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How the Titanic Sank

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How the Titanic Sank

Post by Karen on Thu 19 Apr 2012 - 0:44

HOW MAMMOTH LINER STRUCK.
PASSENGERS AT CARDS.

COLLISION NOT ENOUGH TO STOP GAME.
LONDON MAN'S EXPERIENCES.

SHIP STOOD ON END BEFORE SINKING.

One of the most vivid and thrilling accounts of the disaster which have been given is that furnished by Mr. Beesley, of London.
Mr. Beesley, who was formerly a master at Dulwich College, gave up his post and was travelling partly for the sake of his health and partly to visit his brother in Canada. In an interview with Reuter's correspondent Mr. Beesley said: -
"The voyage from Queenstown was quiet and successful. We had met with very fine weather. The sea was calm and the wind was westerly to south-westerly the whole way. The temperature was very cold, particularly on the last day. In fact, after dinner on Sunday evening it was almost too cold to be on deck at all.
"I had been in my berth about ten minutes when at about a quarter past ten I felt a slight jar. Then soon afterwards there was a second shock, but it was not sufficiently large to cause any anxiety to anyone, however nervous they may have been. The engines, however, stopped immediately afterwards. At first I thought that the ship had lost a propeller.
"I went up on deck in my dressing-gown and I found only a few people there who had come up in the same way to inquire why we had stopped, but there was no sort of anxiety in the mind of anyone. We saw through the smoking-room window that a game of cards was going on, and I went in to ask if they knew anything. They had noticed the jar a little more, and, looking through the window, had seen a huge iceberg go by close to the side of the boat. They thought that we had just grazed it with a glancing blow, and they had been to see if any damage had been done. None of us, of course, had any conception that she had been pierced below by part of a submerged iceberg.
"The game of cards was resumed, and, without any thought of disaster, I retired to my cabin to read until we started again. I never saw any of the players or the onlookers again.

THE SHIP QUITE STILL.

"A little later, hearing people going upstairs, I went out again, and found that everybody wanted to know why the engines had stopped. No doubt many of them had been awakened from their sleep by the sudden stopping of the vibration to which they had become accustomed during the four days we had been on board. Going up on the deck again I saw that there was an unmistakable list downwards from the stern to the bows, but, knowing nothing of what had happened, I concluded that some of the front compartments had filled and had weighed her down.
"Again I went down to my cabin, where I put on some warmer clothing. As I dressed I heard the order shouted, "All the passengers on deck with lifebelts on." We all walked up slowly with the lifebelts tied on over our clothing, but even then we presumed that this was merely a wise precaution the captain was taking, and that we should return in a short time to go to bed.
"The ship was absolutely still, and except for the gentle tilt downwards, which I don't think one person in ten would have noticed at the time, there was no visible signs of the approaching disaster. She just lay as if waiting for the order to go on again when some trifling matter had been adjusted. But, in a few moments, we saw the covers being lifted from the boats, and the crews allotted to them standing by and uncoiling the ropes which were to lower them. We then began to realise that it was a more serious matter than we had at first supposed.
"My first thought was to go down to get more clothing and some money, but, seeing people pouring up the stairs, I decided that it was better to cause no confusion to people coming up by attempting to get to my cabin.
"Presently we heard the order, "All men stand back away from the boats. All ladies retire to the next deck below," which was the smoking-room, or B deck. The men all stood away and waited in absolute silence, some leaning against the end railings of the deck, others pacing slowly up and down. The boats were then swung out and lowered from A deck. When they were level with B deck, where all the women were collected, the women got in quietly with the exception of some who refused to leave their husbands.

SAW NO PANIC.

