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Others Named Mary Kelly

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Others Named Mary Kelly

Post by Karen on Tue 28 Feb 2012 - 19:17

GENERAL NEWS.

George Adderley was yesterday tried at Stafford Assizes for the murder of Mary Kelly at West Bromwich in November last. Prisoner was struck by another woman, and he followed her into the yard, where he encountered deceased, whom he severely assaulted by mistake. She died shortly afterwards. Prisoner was sentenced to 20 years' penal servitude.

Source: The Echo, Saturday January 29, 1881, Page 3

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Re: Others Named Mary Kelly

Post by Karen on Tue 28 Feb 2012 - 19:31

By the return of Mr. Cameron Corbet and the Hon. Howard Spensley (the former for the Tradeston Division of Glasgow), two members of the Victorian Board of Advice are now Members of the House of Commons. Mr. Corbet's father was a partner in the Glasgow firm with which the Hon. Jas. Service, Premier of Victoria, was connected at the period of his emigration to Australia. Mr. Corbet, senior, was the founder of the cheap dinner system, which has conferred such great benefits on the mercantile metropolis of Scotland. It was only a graceful compliment, therefore, on the part of Mr. Service to appoint the son of his old principal to a seat at the London Board of the Colony over which he at present presides. Dr. Kevin Izod O'Doherty, who has been returned unopposed for North Meath, is now on his way back to Brisbane, whence he will quickly return to London, in order to play the role of an active Parnellite member. As Mr. O'Doherty's career plainly shows, he has from his youth up been in thorough harmony with those Irish political aims and aspirations which are described in our time as "Parnellite." Mr. O'Doherty is married to Miss Eva Mary Kelly, better known as "Eva," the poetess of the Nation. Mr. Henniker Heaton, M.P. for Canterbury, in returning thanks for his triumphant majority, observed that so far the electors had only heard his words, but in future they would know his deeds. This is no vain boast, for Mr. Heaton is well fitted for what is called in the Colonies "a good local Member." He will, in a word, be no mere ornamental representative, but a hardworking, practical delegate, ever on the alert to advance the interests of his constituents, individually and collectively. The interest which Australia has taken in the English elections generally, and the pleasure which is felt in Mr. Heaton's success, are shown in the telegrams which that gentleman has received, not only from his own Colony of New South Wales, but from Melbourne and other Australasian cities.

Source: The Colonies and India, December 4, 1885, Page 11

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Re: Others Named Mary Kelly

Post by Karen on Tue 28 Feb 2012 - 19:45

VIOLENT ASSAULT.

Martin Kelly, aged 25, a baker, living at 15, Jacob's Wells-mews, Marylebone, was brought up on a warrant by Detective-constable Tanner, of the D Division, at Marylebone today, charged with violently assaulting Mary Kelly, his sister. - Mr. Moore, from the Associate Institute for the Protection of Women, watched the case, and from the evidence adduced it appeared that the defendant was an idle and drunken fellow, and has been charged at this court several times, not only for drunkenness, but for assaults. Although his sisters have paid his fines, he was in the habit of going home the worse for liquor and beating them. A short time ago he assaulted his eldest sister, and he was sentenced to two months' imprisonment with hard labour, without the option of a fine. The present complainant was obliged to leave her mother's house, and take lodgings in North-street, Manchester-square. On Thursday night she had occasion to go to her mother's lodgings, in order to get an under-garment, and on entering the room she saw the defendant sitting on a chair in a state of semi-drunkenness. He asked her what she wanted, and on telling him he swore that she would not take anything out of the house. He struck her a violent blow on the face, caught hold of her hair, and dragged her through the passage into the street. Whilst she was on the ground he kicked her with some force in the pit of the stomach, causing her great pain. She was examined by Dr. Spurgin, the divisional surgeon, who found that she was severely bruised. The defendant, when taken into custody by Detective Sammon, said when the warrant was read to him, "I suppose it is for the row last night." - Mr. Mansfield said the defendant was a great coward, and sentenced him to be imprisoned and kept to hard labour in the House of Correction for six calendar months. At the expiration of that time he would have to find two sureties in the sum of 25 pounds, and his own recognisances in 50 pounds, to keep the peace for twelve months. The defendant, who seemed surprised at the decision, was then removed to the cells.

