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Elizabeth Annie Smith

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Elizabeth Annie Smith

Post by Karen on Tue 5 Jun 2012 - 20:02

SHOCKING TRAGEDY AT LEA-BRIDGE.
A MOTHER'S APPLICATION.

A respectable-looking woman applied to Mr. Hannay, at Worship-street police-court, on Wednesday, for his assistance in making public the fact that her daughter, a young woman, 25 years of age, had disappeared under suspicious circumstances. The applicant, who gave her name as Smith, of 33, Hemsworth-street, Hoxton, said that the daughter in question went on Saturday night to a dance in the neighbourhood of the Lea river, and did not return at night, though expected. Her daughter was she said, a good and steady girl, in work as a machinist in Hoxton, at a weekly salary. - Mr. Hannay said there seemed a mystery in the matter. Down to this time the police, we are informed, had refused to listen to the mother's suspicions of foul play; but after the publication of the application in Thursday's papers they were driven into action.
On Thursday a broken umbrella, belonging to the young woman, was discovered in some bushes by the Lea. The river was accordingly dragged, and on Friday morning the drags brought to the surface the body of the young woman.

A DOUBLE ARREST.

Our representative says that Inspector Bond, with Detective-inspector Helson and Sergeant Vagg, all of the J division, set themselves to work to make inquiries on Thursday. They found that the young woman, whose age was 25, and who worked as a machinist in the Kingsland-road, was accompanied to the Greyhound tavern, Lea-Bridge, where open-air dancing on a platform, after the model of the old Eagle tavern, takes place, by a well-dressed man, who is described in slang as a "toff." Whilst there she was seized with some sort of a fit, and was found in a bad state, sitting on the doorstep of a coffee-shop which was kept by a Mr. Martin. He says that he took her in, and believed she had been drugged, but she revived in his house, and seems to have used some strong language with regard to a person she spoke of. When she left the coffee-shop she returned to the Greyhound, and later on was seen by some women with some labouring men going across the mill fields. These fields are intersected by some of the back waters of the river Lea, and here on Friday morning the police, who had been dragging the cuttings the day previously, discovered the dead body of the missing young woman. The first discovery which led to the dragging of the spot was that of an umbrella, broken in a struggle and minus any handle, on the path, by the waters. At 20 minutes past five the body was brought to the surface, and soon after removed by Serjeant Hatley, J division, to the mortuary at the old Town hall, Hackney. There, during the day, it was identified by Mr. Smith, the father, who is a most respectable man, carrying on a small business as a builder. One side of the face and a portion of the hands were eaten away by rats, but recognition was beyond doubt. Following up clues obtained by the sisters of the deceased, the police prosecuted their endeavours to find the men who were said to have been in the young woman's company about midnight on Saturday. One of these was said to be a bargeman, who stated that he parted from the deceased, and that she then said she was going home. Her route home was certainly not near the spot where her body was found, and the man referred to was questioned on this point. He admitted that when he left her another man named Contor approached her. The police say that his statements greatly contradict themselves. After the finding of the body Serjeant Vagg found the man, whose name is Anthony, and Inspectors Bond and Helson had a long interview with him on the scene of the murder, and the man made a lengthy statement, which was taken down in writing. Subsequent to that the officers searched for and found the man Contor, it being rumoured that he had kept to his home since the occurrence, and had a scratched face. The man was found at home lying on his bed at eight o'clock in the evening.

THE PRISONERS BEFORE THE MAGISTRATE.

At Dalston police-court yesterday afternoon, before Mr. Bros, George Anthony, 23, bargeman, of Middlesex wharf, Lea-bridge, and Charles Contor, 30, labourer, of Sezand-terrace, Lea-bridge-road, were charged on suspicion with having been concerned together in causing the death of Annie Smith by drowning in the River Lea.
The first witness was William Bond, inspector J division, who said that on Wednesday he received information that the girl Annie Smith, of 33, Hemsworth-street, Hoxton, had been missing from her home since the previous Saturday. In the course of his inquiries he saw the prisoner Anthony at the Ship Aground beerhouse in the Lea-bridge-road. Witness asked him if he had seen anything of a woman on the previous Saturday night. He said: Yes, About 12 o'clock I saw the woman with three men outside this beerhouse, the worse for drink. I heard she had been robbed of her purse and one of the men had taken it. I went up to that man and had a struggle with him. I fell into the ditch, and some other men came up. The man was then searched by young Marvell (the son of the landlord of the beerhouse), but nothing was found upon him. The man afterwards went away, and I asked the woman if I should go up the road with her. She and me then went up to Lea-bridge together as far as Chatsworth-road. I left her there, and I don't know where she went. I never saw her after.
By Mr. Young: Chatsworth-road would be on her way home. The body was found about three-quarters of a mile from that spot.
Inspector Nelson, C.I.D., J division, said that on Friday morning he received instructions to make inquiries into the case. The body of the young woman had then been found. He went to the prisoner Anthony and told him his business, adding that he believed he was the last to see the young woman alive on the Saturday night. He replied, "I will tell you all I know." Witness cautioned him, and he proceeded: About five minutes to 12 o'clock on Saturday night I was outside the Ship Aground, and I saw two men running towards Clapton. I heard that they had stolen the girl's purse who was standing close by. I, with Joseph Contor, Murphy, and others, ran after them. I stopped one of them. We had a struggle. He was searched and allowed to go. I walked back to the girl, and with her walked on the Lea-bridge-road, down Chatsworth-road, and across the marshes, over Strong's bridge, along the towing-path about 50 yards to the waterworks gates. I then saw Charlie Contor coming along the path, and I went away. I left her standing against the wall, and I went along the path over Pond-land-bridge, across the fields, and down home. Charlie Contor was talking to her when I left. When I came back into Lea-bridge-road I saw George Judd, Micky Cornwell, and said "Good-night." I got home at five to one. Witness saw scratches on Anthony's head, which he said had been caused in the struggle with the man. The road Anthony had said he went was not his right or his nearest way.
By Mr. Young: Anthony spoke quite willingly. Witness thought it a reasonable explanation that the scratches on Anthony's head were caused in the struggle with the man. There was no protection to the water at the spot where the girl was found; the bank was green; and anyone on the marshes might walk unsuspectingly into the water.
By the Magistrate: The wall referred to by the prisoner is quite a third of a mile from the spot where the body was found.
Dr. Charles Aveling, the divisional surgeon at Hackney, said he was called to see the body at the Hackney mortuary on Friday morning. The dress was wet and muddy, but there was no evidence of tearing or anything to show that there had been a struggle. There was the usual tint about the body to be expected from drowning, which might be mistaken for bruising. The left cheek had been gnawed through apparently by rats, and the right arm had also been laid bare by similar means. In the evening witness made a post-mortem examination, and death was due to suffocation by drowning. The assumption was that the woman had been violated, and to obtain some evidence of that witness made a post-mortem without the coroner's order. There was no evidence of recent violation. There could not have been a severe struggle in the water, but witness was certainly of opinion that she went into the water alive. The same evening witness examined the two prisoners. On Anthony there was a small scratch on his forehead, which was apparently about a week old, and on Contor there were three small scratches and an abrasion on the nose.
By Mr. Romain: The liver of the woman was enlarged, and that seemed to indicate that she was of free habits so far as regarded drink. There was not so much water in the stomach as one might expect, and witness came to the conclusion that, either from weakness or some other cause, she did not struggle after entering the water. - Mr. Bros said he thought there was very little evidence against Contor; in fact, practically none. He remanded both prisoners for a week, but allowed Contor out on his own bail in 25 pounds.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, April 29, 1888, Page 7

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Re: Elizabeth Annie Smith

Post by Karen on Tue 5 Jun 2012 - 20:02

THE LEA MYSTERY.
PRISONERS AGAIN IN COURT.

