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Missing Articles of 1890

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sun 4 Mar 2012 - 21:49

April 29, 1890

Senator Ingalls is at work on the final chapters of his long-looked-for novel. It will be a "ripper," he says.

Source: The Morning Call, Tuesday Morning, April 29, 1890


Last edited by Karen on Thu 8 Mar 2012 - 12:23; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sun 4 Mar 2012 - 22:00

April 30, 1890

GENERAL NEWS.

A writer in a Northern paper says: Up in Auckland now, when the good housewife is in pursuit of that animal known to Mr. Kerr, M.H.R., as the chamois, but to less scientific people as the flea, when she has affected a capture she is careful not to lead it to execution until she has ascertained whether it has a name or not. The proprietor of a flea show is offering 25 pounds for the capture and restoration of a runaway, which answers to the name of Billy Robinson, and every one caught is held up to the light while these words are pronounced to see the creature's guilty start or its answering smile of recognition, in proportion as it relishes a return to captivity. Jack the Ripper has not evaded capture more successfully than Billy Robinson, however. Even the police haven't a clue to his whereabouts, and all over Auckland and suburbs, in the dead of night, husbands are startled in terror from their slumbers by the cry of their better halves of, "Quick, John, strike a light; I think I've got Billy Robinson;" But all to no purpose. Billy Robinson has skipped.

Source: Tuapeka Times, Volume XXIII, Issue 1687, 30 April 1890, Page 3

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Tue 6 Mar 2012 - 15:26

May 1, 1890

A FARTHING SHOP IN WHITECHAPEL.

"Where do the farthings go?" We miss them after the limited finance of school days. A good many of them go to Whitechapel, to a shop in Dorset street. Among a lot of diminutive packages of soap and tea and sugar, and ha'porths of bacon there was a saucer of farthings. I went into the ill-lighted emporium, and a very intelligent young woman who was serving told me that they sold everything in quantities of "farthing's worths."
"You can have a farthing's worth of tea, and soap, and butter, and milk. We don't sell less than a ha'porth of loaf sugar though."
On the counter a baby was crowing, and all the time people were streaming in for their farthing's worths. Cooked bacon is sold at a shilling a pound and "raw bacon," said the young woman, at sevenpence. At night the place is a sort of supper club, the members of which all fetch their own provisions, from three-halfpence upwards.
Bang! went a dirty tin on the counter, and an unkept child wanted a farthing's worth of milk. She put her unclean nose into it as she walked out. Then a man came in, and after some haggling to have the cheapest he contracted for seven farthing's worth of bacon. He was a lean and hungry man, long of limb. Then a woman for a farthing's worth of milk and the same of butter. They evidently breakfast late in Dorset Street. This customer also had a ha'porth of "piscalli," a peculiar pickle in which it is not exactly possible to distinguish anything but mustard, but it looks chiefly like cauliflower.
Two or three times while I was there the shop filled and emptied, and nearly all the business was done in farthings. One little boy had a ha'porth of tea-dust. The shop opens at six in the morning, and closes at twelve or half-past at night. This is the only way that any profit can be got from such poor customers. Then there are all the packets to be made up ready for customers before the place opens. This is probably the dearest and the meanest mode of housekeeping anywhere. The people who live in the street are the dregs of Whitechapel. Some of them are dockers, but they are the fringe of the worst among the casual laborers. It explains somewhat how these men, who live from hand to mouth, held out so long during the strike. If they got a penny from the relief fund there was sufficient to buy a tea with. With another penny for bread and a penny for coals - for threepence, in fact the larder is filled, and a cheerful glow permeates the one room that is usually the residence of those who don't live in the common lodging-houses.

Source: North Otago Times, Issue 7032, 1 May 1890, Page 1

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Tue 6 Mar 2012 - 15:32

May 3, 1890

Page 3 Advertisements Column 6

CRITERION YARDS.
SATURDAY 10TH MAY, 1890.
At 12 noon.

MITCHELL, WHITE & CO. will sell by auction, as above -

1 FAMILY STATION WAGGON
1 DOUBLE SEATED BUGGY
1 WHITECHAPEL CART

These will be on view at the Yards on and after Wednesday next and will be sold without reserve.

Source: Southland Times, Issue 11446, 3 May 1890, Page 3

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Tue 6 Mar 2012 - 15:54

May 4, 1890

POLICE INTELLIGENCE.
BOW STREET.