Source: The Echo, Saturday January 13, 1877, Page 3

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Re: Others Named Mary Kelly

Post by Karen on Wed 29 Feb 2012 - 1:22

The following incident occurred alongside the other case in 1885 of the involvement of Mary Kelly's West-End Madam (Mary Jeffries) with the young females of the theatre being seduced into prostitution.

MUSIC HALLS.

To the Editor of the East London Press.

SIR, - In reply to the letter of your correspondent, "YORK," I assure him that I am much gratified to learn that my writings in your columns are attracting the notice of Hull folks, for in no country in England is music-hall purification and other "professional" reform more needed. I am glad also that "York" has noticed that the facts which have been divulged are calculated to cause your readers to come to the conclusion that the charges, which at first sight seem unwarrantable, are true. That is as it should be. We want such facts exposed, and we shall make still stronger charges yet, with such earnestness that members of "the profession" will discover that the good ship TRUTH carries more effective guns than have yet been fired. The following letter appeared in The Echo of Friday last, April 17th: -

ENGLISH GIRLS AND FOREIGN SITUATIONS.

SIR, - I would invite the attention of the Society which Mr. West represents to a few "music-halls" of the minor class in London, whose practice with regard to the young women who are "brought out" on their boards is at least worth attention. The girls who appear at these places are mostly engaged during the day in factories, &c.; they possess a good voice, and, what is worse for them, an attractive appearance. They are induced to part with perhaps a sovereign or so for the privilege of appearing for a week before the public, and are promised engagements. The promise is kept punctually, and the engagements are nearly always on the Continent. In common fairness, it must be added that the music-halls I allude to are of the lowest type -

Yours, &c.,
A MAN OF THE WORLD.

Years ago I called public attention to this infamy, and shall do so yet again. The said system of procuring is well exposed in the "Evil Influence of the Stage," which you are about to publish; by which your readers will learn that the system is not confined to the lowest class of music-halls or theatres.

DIVIDED COUPLES.

Only yesterday, April 19th, there appeared in most of the weekly newspapers a paragraph which demonstrates the truth of my assertion that professional exigencies separate many married couples, and the paragraph in question shows that even a professional lady who is a pattern of purity and virtue may, by the said exigencies, be sundered from a beloved husband during his last illness, and may be unable to reach his house until his death struggles are over, and the lamented one has resigned his last breath alone or in the presence of strangers, leaving words unsaid which might have been balm to the soul of the sorrowing "partner of his joys." The paragraph in question appears in The Referee of April 19th, as follows: -

POOR CHARLES KELLY died on Friday night at 27, Bedford place, in his forty-sixth year. The immediate cause of death was cerebral apoplexy, but he had been ailing for some time past. His end was peaceful and unconscious. Before he became an actor Mr. Kelly had borne the Queen's commission. His real name was Wardell, and he was the second husband of Miss Ellen Terry, whom he married about ten years ago. Miss Terry, hearing of her husband's dangerous condition, went to his house on Friday night, but arrived two hours after he had breathed his last. He will be buried next Wednesday at noon in Brompton cemetery.

"As an actor Charles Kelly will perhaps best be remembered by his Arkwright in "Arkwright's Wife," his John Goring in "The Crisis," his Brown in "New Men and Old Acres" (which he played for a long run), and his Gabriel Oak in "Far from the Madding Crowd." He was a man of highly-cultivated intellect, and was in private life a most entertaining companion."
In such a case how cruel is the necessity which puts asunder those whom nothing but death should have parted, and how applicable to the loneliness of the survivor must be the lines: -

"Earth pours forth its song of gladness,
And there's music in its tone,
But to me its mirth is sadness,
For on earth I am alone.

And life is now a cheerless waste,
A withered flower which ne'er can bloom,
My heart hath not one resting place
Or home of refuge, save the tomb."

PROFESSIONAL VANITY.