Charles Cator (who was out on bail), 30, labourer, of 2, Tozart's-terrace, Lea-bridge, and George Anthony, 23, bargeman, of Middlesex Wharf, Lea-bridge, again appeared at the Dalston Police-court, today, charged on suspicion of having been concerned together in causing the death of Annie Smith, by drowning her in the River Lea, on April 22.
Detective-Inspector Helson said that the Treasury had directed him to ask for a remand until after the result of the inquest had been made known, as the Public Prosecutor had decided not to proceed against the prisoners until the whole of the depositions were before him. The inquest would be resumed on Tuesday next. - Mr. Bros expressed his willingness to further remand the case.

CATOR AGAIN ADMITTED TO BAIL.

Mr. Romain (for Cator) said that nothing further had transpired against his client, and he thus asked that he might be allowed out again on his own bail. - Mr. Bros: Has anything further transpired to connect the prisoners with the girl's death? - Inspector Helson: No, your Worship; but Cator was summoned at the inquest, and he then refused to answer questions put to him. - Mr. Romain: Yes. That was on my advice. - Mr. Bros: That is nothing against him. I shall not alter the bail.

ANTHONY REMAINS IN CUSTODY.

Mr. Young said that nothing further had transpired against his client. The other prisoner had had an opportunity of speaking, but that had been denied to his client. He asked that Anthony, too, might be released on bail, as the Jury had expressed a wish to see him when the inquiry was resumed on Tuesday. - Mr. Bros pointed out that the prisoner could be brought before the Coroner, if he wished it, by application to the Home Secretary. Anthony would, so far as he was concerned, be remanded for a week, without bail. The case against him was very different to that against the other prisoner. - The prisoners were then removed.

Source: The Echo, Saturday May 5, 1888, Page 3

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Re: Elizabeth Annie Smith

Post by Karen on Tue 5 Jun 2012 - 20:03

THE LEA MYSTERY
THURSDAY'S PROCEEDINGS.

Mr. W.E. Baxter again resumed the inquiry, relative to the death of Elizabeth Annie Smith, at the Manor Assembly Rooms, on Thursday, at half-past two o'clock, the first witness called being
William Heath, in the employ of the Waterworks Company, and living at Lea Bridge, who deposed that on the 21st April and the three or four days following the flood gates of the back water of the Lea were open and anything floating in them might pass through. The waters were swollen in consequence of the rain, and would be flowing at the rate of about two or three miles an hour.
Mrs. Sarah Martin, who lives at the Carman's Rest Coffee-house, Lea Bridge-road, gave evidence substantiating the statements previously made by her daughter and the youth, McGill. In answer to a juror, witness said if deceased had fallen into the river in the state in which she found her outside the coffee-house about a quarter to nine, she did not think she would have been able to have got out. The man whom she first saw with deceased was not a bargee.
Henry Thomas Marvell, of the Ship Aground beer-house, Lea Bridge, deposed that on Saturday, 21st April, about midnight, just after he had closed his house, a man came and asked for a pot of beer. Witness told him he was too late. There were three men together, with two coster barrows, and a female was sitting near the front door. Witness did not go near her, and could not say how she was dressed. There were about a dozen men talking there at the time. The three men appeared to be going away, and leaving the young woman behind, when one of the others said, "Do you know the young woman? Don't leave her behind here." They came back for her, and took her up the Lea Bridge-road towards Clapton. Witness knew neither the young woman nor the three men. There were several there whom witness knew, including Anthony, Joseph Cantor, and Murphy. Witness did not notice whether the woman was the worse for drink. Neither of the three men who went away with the woman was Anthony or Cantor. In answer to Mr. Young, witness said he had known Anthony two or three years, and knew him to be a hard-working, steady young man, and not likely to do harm to any person. Anthony was in and out his house on the afternoon and evening in question. On the Monday following he heard Anthony say that he had had a roll down the side of the bank into the marsh with a coster, and that was how he got his scratch. In answer to Mr. Romaine, witness said there were five brothers named Cantor. He saw Joseph Cantor, but did not see Charles Cantor [the person who had been charged.]
Thomas Marvele, son of the previous witness, identified deceased as a young woman who came to the Ship Aground with three men late on the night of the 21st April. The men had two coster barrows, and they all looked like costermongers, whose ages ranged from about 20 to 35 years of age. Deceased was held up by the arms of two of those men. She did not appear to be drunk, but seemed very silly; witness had an idea that she had been drugged. She wore neither bonnet nor veil, but had one glove on. She was "smothered" in mud. They were all very quiet. Witness saw one of the men with his arm round her waist and his hand under her jacket. The man passed something to one of the other men, and he thought the woman was being robbed. He went up to her and asked if she had lost anything, and she replied she had lost her purse. Witness then asked her what was in it, and she answered, "There's a ring and some coppers." The men left deceased standing against the water trough at Day's, and went up the road towards Clapton, and witness and some others ran after them. Anthony, who was with witness, overtook one of the three and asked him for the purse, but he said he had not got it. The two struggled, and whilst the man was on the ground witness searched him. He had got money in his waistcoat pockets, and a latch-key in his trouser's pocket. There was no purse and he was allowed to go. Witness returned to deceased, who was leaning against the Lee Bridge-road railings, and asked her where she lived. She replied, "Hoxton." Witness left Anthony standing with her. He did not see Charles Cantor, though he might have been there. Deceased's sister called at the Ship Aground on the following Monday afternoon, and asked if witness had seen anything of the young woman. Witness related all he knew, and Miss Smith left her address. Witness afterwards told Anthony who went with him to Hemsworth-street, and explained to deceased's mother that he saw her daughter on the Saturday night and left her near Chatsworth-road.
George Judd, 2, Iszard's-cottages, Lea Bridge-road, bargeman, said he saw deceased on Saturday night about half-past twelve o'clock standing on the Lea Bridge-road leaning against the railings opposite to the "Ship Aground"; George Anthony was talking to her. Witness left them together about a quarter to one o'clock. About half-past one witness saw Anthony come out of Radley's boat-house, which was moored a little distance off in the back water, cross Lea Bridge-road, and go down Middlesex wharf, where he lodged. No words were exchanged.
Police-constable Charles Herbert (J 219), stated that he passed Lea Bridge about one o'clock. There was no crowd outside the Ship Aground. As far as he knew he did not see the deceased. Witness heard no cries that night. There was a fog hanging over the marshes and near the bridge.
Joseph Burns, of Howard's-place, Northampton-road, Clerkenwell, costermonger, said on Saturday, April 21, he had been to Walthamstow market, James-street, and on his return saw a woman leaning against one of his mate' barrows shortly after eleven o'clock on Lea Bridge-road. She said she would like a drink, and seeing the door of the "Ship Aground" open he and his mates proposed to have a pot of beer. The woman went with him to the house and sat down on a seat in front of the place. Witness noticed her dress was torn and dragging along the ground. She looked respectable. He asked her if she had a pin so that he could pin it up, but she had not got one. One of his mates handed him a pin, and he sat upon the seat and pinned up her dress. She again asked for a drink, but the landlord would not serve them, it was too late. Thereupon one of the persons who were standing by, having just come out of the public-house, said "Never mind, old girl, I'll give you a drink. I'll soon get some beer." He then went to the door and got served. Deceased drank of the beer. She did not seem drunk but rather fainting. Witness did not put his hand under deceased's mantle. After he had pinned up the dress he got up and walked into the main road. He had gone about fifty yards, when about half-a-dozen men overtook him and accused him of stealing a purse. Before witness could speak they struck and kicked him. They were at the time under the influence of drink. Witness eventually rolled in the ditch, and they beat him unmercifully. Witness remarked, amidst laughter, that he thought his time had come. After being searched, he was allowed to go, and he went towards Clapton and spoke to a policeman at the corner, also showing him his face which was cut in various parts.
George Eaves, 1, Prince's-place, Virginia-row, Bethnal-green, costermonger, corroborated the main part of the previous witness' statement.
Inspector Bond (J Division) deposed that on Monday, April 23rd, he received information that deceased was missing. In the course of his inquiries he saw George Anthony at the Ship Aground beer-house. He told witness he was with deceased on Lea Bridge-road on the previous Saturday night about twelve o'clock. He first saw her with three men, and on hearing that they had stolen her purse, he stopped one of them and a struggle ensued, both falling into a ditch. Others came up and the man was searched, but the purse was not found. He afterwards went to the woman and walked with her up Lea Bridge-road as far as Chatsworth-road. He did not see her again, nor did he know which way she went. Anthony gave his statement readily.
There being other witnesses to be called, the Coroner again adjourned the inquest until Tuesday next, at half-past two.