SERIOUS CHARGE AGAINST A CLERGYMAN. - The Rev. Robert James Simpson, aged 67, of St. Peter's, Eltham-road, Lee, Kent, and late rector of St. Clement Danes, Strand, was charged with inciting a lad named Joseph Sampson to commit an unlawful offence in a railway carriage on the South Eastern railway between Cannon-street and Charing-cross.
- The chief witness was Joseph Sampson, aged 15, son of a tailor, of 12, Scarborough-street, Whitechapel.
- Serjeant Wyatt, of the M division, deposed to accompanying the defendant and the boy Sampson to Cannon-street. He saw the accused approach the boy at Charing-cross. Simpson gave the lad his bag and 3d., and witness heard him say "London-bridge." The boy got the ticket and came back to the prisoner. They both walked to the local platform. The train was just leaving the station, so they went to the waiting-room until the departure of the 12:15 train. Witness accompanied them to Cannon-street, where the prisoner alighted. Witness stopped him and told him that he would have to accompany him and the boy to the station-master's office. The lad there repeated the accusations mentioned in evidence. The accused was then taken into custody. On the way to the station he said, "For God's sake, whatever shall I do? I have done wrong, I know I have done wrong; but it is not so bad as the boy has stated."
- Inspector Tildesley deposed to taking the charge at Bow-street police-station. It was read over, and Simpson remarked, "If I am to be ruined I must meet this charge and go to my ruin, but I would like to see the boy's father before this goes any further."
- Mr. Crawshaw asked for bail.
- Mr. Lushington replied that he had a difficulty, as there was no cross-examination.
- Mr. Crawshaw said the defendant through him absolutely denied the truth of the charge. The defendant was remanded from Monday to Wednesday. At the resumed hearing the boy's father was called, and, in cross-examination, denied that he had said, since the adjournment of the case, that if he had known, in the first place, what he knew now, he would not have brought the charge against the defendant.
- The defendant went into the witness box and offered an explanation of all the circumstances under which he met the prosecutor, denying absolutely that anything such as was suggested took place. Testimony as to the associations and the antecedents of the defendant was then given by Admiral Champion, Sir James Whitehead, High Sheriff of London and ex-Lord Mayor, Archdeacon Sinclair, and Sir Alexander Grierson.
- In adjudicating upon the case Mr. Lushington reviewed the evidence, and said, "I have no hesitation in saying that I should not be justified in sending such a case for trial before a jury. It is a great fortune for the defendant that he has been able to give his account on oath in the witness-box. I have no hesitation in saying that he leaves the court without a stain on his character."
- The decision was received with applause in court.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, May 4, 1890, Page 4

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Wed 7 Mar 2012 - 6:49

May 5, 1890

HOSTS IN HYDE PARK.
A Monster Labor Demonstration in the World's Metropolis.

HALF A MILLION PARTICIPANTS.
Two Hundred Thousand Men March to Music from 150 Bands - "We Kill Ourselves to Feed Ourselves" a Conspicuous Motto - A Jolly and Orderly Gathering.

LONDON, May 5. - Yesterday should become a memorable one in the history of demonstrations on the part of the laboring classes of England, for it has never been equalled since the days of monster outpouring of the people which characterized the reform movement of 1867. The most moderate estimate of the number of people taking part in the Hyde park meetings is 500,000, of which 200,000 came in the processions and 300,000 gathered at will. This is a very conservative calculation, however, and some observers accustomed to gauge large crowds do not hesitate to assert that fully 1,000,000 people participated in the demonstration. There were 150 bands of music in the processions.
The affair was a three headed one, the largest number of men being under the leadership of the Trades council - a distinctively non-socialistic body. A somewhat less numerous contingent acknowledged the leadership of the central committee, which leans strongly toward socialism, while a third and relatively small division was under the control of the out and out socialistic organizations, known as the Social Democratic Federation.

All Factions United.

All possibility of strife or friction among the various bodies had been avoided by careful previous arrangements and for once people of all shades of opinion on the labor question joined in a common movement. The trades council procession was badly led and for the most part was hardly better than a straggling mob of ill conditioned, dirty, ragged men, whose appearance made it plain that they represented the unemployed, rather than the working men. These forlorn hosts made no attempt to keep step, even when they were within hearing of music. They moved along pell mell, but despite their miserable appearance they manifested great good nature and indulged in much horse play and rude joking among themselves.
Their gorgeous banners were in odd contrast with the evident poverty of the bearers. There were over 200 of these emblems adorned with all manner of mottoes and devices. One was noticed having a good portrait of Mr. Gladstone on one side and on the reverse the grim motto "We kill ourselves to feed ourselves." The music furnished was a rule more noisy than artistic. In passing Westminster Abbey and Buckingham palace the bands banged wildly as if in defiance of those aristocratic precincts; and it is probable that many a shudder of dismay was thus caused which could not have been produced by clubs and stones. The central committee's procession moved in much the best form and was made up of a well-to-do set of workmen.

An Imposing Scene.

When all the marchers had reached the park the scene was an imposing one. The plainness of garb characterizing the assemblage as a whole was largely offset by the gay banners and by the surprising prevalence of personal decoration in the shape of bright ribbons, rosettes, etc., some being the badges of the unions, others impromptu embellishments. The scene resembled a huge fair, the crowd outside of the dense central portion being dispersed in smaller groups each made of the auditors of some orator of more moderate fame than that of the leaders who addressed the main crowd from the central platforms. The park belt, three-quarters of a mile long by half a mile wide, was crammed with a solid mass of people, while all the streets and ways leading to the park were more or less congested.
The Whitechapel district seemed to have disgorged a considerable fraction of its unhappy denizens to swell the throng. The crowd ebbed and flowed, and instead of one meeting, there was, properly speaking, a continuous succession of audiences. This was largely the necessary result of the paucity of speakers. It was impossible for half the people to hear what was said, and in fact no one seemed to care much about listening. The gathering together in the public place and exchanging greetings and opinions seemed to be the idea uppermost. The marching or coming and going continued from 2 o'clock until after nightfall.

Drew the Line at Elephants.

Groups of marchers continued to arrive long after darkness had put an end to the speaking. The day was an orderly one, despite the thronged condition of the streets. The police did not interfere in any way with the processions or meetings except to put a veto upon an attempt to lead an elephant through the streets as part of the turnout. The only arrests were those of thieves, who were out in great force, their prey being naturally the spectators on the sidewalks rather than the humble marchers in the streets. Altogether the demonstration was a creditable one to the great eight hour movement.