"In some cases they were torn from their husbands and pushed into the boats, but in many instances they were allowed to remain, since there was no one to insist that they should go.
"Looking over the side, one saw the boats from aft already in the water slipping quietly away into the darkness. Presently the boats near me were lowered with much creaking, as the new ropes slipped through the pulleys and blocks down the ninety feet which separated them from the water.
"An officer in uniform came up as one boat went down and shouted out, "When you're afloat, row round to the companion ladder and stand by with other boats for orders." "Aye, aye, sir," came up the reply, but I don't think any boat was able to obey the order, for when they were afloat and had their oars at work, the condition of the rapidly settling liner was much more apparent. In common prudence the sailors saw that they could do nothing but row from the sinking ship and so save, at any rate, some lives. They, no doubt, anticipated that the suction from such an enormous vessel would be more than usually dangerous to the crowded boat, which was mostly filled with women.
"All this time there was no trace of any disorder. There was no panic or rush to the boats, and there were no scenes of women sobbing hysterically, such as one generally pictures happening at such times. Everyone seemed to realise so slowly that there was imminent danger that, when it was realised that we might all be presently in the sea, with nothing but our lifebelts to support us until we were picked up by passing steamers, it was extraordinary how calm everyone was; how completely self-controlled we were as one by one the boats, filled with women and children, were lowered and rowed away into the night.
"Presently word went round among us that men were to be put in boats on the starboard side. I was on the port side. Most of the men walked across the deck to see if this was true. I remained where I was, and shortly afterwards I heard the call, "Any more ladies?" Looking over the side of the ship, I saw boat No. 13 swinging level with B deck. It was half-full of women. Again the call was repeated, "Any more ladies?" I saw none coming.
"Then one of the crew looked up and said, "Any ladies on your deck, sir?" "No," I replied. Then you'd better jump," said he. I dropped, and fell into the bottom of the boat as they cried, "Lower away."
"As the boat began to descend, two ladies were pushed hurriedly through the crowd on B deck, and a baby ten months old was passed down after them. Then down we went, the crew shouting out directions to those lowering us. "Level," "Aft," "Stern," "Both together," until we were some ten feet from the water. Here occurred the only anxious moment we had during the whole of our experience from the time of our leaving the deck to our reaching the Carpathia.
"Immediately below our boat was the exhaust of the condensers, and a huge stream of water was pouring all the time from the ship's side just above the water line. It was plain that we ought to be smart away from it if we were to escape swamping when we touched the water. We had no officers on board, and no petty officer or member of the crew to take charge, so one of the stokers shouted: "Someone find the pin which releases the boat from the ropes and pull it up!" No one knew where it was. We felt as well as we could on the floor and along the sides, but found nothing. It was difficult to move among so many people. We had sixty or seventy on board. Down we went, and presently we floated with our ropes still holding us, and the stream of water from the exhaust washing us away from the side of the vessel, while the swell of the sea urged us back against the side again.

STOKER ELECTED CAPTAIN.

"The resultant of all these forces was that we were carried parallel to the ship's side, and directly under boat No. 14, which had filled rapidly with men, and was coming down on us in a way that threatened to submerge our boat.
"Stop lowering 14," our crew shouted, and the crew of No. 14, now only twenty feet above, cried out the same. The distance to the top, however, was some seventy feet, and the creaking of the pulleys must have deadened all sound to those above, for down she came - fifteen feet, ten feet, five feet, and a stoker and I reached up and touched the bottom of the swinging boat above our heads. The next drop would have brought her on our heads. Just before she dropped, another stoker sprang to the ropes, with his knife open in his hand. "One," I heard him say, and then "Two," as the knife cut through the pulley rope.
"The next moment the exhaust stream carried us clear, while boat No. 14 dropped into the water, taking the space we had occupied a moment before. Our gunwales were almost touching. We drifted away easily, and when our oars were got out we headed directly away from the ship.
"The crew seemed to me to be mostly cooks. They sat in their white jackets, two to an oar, with a stoker at the tiller. There was a certain amount of shouting from one end of the boat to the other, and the discussion as to which way we should go was finally decided by our electing as captain the stoker who was steering and by all agreeing to obey his orders. He set to work at once to get into touch with the other boats, calling upon them and getting as close to them as seemed wise, so that when search boats came in the morning to look for us there would be more chance that all would be rescued.
"It was now one o'clock in the morning. The starlit night was beautiful, but as there was no moon it was not very light. The sea was as calm as a pond. There was just a gentle heave as the boat dipped up and down in the swell. It was an ideal night, except for the bitter cold.

