing since Monday afternoon. She was in the service of the Rev. Mr. Bray, Shadwell, and lately had quarrelled with another servant. She disappeared on Monday, leaving a letter, in which she stated she was going to poison herself, because Lizzie (her fellow servant) had been "going on awfully," and she could not put up with her any longer. Her description was as follows: - Age 15; height, 5ft. 2in., slim; complexion fair, hair light, grey eyes; was dressed in brown dress, black hat, with black feathers, and slippers. Applicant was referred to the representative of the press.

Source: The Mercury, Saturday May 26, 1888, Page 7

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