One weakness with which it is the misfortune - or the ignorance - of music hall performers to be afflicted is vanity. With this, nine out of ten of the professionals - male and female - are tainted. Women who dress like "princes" on the stage want to dress like princesses off the stage, and a gentleman who struts about and does the "double shuffle," sand-jig, or "first step to the gallows" upon the stage, dressed in, may be, a crimson coat, pea-green waistcoat, sky blue trousers, and yellow "masher" hat, must needs keep up his dignity by dressing like a "gentleman" - or "swell" - when off the boards. And this is equally the case with successful stars and less fortunate - and less smutty - "pros" who cannot manage to secure a "shop."
This subject recalls to my memory that birds of paradise are said to be vain. It is said that there is no bird, not even the peacock, that is so vain of its plumage as the bird of paradise. Indeed popular fancy once allied them with the angels, and named them "God's birds," but fact proves them to belong to the crow family. "Verily, all, all is vanity."
So it is with the favourites of music-hall "gods." Fact proves that the professional "jim crow," would like to fool mankind into the belief that he is a "thundering, terrific success," and a real live "Imperial Eagle." And the male parasite of a female "star" naturally imagines that he is a dolphin instead of a mackerel.
"YORK" suggests that I shall thoroughly show up music-hall filthiness. This it would be impossible to do in language fit to be perused by the readers of a respectable newspaper. The titles and refrains of many music-hall "songs" are outrageously and openly filthy, and the real meaning of some of the most successful songs is so palpably and unmistakably foul that to use in reference to it the hackneyed phrase, "to the pure all things are pure," would be like labelling foetid cesspool-filth - "Otto of Roses." Therefore music-hall filthiness cannot be completely "shown up" without to a certain extent imitating those creatures upon whom is lavished every luxury for dressing like organ-players' monkies, and tainting the moral atmosphere as festering carrion corrupts the air.
However, "YORK" may rest assured that the foul and filthy elements of music-hall "education" will yet be properly denounced and impeached by that unsparing scourge.

AVALANCHE.

MISS TERRY'S LATE HUSBAND.

The death of Mr. Charles Kelly, which took place on Friday evening, was scarcely unexpected. He had for a long time suffered great pain which he bore with courage. When, amidst the welcome of a crowd of friends, Miss Terry was landing in Liverpool from her American tour, her husband, Charles Wardell (to give the deceased actor his family name), was lying on his death-bed in London. Apprised of his condition by telegram, she came to Cheltenham, only to find that he had breathed his last two hours before her arrival. Belonging to a family which has achieved professional distinction, he brought into the theatrical circles in which he moved an atmosphere of refinement, which impressed everyone with whom he came into contact. The gentleness of his manner and the instincts which governed his life, were specially conspicuous when the hardships of fortune overtook him. As an actor he distinguished himself as Arkwright, in "Arkwright's Wife," and Brown, in "New Men and Old Acres." His marriage with Miss Maria Kelly (whence the adoption of his stage name) developed a faculty for playing Irish gentlemen, as distinguished from the car caricatured Hibernian, which was used with excellent effect in "A Quiet Rubber." When Florence, the American-Irish actor, who had remarked that he Kelly, and another, were the only good Irishmen on the stage, was informed that Kelly was a Tyneside man, he replied: "Ah, thin, what right had the man to be born out of his own country?" Kelly's father was a clergyman who was twice offered a place on the Episcopal bench. His brother is Mr. Frank Wardell, the Government mining inspector in Yorkshire. Charles Wardell, who in his earlier years held a commission in the 66th Regiment, was the second husband of Miss Ellen Terry, her first was Mr. G.F. Watts, R.A., who was, perhaps, the most purely poetical painter of the contemporary British school. - The Evening News.

Source: East London Press, April 25, 1885, Page 7


Last edited by Karen on Wed 29 Feb 2012 - 1:34; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Others Named Mary Kelly

Post by Karen on Wed 29 Feb 2012 - 1:30

Epitome of General News.