FIVE MINUTES UPRIGHT.

"In the distance the Titanic looked enormous. Her length and her great bulk were outlined in black against the starry sky. Every porthole and saloon was blazing with light. It was impossible to think that anything could be wrong with such a leviathan were it not for that ominous tilt downward in the bows, where the water was by now up to the lowest row of portholes.
"At about two o'clock we observed her settling down very rapidly, with the bows and the bridge completely under water. She slowly tilted straight on end, with the stern vertically upwards. As she did so the lights in the cabins and the saloons, which had not flickered for a moment since we left, died out, flashed once more, and then went out altogether. At the same time the machinery roared down through the vessel with a groaning rattle that could have been heard for miles.
"It was the weirdest sound surely that could have been heard in the middle of the ocean. It was not yet quite the end. To our amazement, she remained in that upright position for a time which I estimate as five minutes. It was certainly for some minutes that we watched at least 150 feet of the Titanic towering up above the level of the sea, looming black against the sky. Then with a quiet, slanting dive, she disappeared beneath the waters. Our eyes had looked for the last time on the gigantic vessel in which we set out from Southampton."

CRIES OF ANGUISH.
First Concussion Thought to be Only a Whale Struck.

The Paris "Matin" publishes the following interesting narrative signed by three French survivors of the "Titanic" disaster, M. Pierre Marechal, an aviator; M. Omont, a manufacturer of Havre; and M. Chevre, a sculptor: -
We were quietly playing auction bridge with a Mrs. Smith, of Philadelphia, when we heard a violent noise similar to that produced by the screw racing. We were startled and looked at one another under the impression that a serious accident had happened. We did not, however, think for a moment of a catastrophe, but through the portholes we saw ice rubbing against the ship's sides. We rushed on deck and saw that the Titanic had a tremendous list. There was everywhere a momentary panic, but it speedily subsided. To the inquiries of a lady, one of the ship's officers caustically replied, "Don't be afraid; we are only cutting a whale in two." Confidence was quickly restored, all being convinced that the Titanic could not founder.
Captain Smith, nevertheless, appeared nervous; he came down on deck chewing a toothpick. "Let everyone," he said, "put on a lifebelt. It is more prudent." He then ordered the boats to be got out. The band continued to play popular airs in order to reassure the passengers. Nobody wanted to go in the boats, everyone saying, "What's the use?" and firmly believing that there was no risk in remaining on board. In these circumstances some of the boats went away with very few passengers; we saw boats with only about fifteen persons in them. Disregarding the advice of the officers many of the passengers continued to cling to the ship. When our boat had rowed about half a mile from the vessel the spectacle was quite fairylike.
The Titanic, which was illuminated from stem to stern, was perfectly stationary, like some fantastic piece of stage scenery. The night was clear, and the sea perfectly smooth, but it was intensely cold. Presently the gigantic ship began to sink by the bows, and then those who had remained on board realised to the full the horror of their situation. Suddenly the lights went out, and an immense clamour filled the air in one supreme cry for help. Little by little the Titanic settled down, and for three hours cries of anguish were heard like some vast choir singing a death song.
At moments the cries of terror were lulled, and we thought it was all over, but the next instant they were renewed in still keener accents of despair. As for us, we did nothing but row, row, row to escape from the obsession of the heartrending death cries. One by one the voices were stilled.
Strange to say, the Titanic sank without noise, and contrary to expectations the suction was very feeble. There was a great backwash, and that was all. In the final spasm the stern of the leviathan stood in the air, and then the vessel finally disappeared - completely lost.