Source: Lebanon Daily News, Monday May 5, 1890

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Wed 7 Mar 2012 - 7:11

May 8, 1890

THE RIPPER.
Thought They Had a "Jack the Ripper" in the Clayton-Breckenridge Investigation.

But He Proves by His Handwriting That He Could Not Have Been One.

LITTLE ROCK, May 6. - The Clayton-Breckenridge investigating committee listened to the evidence of one hundred witnesses; a majority of whom were negroes. Shortly after the committee assembled in the morning Hon. Carroll Armstrong rose and made an apology for the strong language he used on the evening before, in denouncing the slanders against the people of Conway county. His apology was made to the committee. Before adjournment this afternoon Chairman Lacey announced the intention of the committee to conclude its labors today. The most important witness called today was Oliver T. Bentley, whom Clayton suspects of having killed his brother. Bentley is a deputy sheriff of Conway county, and claims to have been in Morrillton on the night Clayton was killed at Plummerville. Today he handed the committee the papers in the divorce case of Luther versus Luther, which he served on Lydia Luther and others on Thursday afternoon, January 29, 1888, across the river from Morrillton. He returned from across the river about 5 o'clock in the afternoon. About dark that night he served notice on John Kinkle, attorney, to take a deposition in the case on February 3. Kinkle appeared before the committee and corroborated the testimony given on this point by Bentley. The witness is prepared to prove that after he left Hinkle, he went to supper and from there attended a dance. After the witness had given this testimony, he was asked if he had any objection to giving the committee a specimen of his handwriting, to which he made an answer in the negative. Chairman Lacey then dictated to the witness to write the following letter, which he did very rapidly:

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE,
June 13, 1889.

Town Marshal, Morrillton, Arkansas:

You may soon prepare your coffin, bid adieu to your family, as you shall soon take the road that Colonel Clayton did, as we thought it was old Powell Clayton. He is the one we shall kill before many more suns do set over his head, and you, yourself. G___d d____n your soul to the depths of hell - you, too, shall soon bite the dust. You passed a great insult to me on the streets of Morrillton once, and I have not forgotten it, nor never shall, till I shoot your d___n brains out. This is no fooling, you rascal, and you needn't doubt it. I shall kill you in spite of hell and damnation. You, you, seen me while ago and you did not know it. You will soon see me, but it will be too late for you to live.

Respectfully,
JACK THE RIPPER, No. 1.

As soon as Bentley concluded writing the above gory epistle, he handed the sheet of paper to Major Lacey, who compared the writing with that of the original. There was no similarity whatever in the chirography of "Jack the Ripper, No. 1," and that of Bentley.

Source: Fort Wayne Weekly Gazette, Thursday May 8, 1890

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Wed 7 Mar 2012 - 10:03

May 6, 1890

THE INFLUENZA IN LONDON IN 1837.

In 1837 - the year of Queen Victoria's accession - England suffered from an epidemic of influenza so virulent and widespread that it gave rise to a genuine panic, and, for a while, almost threatened a paralysis of business. The characteristics of the malady were inflammation of the throat and lungs, with violent spasms, sickness and headache. Now that we seem to be within measurable distance of the return of the epidemic, it may be interesting to recall the facts of its last visit: -
So general were the effects of the epidemic that at the War Office, the Admiralty, the Navy Pay Office, the Stamp Office, the Treasury, the Post Office, and other Government departments, the greater number of clerks were prevented from attending to their daily avocations. At Greenwich and Chelsea Hospitals numerous deaths occurred among the aged inmates; and at Woolwich garrison the disease was so prevalent that from forty to fifty men per day, belonging to the Royal Artillery, Royal Engineers, Sappers and Miners, and other troops, were admitted into the Military Hospital, amongst whom several deaths occurred. Of the police force upwards of eight hundred were incapacitated from duty. On Sunday, January 13, the congregations in the churches were lamentably thinned, and the number of burials on the same day in the different cemeteries were nearly as numerous as during the raging of the cholera in 1832 and 1833. In the workhouses the number of deaths far exceeded the figures of any return made in the course of the previous thirty years. But it was on the following Sunday (the 20th) that London realised to the full the extent and devastating nature of the influenza epidemic. "Death," said one careful chronicler, "had a high day in the metropolis, and perhaps in the memory of the oldest inhabitant such a scene has not been witnessed. There was scarcely an undertaker not employed, and many were unable to accomplish their orders. Hearses and mourning coaches were to be seen driving through the streets, hurrying from the execution of one funeral to the commencement of another. The walking funerals were met at almost every corner of the public streets, and many who had ordered carriages were unable to procure them, and compelled to wade through the dirt and wet on foot. The churchyards seemed to be all bustle and confusion. The principal interments took place in the parishes of St. Pancras, Marylebone, St. Giles's, Clerkenwell, Whitechapel, Bethnal Green, St. Margaret's, and St. John's, Westminster. It is computed that no less than 1000 burials must have taken place on Sunday, and when it is considered that the number of parishes in and round the metropolis is near 200, the calculation does not seem to be an exaggerated one. In St. Pancras and St. Giles's churchyards the scenes were truly awful, and even disgusting to the feelings. The burial ground in the former had more the appearance of a ploughed field; furrows from the graves, were turned up all over the place, and such was the scene between three and four o'clock that no less than between forty and fifty interments took place, the undertakers scarcely knowing which grave to go to. Groups of mourners with corpses waiting in every part for the clergyman to take his turn in performing the funeral service; then the horrid manner of the gravediggers ("navvies," who seemed hired for the purpose), their awful language and careless manner of filling in the graves, jumping and stamping on the coffins - such a sight, indeed, was enough to appal the hardest heart. Some of the mourners had actually to wait upwards of an hour before their relatives could be interred." This epidemic seems not only to have proved destructive in its own natural form, but at Guy's Hospital, in the wards where a free circulation of the air existed, it ran, in many cases, into bronchitis and pneumonia, and even induced severe symptoms of typhoid or yellow fever. So fatal, indeed did it prove that the managers of several hospitals set apart wards exclusively for influenza patients. At a meeting of the Westminster Medical Society, Dr. Johnson stated that the influenza had been far more violent in its character and universal in its extent than the cholera epidemic of 1833. The grippe prevailed at Boulogne to an extraordinary extent, whole families were attacked; but, though accompanied by painful symptoms, it seems to have been of a milder character than the English influenza. In some of the surrounding villages, however, half the population were laid up, and the churches had to be closed for want of congregations. During February the epidemic rapidly declined. The weekly account of burials published in the "Medical Gazette" put down the number for the week ending February 21 at twenty only, and the improvement in the general health of the metropolis was even more satisfactory. Thus ended "the influenza" of half a century ago. - "Pall Mall Gazette."

