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Missing Articles of 1890

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Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Mon 20 Feb 2012 - 10:35

January 9, 1890

Jack the Ripper.

The excitement caused by this inhuman monster is scarcely equalled by that produced by the great discovery of Dr. Miles - the Restorative Nervine. It speedily cures nervous prostration, change of life, pain, dullness and confusion in head, fits, sleeplessness, the blues, neuralgia, palpitation, monthly pains, etc. Mr. John S. Wolf, druggist, of Hillsdale, Michigan, Talbott and Moss, of Greensburg, Ind., and A.W. Blackburn, of Wooster, O., say that "the Nervine sells better than anything we ever sold, and gives universal satisfaction." Dr. Miles' new illustrated treatise on the Nerves and Heart and a trial bottle free at Orcutt & Hayes Drug Store.

Source: The Jackson Sentinel, Maquoketa, Iowa, January 9, 1890

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sat 25 Feb 2012 - 2:29

January 25, 1890

THE HACKNEY SLANDER CASE.

On Monday, in the Queen's Bench Division, Mr. Justice Stephen and a common jury tried the case of Clarke vs. Hart. This was an action of slander brought by Dr. Clarke against a tobacconist who carries on business in Mare-street, Hackney. Mr. Morton Smith was for the plaintiff, and Mr. Rolland for the defendant. The facts, as opened by counsel, were shortly that in November, 1888, when the "Jack the Ripper" scare was at its height, the defendant was acting as an amateur detective in Whitechapel. In consequence of his having made a communication to Scotland-yard the plaintiff was subjected to much annoyance. He was "shadowed" by detectives, and his house was visited and searched by the police, it being suggested that a man who was suspected and being followed had entered it. On a letter being written the only answer was that the defendant was only discharging his duty as a citizen. Counsel went on to say that even now plaintiff was willing to accept an apology and his expenses. At the suggestion of the learned judge, counsel for the defendant consulted his client, and by consent a juror was withdrawn, the defendant expressing his regret that anything he had done had occasioned any pain to the plaintiff, and agreeing to pay plaintiff's costs. Mr. Justice Stephen said that as to the notion that every man had a duty to detect crime, his only duty was to sit still unless he actually knew something about it. The amateur detection of crime only led to much inconvenience to all parties concerned.

Source: The Mercury, Saturday January 25, 1890, Page 2

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sat 25 Feb 2012 - 2:43

February 5, 1890

The rector of Whitechapel, the Rev. A.J. Robinson, has just issued a report of work done in his parish during the past year. In his prefatory address he says: "Against the grain though it may be, the necessity of the times compels one to draw attention to Church work. There is darkness in Whitechapel, but there is light also, and the light that streams from the great light-house, the parish church, and is carried into the streets and courts around by the zealous and devout light-bearers is, without doubt, having its effect. What is the Church doing, then? I reply, look within and see. Note very specially that most of the light-bearers are working people themselves. I cannot bear to hear people speak as they do in such condemnatory terms of all the inhabitants of Whitechapel. I will venture to say that at the Last Day the Judge will place many a poor man and woman in Whitechapel high up among the saints - "Many that are last shall be first." On the question of having a Mission in the East-end, he agrees with it provided West-enders would work with the clergy of the East-end. "It is difficult to exaggerate the absolute immorality that is caused by the multiplication of contending unsectarian agencies. But, in our case I am deeply thankful to say that the vicar and congregation of St. Jude's, South Kensington, at the suggestion of the Bishop of Bedford, have offered assistance in the way of workers, &c., to this parish. They have just begun their labours, so that it is impossible to speak yet of the results; in the meantime I can but express my sincere gratitude to Dr. Forrest for so kindly coming to our aid."

Source: The Guardian, February 5, 1890, Page 205

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sat 25 Feb 2012 - 10:13

February 7, 1890

ODDS AND ENDS.

At a recent fancy dress ball at Clifton England, one of the men present was costumed as "Jack the Ripper."

Source: The Steubenville Weekly Herald, Friday February 7, 1890, Page 6

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sat 25 Feb 2012 - 10:15

February 7, 1890

Twelve Mile Items.

Ellis Oles, Jack the Ripper. I'll kill ten more and then quit.