The deaths are announced of - Sir Hugh Allan, of Montreal, founder of the famous line of steamers, aged 72; Mr. Anthony Trollope, the novelist, 68; Miss Frances Maria Kelly, the last survivor of the great school of actors, 92; M. Louis Blanc, the French Republican leader, 69; Mr. Lambert, formerly M.P. for Bucks; Mr. George Clement, of Hastings, after a life of usefulness, who began his career without a penny, and leaves a fortune of 200,000 pounds; M. Lachaud, the famous French advocate, 64; Sir Thomas Watson, the celebrated physician, 90; Sir Joseph Napier, 78; Samuel Remington, the inventor of the rifle bearing his name; M. Galignani, the last of the family connected with the Galignani's Messenger, 87.

Source: The Nonconformist and Independent, December 14, 1882, Page 1169

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Re: Others Named Mary Kelly

Post by Karen on Thu 1 Mar 2012 - 12:50

The Wreck of the "Tararua." - The event which in New Zealand has eclipsed all others in importance and painful interest has been, says the Herald of May 23, the wreck of the Tararua, by which about 130 persons lost their lives. The Tararua was a steamer belonging to the Union Company of New Zealand, and was employed on the coast of New Zealand, and running to Melbourne and Sydney. On the voyage on which she was wrecked, the Tararua had passed down the East Coast of New Zealand, calling at the different ports. She was between Port Chalmers, the port of Dunedin, and the Bluff, the last place of call before going to Melbourne. The excitement throughout the colony was intense, for at all the ports some passengers had been taken in, and the officers and crew were well known. The circumstances of the wreck were painful in the extreme. When the vessel first struck the sea was comparatively calm, and it was thought no lives would be lost. But a heavy surf breaks on that part of the coast, there are no lifeboats or life-saving apparatus: one boat which went from the vessel was driven up on the beach and broken, while the other could render no assistance, and was picked up at sea. Then a heavy swell set in, the steamer settled down on the rocks, and was washed over by terrific waves. The crew and passengers huddled at last on the forecastle and in the rigging, and as they became exhausted were gradually washed off into the sea. The vessel struck at five o'clock on the Friday morning; by two o'clock on the afternoon of that day all the women and children had been washed off the forecastle; a few of the strongest of the men held on to the rigging till night. At two o'clock on Saturday morning a wild cry was heard by those on shore as the mast fell into the sea, and when the morning dawned there was scarcely a vestige of the wreck. Between sixty and seventy bodies have come on shore, most of which have been identified. The majority have been buried on a piece of ground on the coast. We subjoin the following narratives of survivors.
George Robin writes: - I am a steerage passenger from Otago to Melbourne. I left the ship by the last trip of the first officer's boat, and just reached the beach. The boat capsized, and I made for shore. As soon as we landed we lit a fire on the beach, and kept it burning all night. Just at dark we saw the ship. The passengers were then clinging to the rigging. I picked Cook up out of the water as he swam ashore. Our boat was capsized right on the top of us. When we extricated ourselves we swam ashore. The sea was very rough.
Gustave Tellein states: - I am a steerage passenger. I corroborate what Robin states. When the ship first struck it seemed but lightly, but after that she bumped heavily. The second time she struck a hole was made in her. She continued striking until she finally broke up. Captain Garrard was perfectly cool, and gave his orders very collectedly. I think he did all in his power to save us and the ship. Robin picked up the body of a saloon passenger. He was entirely nude, and about 30 years of age. It had reddish-brown whiskers and moustache.
William Hill said: - I am a through passenger for England in the steerage, with my wife and child. At the time the ship struck I went on deck to look for my wife and child. I found her walking about the deck (the females were in another compartment) with the child in her arms. All was confusion; the women and children were screaming. The vessel was bumping heavily on the rocks, and a heavy sea was washing over her. I told my wife to hold on to a stanchion, and went to see if there was any means of getting a boat. I found all was confusion. At last the starboard boat was got, and she was being lowered from the davits. A sea struck her, and she was stove in. The men got back to the ship. After some delay a boat was got out on the port side, and then Captain Garrard succeeded in restoring order. He put the second mate in charge of the boat. It went round to starboard (the lee side), and the men who could swim were also placed in her in order that they might carry intelligence to land. The boat succeeded in getting near shore, and a man then swam ashore. The boat then returned to the ship, and the passengers were anxious to get in. A line was hove from the yard-arm, and six passengers were lowered into her. They were cautioned not to go unless they could swim. I saw them struggling in the water. I allude to passengers. I only saw three of them gain the shore. It was getting light at the time when the boat returned. The captain said he could not risk any more going. The females were conveyed to the smoking-room in front of the bridge. The captain it was, I think, that said to me, "Get your wife and child into the smoking-room; she will be all right there." The sea was breaking over the vessel aft. I said to my wife that, if there was a chance of getting away to render assistance, I would go, as I should not be allowed to remain with her. I took a survey of the shore, and, seeing a smooth part near the reef, I went to the captain and called his attention to it, asking him if there was not a possibility of landing on that part of the reef. He sent away a second boat in charge of the carpenter. I did not see her leave the ship. When she came back the carpenter said he thought it was possible to land on the reef. A kedge anchor was put in the boat. I asked the captain to allow me to go to the reef and examine it, and I said I would hold up my arms as a signal if it were safe to land on it. One of the firemen went with me, and the boat's crew. On nearing the reef in the second mate's boat, we found it was not so smooth as it appeared. It was very rough, and there was a heavy sea rolling over it; the fireman swam from the boat to the surf. It was a very dangerous place. I returned to the ship, and then went back to the reef for the fireman, who swam out to the boat, and was taken on board; he was greatly exhausted. We could not get alongside the ship again on account of the high seas. The chief officer and the boat's crew tried to land on the reef, but could not, and they made for the beach. At this time the Hawea made the scene of the disaster, and Mr. Mills attempted to communicate on being attracted to the wreckage. (No further statement could be procured from this survivor.)