Source: Bruce Herald, Volume XXI, Issue 2163, 6 May 1890, Page 4

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Wed 7 Mar 2012 - 10:11

March 16, 1890

RIVAL TO WHITECHAPEL CRIMES.
From the London Daily Telegraph.

The dreadful crime which has just been brought to light in West Ham is hardly surpassed by horror in any of the series of undiscovered murders in Whitechapel. If the hideous element of mutilation be wanting to this latest deed of blood, it is marked by all those terrible characteristics of cruelty, mystery, and diabolical cunning on the part of the perpetrator which distinguished the earlier crimes to which we have compared it. And there is something especially appalling in the fact that the violation and murder of the unhappy girl, Amelia Jeffs, should have been committed within a stone's throw of her own home, and that her dead body should have been lying concealed for a whole fortnight on a spot so close to the dwelling of the distracted parents, who have been searching high and low in the meantime to discover her. A medical examination has left little doubt that she was first outraged and then strangled. The police promise to leave no stone unturned to discover the perpetrator of the terrible crime, and, difficult as their task must be in the apparently complete absence of any clue to guide them, we sincerely hope that this last atrocity is not destined to add another to the too long list of undetected murders.

Source: The New York Times, March 16, 1890

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sat 10 Mar 2012 - 1:13

May 11, 1890

MURRAY'S MUSINGS.

The dress destroyer is again abroad in New York. Whoever it is, he or she has created greater consternation among the fair sex than would be created by the advent of Jack the Ripper. And it is quite enough to throw woman-kind into a panic. To feel that a night at the opera, or a stroll down Broadway, or an afternoon's shopping may result in the ruin of a costume on which days of laborious thought and weeks of preparation, to say nothing of a good round sum of money, have been expended, is enough to disturb the mental balance of almost any lady. When she happens to be one of the many who can afford but one really nice costume for the season the solicitude is still greater. What in the world any human being finds enjoyable in haunting theatre lobbies, crowded shops and sidewalks with a bottle of acid or ink and distributing the contents over the skirts of the best dressed women indiscriminately is a marvel. Yet that somebody does enjoy it is evidenced by the ruined dresses of scores of New York ladies recently.
It is scarcely possible that such miscreants could be working on a salary or commission from the women tailors and dressmakers, though pure malice would seem to be an inadequate reason. The police have several times thought they had the man - they think it is a man - but the slight intermission of safety that follows one of these onslaughts is regularly broken by a fresh trail of ink and acid in some other section. Naturally enough, the theatrical managers and shopkeepers on whose premises these depredations occur, do their best to conceal the facts, since once admitted it would mean little less than ruin. Some shrewd fellow, who ought to be a detective, believes it is not a man at all, but a woman - a woman scorned, of course. His theory is that it is some half-crazed girl who is thus working out a general, systematic scheme of revenge on her sex. A few months ago the terror of the town was some fellow who went around at night chipping off the porcelain lettering from the shop windows. As these letters cost from 50 cents to $1 apiece you can imagine the havoc possible in a single night when the city was without electric or gaslight.

CHARLES T. MURRAY.
NEW YORK, May 10.

Source: The Pittsburg Dispatch, Sunday May 11, 1890, Page 4

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sun 11 Mar 2012 - 11:53

May 18, 1890

HOUNDED ALL HIS LIFE.
The "Elephant Man" Shunned By All On Account of His Deformity.

We can remember no invented tale that speaks so to the heart at once of the cruelty of life, and the beauty of human compassion, as the true story closed this week by a sentence in the newspapers announcing that Joseph Merrick, the "Elephant Man," was dead. Imagine a human soul clothed in a body so unspeakably frightful, that, seeing it, men turned sick with loathing, and women fainted; a being who had to be conveyed from place to place in secret; who hardly dared to venture abroad even at night; who, finding his fellow-creatures ran from him, grew terrified by the terror he created, and shuddered in dark corners like a hunted beast. Imagine him driven by starvation to accept a showman's offer and be exhibited to the most brutal of audiences, that commonly enough shrieked and ran pell-mell from the tent as soon as the curtain was drawn.
Early in 1886 Mr. Frederick Treves, one of the surgeons of the London Hospital, found Merrick in a penny show in a room off the Whitechapel road, crouching behind an old curtain, and trying to warm himself over a brick that was heated by a gas-jet. Mr. Treves went up to him without fear or loathing but with sympathy. For the first time in his life of twenty-four years Merrick heard a kind word and was spoken to like a man. The effect was curious. It made him afraid at first. He shrank as an ordinary man would from something uncanny. Then, as he began to realize the truth, he broke into sobs of gratitude. Days and even weeks passed however, before he recovered the shock of hearing a compassionate word.
The police prohibited his show on the ground of public decency. So he went to Belgium, where again the police interfered, and where an agent decamped with his money. Merrick was left destitute and starving in the streets of a foreign town, where the ignorant mob thought him a fiend.
He came back to London - how, no one quite knows. At every station and landing place crowds dogged him. Steamers refused to have him on board. But he came back to London, because in London lived the only man who had ever

GIVEN HIM A KIND WORD.