Source: Daily Journal, February 7, 1890

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Tue 28 Feb 2012 - 5:03

February 9, 1890

THE MOLLY MAGUIRES.
Belief that the Order Still Exists in South-eastern Pennsylvania.

PHOENIXVILLE, Pa., Feb. 8. - The authorities of Chester county believe that the notorious organization known as the Molly Maguires is still in existence. They have reasons to suspect that Patrick Hagney, who was shot last Sunday morning in this town, was murdered at the instigation of that society. Chief of Police Joseph Moore found a large piece of paper tacked to a wheelbarrow a few feet away from the spot where the murdered man was standing where he was shot. On the paper in large letters was the heading: "Death to traitors," and stating in effect that the Molly Maguires always removed their enemies even if murder had to be resorted to. It also states that when the opportunity was presented, two local policemen named Dennis Kelley and John Kane, would share the same fate as Hagney. The letter was signed, "Jack the Ripper."
This paper is now in the possession of Charles Bazanoff, the chief engineer and vice president of the Phoenix Bridge company. He will allow no one to see it. While a correspondent was talking to Deputy Coroner Howell of the murder, a friend of the latter stated that to his knowledge a meeting of Mollie Maguires was held on Sunday last on High street, Pottstown. But little information can be gleaned from the authorities, as they think that publicity given to the case at this time will interfere with their investigation. While there appears to be strong evidence that Bernard Moller, the man who is in prison here, did commit the murder, as Hagney charged in his ante-mortem statement, yet it is believed that he only acted as the agent for some organization. He has a bad reputation.

Source: Wichita Eagle, Sunday Morning, February 9, 1890

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Tue 28 Feb 2012 - 5:04

February 19, 1890

There is quite a panic among the poorer population of Madrid, occasioned by letters addressed to the Mayor of that city by an anonymous writer, who declared himself to be "Jack the Ripper," a fugitive from English justice, with a settled purpose of murdering all the young children he can lay his hands on. A stranger has only to ask a child the way to a particular street in order to be set upon as a would be assassin by the apprehensive populace; and the other day, as a woman who had found a lost child was conducting it to the nearest police station, she was violently assaulted and severely beaten by a number of women, who denounced her as an agent of Jack the Ripper.

Source: Inangahua Times, Volume XV, Issue 20767, 19 February 1890, Page 2


Last edited by Karen on Tue 28 Feb 2012 - 8:30; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Tue 28 Feb 2012 - 5:04

February 20, 1890

A TWIN CITY VENTURE.
Councilmen Visit the Stockyards and Packing Houses at Long Lake.

The Latest Improved Machinery and Deft Hands at Work.
Although the Enterprise Is Young, the Business is Flourishing.

The Largest Sheep Corral in the Country Close at Hand.