Source: The Mercury, Saturday May 5, 1888, Page 5

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Re: Elizabeth Annie Smith

Post by Karen on Tue 5 Jun 2012 - 20:03

THE TRAGEDY AT LEA-BRIDGE.

Mr. Baxter held an inquiry at the Manor rooms, Hackney, on Monday, on the body of Elizabeth Annie Smith, aged 25, a machinist, lately residing at 33, Hemsworth-road, Hoxton, whose dead body was found in the river Lea on April 20. - After the father and mother had given evidence respecting the habits of the deceased, William Drummond M'Gill, of Bird-street, Wapping, stated that on April 21 he was acting as manager of the Carman's Rest coffee-house, Lea-bridge-road, next to the Greyhound dancing grounds. He had seen the body of deceased, and recognised her as having gone into the grounds on the 21st. At 7:30 p.m. witness saw her there with a young gentleman. She did not then appear to be the worse for drink. The young man was about 18 or 20 years of age, and witness saw him dancing with the deceased woman until about nine o'clock. About that time witness was called to the front of the shop, where he saw deceased, apparently insensible; Mrs. Martin, witness's mistress, having hold of her. By her orders witness carried the young woman into the coffee-house and put her on a seat. He gave her some water, and a quarter of an hour later she came to a little, but again became unconscious. When she revived he gave her a strong cup of tea. She began to sneeze, cough, and vomit. She smelt very strongly of snuff and brandy. Soon afterwards witness was told the deceased's young man was outside. Witness said to him, "Why don't you come in and see to your young lady?" To which he replied, "I know nothing about her." - Witness continued, "You have been with her all the evening. Surely if you have got any feeling you can come in and see how she is getting on." - To which he answered, "I don't know anything about her, I tell you." - Deceased had partly revived by this time, and after having her face washed she noticed the young man in the grounds and proceeded there. About five minutes afterwards the witness saw them sitting at the back of the grounds, "cuddling one another round the neck." Half-an-hour afterwards the girl went into a kind of fit, and the young man ran away. Some young ladies were standing by, and as they seemed to know her witness left her. He saw Smith leave the grounds alone at about 10:45, when she went towards the Greyhound public-house. Just before she got there two young men got hold of her and took her inside. After closing the shop he stood outside for a few minutes, when he saw the woman leave the house with the two young men, go across the road, and up the road towards London. - By the Jury: When deceased walked away with the two young men she appeared to be intoxicated. The men wore dark clothes, and were respectably dressed. He did not think he could identify either of the men. - On the suggestion of Mr. Romain, Cator was brought into court with others, but the witness could not recognise Cator as being one of the young men that was with deceased.
On Tuesday the evidence given at the police-court was repeated, including that of Mr. Charles Taylor Aveling, the police surgeon who made the post-mortem examination, and of Police-serjeant Hatley, who found the body in the Lea.
Miss Amelia Smith, sister of the deceased, was called. She stated that she knew that her sister was going to the Greyhound dancing gardens on Saturday, the 21st ult. Deceased had told her so in the morning. She left to go there about a quarter to six. Witness could not say if she was going to meet anyone, as the deceased did not make a confidant of her. The deceased went out with a man named Steel, but they had a row on the previous Monday; she was not going to see him that night. She was sure the deceased left the house that evening without an umbrella. The umbrella produced was not her sister's. She had never seen it before. Witness knew that the deceased had money when she left the house, for she had just previously drawn her salary. - By the Jury: The deceased earned 14s. a week, and sometimes more. She often went out with her young man dancing.
William Steel, 39, Hemsworth-street, a carpenter, said that he knew the deceased, whom he had been courting for six years. They were to be married. He did not know where she was going on Saturday week, as they had had words on the previous Monday because he had found the deceased in the Duke of Gloucester public-house. A little drink would make her silly and hysterical. She might have been drunk about once a week, on Saturdays generally.
Charles Cator, of Tozart's-terrace, Lea Bridge-road, a labourer, was then sworn. He stated that he had been charged at the police-court with complicity in the murder, and was now under remand. Under the advice of Mr. Romain, his solicitor, he refused to answer any questions other than those already given.
Sarah Martin, 18, daughter of Mr. Martin, who now keeps the Carman's Rest coffee-house at the Greyhound-terrace, near the dancing garden gates, said she saw the deceased in the gardens with a young man. She was afterwards in front of their house in a staggering condition. At first she went into Mrs. Brown's shop, but she was then brought into their coffee-shop, and they gave her some tea. The deceased was sitting down with her bonnet off, and she smelt very strongly of brandy and snuff. She kept sneezing very much. As she had her bonnet in her lap witness offered to put it on for her. Deceased said: You go away; you don't know anything at all about it. I am sick of it. I wish I was settled.
The coroner said those words might be taken in two different ways. Did the deceased seem to mean she wish she was settled in life - married - or that she was tired of her life?
The witness said she did not know; those were the words she used.
On the inquest being again resumed, on Thursday, Sarah Martin said she resided at the Carman's Rest coffee-house, Lea Bridge-road, which was kept by her husband. She had not seen the body, but she remembered seeing a young woman in her coffee-house on Saturday, April 21. She first saw the young woman about a quarter to six p.m. in Lea-bridge-road, and she was then in company with a young man. They passed and repassed her house until the gardens were opened. The young woman had an umbrella and the gentleman a walking-stick. She should think that he was about 18 years of age. He had on a light "pepper-and-salt" pair of trowsers and a dark tweed waistcoat and coat. He wore a flower in his button-hole, and had on a black hard felt hat, which he wore on the side of his head. He had no whiskers, and was about 5ft. 4in. in height. The witness continued that she saw them next in the gardens, and at about half-past seven saw them dancing. Next time she saw the deceased it was about 20 minutes to nine, and she then walked past witness's door alone and staggering. Witness sent for her daughter, who was in the gardens. Her daughter and M'Gill attended to the deceased, who made no remark in witness's presence for a quarter of an hour. The deceased appeared to her to be very much the worse for drink. Witness's attention was drawn to something the deceased vomited, and it smelt very strongly of snuff and of brandy. The deceased had then no umbrella. The deceased afterwards revived, and returned to the gardens.
Thomas Marvell, landlord of the Ship Aground, Lea-bridge, stated that at 12 midnight, just as he had closed, and man came and asked for a pot of beer. Witness told him it was too late. There were three men together, and a female was sitting at the end of his front garden. There were about a dozen people out there talking together at the time, some with barrows, who said they had been to Walthamstow. The three men were going off, when he heard a man say, "Do you know the young woman? You are not going to leave her behind?" They then stepped back, and deceased went off with them up the Lea-bridge-road towards Clapton. He did not know the three young men or the woman. There were Anthony, Cator, Murphy, and two or three females that he knew.
By the Coroner: The last time he saw Anthony was about 10 minutes past 12, when witness went indoors. There were no scratches about him at that time. He saw him with some afterwards, and heard him say he got it done with the young fellow who they thought stole the young woman's purse. He heard Anthony say this on Monday in his beershop. The inquiry was again adjourned.