He made his way to the London Hospital, found Mr. Treves, who had him lodged for a time in an attic in the hospital, and determined to find a permanent shelter for him.
But now it was found that no institution would receive him. The Royal Hospital for Incurables and the British Home for Incurables alike, declined to take him in unless sufficient funds were forthcoming to pay for his maintenance for life. He himself begged that he might be placed in a blind hospital. It is hard to match the pathos of this plea.
Then in November, 1886, Mr. Carr Gomm, the chairman of the London Hospital, wrote to the Times, asking help for this case, and the British public responded. A room was built for Merrick on the ground floor in a remote wing of the hospital, and there, surrounded with books, flowers, and a hundred tokens of kindness that is really quick in the public heart, he has lived until this last week.
He had found many friends - the Prince and Princess of Wales, Mr. Gladstone, Mrs. Kendal and others. To Mrs. Kendal is due the happy suggestion that Merrick should be taken to see the Christmas pantomime at Drury Lane. She engaged the royal box; she had him brought to the theatre, and took every precaution that no strange eyes should see him. Hidden from the house behind the curtains of the box, the "Elephant Man" tasted an hour or two of intoxicating happiness. It was all real to him - the fairies, the splendor and the jewels.
Merrick, in spite of his hideous exterior and terrible experience, was in his way a gentle sentimentalist, and gushed forth at times, under the happy conditions of his life at the hospital, in verse modelled on the hymns of Dr. Watts, in which he gave utterance to his feelings of gratitude, the sincerity of which none ever questioned. It was a tender heart that was beating under a mask

MORE HIDEOUS THAN THAT OF ORSON.

Above all, it was a heart that was filled with love for the man who was literally his savior, who first spoke kindly to him, who rescued him from a fate a thousand times worse than death, and to the end was both his doctor and his friend. Recently it was only Mr. Treves who could thoroughly understand the poor creature's maimed utterances, and to Mr. Treves he clung to the last with the wistful trust and affection of a dumb animal.
It is difficult to speak of this man's case without emotion. But luckily it is harder still to hear of it and believe that the "struggle-for-lifers" have grasped the true secret of life, or even half of it.
- London Speaker.

Source: The Daily Tribune, Sunday Morning, May 18, 1890, Page 13

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sun 11 Mar 2012 - 11:59

May 19, 1890

EDITOR HALSTEAD believes it to be his duty to rip up the democratic party of New York state. Mr. Halstead is an experienced ripper. With the aid of Foraker, he ripped up the republican party of Ohio, for which he deserves the thanks of the public. Perhaps he will find another Foraker in New York, and thus rid the country of Tom Plattism; for we have observed that when the great journalist believes that he is engaged in ripping up the democracy, he is inserting his jack-knife into the bowels of republicans.

Source: The Constitution, Monday May 19, 1890, Page 4

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sun 11 Mar 2012 - 13:18

May 20, 1890

Local and General News.

Mr. A.L. Parr has just completed a very handsome Whitechapel cart to the order of a country resident. The vehicle is well finished in every respect. The workmanship is so good, and the price charged is so moderate, that Mr. Parr has already booked orders for two more.

Source: Fielding Star, Volume XI, Issue 140, 20 May 1890, Page 2

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sun 11 Mar 2012 - 13:20

May 21, 1890

PERSONALS.

Charles D. Ripper of Oakland is at the St. Elmo.

Source: The Los Angeles Times, Wednesday May 21, 1890, Page 8, Column A

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sun 11 Mar 2012 - 13:25

May 25, 1890

LATEST MARKETS.
HAY, STRAW, AND CLOVERS.

In the English markets trade has been moderate, without change of values. Trade at Whitechapel has been dull, with a dropping tendency of prices, as under: -

Clovers, 78s. - 92s. Beat Hay, 60s. - 87s. Straw
Inferior, 45s. - 75s. Inferior, 25s. - 49s. Inferior

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, May 25, 1890, Page 2

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sun 11 Mar 2012 - 21:00

May 29, 1890

A FIGHT WITH A KING.