DIED LIKE A HERO.
Man Who Placed His Wife in a Boat and Stood Back to Save Another.

Mr. Jacques Futrelle was one of those who parted from his wife, and steadfastly refused to accept a chance to enter a lifeboat when he knew that the Titanic was sinking under him. How he stayed to his death is told by Mrs. Futrelle, who said: -
"When the Titanic hit the iceberg there was the most appalling excitement, and who, after passing through such experiences, could blame these poor people for the panic which overwhelmed them? Jacques is dead, but he died like a hero, that I know. Three or four times after the crash I rushed up to him and clasped him in my arms, begging him to get into one of the lifeboats. "For God's sake, go!" he fairly screamed, and tried to push me towards the lifeboat. I could see how he suffered. "It's your last chance; go!" he pleaded. Then one of the ship's officers forced me into a lifeboat, and I gave up all hope that he could be saved."
Mr. August Wennerstron, of Sweden, spied a collapsible boat behind one of the smokestacks as the vessel was sinking. With three other men he managed to tear it from its lashings, and the four jumped overboard with it. The boat turned over four times, but each time they managed to right it. While drifting about Mr. Wennerstron said he saw at least two hundred men in the water who were drowned. Finally he and his three companions were all picked up by the Carpathia.

MAJOR BUTT.

When President Taft heard definitely on Friday that Major Archibald Butt had gone down on the Titanic he said: - "I never had any idea that Archie was really saved. When I heard that 1,200 people went down on the Titanic I knew that he went, too. Archie was a soldier; he was always on deck, where he belonged."
All accounts agree that Major Butt not only died like a soldier, but like a hero, and the American journals are full of eulogies of this brave man, who saw the women and children off and cheerfully sacrificed his own life. The President's testimony is eloquent in its simplicity.

70,000 LETTERS LOST.

The Titanic carried mails from Liverpool consisting of 228 letter and newspaper bags, containing about 70,000 missives and 450 registered letters.

PET DOGS SAVED.

Five women survivors saved their pet dogs, and another has saved a little pig, which she regards as her mascot.

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Karen Trenouth
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Re: How the Titanic Sank

Post by Karen on Tue 15 May 2012 - 9:09

THE "TITANIC" AND THE STARS.

[img][/img]