Peter Maloney said: I am second officer of the Tararua. It was my watch from twelve on Thursday to 4 A.M. on Friday. The night was very dark, and there was a thick haze over the land. The ship struck about 5 A.M. on Friday. The captain had come over the bridge, and all the officers were on the deck. Captain Garrard thought he was far enough to the south to clear the Waipapa Point, and gave instructions to alter the course to the west, so as to head for the Bluff. A few minutes before the ship struck, the captain went aft to verify his position by the standard compass. While he was doing so, I became aware that the ship was in a dangerous position. The course was immediately altered, but too late, for the vessel went right on the reef to the northward of Slope Point. I was sent away with a boat's crew and one of the passengers to find a landing if possible, and the second boat was dispatched in charge of the chief officer with the same instruction. James Maher, one of my boat's crew, swam to the reef to find if it were possible to land the people there. Meantime, the chief officer's boat had capsized. Five persons were seen to land from her. I took my boat back to the vessel, and then returned to the reef with three passengers in addition to my boat's crew. Those passengers who were supposed to be able to swim jumped overboard, and were not seen again. James Maher swam back to the boat, and was taken on board greatly exhausted: he was bruised in the ribs, arms, and head. Early in the day the other two boats were washed out of the davits and smashed. After getting Maher on board, I tried to get alongside the steamer again, but found it impossible, as the sea was making a clean breach over her, excepting on the forepeak. The ladies and children were placed in the smoking-room on the bridge for safety. As I could do no more, I stood out to sea if I could fall in with any passing vessel, and see if I could obtain help, and at 2:30 P.M. on Saturday, Captain W. Hanning, of the ketch Prince Rupert, took us alongside, and we remained by her till the Hawea came up.
John Chatterton said: I am a steerage passenger. I went off on the mate's boat at 10 A.M. on Friday, April 29, with three passengers, five of the crew, and a lad (a brass-cleaner). On nearing the beach a wave capsized the boat, and all hands had to swim for it. After a desperate struggle, all succeeded in reaching the beach but the boy, who was drowned. When the ship struck I was in my bunk, and hearing the noise, said "What is that? We are on a rock." There was an immediate rush on deck. As soon as the passengers were there, all was quiet and orderly. Directly she struck the sea broke over the stern and carried away the rudder, the wheel, and the after-gear. We were, I should say, quite a mile and a-half from the shore, and drifted to within half a mile. She struck at a quarter past 5, and at a quarter to 6 A.M. the first boat was sent away. The first boat to leave was carried away out of the davits. Soon after I got off, the women were carried to the forecastle. The rigging lights were burnt through the night. About 2:53 on Saturday morning, I heard a loud shout - "Bring a boat." We could see the outline of a vessel before this, but nothing after. A large quantity of cargo, &c., was washed ashore. One of the cabin passengers (a man) came ashore about 4 P.M. on Saturday, but he died as they hauled him on the beach. A young girl came ashore on the reef about 11 A.M. on Saturday. She was much disfigured about the face. We on shore could do nothing to assist them. I should think there were about 60 in the fore cabin, and about 20 females in the second ladies' cabin. I shipped at Auckland for Melbourne, and have lost everything except what I stood up in. After the boat was upset I turned over several times. I could not swim all the time, but waited for a smooth chance, and then struck out. After I got ashore, I saw several person clinging to pieces of wreck, but as they got near the beach they fell off, and I saw no more of them.
The First Mate's Statement. - The first mate's statement is: - Turned in at 4 A.M. The captain and second mate were on deck. At 5:25 A.M. the vessel struck. When I left the deck she was steering west. From 2 to 4 o'clock had been steering W.S.W. Weather hazy over the land. I noticed nothing unusual. When I called the watch the captain came on deck, and altered the course as stated. I was asleep when the ship struck. I went on deck. The engines were reversed, but it was no use. She struck aft, un-shipped rudder, and broke the propeller. The engines were of no use, and were stopped. All hands were called to clear the boats. Ten minutes after the engines stopped the ship was full of water. At 5:30 o'clock the first boat was lowered. The second mate was in charge, with four sailors and one passenger to try for landing the passengers. Lawrence Young, when the boat was half way, swam ashore, having previously promised, if successful, to remain and help the landing of the passengers. He did so, after finding his way to Brenton, and causing to be sent the first telegraphic message per station hand Charles Gellis, who rode thirty-five miles to Wyndham. By 12:30 another attempt at landing the passengers was made. Of five men two were drowned. The surf boat was then lowered. The carpenter was sent with it, to see if landing was practicable on the reef. The report which they made was very unsatisfactory and discouraging. The second mate was then sent, and tried landing on the reef, without success. One man was lost. The captain next sent the first mate, in charge of a boat containing three passengers and a boy. All landed safely except the boy, who was drowned. The boat was capsized, and opened at both ends. Useless attempts at repairs were made by the men on shore, but the sea was too heavy to launch. The vessel bumped heavily. The passengers were in the rigging and clustered on the forecastle. A head sea was breaking over heavily. At 2:30 a heavy sea was breaking, which washed several passengers, women and children, over, and after that they dropped off one by one.
List of passengers. - The following is as complete a list of the passengers by the Tararua as the Union Company are able to supply:

From Dunedin to Melbourne.
- Saloon: Mr. W. Oramsay, Mr. J.O. Eva.
Steerage: Messrs. T. Rae, George Grey, James Young, P. Anderson, Wm. Dobson, J. Dobson, J. Bainbridge, Harry T. Cook, C. Shaw, M. Dowdale, H.N.G. Andrew, John Barry, Robert White, George Robins, George Martin, Anderson, and Robert Brown.

From Dunedin to Hobart.
- Steerage: Mr. and Mrs. Bryant.

From Dunedin to Bluff.
- Saloon: Mr. Bailey

From Sydney to Bluff.
- Saloon: Mr. R. Rogers

From Auckland to Hobart.
- Steerage: Miss May Kelly.

From Auckland to Melbourne.
- Saloon: Mr. Wm. Bell
- Steerage: Mrs. Denz, Messrs. Chatterton and St. Noth.

From Tauranga for Hobart.
- Saloon: Mrs. Brennan and three children.

From Napier to Melbourne.
- Steerage: Mr. J. Daly.

From Wellington to Bluff.
- Mr. Benman.

From Wellington to Melbourne.
- Saloon: Messrs. C. Burgett, S.T.B. Marsh, Mr. and Mrs. William Downes
- Steerage: Messrs. Tholin, O'Sullivan, Williams, Holt, and Duns.