"Ah, would yer? Take that!"
"And you take that, and see how yer likes it!"
Such were the shouts which, mingled with oaths, stamping, and the sound of savage blows, echoed through a dark, foul, cut-throat lane in one of the worst parts of Whitechapel, one dark autumn night nearly 70 years ago, when George IV was King of England, and when London was a very different place to what it is now.
Three men had halted at the entrance of the lane as if doubting whether to turn into it or not; but the moment the uproar of the fray reached their ears, the tallest of the three cried gleefully:
"Hurrah! we are in luck! Here's a fight going on, and we're just in time to join in. Come along!"
And he dashed into the gloomy alley, with his two comrades close at his heels.
The three new comers wore the rough clothes and slouched, greasy caps which seemed to be the fashionable costume of this ruffianly quarter; but had there been light enough to see them plainly, any passer-by might well have wondered how men so meanly dressed came to have such white hands, such well-trimmed whiskers, and such proud, handsome, high-bred faces.
As their leader had said, they came just in time to take part in the fight that was going on. Four big, dirty, savage-looking men - evidently ruffians of the lowest class, and all more or less intoxicated - were hammering each other with yells of brutal rage by the glimmer of the solitary lamp that faintly broke the darkness of this evil place, while a fifth man (a huge, brawny fellow with a broad flat nose and bull-dog jaw) leaned against the wall with his hands in his pockets, watching the sport with unmistakeable enjoyment.
This appreciative spectator was dressed like a Thames waterman, and such indeed he was; but he could handle his fists quite as skilfully as his oars, and had long since made the name of "Fighting Ben Badger" the terror of the whole waterside district from Wapping Stairs to London Bridge. Fond of fighting though he was, however, Ben was not naturally quarrelsome, and usually required some provocation to rouse him; but when once he was roused, it was apt to go very hard with his opponent.
The four-handed fight was at its hottest, when a small, ragged, half-starved, miserable-looking boy, disturbed from his sleep in a dark corner close to the scene of action by the yells and curses of the combatants, started out in terror, and attempted to run away; but in doing so he came into collision with one of the scuffling men, who stumbled and all but fell.
The infuriated ruffian launched out a savage kick at the child (which would certainly have killed him had it reached its mark), and then, darting forward, was just about to clutch his victim by the throat, when a crushing blow on the temple knocked him down like a ninepin.
"Take that, you coward!" shouted the tallest of the three strangers (who had just come up to the spot), "and hit some one of your own size, will you? And you," he added, turning to the rest, "do you call yourselves men and will you look on and see a child ill-used by a great hulking beast like that? You're a pack of cowardly brutes, and you ought to be ashamed to show your faces among honest Englishmen!"
The other three brawlers eyed the newcomer in blank amazement; but just then Ben Badger - apparently feeling himself called to the front by this sweeping rebuke - stepped forward, and growled:
"Look 'ere, Mr. Longshanks, if you give us any more o' yer sauce, blowed if I don't knock yer head off!"
"You'd better be quite sure that you can do it," retorted the Unknown, coolly taking off his coat; "but if you'd like to try, I'm your man."
"Here, let me tackle him!" whispered one of the stranger's comrades, imploringly; "he's a noted fighter, and you may get badly hurt. Remember what your life is worth!"
"Thanks, I can do my own fighting," said the other, with a calm dignity, strangely at variance with his mean dress. "I command you not to interfere - you understand that, I hope?"
The next moment he stood face to face with "Fighting Ben."
The big boatman began as usual by pressing on and trying to beat down his enemy by sheer strength and weight; but this time the plan did not work so well, for the stranger was evidently a very skilful boxer, as well as a man of uncommon strength. Twice Ben made a rush, and twice a blow that would have instantly disabled any less powerful man sent him staggering back again.
"You knows how to fight, you does," said he in a tone of sullen admiration; "but I've got to lick yer whether or no."
And then began such a hail of blows as none of the lookers-on, practised fighters though they all were, had ever seen before. The sledge hammer fists of the combatants went to and fro so quickly that the eye could hardly follow them, while the spectators, too deeply interested even to shout, held their breath as they watched this battle of giants, and listened to the hard breathing and muttered curses of the fighters.
Suddenly a terrible hit full on the chest sent the Unknown reeling back against the wall; but as Fighting Ben, with a shout of savage triumph, sprang in to finish his work, the stranger drew himself together, and dealt him a blow in the face that echoed all along the gloomy alley like the thud of a carpenter's mallet; and down went the Thames champion on his back as if struck by a cannon ball.
He was up again directly, however, and came on again with unabated fierceness, battered and bleeding though he was; while the stranger (who seemed to be considerably the older man of the two) felt his breath and strength beginning to fail with the strain of this superhuman struggle.
Plainly enough it was time to end the combat; and as Badger came on again, the stranger, cleverly dodging a tremendous blow, sprang in and grappled. For a moment the two were so squeezed and twisted together that the anxious eyes which watched them could hardly tell which was which; and then Ben's burly form was swung fairly off its feet, and hurled to the earth with such force that he lay stunned and senseless.
"I think he has had enough," said the conqueror, quietly. "Pick him up, some of you, and see if he's hurt."
The hulking ruffians around him, awed by his commanding tone as well as by the prowess that he had just displayed, obeyed at once.
Just at that moment three or four constables (for the new police had not yet begun to exist) came up to the spot - too late, as usual - and the light of the lantern carried by the foremost of them fell full upon the face of the victorious boxer.
"Bless my soul!" cried the man, pulling off his hat and making a clumsy bow, "who'd ever ha' thought of seein' your Majesty here!"
"Hold your tongue, you fool!" whispered the tall pugilist, angrily.
But it was too late, for all the bystanders had heard and understood the constable's exclamation.
"The King!" cried the four roughs with one voice, staring as if their eyes would start out.
"Are you really the King, guv'nor?" asked Ben Badger, who had by this time recovered his senses, and was rising rather unsteadily to his feet.
"I am the King, at your service," answered George IV, clapping him heartily on the shoulder with one hand, while offering him a guinea with the other.
"Well, by jingo," cried Ben, pocketing the money, "I've said many a hard word of kings in my time, but if they can all fight like you, blow me if I ever says another word agin 'em as long as I live!"
And to the end of his days Ben Badger always said that, "for a king, old George warn't a bad sort o' chap arter all."