That the Twin City stock yards is an industry that has come to stay was proven to the satisfaction of the Minneapolis city councilmen and a large number of private citizens and capitalists, who visited the plant yesterday upon the invitation of President H.E. Fletcher, of the stock yards company. While the great point of interest was in the packing house, a careful inspection showed the pens, which will accommodate 500 horses, 5,000 cattle, 10,000 sheep and 20,000 hogs, were constructed upon the most improved plans and the latest labor-saving devices for feeding, watering and handling all kinds of stock had been introduced. The Twin City Packing company's big packing house is now in full operation, and 50 head of cattle, 200 hogs and 300 sheep are slaughtered daily. Not only does this meat supply the local markets of St. Paul and Minneapolis, but already it has found its way into and successfully competes with the meat shipped from Chicago and Kansas City, and owing to the fact that the Twin City stock yards are 400 miles nearer the grazing country than either Chicago or Kansas City the projectors of the enterprise claim that it will be but a short time before they not only compete with those packing houses in the Northwest, but they will carry the war right into their own country, and can afford to supply the Eastern markets at a profit at a less price than can the famous "Big Four," and that in a few years the entire tract of 1,200 acres will have become a busy city, given up to the supplying of the entire world with dressed meat.
The old style of a half-dozen muscular men hauling a half-crazed steer up to a ring in the wall by a noose around his throat and a brawny man hitting him with an axe and then everybody joining in and skinning him and adjourning to the nearest beer saloon for refreshments after the meat is hung up to cool over, and, as it to often the case, a foul-smelling sewer, is entirely done away with at the Twin City stock yards. There six men with the aid of the machinery do the same work that required thirty under the old style. From the yards the cattle are driven up to a pen on the second floor. Alleyways which are just wide enough to admit one steer at a time, lead to the doors of the slaughtering room. The doors leading to this room are raised and lowered by steam, and, in fact, steam is used wherever possible. After the steers are driven into the alley they are separated by doors, so that the bovine finds himself in a narrow, box-like stall, over which is a convenient platform, upon which the "killer" stands. He is an inoffensive-looking, good natured young fellow, and during working hours carries in his hand a light iron maul attached to a long handle. A slight tap between the horns and down drops the steer in a heap. A chain attached to a steam winch is quickly fastened around one of his hind legs and he is drawn rapidly inside and up towards the roof until his head is about three feet from the floor. Then a man dressed in an oilskin coat cuts his throat, and in a few minutes he is taken by the rippers, skinners and cutters, and in twelve minutes his carcass is being moved upon the overhead tracks towards the cooling house. So rapidly and systematically do the men work that they say they can have an entire beef dressed in twelve minutes after he is drawn into the pen.
The hogs are driven up an easy incline to the third story. Then his pigship's throat is cut in a scientific manner, and he is slid down into a tank of scalding water, and from there to a scraping block, where he is quickly cleaned. Then he goes to the cutters and in almost an incredible space of time he is slid down into the cooling rooms and is ready for shipment.
Adjoining the packing house owned by the stock yards company is that of the Minneapolis Provision company. Their plant is now being completed, and is said to contain more modern improvements than any other packing house in the world. Attached to this plant is an improved process for rendering lard, for which Alexander W. Winter, of Chicago, has made an offer, but it was intimated yesterday that the provision company knew when they had a good thing and that they were not very anxious to sell. The fat from the hogs is thrown into chutes which carry it to large rendering vats. After that the lard is carried through pipes into the various processes to which it is subjected before being packed for shipment. One thing is noticeable about the packing houses and that is the cleanliness of the whole concern. Although on the floors where the hides are stored there is an unpleasant odor, the floors are scrupulously clean. In the killing rooms the blood is carried by chutes into taks, where it is mixed with other substances and becomes a rich fertilizer. Nothing is wasted, and even the water which is used to wash the animals during the dressing is filtered before it is allowed to escape from the pipes upon the sandy soil about a mile away. Dr. C.J. Alloway, the superintendent of the stock yards company, said yesterday that since Nov. 1, 1889, his company had shipped 2,000,000 pounds of meat to St. Paul, 700,000 pounds to Minneapolis, 1,600,000 pounds to the various cities in the Northwest, and 2,000,000 pounds to the East. These figures show that although the enterprise is young, it is very vigorous, and promised to make Minneapolis famous. The company is shipping beef to the Eastern market in their own refrigerator cars, which are painted a bright yellow, and are said to have attracted considerable attention on account of the various improvements which have been introduced. Close to the stock yards are the slaughter houses of the local butchers, who receive their supply of cattle from the yards.
About a mile further up the road is the sheep corral of the New Brighton Live Stock company. Rice creek flows through the corral which is both dog and wolf proof, and 60,000 head of sheep can be accommodated inside the enclosure at one time. At present there are 10,000 head being fattened for the market. They are fed on wheat screenings from self-feeding troughs, which contain tons of feed. The colder the weather, the better the sheep thrive. Those now in the corral are Montana merinos, and the aldermen all declared that they were as fine a looking flock as were ever brought to Minnesota. Everybody was pleased with the trip, and all united in prophesying a brilliant future for the enterprise visited.

Source: The Saint Paul Daily Globe, Thursday Morning, February 20, 1890, Page 3

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Tue 28 Feb 2012 - 5:05

February 23, 1890

A SHOCKING CASE.