From Lyttelton to Bluff.
- Steerage: Messrs. Lawrence, Sharp, Boyle.

From Lyttelton to Melbourne.
- Revs. J. Waterhouse, B. Richardson, Mr. Mitchell, Mr. J. Armitage, Mr. Connell, Dr. Campbell, wife, and five children and nurse, Mrs. W.B. Jones, Messrs. J. Gordon, J. Waterhouse, C. Gough, Crawford, and Gillingham.
- Steerage: Mr. and Mrs. Hill and child, Messrs. J. Wallace, A. Young, B. Hanson, and others.

The story of Frank Denz, one of the seamen of the Tararua, is as follows: - I married in Auckland two years and a half ago. We had one child fifteen months old. I persuaded my wife to visit Melbourne, the company letting me take her over at half-price. When she came on board, Captain Garrard came forward and said to her, "I'll give you the other half of the fare, and you can buy a new dress with it." Poor girl! she never got it. When we got to Port Chalmers, my wife and Mary Kelly went to Dunedin. I warned them carefully to come by the three o'clock train. I wish to the Lord I had told them six o'clock! The man who had been at the wheel before me relieved me for a few minutes to get some coffee. I took the coffee, and came out to drink it just as the ship struck. She was full of water almost at once. My wife, Mary Kelly, and another woman clung to me. The back waters of the seas that broke over the ship carried us right aft. The women all screamed at first, but were soon brave, and believed us when we said that there was no danger. They were put in the smoking-house and covered. I put a rug and my jacket on my wife. Mary Kelly would not go into the house, but helped with the ropes, and seemed to wish to encourage the men, but they were not afraid. They made the same noise as ever. You would have thought to hear them swear that they could not sink. I was not more afraid than the rest, but the wife kept clinging to me, and that made me weak. The captain was cross, and scolded me, but I could not push her out at such a time. I wish to God I had taken my chum's advice, and put her and the child in the second mate's boat. Then I would not have to look for them on the beach. When the carpenter was ordered out of the boat for the mate to take charge he said, "Thank God, I am safe." The ship was the safest place then. If the wind had not come up she would have been there yet. The men complained of one of the hands in the boat. He was afraid of getting wet, and kept looking for the seas and missing stroke. The captain had him shifted out. He also said, "I praise God I'm out of her." I was ordered to take his place. I was crying, as I could not bear leaving the wife and child. The captain was not cross then. He persuaded me, and held out his arms for the child. I gave her to him, and said, "Now, my captain, you'll look after her, won't you?" He said, "Yes, Frank, I will; be sure of that." I tied the baby's hood on. This is it (holding up a little blue hood). I found it on the beach. I tied this shawl (holding it up) round the wife, and lashed it on with two Manila ropes. See how it is torn with washing off. That's all that's left to me now. I would not take fifty pounds for those two things. I had 19 pounds and a watch. I gave them to her to make her feel safe, and so that she would have something if I was drowned. She cried out to the other women, "Don't be afraid! Frank will save us! He's going in the boat!" She thought I could do anything, poor girl. I think I hear her now. Our boat was 24 feet long, but it upset end over end, and not sideways. That will show you how rough the sea was. We all go ashore, but the boy who cleaned the brass on the ship. Just before we upset the poor little chap said, "I believe it's through me the vessel struck, for I'm very unlucky." I daresay those on board thought it very hard that we did not come back, but they saw the fix we were in. I would have gone back to the wife if I had been sure of being lost. Perhaps I would not now, but all that day I would. I never prayed so much in my life before. I prayed for help, and then ran again and again to the point to see if there was a steamer coming from the Bluff. I saw when the sea broke away the side of the smoke-house, and the captain led the women forward, that he had my little girl in his arms. When the cook came ashore, he told me that Mary Kelly was washed off at the same time as himself, and that he did his best to save her, but could not. Dr. Campbell was setting the engineer's leg, and was washed off at the same time. Long before dark all the women were drowned, and all the children but my child. The captain was in the rigging holding her. There were also about forty men in the rigging. I kept my eye on them as it grew dark. The last thing I saw was the captain holding my little girl. I am sure he died with her in his arms, but could not save her. No. It was not to be. It was not to be. (And playing with the little blue hood that was his girl's, he sobbed audibly.)
The late Captain Garrard. - Captain Garrard was the son of Mr. Joseph Garrard, an officer in the Revenue service at home, and was born on March 2, 1852. When about eleven years of age he entered the Royal Naval School at Greenwich, and here he studied so successfully that at the age of fourteen he was admitted to the Nautical Schools to receive a course of instruction in navigation and nautical astronomy. At the final examination he came out at the head of the list, and received a special recommendation of the Admiralty for six months' further tuition. When he left the schools he was head captain of his company, and carried with him the respect of all who knew him, both masters and boys. He entered Lidgett's line of vessels, and served five years' apprenticeship, visiting during that time the principal commercial ports of the world. During his career as third mate he was wrecked in the ship Humber on an island in the Bay of Fundy, but fortunately no lives were lost, and this may be attributed mainly to his exertions after the crew had succeeded in effecting a landing upon a most inhospitable shore. The disaster occurred in the depth of winter, and the men suffered considerably from drowsiness, caused by the intense cold and the drink taken ashore with them. Captain Garrard, who then was, and has always been, a total abstainer, appears to have been in a better position to withstand the cold. He succeeded in making his way over the frozen cliffs and through the snow drift to a fisherman's cottage, where he gave information of the accident, and the men were rescued. Captain Garrard subsequently gained some experience in steam navigation in the Mediterranean, and came out to this colony about five years ago in the Dilawur to Wellington. He went with the vessel as far as Adelaide on the return journey, but there he succeeded in obtaining his discharge, with the intention of finally settling in the colonies. He joined the Hawea as second mate, and obtained rapid promotion, being shifted from one boat to the other at frequent intervals. It may be mentioned that Captain Garrard brought the lady in Australia to whom he was engaged over to New Zealand in December last, in the Albion steamer, then under his command.