To those who believe that the stars rule mankind the awful catastrophe which has overtaken the "Titanic" is an object-lesson of a most educative character.
Astrology tells us that if ships are launched when the planets are in certain positions disaster must ensue. Now, whether this is so or not, it is a fact that at the time of launching of the "Titanic" the stars did presage misfortune and early doom.
The science tells that if at the moment of launching the moon, or the zodiacal sign on the eastern horizon, or both, are afflicted by the planets Saturn or Mars, trouble and loss will follow to a degree measurable by position and signs. Astrology also gives rules that certain signs govern various parts of a ship, thus showing where trouble may be expected.
Now it is an incontrovertible fact that when the "Titanic" was being launched, not only were the signs above existent, but every planetary aspect was against her, except that of Venus and Mercury. "It is also a fact that the chief afflicting planet governs ice and icebergs, and that the positions of the affliction by Saturn and by Herschel (who governs the unexpected in life) are identical with those parts which were so damaged as to cause the collapse and sinking of the "Titanic."
From the map it will be seen, curiously enough, that the afflictions form a complete cross, and occur between Jupiter and Saturn from the third and ninth houses. The third and ninth houses are both migratory or travel signs, while the opposition of Herschel to Neptune, the moon and Venus was a very deadly one for the safety of passengers - Herschel meaning destruction and Neptune loss and grief. The opposition of Jupiter and Saturn, with the ominous signification of the sad fatality of the "Titanic," foreshadowed also the death of millionaires.
These aspects, at the time of launching, occurring as they did, at a new moon, which also presaged disaster to ships and mortality at sea amongst the leisured classes, only served to emphasise the "Titanic's" ill-fate. This new moon sadly enough foretold the death of a great literary personage, by unforeseen disaster, which, in the death of Mr. W.T. Stead, has very sadly come to pass.
This fatal hour of launching was consummated by two other astrological happenings, without which the "Titanic" might have sailed many voyages, ere the inevitable dramatic tragedy might have occurred.
It was tragic that on the very day selected for her departure the moon should (symbolical of the "Titanic") have been transiting Herschel. It was a dire misfortune, since Herschel was the moon's great opposing malific, while, again, on the day of foundering, the sun (protector of life) had reached the fatal and exact zodiacal point which, in planetary service, completed destruction, and this last aspect occurring without any relieving star or planetary force, except that of Venus and Mercury, which foretold success in wireless messages, bringing relief, and saving women - Mercury signifying messages and transit - Venus, luck.
In this connection it was a sad fatality that both Mr. W.T. Stead and Colonel Astor should have elected to travel in the "Titanic," for looking at the date of their birth and their progressive stars, one sees that all their malific and destroying planets are marshalled into activity, and on the night when the "Titanic" sank, their malifics combined with those of the vessel in making the square which exiled life.
The superstitious will view the ascending number 13 with awe, and it will be seen that Saturn's number was 13, and equally squared the horoscope or chart of the "Titanic" at the four cardinal points on the birth or launching day. Surely this lesson in astrology suggests the wisdom of shipbuilders choosing the dates for launching in conformity with astrological ruling. In any case, no harm would be done, and if planets speak the truth, a warning should be timely given and great disasters saved by a simple alteration of dates. VENUS-TAURUS.

Source: Penny Illustrated Paper, Saturday April 27, 1912; Page 521; Issue 2657

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Re: How the Titanic Sank

Post by Karen on Tue 15 May 2012 - 19:36

[img][/img]

WHERE THE "TITANIC" WENT DOWN.

The above view of an ice-pack was taken by a passenger on another damaged steamer near the spot where the "Titanic" sank. It shows the condition of the water, and two large icebergs in the distance. One of these, to the left of the picture, may be the actual berg which struck the Titanic, as it resembles in shape the berg described by eye-witnesses of the disaster.

Source: Penny Illustrated Paper, Saturday May 11, 1912; Page 582; Issue 2659


Last edited by Karen on Tue 15 May 2012 - 20:37; edited 1 time in total

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Re: How the Titanic Sank

Post by Karen on Tue 15 May 2012 - 19:40

[img][/img]

THE SHIP WHICH DIDN'T SAIL.

View of the boat-deck of the "Olympic," a sister-ship of the "Titanic." After putting out of Southampton the "Olympic" was held up by part of her crew, which refused to proceed on the ground that non-union men had been brought on to the ship. The men struck and were sent back to Southampton.

Source: Penny Illustrated Paper, Saturday May 4, 1912; Page 551; Issue 2658


Last edited by Karen on Tue 15 May 2012 - 20:32; edited 1 time in total

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Re: How the Titanic Sank

Post by Karen on Tue 15 May 2012 - 20:15

THE "TITANIC" WENT ALL THE WAY DOWN.