FUNERAL OF THE VICTIM.

The remains of the ill-fated Annie Smith were interred at Abney-park cemetery on Friday. A great number of the public assembled. Although these sightseers were of the poorer class, very many of the women and girls had some token of mourning, crape hats and bonnets being plentiful, and all appeared to deeply commiserate with the family of the deceased.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, May 6, 1888, Page 2

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Karen Trenouth
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Re: Elizabeth Annie Smith

Post by Karen on Tue 5 Jun 2012 - 20:03

THE LEA MYSTERY.

Charles Cator (not Contor, as has already been stated), 30, labourer, Tozart's-terrace, Lea-bridge, and George Anthony, 23, bargeman, of Middlesex wharf, Lea-bridge, were charged on remand at Dalston police-court, yesterday morning, on suspicion of having been concerned together in causing the death of Annie Smith by drowning her in the River Lea on April 22.
Detective-inspector Nelson said that the Treasury had directed him to ask for a remand until after the result of the inquest had been made known, as the Public prosecutor had decided not to proceed against the prisoners until the whole of the depositions were before him. The inquest would be resumed on Tuesday.
Mr. Bros expressed his willingness to further remand the case.
Mr. Romain (for Cator) said that nothing further had transpired against his client. He asked that he might be allowed out again on his own bail. - Mr. Bros: Has anything further transpired to connect the prisoners with the girl's death? - Inspector Nelson: No, your worship; but Cator refused at the inquest to answer questions put to him. - Mr. Romain: Yes; that was on my advice. - Mr. Bros: That is nothing against him. I shall not alter the bail. The magistrate further said that Anthony would, so far as he was concerned, be remanded for a week without bail. The case against him was very different to that against the other prisoner.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, May 6, 1888, Page 12

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Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"

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Re: Elizabeth Annie Smith

Post by Karen on Tue 5 Jun 2012 - 20:04

THE MYSTERIOUS DEATH IN THE LEA.
CONCLUSION OF THE CORONER'S ENQUIRY.