Source: Otago Witness, Issue 1895, 29 May 1890, Page 36

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Tue 13 Mar 2012 - 18:50

May 31, 1890

TELEGRAPHIC BREVITIES.

Another "Jack the Ripper" horror is reported from England.

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Tue 13 Mar 2012 - 19:12

June 2, 1890

COOKERY OF THE POOR.
Toothsome and Nutritious Dishes at a Minimum of Expense and Trouble.

A faculty of social science has, it is stated, been instituted at the University of Brussels, and Prof. Berger, a Belgian authority in chemistry, has given a course of lectures on alimentary chemistry. In the first of them he came to the economic conclusion that it was possible to determine with precision the quantity of nutritive elements indispensable for the reparation of the power of a workingman, and consequently the amount of money necessary for purchasing this quantity, and that, therefore, when the other primary wants of a workingman were determined in the same way, the minimum of salary could be fixed with scientific accuracy. Questions of taste, digestibility, and prejudice are, however, apt to be ignored in calculations of this kind; so that, although of value as a basis of information, they are far from having the practical use which their authors ascribe to them. The knowledge of the housewife and of the cook, and a familiar acquaintance with the habits and surroundings and tastes of the laboring classes, are necessary to give reality to such calculations. An excellent example of may be done in this way is furnished in the able and interesting chapters on the subject in the popular little handbook of domestic economy largely used in boarding schools, entitled "The Making of the Home," written by Mrs. Barnett of St. Jude's, Whitechapel. The same subject is treated with great technical knowledge and power of sympathetic feeling for the poor in her chapter on "Our National Defenses." In the joint essays by herself and the Rev. S.A. Barnett, in the well-known collection of essays entitled "Practicable Socialism." The subject is one in which medical men, skilled as they are in the physiology of food and accustomed to deal with the poor both in family life and public institutions, might give great aid. That which are working classes greatly need is instruction in the art of braising, or slowly stewing at a low heat, combinations of meat scraps and of vegetables. Anything more toothsome and nutritious than the vintagers' pot au feu, which I lately tasted in the Medoc during the gathering of the grapes, cannot well be imagined. It was so delicious that a supply was ordered into the chateau for midday lunch, and it was voted by acclamation worthy of a cordon bleu. It was made with leg of beef, onions, carrots, cabbage, and the like, and poured smoking into bowls over slices of thin bread. What a lesson is conveyed to our managers of soup-kitchens and what a meal for our harvesters!

Source: The Gazette, June 2, 1890

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Tue 13 Mar 2012 - 22:45

June 4, 1890

THE DERBY.

A wet Derby Day! To the sporting world, and the thousands who, never seeing any other sporting event the whole year through, always make a point of journeying to Epsom for the greatest Turf struggle, it means the destruction of all their hope of enjoyment; to those who year after year calculate upon reaping a rich harvest from the fraternity who lavishly patronise all sorts of vehicles, and drive gallantly on to the Downs, it means a dislocation of all their plans; but to the Railway Companies that are able to enter the competition for public favour, it should have meant crowded trains and greatly increased returns. But it has not been so. They have had fewer passengers than usual. The wet weather has evidently deterred a great many risking a drenching on the Downs. Not for many years has there been such a falling-off in the road traffic as today. On a lovely summer morning, with the sun streaming down upon the white roads, and through the leafy trees of Tooting, Morden, and Mitcham, the road is alive with hundreds - aye, thousands - of jovial holiday-makers. The Whitechapel coster, with his better half, disporting themselves in their tiny barrow drawn by their faithful animal; the well-to-do tradesman of the suburbs; the City man in his dog-cart, drawn by a high - stepping bay; the independent individual, with his four-in-hand and small party of gaily-attired friends, discussing the merits of the contents of sandwich baskets and wine bottles, all mingle together in the stream that winds its way Epsomwards on such a morn. But today how different is the scene! At nine o'clock Clapham-common, or, rather, the road that skirts it, was but little more animated than on any other morning. Certainly a few rather odd-looking carts, laden with all that goes to satisfy the wants and minister to the creature comforts of the crowd, were quietly pressing forward to the scene of the day's sport; but the tradesman, the publican, and the coach were until later in the morning conspicuous by their absence. Very early in the morning there were indications of the coming rain, and by eight o'clock showers began to fall in the Metropolis. The long rows of coaches one always finds in Kennington-lane on Derby morning waiting for customers were not patronised in consequence, and by nine o'clock many had gone home, their drivers in despair. It was well on towards half-past ten before the more venturesome holiday-makers started upon their journey, and from that time the road a way down to Epsom assumed more nearly some of the features of Derby morning. Notwithstanding the atmospheric conditions, the drive is a really delightful one. The trees are just now at their best, and the flowers abloom in the gardens of the picturesque houses of Tooting give forth a delicious perfume, while the leafy rows at Morden and Mitcham are a soothing change after the bustle of the London streets. Whatever may be said of the decline of the Derby, the scene when the course was reached was enough to convince one that it holds, and is destined to hold, the pre-eminent position in the affections of the sporting world. Though the Derby has undergone material changes since its foundation in 1780, when the pink and white stripes of Sir Charles Bunbury, a famous sportsman in his day, were borne to victory by Diomed, it yet remains the most coveted prize of the Turf. So, too, is it with the public the most attractive of all races, for from every part of the country the votaries of sport gather together to view the great struggle.