There have been so many disputes as to whether the "Titanic" sank to the bottom of the ocean or only to a depth of a few hundred feet, that the "Scientific American" deems it necessary to settle the question with the assertion: "The 'Titanic' is on the bottom," and an explanation of why this is certain.
There is, it says, a commonly erroneous supposition that the density of the water is far greater at the bottom than at the surface. "Density," it continues, "is here confused with pressure. The pressure increases enormously as we descend, amounting to considerably over 6,000 pounds per square foot at a depth of 100 feet. Divers sometimes work at depths of as much as 150 feet, where the pressure is half again as much - 9,363.75 pounds, to be exact. When provided with special armoured diving suits, divers have operated at considerably greater depths; but nothing approaching the depth at which the "Titanic" lies. This depth is given at 2,000 fathoms, which is considerably over two miles, and the pressure amounts to three-quarters of a million pounds per square foot.
"It is only natural to suppose that under such pressures the density of the water would be increased, but laboratory experiments have shown that it is almost impossible to compress water. At a depth of a mile the density of sea water is only 1.130 greater than at the surface.
"With this clearly in mind, it is very evident that an object that would not float at the surface of the sea could not float at any intermediate point, but must surely sink to the bottom; for it could not displace a greater weight of water at the bottom than at the top, even though the water in the first case was under much higher pressure. As a matter of fact, any air-filled chambers or compressible matter in the vessel would be crushed in by the enormous pressure of the water, so that the displacement of the wreck would be growing less as it went down, and it would be falling through the water at a corresponding acceleration. We must also remember that steel is much more compressible than water."

Source: Penny Illustrated Paper, Saturday June 1, 1912; Page 697; Issue 2662

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Re: How the Titanic Sank

Post by Karen on Tue 15 May 2012 - 21:43

THE "TITANIC" SCREAM.

"Vanity, vanity - all is vanity," saith the preacher; and so might have said the millionaire who went down with the "Titanic" alongside steward and stoker facing death to preserve the lives of people they have never seen. Just think of it! The last word in shipbuilding, the triumphant result of years of thought and labour, to say nothing of an expenditure of a million and a half sterling in money, replete with every device that could make for luxury, ease, and comfort - save, perhaps, boats and binoculars for the look-out men. The "Titanic" was man's handiwork, and while he was about it, somewhere in the Polar seas Nature was fashioning an iceberg at no expense and no trouble. It wasn't anything out of the way as icebergs go in point of size, though it was rather out of the way as regards its location, and very much in the way where shipping was concerned. The "Titanic" brushed against it with a jar which was barely noticed by most of those on board, and in an hour or two the "Titanic" was not.

In a year-book for 1909 we came upon the following entry:

- "The White Star Line have arranged to construct for their New York service two steamers which in point of size will eclipse everything afloat, whilst the numerous innovations devised for the comfort of passengers will come as a revelation. The first of them is to be called "Olympic," and "Titanic" is suggested as the probable name of the other. The "Olympic" and "Titanic" will each have a displacement of 60,000 tons, and cost a million and a half sterling each."

If the writer had only had the gift of prophecy, what an interesting addendum he could have made! These year-books should be compiled by an "Old Moore" or "Mother Shipton." There is no record of the launching of the iceberg or the cost or tonnage or displacement; so it displaced the "Titanic" as a reminder; the hint will be taken, and future editions will probably rectify the omission.
This is the story in brief - the only way such a story can be or should be told. A calm, clear night, a huge ship ploughing along through it on a track as familiar as the Canterbury road to the pilgrims of old; men and women at cards, asleep, or at work; a bump, a hurried order to get the women into the boats, some panic, some shooting, and then fifteen hundred souls in the sea and seven hundred on it.

But why the scream? It has happened before; it will happen again. On both sides of the Atlantic newspaper editors grew hysterical, and yet nothing seems to have been left undone that should have been done; nothing done that should not have been done. Is it on account of the loss of life? Fifteen hundred casualties seem terrible when they come together: it is about the total annual tribute to the sea made by the officers and men of the British mercantile marine alone. Few people have the least idea of the number who go down to the sea in ships every year - and stay there. In 1904, for instance, 86 British steamers with a combined tonnage of 180,000, and 139 foreign representing 200,000 tons, were lost; and the year after these figures were exceeded by something like 70 ships of nearly 150,000 tons, and that takes no account of fishing vessels, yachts, pleasure boats, and such like. Unfortunately, no figures are available that will allow us to estimate what this must mean in lives; but it is safe to say that the "Titanic's" death-roll would make no appreciable difference to it.