The inquest on the body of Elizabeth Annie Smith, the young woman whose body was recently found in the Lea after she had been missing from home for five days, was resumed for the fourth time by Mr. Coroner Wynne E. Baxter, on Tuesday afternoon, at the Manor Assembly Rooms, Hackney.
Mr. Young and Mr. Romaine again appeared respectively for Anthony and Cator, the two men whom the police had charged with being concerned in deceased's death, and there was a good attendance of the general public.
Detective Inspector Helson, J division, said that on the morning of Friday, the 27th April, he received instructions to make inquiries into the case. He saw the accused man, George Anthony, at the corner of Chatsworth-road and Lea Bridge-road. Witness told him his mission, and also gave him to understand that any statement he might make would be taken down in writing. He then said: "Last Saturday night, about five minutes to 12, I was in Lea Bridge-road, near Lea Bridge, and I saw two men running away towards Clapton. I heard they had stolen a purse from a girl who was standing close by. I, with Joseph Cator, Ned Murphy and others, ran after them and stopped one of them; we had a struggle and he was searched and allowed to go. I walked back to the girl, and with her walked along Lea Bridge-road, down Chatsworth-road, across the marsh (pointing to the south mill fields at the back of the houses on the right-hand side of Lea Bridge-road), and over Strong's bridge and along the towing path by the side of the water-works wall for about 50 yards to the water-works gate. I then saw Charley Cator coming along the path, and I went away and left her standing against the wall. I went along the path over the bridge and across the fields and down home. Charley Cator was talking to her when I left her. After I came back into Lea Bridge-road I saw George Judd and Mickey Cornwall; I said "Good-night" to them and went home. I got home about five minutes to one." Witness then informed Anthony that that statement exceeded what he had heard already, and he should have to detain him. Anthony had a scratch on the forehead which he said was caused in a skirmish he had with a man to whom he had alluded. Witness then sent him to the police-station with a constable and went to the address of Cator, 2, Wand's-terrace, Lea Bridge-road. Witness told him he had just seen Anthony. Cator said, "I cannot tell you anything about her, sir, except that I saw her standing down here against the posts" (pointing to the direction of Lea Bridge where there were some posts, near the Ship Aground beerhouse). Witness told him he was not obliged to say anything, but if he did he should take it down in writing. Witness also told him he would have to accompany him to the police-station whilst he made further inquiries. Cator said nothing more. At the police-station Anthony and Cator were charged on suspicion with being concerned together in causing the death of Elizabeth Annie Smith, by drowning her in the River Lea. The charge was read over to them but neither of them made any reply. Cator has a small scratch on the cheek just under the left eye.
G. Toben, dairyman, Brett-road, Hackney, stated that on Sunday afternoon he, in company with another young man called Fletcher, went to the spot where deceased had been found. Witness found the black glove [produced] in the marshes, midway between the pathway and the river, and about 100 yards east from the waterworks wooden fence.
One of deceased's sisters, Amelia Smith, was shown the glove (which was marked 5-3/4 size) found by the last witness, but she could not identify it as belonging to the deceased, although she said deceased wore a pair of black kid gloves when she went to the Greyhound on the evening of the 21st April. Witness made inquiries after deceased on Sunday, April 22nd.
Amy Smith, another of deceased's sisters, deposed that she went to Lea Bridge-road on the Monday after deceased was missed. She saw a woman who kept a chandler's shop near the Ship Aground, and who told witness that she saw deceased there about 12 o'clock on the previous Saturday night. Another woman living near told witness that she also saw deceased with a man on the night in question. The same evening Marvell, son of the landlord of the Ship Aground, and Anthony, came to their house in Hemsworth Street. Anthony said he had come to clear himself, because he was said to be the last person seen with deceased. Marvell stated that he saw a man take a purse from deceased, and he and some others ran after and stopped him. He searched him, finding some money and a latch-key. Anthony further said he left deceased at the corner of Chatsworth-road, and went home. Deceased told him that she did not want his company and was going home.
Mrs. Ann Smith, mother of the deceased, was recalled, and corroborated the previous witness' evidence as to what took place at the interview with Anthony and Marvell on Monday evening, April 23rd.
There being no other evidence to place before the jury, the Coroner then commented upon the testimony which they had already had. He said the evidence was so voluminous that it was unnecessary for him to go through it all, but the real facts of the case occupied but a small compass. The jury would have, of course, to take into consideration the girl's character and her position, and would have to ascertain the cause of death and try to find out how she came by her death. The girl was a machinist, 25 years of age, and seemed to have a very respectable home and surroundings. Her history, however, was very different from what they might have expected. It was perfectly clear that she was a very self-willed girl, and did not conduct herself in the manner her parents wished her to do, being constantly out late at night, and on the Monday before the occurrence she was found by the young man, to whom she had been engaged for many years, in a public-house the worse for drink. On the particular Saturday she left home about half-past five and went to the Greyhound dancing-grounds, Lea Bridge, she being the first to arrive there, with some young man, about whom nothing could be learned. She was seen the worse for drink, and there was an idea that she had been drugged, but that idea fell to pieces when the post-mortem examination was made. She was drunk very early in the evening and was more or less in that condition throughout the period with which they had to deal. She seemed to recover somewhat from her drunkenness in the coffee-house, and went back into the dancing grounds, where she was afterwards seen in a maudlin state with the young fellow's arm around her. Subsequently she was seen leaving the Greyhound public-house about closing time, and again at twelve o'clock, when she was walking by the side of some costermonger's barrows. Those costermongers did not seem to have done anything improper to her. Her dress was dragging on the ground, and she appeared to be altogether in a deplorable condition. On arriving at the Ship Aground deceased complained of being thirsty, and it was stated that she was given some beer to drink. At that time there were a lot of people just turned out of the Ship Aground, some of whom were the worse for drink. Thinking the woman had been improperly treated, and her purse had been stolen - but the jury knew she had no purse to be stolen - those men chased one of the poor costermongers and treated him very roughly; in fact the man stated that he thought his last hour had come. It was clear that the man Anthony, who, it was stated, was not only very rough, but the worse for drink, was seen with deceased for some time leaning against some railings, after which he went along Lea Bridge-road with her. Anthony's statements as to what subsequently took place were different and somewhat contradictory. To Inspector Bond he said he left the woman at the corner of Chatsworth-road, whilst he told Inspector Helson that he accompanied her down Chatsworth-road and across the south mill field, over Strong's bridge and along the towing path for about fifty yards towards the water-works, where he saw Charles Cator, with whom he left deceased. He also stated that he went home over Pond bridge and across the fields. The jury had not heard Cator's statement, and therefore could not tell how far Anthony's tale was correct. Deceased therefore disappeared from their view between 12 and 1 o'clock on Sunday morning, and her body was not found until the Friday morning following, in the water, at a spot not very far from the place where Anthony said he left her. There had been a strong current in the water between the times. The post-mortem examination showed that there were no marks of violence on the body, that there was no evidence of violation, and that death was due to drowning. Deceased, they were told, could not have struggled much in the water, and that would agree with the condition in which she was on the night in question. There seemed to be only three ways in which she could very well have been drowned; either she committed suicide, was thrown or pushed in the water, or she accidentally got into the water. As to the case of suicide, deceased was a girl leading evidently a gradually intensified wicked life. While she was in a maudlin condition at the coffee house she said she was tired of life, and wished she was "settled." Against the idea that she committed suicide they had the medical evidence showing that she had not been outraged, and the evidence of her relatives proving that she never threatened to take her life. As to the second point that she had been pushed into the water, there was the fact that Anthony was seen with her late at night, he being in a state of semi-drunkenness. If, however, he had committed such an act as to push her in the water he would hardly have walked home in the way in which he did when seen by Judd coming from the direction of the spot, where he (Anthony) said he left the girl. Anthony's evidence was scarcely trustworthy in a case of that kind, because he would naturally be interested in putting the fact that he was last seen with the deceased on the shoulders of another man. There seemed high probability, if it were true that deceased got down in the marshes and not knowing the district, that she might unwittingly step into the water. He (the Coroner) would say no more, but would ask the jury to consider their verdict.
After a brief consultation the jury found a verdict to this effect, that deceased came by her death by drowning, but under what circumstances there was not sufficient evidence to show.

Source: The Mercury, Saturday May 12, 1888, Page 6

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Re: Elizabeth Annie Smith

Post by Karen on Tue 5 Jun 2012 - 20:04

THE LEA MYSTERY.
CATOR AND ANTHONY DISCHARGED.

At Dalston Police-court, today, Charles Cator and George Anthony, the men charged on suspicion with being concerned together in causing the death of Annie Smith, of Hemsworth-street, Hoxton, by drowning her in the River Lea under circumstances already reported, were again placed in the dock. Mr. Sims represented the Treasury; Mr. Romain defended Cator, and Mr. C. Young appeared for Anthony. - Mr. Sims said that since the prisoners were before the Court last Saturday, the Coroner had completed his inquiry, and the Jury had returned a verdict of "Found drowned." In a case of this description the police had, of course, made every inquiry, and all the witnesses that they could procure had been examined. He (Mr. Sims) was not in a position to carry the evidence any further. There was no evidence that the girl had been robbed or violated, and, under these circumstances, the Public prosecutor had come to the conclusion that there was no possibility of a conviction, and the charge should be withdrawn. - Mr. Bros was of opinion that there was not sufficient evidence to secure a conviction before any Jury, and he therefore allowed the charge to be withdrawn. - The prisoners were then discharged.

