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Inspector Byrnes' Obituary

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Inspector Byrnes' Obituary

Post by Karen on Wed 11 Apr 2012 - 9:28

INSPECTOR BYRNES DEAD.
Former Chief of New York Detectives and Terror of Criminals.

New York, May 9. - Thomas Byrnes, famous as superintendent of police and as inspector in charge of the detective bureau years ago, died Saturday night at his home, No. 318 West 77th street. He was 68 years old, and had been ill for more than two years, suffering from chronic indigestion.
Thomas Byrnes was born in New York in 1843. He learned the trade of gas fitting and worked at it until 1861, when he enlisted in Ellsworth's Zouaves and went to the war. He joined the police force in 1863, and made his way rapidly to the top, being made roundsman in 1868, sergeant in 1869, captain in 1870, inspector in 1880, chief inspector in 1888, superintendent in 1892, and chief of police under the "bipartisan law" May 10, 1896. At that time he had been much under fire, and in the same month he retired on $3,000 pension.
Byrnes, as a patrolman, had his first beat in the Mercer street precinct, and it was later as a captain in that precinct that he did his first piece of real detective work in the capture of the Manhattan Savings bank robbers and the recovery of the stolen bonds. Not long after this Byrnes was transferred to police headquarters and put in charge of the detective bureau, which had become disorganized and lacking in system.
Within a few hours after taking command in the bureau, Byrnes had picked out nine of his best men and detailed them to special duty in the financial district, with orders to arrest every known crook found below Fulton street. He hired a room at his own expense for these men to use as their headquarters. This was the beginning of the Wall street bureau, which made that district the safest in the city and practically put an end to robberies by professional criminals in the protected section. So pleased were the bankers and brokers with the results of Byrnes' plan, that the then president of the Stock Exchange called on the inspector and offered him the use of a room in the Stock Exchange for the headquarters of the new bureau.
Under Byrnes' management the detective bureau had the biggest shake up of its history, for he promptly discarded the fossils, and, selecting the best raw material he could get, began in earnest the work of building up a real detective force. With this machine at his command, Byrnes made it his business to teach criminals that certain kinds of crimes must not be committed here. Highway robbery, bank burglaries or important burglaries of any kind, forgeries, counterfeiting and many other crimes were prohibited, and Byrnes' system worked so well that the number of such crimes was very materially decreased.
As superintendent Byrnes broke up a strong association of precinct wardmen who he had reason to believe were the real masters of the precincts. It was said that they had so strong and powerful a pull that even Byrnes could not interfere with or remove them; but he did, and the wardmen went back to patrol duty. As a result, policy "the meanest crime," was checked and the backbone of the business broken.
Superintendent Byrnes caused a great stir when he did what Mayor Gaynor has recently suggested doing, took away the policemen's night sticks or long clubs. It was remarked that in the twelve months following the disarming order not a single case of police brutality was reported. Other triumphs reported by the newspapers at the end of Brynes' first year as head of the uniformed force were the closing of the pool rooms and the breaking up of the green goods business, which was flourishing when he took office.

Source: Amsterdam Evening Recorder, Monday May 9, 1910, Page 7

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Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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Re: Inspector Byrnes' Obituary

Post by Karen on Sat 14 Apr 2012 - 14:23

INSPECTOR BYRNES DEAD.
Famous Police Officer Succumbs to Chronic Indigestion.

NEW YORK, May 9. - Thomas F. Byrnes, formerly Superintendent of Police of the city of New York, but more famous for his work in the detective bureau, died at his home here Saturday night from chronic indigestion, after an illness of more than two years. He was sixty-six years old.
It was Byrnes who first drew the deadline in the financial district, below which no crook was allowed to stray, on penalty of instant arrest. His many successes in unravelling baffling crimes made him perhaps the best known detective of his generation.

Source: The Oswego Palladium, Monday May 9, 1910

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Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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