John Lupton, 38, a sailor, of 211, Abbey-street, Bermondsey, was charged at the Thames police-court, on Friday, with indecently assaulting Susanna Bailey, a girl of 14 years, living at 240, Tabard-street, Borough, while travelling in a railway carriage on the District railway, between the Monument and St. Mary's (Whitechapel) stations.
- The statement of the girl (who had been for a month in a Salvation army home) was that she was with her brother, whose age is 18, looking at a waxworks show in the Borough on the previous evening, when the prisoner got into conversation with them, and they went into a public-house and drank together. The accused then took her and her brother to the Elephant and Castle railway station. From there they went in an omnibus and rode over London-bridge. They then went to the Monument railway station, where the prisoner took tickets for herself and her brother. The three entered an empty compartment. Prisoner then caught hold of her and committed the offence with which he was charged. He hurt her very much and she screamed out. A lady heard her scream and called out to a railway official to stop the train. When in the train prisoner gave her brother 1s. 5-1/2d. That was before he assaulted her. After she screamed a gentleman came and opened the carriage door. He asked what was the matter and she told him. Her brother sat beside her while prisoner assaulted her. Prisoner was afterwards taken to the police-station, where he was charged. - By Mr. Brian (who defended): She would swear she did not speak to the prisoner first. Her brother suggested that they should go with the accused. When she screamed out her brother told her not to holloa. Prisoner asked her not to give him in charge as he had a wife and children. She had been in a Salvation Army home for a month; but she denied ever having misconducted herself with men.
- By Mr. Lushington: Her mother sent her out. - The magistrate here remanded the prisoner, and said the brother could be given in charge for allowing the prosecutrix to be criminally assaulted.
- Mr. Lushington refused to grant bail.
Yesterday morning William Bailey, the brother, described as 18, was charged with aiding and abetting in the offence. Evidence of arrest having been given, Mr. Lushington remanded the accused, to enable him to be brought up with Lupton.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, February 23, 1890, Page 3

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Tue 28 Feb 2012 - 5:05

February 24, 1890

BOWLING.

The fifteenth game of the Fuch tournament in Brooklyn was rolled on Friday evening. The score:

Ansonia - Hitchcock, 146; Dens, 125; Hyland, 112; Ardisson, 111; Hull, 112; Hoffman, 146; Parsons, 150; De Rowinix, 121; Stutterhein, 148; Smith, 178. Total, 1,349.

Calamity - Ripper, 122; Lincoln, 111; Schwanhausser, 147; Hine, 129; Van Horn, 118; Scanlon, 148, Turnbull, 126; Holt, 184; Hoonry, 109; Bechtel, 170. Total, 1,317.

Source: The Sun, Monday February 24, 1890, Page 5

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Tue 28 Feb 2012 - 5:05

February 26, 1890

COLUMBUS, Feb. 26. - At the regular weekly caucus tonight the Democrats decided to devote each Wednesday to partisan measures and to repeal the registration law, except as to Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Toledo and Dayton. The redistricting bill will be pressed to a passage in the house tomorrow, Wednesday, afternoon and the Columbus "ripper" will be put through at the same time.

Source: Sandusky Daily Register, Wednesday Morning, February 26, 1890

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Tue 28 Feb 2012 - 5:09

March 3, 1890

A PERFECT PLOT.

London World.