Source: The Echo, Saturday May 12, 1888, Page 4

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Re: Elizabeth Annie Smith

Post by Karen on Tue 5 Jun 2012 - 20:05

THE LEA-BRIDGE MYSTERY.

At Dalston police-court, yesterday Charles Cator and George Anthony, the men charged on suspicion with being concerned together in causing the death of Annie Smith, of Hemsworth-street, Hoxton, by drowning her in the river Lea, under circumstances already reported, were again placed in the dock. - Cator surrendered to his bail, and Anthony was brought up in custody.
Mr. Sims said that since the prisoners were before the court, on the previous Saturday, Mr. Wynne Baxter, the coroner, had completed his inquiry, and after a hearing extending over four days, the jury returned a verdict of "Found Drowned." In a case of this description the police had, of course, made every inquiry, and all the witnesses they could procure had been examined. He (Mr. Sims) was not in a position to carry the evidence any further. There were no marks of violence on the girl's body, and how she got into the water was still a mystery. There was absolutely, on the evidence which had been given, no case whatever against Cator; the statement which had been made by the other prisoner, in which he said that he left the girl with Cator, not being admissible. Against Anthony the case was very slight. There were, it was true, a few scratches about his face, but these might be accounted for by the fact that prisoner had befriended the deceased when her purse was alleged to have been stolen, the injuries being sustained in the struggle which followed. There was, however, no evidence that the girl had been robbed or violated, and under these circumstances the Public prosecutor had come to the conclusion that there was no possibility of a conviction and the charge should be withdrawn.
Mr. Romain said that with regard to the statement of Anthony, that his client was the last person seen with the deceased, quite contrary statements were made at the inquest.
Mr. Bros thought that after the statement of the representative of the Public prosecutor, the least said the better.
Mr. Young said he simply wished to say that from the first his client had protested his innocence.
Mr. Bros was of opinion that there was not sufficient evidence to secure a conviction before any jury, and he therefore allowed the charge to be withdrawn.
The prisoners were then discharged.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, May 13, 1888, Page 7

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Re: Elizabeth Annie Smith

Post by Karen on Wed 6 Jun 2012 - 3:38

THE LEA MYSTERY.
THE INQUEST.

On Monday afternoon Mr. Coroner Wynne Baxter conducted an inquiry at the Manor Assembly Rooms, Hackney, on the body of Elizabeth Annie Smith, aged 25, who lived at Hoxton, and whose body was found in the Lea, Clapton, at the latter end of last week, deceased having been missing from her home since the preceding Saturday. Mr. V. Young appeared for Anthony (one of the persons accused of being concerned in causing the young woman's death), and Mr. Romaine watched the proceedings on behalf of Cantor, who also was arrested by the police.
The inquest had been fixed to be held at the Earl Amhurst Tavern, Amhurst-road, but the accommodation there was found quite inadequate for the people who attended the inquiry, and the Coroner declined to do more than swear the jury at that house. He stated that he had tried to get Shoreditch Town Hall, and had been all over the parish seeking a place sufficiently commodious to hold the inquiry. Opinion was freely expressed by the jurors that it was not at all creditable for a parish like Hackney to be without a proper Coroner's Court. After the jury had been sworn, the Court adjourned to the Manor Rooms. The first witness called was
Albert Dennis Smith, living at 33, Hemsworth-street, Hoxton, who identified the body as that of his daughter, Elizabeth Annie. Deceased was one of a family of ten, and was a machinist, working for a Mrs. Rawling, of Hoxton-street. Witness last saw her alive on Friday afternoon, April 20th. On Saturday morning she was not present when he breakfasted between eight and nine o'clock. About 6:15 p.m. he went home to tea, and he then understood deceased had gone out. He did not expect her back again until about half-past eleven or twelve o'clock, she generally being out late on a Saturday night. Deceased had not returned home on Sunday morning, and about ten a.m. her sister Amelia went in search of her, but returned three hours later without being able to glean any tidings of her. On Monday most of the family were out searching for deceased. Witness on Tuesday inquired at the Kingsland Police Station concerning his missing daughter, and found that they had had the circumstances of the case reported to them from the Hackney Division. Nothing transpired until the 27th April (Friday), when between eight and nine o'clock witness was fetched to the Hackney Mortuary, and there saw the body of his lost daughter. Witness knew his daughter had been to a dancing-place, near Lea Bridge-road, called the Greyhound. He believed she had been there once before this year. She was engaged to a young man named William Stead, of 37, Hemsworth-street, and had kept company with him between five and six years. After deceased had been missed witness saw him, but he said he had not been with her. In answer to the Coroner, witness said deceased drank a little at times. He had seen her the worse for drink. Witness used to advise her as well as he could, but she was very self-willed. She had never threatened to take her life.
A Juror: Was she really actually at work from day to day?
Witness: Most decidedly.
Another Juror (addressing the Coroner): Is it the custom to have these cases brought before the police previous to their coming before the Coroner?
The Coroner: No, that is a matter to which I shall draw your attention.
In reply to further inquiries, witness stated that he could not say whether deceased went from Hoxton to the Greyhound by herself.
Mr. Young: You did not appear to be uneasy when you found your daughter was absent on Sunday morning?
Witness: Decidedly I was uneasy.
Mr. Young: Had she been absent on any other occasion?
Witness: She had sometimes been out all night without informing me that she would be out, but she afterwards told us where she had been. She used to stay with friends.
Mr. Young: How often has that been the case? Not more than two or three times. Witness, in reply to further interrogatories, stated that deceased's addiction to drink had increased latterly. She earned 14s. a week when in full work.
By Mr. Romaine: Deceased gave her mother 5s. a week for her support, and kept the remainder of her earnings for herself. As far as witness was aware, deceased was sober when she left home on Saturday, the 21st April.
Ann Smith, mother of the deceased, said: On Saturday, April 21st, deceased was up by half-past eight. She had her breakfast, and left the house in time to be at business by nine o'clock. She returned about half-past two, and remained at home until 5 o'clock or 5:30 p.m. She gave me two half-crowns and said her wages only amounted to 9s. 4d., she not having worked full time. Before she went out I asked her where she was going, and she said, "The Greyhound, mother." I knew where the place was, and that dancing was carried on there. I did not try to persuade her from going. She had been there in previous years, but not this year. She was generally out late on Saturday evening, returning very often after we had retired to bed. She never went out with other members of the family on a Saturday evening, but sometimes did with William Stead, her young man. I used to get up to let her in when she came home late. She did not return on the night of the 21st April. In the night I went to her bedroom, and found she had not returned. I did not think her absence was serious. She had been absent before, but had always been able to give a good account of herself. I first made inquiries about her on the Sunday morning. My daughter Amelia went out to look for her. My eldest son is 20 years old, but he didn't offer to go out. Amelia returned about one o'clock without any tidings. On Wednesday I went to Worship-street Police Court, and mentioned the case to the magistrate. To my knowledge deceased was not in any trouble. She had never threatened to commit suicide. I have seen her the worse for drink when she has returned home on Saturday nights. I don't think she had had any trouble with the young man with whom she kept company. She had no watch or jewellery upon her when she left. She wore a pair of common earrings. In answer to a juror, witness said she did not know what sort of a place the Greyhound was. Deceased was very self-willed, and witness considered she had no control over her. In reply to Mr. Romaine, witness said deceased used to be hysterical when in a passion. By the Coroner: Deceased had stopped out occasionally all night unexpectedly, but she had always said where she had been, and when witness inquired she always found her statements to have been correct.
Eliza Heming, wife of a silversmith, living at 5, Great Chart-street, Hoxton, stated that she saw deceased, with whom she was acquainted, on Saturday night, April 21st, about ten o'clock, at the Greyhound Gardens, Lea Bridge-road. Dancing was going on there. Deceased was sitting on a seat with her bonnet in her lap, and had a crowd of people round her. She seemed as though she had had a "drop" to drink. Witness spoke to her, but could not understand her reply. Witness stood there about ten minutes, and then went away. She did not see deceased's young man, but the people said he was there. Deceased could not stand up long. Around deceased there were about two dozen people. The garden was lit up. Witness did not notice any scratches on deceased's face.
William MacGill, of No. 1, Bird-street, Wapping, said on Saturday, 21st April, he was acting as manager for a coffee-house called the "Carman's Rest," at the corner of the entrance to the Greyhound Dancing Grounds. He had seen deceased's body. He did not know her, but recognised her by her dress and features as a young lady who, on April 21st, was in the Greyhound gardens with a young gentleman. They were the first two who were in the grounds, and went in about half-past seven o'clock. She did not seem to be the worse for drink at that time. The young man was about 18 or 20 years old, about 5ft. 4in. in height, wore black felt hat, cutaway black coat, light grey trousers, and a silver chain. So far as witness could see from the coffee-house, they danced together. About 8:45 that night witness' attention was called to the young lady lying insensible outside the coffee-house door. Mrs. Martin, the proprietress of the coffee-house, had hold of her at the time, and told him to take her inside, which he did. He administered some water to her. She was unable to speak. After sitting for about a quarter of an hour she seemed to revive somewhat, and had some more cold water, after which she again became unconscious, but revived again, and was given some strong tea. She afterwards vomited, and then witness found that she smelt strongly of snuff and brandy. Witness, after wiping her face, was called to the door by somebody, who said her young man was outside. Witness went outside, and he walked away from the shop to the Greyhound. Witness went up to him and said, "Why don't you come inside and see to your young lady?" He said, "I don't know anything at all about her." Witness said, "Why, you've been with her all the evening; surely, if you've any feeling towards the girl, you would come and see how she was getting on." He answered, "I don't know anything at all about her, I tell you." Witness then returned to the shop, and found she had revived, but not quite regained consciousness. Mrs. Martin afterwards took her into the scullery and bathed her face. While there deceased noticed the young man in the grounds, and she went out of the shop into the grounds. Witness about five minutes afterwards followed and saw the young fellow and her sitting right at the back of the grounds, "cuddling" one another round the neck. They were there for about half-an-hour, when she fell into a kind of fit, and the young man ran away from her amongst the crowd. There were some young ladies standing by at the time, and witness asked them to go and see to her, which they did, seeming to know her. At that time there were