Source: Australian and New Zealand Gazette, July 9, 1881, Pages 9-11

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Re: Others Named Mary Kelly

Post by Karen on Sun 12 May 2013 - 11:18

Interesting articles found from the Welsh newspapers regarding a Mary Kelly, inmate of a workhouse, who gave testimony against Annie Maria English, another girl living in the same ward, who was charged with breaking windows.

POLICE COURT. - MONDAY.
Before W.E. SEYS (chairman), and R.C. JENKINS,
Esqs.
MISS ENGLISH AGAIN.

Annie Maria English, a young lady hailing from Aylburton, but an inmate of the workhouse, who about a month since was sent to gaol for smashing windows at the union, was again brought up on a charge of refractory behaviour at the workhouse on Sunday morning. - From the statement of Mary Kelly, an inmate of the same ward as the prisoner, it seemed that she charged her with hanging her cloak on the wrong peg, called her a false b_____, struck her in the face,
and threatened that if she was sent to gaol for it she would make a figure of her when she came out. - Prisoner pleaded guilty, and after being admonished by the chairman, who warned her that if she was brought up again she would be punished to the full extent of the power of the bench, she was sent to gaol for 21 days' with hard labour.

Source: County Observer and Monmouthshire Central Advertiser, 12 March 1881, Page 5


THURSDAY.
Before W.E. SEYS, Esq.
A PROMISING DAMSEL.

Mary Anna English, a brazen faced girl of 15 years of age, who had recently been removed to the Chepstow Union from Walsall, was brought up on a charge of disorderly conducting herself, and doing damage to property at the Union Workhouse. - J.S. Hartland, assistant master, proved the extent of the damage, and Mary Kelly, an inmate, proved seeing the prisoner break eight panes in the girls' ward, the stated object for doing so being that she wanted to be removed to
either Usk or Gloucester, so that she might get out of the workhouse. - She now pleaded guilty, and said she would do it again. - The magistrate sentenced her to fourteen days' hard labour, to which she retorted "All right, Billy; I can do it."

Source: County Observer and Monmouthshire Central Advertiser, 12 February 1881, Page 5

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Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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