Source: The Echo, Wednesday June 4, 1890, Page 3

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Tue 13 Mar 2012 - 23:00

June 5, 1890

The Fight For Funds and Patients.

Would it be wise to map out London into territorial areas? - Yes; I hold that very strongly. The general hospitals in London are not working together, nor with special hospitals or dispensaries in their districts, nor with provident dispensaries. The whole of the hospitals are competing against each other for funds, and to a certain extent for patients; and that is a very bad thing for the poor, and for the hospitals; and I should like to see the dispensaries, the poor-law infirmaries, and special hospitals united to a certain extent with the general hospitals.
I can understand the territorial scheme, if they were in a district where the London Hospital is, because it stands by itself in Whitechapel; but if you come a little further west, you find, not far from Tottenham Court-road, the Middlesex Hospital, University College, a sick asylum very close to it, and Charing Cross Hospital, not far from it. St. George's again and King's College, how would you map out that part of London? - Undoubtedly there are grave difficulties owing to the position of the hospitals; but if there were any comprehensive scheme for London, I think it might be possible to remove some hospitals; or at all events, although not quite convenient, the territorial areas might be attached to the hospitals in their present position.
Surely the removal of a hospital or hospitals as you suggest would be a most gigantic undertaking.

Source: Charity Record Supplement, June 5, 1890, Pages 6-7

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Tue 13 Mar 2012 - 23:09

June 8, 1890

THE LONDON MARKETS.
HAY, STRAW, AND CLOVERS.

Supplies of old Hay are unusually large, and as the crop this year promises to be one of moderate average, it is not thought that there will be any immediate return to higher prices.
Whitechapel supplies have been larger and trade slow, but prices rather steadier, as under: -

Clovers, 74s. - 91s. Best Hay, 60s. - 87s. Straw, 37s. top
Inferior, 45s. - 75s. Inferior, 25s. - 49s. Inferior, 19s.

Cumberland values are: - Prime picked Middlesex Hay, 75s. - 82s.; good, 65s. - 75s.; useful, 55s. - 65s.; inferior, 36s. - 55s.; prime Clover, 80s. - 95s.; useful, 70s. - 80s.; inferior, 45s. - 70s.; Straw, 27s. - 37s. per load.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, June 8, 1890, Page 14

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Thu 15 Mar 2012 - 1:00

June 11, 1890

Whitechapel Excursionists to Oxford.

On Saturday last a hundred and twenty students from the Whitechapel centre of the University Extension Society made a pilgrimage to Oxford. They were received at Merton College by the Warden, who gave an interesting account of the growth of the University and the development of the collegiate system. After viewing Merton the visitors walked to Wadham College, where dinner was provided. In the afternoon some of the students visited the Bodleian, others the Taylorian Institution, while a third party spent a profitable hour with Dr. Murray. Later in the afternoon the party assembled in Balliol Hall to hear an organ recital, and then separated into small groups under the care of members of the University, and took tea in their rooms.

Source: The Echo, Wednesday June 11, 1890, Page 3

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Thu 15 Mar 2012 - 1:04

June 12, 1890

NEWS AND COMMENT.

"Jack, the Ripper," is on the war path again.

Source: The Fayetteville Observer, Thursday June 12, 1890

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Thu 15 Mar 2012 - 1:14

June 13, 1890

Another Settlement.

Settlements and missions by Universities and public schools are now all the rage. Mr. Barnett and his friends led the way at Toynbee Hall, Whitechapel, and they were speedily followed by the more distinctively Church Settlement of Oxford House, Bethnal-green, while Eton has its mission further east, at Hackney-wick. The Wesleyans have recently started a Leys Mission at St. Luke's, and will shortly have a University Settlement in the South-East of London. Now the Congregationalists are entering the field, and propose to start a settlement in connection with Mansfield College, Oxford, at Canning-town, in London over the border. The honorary warden is the Rev. F.W. Newland, of the Congregational Church, Canning-town, while the active management will be undertaken by Mr. Percy Alden, of Balliol and Mansfield. The work is to be largely of a social and educational, as well as of a religious, character. A sum of 250 pounds is required to start with, and about 600 pounds a year to carry on operations. Canning-town is a densely populated neighbourhood, in which there is ample room for work of this kind.

URBANUS.

Source: The Echo, Friday June 13, 1890, Page 2

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Fri 16 Mar 2012 - 23:02

June 16, 1890

SUICIDE'S STRANGE DELUSIONS.

At Paddington Coroner's Court, today, Dr. G. Danford Thomas held an inquest on the body of William Riley, aged 38, a plumber, of 62, Chippenham-road. - According to the widow of the deceased, her husband had been out of work since Christmas last. He occasionally drank to excess, and had delusions. He said, "he was followed all over by the 'tecks'" - meaning police-detectives. He was under the hallucination that the detectives noticed the toe-caps on his boots, and removed them, also that everybody called him the Whitechapel murderer, and that he smelt "brimstone" in the house. On Wednesday morning he went to Silvertown in search of work, and, on his return in the evening, he said he was pursued by detectives. On Thursday his wife went out, and when she returned she found the door of their room locked inside. He had before locked her out, and she thus only thought he was sound asleep. Hence she would not have the door forced open, and slept at her daughter's. Returning at half-past six the next morning, she found the door still locked. A boy got through the window and opened the door, when she discovered her husband lying dead upon the floor. Death was due to strangulation. - The jury returned a verdict of "Suicide while of unsound mind."

Source: The Echo, Monday June 16, 1890, Page 4

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