[The next line is illegible.]

umbrella, and the young man had a cane. About a quarter to eleven witness saw her leave the grounds alone. She went towards the Greyhound public house. Directly she reached there two young men got hold of her and took her inside. Witness did not know those two young men. He then closed the shop, and whilst standing outside a few minutes later, he saw deceased leave the public house, it being shutting-up time, and go across the road, accompanied by the two men, and they proceeded up the Lea Bridge-road toward London. In answer to inquiries, witness said deceased, when he last saw her, seemed drunk. The two young men who had hold of her were rather respectably dressed in dark clothes. When witness took her into the shop he thought she was suffering from a fainting fit, the result of dancing. In reply to Mr. Young, witness did not think either of the young men he had mentioned was a bargeman. By Mr. Romaine: When deceased left the Greyhound about eleven o'clock she was going in the direction of the Ship Aground beerhouse. That place was closed. [Cantor and two other young men were brought into the room, but witness could not identify the former as one of the men he had seen on the night.] Witness also stated that the deceased had a pair of earrings on when in the gardens.
Mrs. Heming was recalled, and said she did not at any time see deceased with a young man. When she said there were about two dozen persons there, she meant there were that number around the deceased. There were a large number in the grounds.
At this stage the inquiry was adjourned until the following afternoon at two o'clock.