Why the scream, then? Is it newspaper enterprise, or is it the almighty dollar prevailing? Should we have heard quite so much, day after day, had the "Titanic" been an old forty thousand pound tramp packed with miserable emigrants from stem to stern with a sheer impossibility to scrape up a hundred pounds between them? We think not. When the "Slocum" was burnt to the water's edge somewhere in the United States a few years ago, and eleven hundred people were drowned, burnt, or trampled to death, half a column in the best of the papers told us as much as we needed to know of that catastrophe.

The fact is, it isn't life that matters, but cash. The "Titanic" represented cash, and she carried it. Men of substance and position were on her. Ten or eleven million pounds sterling could have been put up by a dozen of her passengers alone, and would have been readily and gladly, we have no doubt, for the craziest old tub afloat that could be guaranteed to keep above water for a few hours had the chance of bargaining arisen; for what availeth a man his millions when he is floating free in mid-ocean with two miles of icy water beneath him, and not even the iceberg within reach to scramble upon?

In an old handbook - we have a passion for this entertaining form of literature; it is so quaint and unexpected! - we remember reading a short while back that of the total number of deaths investigated by coroners in Great Britain 14,800 were found to be accidental, and "only 5,100" were ascribed to criminal violence or culpable neglect. We admired that "only" - it was so large-hearted and generous!
In the statistics for 1912 how will the "Titanic's" fifteen hundred be listed, forgetting for the moment birth and bullion? So far we have not seen it suggested that they should go under the heading of criminal violence or culpable neglect, though the officer who confessed to turning back stewardesses - seemingly, though women, they had no right to their lives before bullion and birth had been seen to safety - must be having a bad time of it with his conscience - if he has one. So far it has not transpired that Mr. Bruce Ismay reserved half a dozen boats for himself and party and a crew to man them. He was unfortunate in being on board or in getting saved; but there he is on shore, and what can you make of it when all is said and done? Captains of crack liners or tumble-to-bits tramps don't run their ships into icebergs for the pleasure of the sensation and the excitement it causes, and however much we might like to, we really cannot believe that steamship companies send their ships to sea in the hope and expectation of having them sunk in mid-ocean. As a method of advertising it is too costly, and where there is no profit there will be no (intentional) loss.

That seems to dispose of criminal violence on the one hand, and culpable negligence on the other. There is the question of boats, certainly. There were not sufficient, though the Titanic's allowance was in excess of the legal requirements, and those she had were not filled. But admitting the shortage of boats, and that there should not have been a shortage, even though given a boat each at such times, and still a hundred men will scramble into one and sink her, while half a dozen might float bottom up and empty, why the scream? Fifteen hundred men and women have died by accident. Fifteen thousand do so every year on this shore, and unsinkable ships and wireless telegraphy and a plethora of boats notwithstanding, the sea is not so safe as the shore, and never will be, and the shore is not safe, and never will be. The only really safe place is a vault in a country churchyard, and that is damp, and conducive to rheumatism. Those who cross the Atlantic do so with a reasonable expectation of reaching the other side; but only reasonable. Once in several times they fail. The "Titanic's" passengers and crew (don't let's forget the crew!) hit on the "once" - and failed. They weren't heroes, particularly, neither were they curs, and having to die they did it decently, as far as we can gather. It is sad enough, and horrible enough - not quite so horrible as a railway accident generally is - but it doesn't call for several hundred yards of print and black borders, and it wouldn't have got it only the "Titanic" cost a million and a half, and those who went down on her could have bought her up twelve times over, and then had enough left to get themselves bread and cheese with. The scream is for the almighty dollar, and not for humanity at all - as witness the proportion; two pages and a half for the millionaires and highly-placed, and then "sailors, stewardesses and steerage also ran" - or sank.

Source: Penny Illustrated Paper

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Karen Trenouth
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