At the resumption of the inquiry on Tuesday afternoon there was again a large attendance of the public.
Detective-Sergeant W. Vagg, J Division, stated that on Wednesday night last, in company with the deceased's aunt and uncle (Mr. and Mrs. Dewnard, High Gladnor-terrace, Stoke Newington), he made inquiries about deceased. He called on George Hoggs, 5, School Nook, close by the Lea Bridge-road, and he handed witness the umbrella produced. The handle was broken off, and the umbrella was partly covered with mud. He said he found it open underneath the bridge, in the water on Sunday night, the 22nd instant. The Ship Aground was close by the bridge.
Sergeant Hatley, J 20, stated that from instructions from Detective Bond, he, in company with Police Constable (J 295) Yates, commenced searching the river Lea on Friday morning at a quarter to four. They first searched the canal from Lea Bridge to Homerton Bridge. They then went to the rear of the waterworks to the river Lea, walking along the west side. When they got within 150 yards of the White House beerhouse, they saw on the east side what appeared to be paper and rags on the top of the water, entangled in bushes which were growing on the banks of the river. They went over old Ferry Bridge to the east side. On reaching the object they found a number of rats around it. Assisted by Yates, witness got down to the water's edge, put his arm under the water, and got hold of what proved to be the left arm of the body, which was lying on the stomach, the right arm being entangled in the bushes. The dolman was over the head. The dress bodice was opened in the front, and one side of the dress was torn; the other clothes were not torn. Deceased had neither gloves, hat, nor bonnet on. Witness pulled the body to the bank and searched it, finding the handkerchief and brown kid glove, produced, in the pocket. There was nothing else in the pocket. The pocket handkerchief was quite clean. The brooch produced was fastening the dolman round the neck, and an earring was in the right ear, but there was not one in the left. No money was found. Witness then sent the constable for the ambulance, and in the meantime made a fruitless search for the hat or bonnet. The body was subsequently conveyed to Hackney mortuary to await identification. Blood ran freely from a hole in the left cheek, which appeared to have been gnawed by rats. The right arm also appeared to have been gnawed by rats. There were no footprints near the spot where the body was found. Witness should think the body had been in the water for several days. It might have floated down to the place where it was found. The body was about a mile from the place where the umbrella was found under Lea Bridge.
Dr. C.T. Aveling deposed that between nine and ten last Friday morning he saw the body of the deceased at the Hackney mortuary, he being called in by the police. He made a cursory examination of the body, and a further inspection in the evening of the same day.
The Coroner remarked that no information had been given to him until after the body had been examined, which was quite contrary to precedent.
Witness stated that he had orders from Mr. Baxter's predecessor, whether he received direct instructions or not, to make post-mortem examinations on bodies when he thought the interests of justice would be served by so doing, and being so accustomed to act, he had quite forgotten that he had not received such power from the present Coroner. He sincerely apologized for having done anything which might at all be interpreted as disrespectful.
The Coroner said it was not the matter of disrespect that he cared for, but it was a most unheard of proceeding for a post-mortem examination to be made whilst the Coroner was quite ignorant of the case. It placed him in a very awkward position, because by Act of Parliament he could not pay him. He only lived about a mile and a half away, and could easily have been communicated with. Besides, in certain cases he should perhaps have selected some expert.
Witness stated that his only object was to elicit the truth, the case being rumoured to be one of outrage, and perhaps murder. Continuing his evidence, witness said he made his examination in conjunction with Dr. White and Dr. Oliver. The dress was wet and draggled; the upper part of it and trimmings were torn, but the rest of the clothing remained in its usual state. There was no evidence, so far as the clothes were concerned, of any struggle having taken place. There were no marks of blood, or any discharge, on the clothing. The face had been gnawed by rats and blood oozed from the wound, and the right arm had been also considerably gnawed. The mouth was open, but the tongue did not protrude. Witness found no marks on the body of bruising or violence, nor was there any fracture or dislocation of any bone. There were no signs of recent outrage. The lungs were gorged with blood of a black colour. The heart was healthy. Witness could not smell in the stomach any alcohol, drug, or snuff. In his opinion the cause of death was drowning, but he did not think deceased struggled much in the water after immersion. In answer to Mr. Young, witness stated that the absence of struggle might have been accounted for by her being under the influence of drink. If she had drank snuff in liquid, there would no doubt have been some trace of it in the stomach.
Minnie Smith, sister of the deceased, corroborated her mother's evidence with regard to deceased's departure on Saturday afternoon, the 21st April. Witness knew that deceased and the young man with whom she kept company had quarrelled, but she did not know the reason. Deceased left home on Saturday without an umbrella. The umbrella produced witness had never seen before. Stead used to go occasionally to the Greyhound.
William Henry Stead, 39, Hemsworth-street, stated that he had kept company with deceased for the last six years. They were engaged to be married. He did not know where deceased was going on Saturday, April 21st, but on the previous Monday evening he accidentally met her in a public-house called the Duke of Gloucester, St. John's-road, Hoxton. They used to go there together sometimes. Witness smacked her face for being in there alone, and left the place. She was the worse for drink. That would be about eight o'clock at night. Witness never saw her again alive. The last time witness was at the Greyhound Dancing Grounds was Easter Tuesday. Deceased accompanied him then. Witness had never seen the umbrella [produced] before.
Minnie Smith, recalled, stated that on Monday, the 16th April, Stead called at their house, and told them that deceased was in the Duke of Gloucester. Witness fetched her home. She was the worse for drink.
M'Gill, recalled, was shown Stead, but he said he had never met him before.
Charles Cantor (one of the persons accused of being concerned with causing the death of the deceased), living at 2, Warren's-terrace, Lea Bridge-road, was then called.
Mr. Romaine stated that he advised Cantor not to answer any questions.
Mr. Young asked Cantor whether he saw Anthony with deceased, but to this he did not reply.
Sarah Martin, single woman, said she lived at the "Carman's Rest" Coffee-house, Lea Bridge-road, which was kept by her father. On Saturday, the 21st April, about 7:30 p.m., she saw deceased in the grounds of the Greyhound, in company with a young man. About 8:45 p.m. witness saw deceased in a shop, kept by a Mrs. Brown, leaning up against the counter. Mrs. Brown gave deceased a glass of water. The latter seemed to be intoxicated. Witness' mother asked Mrs. Brown to take deceased into her coffee-house, and when they got deceased inside she threw her bonnet off. When witness asked deceased to "try and pull herself together a bit," she replied, "You don't know, I'm sick of it; I wish I was settled." She afterwards began to cry, and witness told her to leave off or she would make her head ache, and deceased replied, "My heart aches, not my head." Deceased was given some tea, after drinking which she

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house close upon ten p.m. she appeared to have revived a great deal. Witness was sure deceased had an umbrella when first she was in the grounds, but she did not have it when she left their coffee-house. There was a young man standing outside the door whilst deceased was inside, and he had an umbrella and a stick. He was the young man whom witness saw when first they went into the grounds.
M'Gill, recalled, was shown the umbrella which had been found under the Lea Bridge, and he said it was something like the one he saw in possession of the deceased on the night of the 21st April.
At this stage the Court again adjourned until Thursday afternoon.

Source: The Mercury, Saturday May 5, 1888, Page 7

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Re: Elizabeth Annie Smith

Post by Karen on Wed 6 Jun 2012 - 9:44

THE LEA MYSTERY.
RESUMED INQUEST.

Mr. Wynne E. Baxter resumed the inquiry, today, at the Manor Rooms, Hackney, respecting the death of Elizabeth Ann Smith, aged 25, a machinist, lately living at 33, Hemsworth-street, Hoxton, whose body was found in the River Lea on Friday, the 27th ult. - Detective-Inspector Joseph Helston deposed that on the morning of the 27th he made inquiries about the missing girl. He found the man Anthony, and, after warning him, took down his statement.

ANTHONY'S ACCOUNT OF THE AFFAIR.

He said: - "On Saturday night, at five minutes to twelve, I was in Lea Bridge-road, and saw two men running away towards Clapton. I heard they had stolen a purse from a girl who was standing close by. I, with Joseph Cantor, Ned Murphy, and others, ran after them. I stopped one of them. We had a struggle. He was searched, and we let him go. I walked back to the girl, and with her walked on to the Lea-bridge-road, down Chatsworth-road, across the Marsh by the side of the fields, and by the back of the houses. We crossed Strong's-bridge, and went along the towing-path to the waterworks gate. I then saw Charlie Cantor coming along the path. I went away and left her standing against the wall. I went along the path over Pond-lane-bridge and across the fields down home. Charlie Cantor was talking to her when I left her. After I came back into Lea-bridge-road I saw George Judd and Mickey Cornwall. I said good night to them, and went home. I got home about five minutes to one." Witness then detained him for inquiries.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday May 8, 1888, Page 3

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Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"

Karen
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