"You are rather late, Stephen," said Mrs. Mostyn, as her husband came into the dining room one day, just as she had finished breakfast," and I cannot stay with you, as I have to go out."
"Go out! Why, you said last night you were going to finish that china painting this morning; though I really don't know why you should work so hard; we are not in absolute penury."
"No; but it is pleasant making money in a way one likes. Besides, there will be some to give away when we find we have too much ourselves. And how is your trade going on?"
"To tell the truth, not brilliantly. In fact, I am rather hung up for want of a plot!"
"A plot?"
"Yes; it is ridiculous. I have a short story to write this week, and, though I have a rather neat set of characters and small incidents ready, if you understand, a main idea is wanting."
"Dear me, that is unfortunate! Why don't you go out for a walk, or for half an hour in the Underground, or to the city on a bus, and find one?"
"My dear Millicent, what nonsense you talk! As if I were the least likely to find my ideal plot that way! No; I must try and worry it out myself somehow."
"Well, I must be off. Good by, Stephen: take my advice - go and look for your ideal in the real of life, I am sure you can find it there."
After his wife had gone, Stephen Mostyn ate his breakfast, and then sat musing a little, after which, springing out of his chair, he said:
"I never felt less inclined to write in my life? Really, I have a good mind to follow Millicent's advice and go out."
In a few minutes he was standing on the doorstep, deciding upon his next move.
"What a beastly fog! I certainly shan't lose much under ground, so here goes for the Metropolitan railway."
"Where for?" said the clerk sharply, as Stephen stood vaguely in front of the ticket office.
"Oh, Whitechapel, I should think that leaves room for discovery," he thought to himself.
"What class?"
"Third - better do it thoroughly. Now, then, for a trial trip between Kensington and the Mile End road, to test Millicent's theory."
A small boy with a large, heavy parcel got into the carriage with him, and spent some moments in vainly trying to secure his burden more firmly by means of a knotty bit of string that crossed it here and there in purposeless festoons. Mr. Mostyn lending his help, between them they made rather a neat thing of it.
"Adventure the first; ended, I fear," said Stephen to himself. "I really can't ask him how old he is, and where he lives, and if he thinks it healthy."
"Temple!"
Out tumbled the parcel and the boy, and in walked an elderly young woman with a fringe and an American cloth handbag. She sat down opposite to Mr. Mostyn, put both hands to her head as if to make certain it was still in its place, opened her bag and realized that she had not lost her ticket, looked at the window and sighed.
"Not exactly ideal, but scarcely real," thought Stephen. "Do you feel the draught from the window?" he asked.
"No, I don't, thank you," with a well arranged look of spiteful timidity, and changing her seat to one at the other end of the carriage.
"Is this a beginning?" thought Stephen. "Now, I should like to ask her if she thinks my life for thirty-five years has been working up to the climax of meeting her, veiled in golden fog, in a third-class Metropolitan railway carriage? I wonder if it's any good going on with this incident?
Madam -?"
"Sir, I think this is Blackfriar's station?" she said, whisking her head around as she spoke, the end of her nose depriving the glass of a very fine smut at the same time.
"It is not my business to tell her that she is now still more attractive than when she got in," thought Stephen; "she would probably give me into custody if I did - Blackfriar's? yes, it is. Do you get out here?"
"Yes," plunging at the door as she spoke.
"Ah," he said, turning the handle for her, "I don't."
There entered, before he shut the door, a small woman, holding in one arm a tiny bundle of a baby, and pushing before her a little boy. She sat down, and the baby keeping its position in the sling formed by its mother's arm, the boy holding close to her, pulling at her shawl, and continually asking her in an unintelligible mutter for something that she either had not got or didn't mean to part with. Her bonnet was slipping off her dull, untidy hair; her face was white, with tired lustreless eyes, pink pinched little nose and discontented mouth. The poor little apology for a baby might have hung around her neck by a ribbon; the other child was small and sickly. A shrunken, depressing little group.
Just as Stephen Mostyn was beginning to weave round in his mind a pathetic, tender fancy, the small boy becoming more than usually importunate, his mother said, with no flicker of change in the expression of her face, but with a voice whose rough grating easily overpowered the noise of the train:
"Jest you stop a-worritin', Tommy, else I'll tell yer bloomin' dad when we git 'ome - see if I don't."
Stephen shut his eyes, and only opened them as the little family bundled out two stations farther on.
"The Monument!" "Mark lane!" No further passengers invaded his carriage.
"I can't stand this any longer, and the condensed fog chokes one. I shall get out at the next station and go back."
"Aldgate!"
Out he jumped and crossed to the return platform, literally feeling his way. The underground station at Aldgate is often quite dark in the middle of summer, and on this day the fog was dense. He found his way to a seat, and (so thick was the darkness) did not discover, till he had taken his place at one end of it, that there were two other people near him. One of them, a man, was speaking in a disagreeable, querulous voice.
"I'm sure it's not my fault if I get nothing to do. I am always trying to find something."
"Yes, in other people's pockets," answered a woman's voice. "You want the wage, not the work."
"Good heavens! that is Millicent's voice exactly," thought Stephen; "what an extraordinary resemblance!"
"What becomes of money in your hands I can't conceive," she went on.
"It is Millicent's voice! What in God's name is she doing!" and Stephen tried to catch a glimpse of the figure that was screened from him by the man between them, and still more so by the darkness.
"What have you done with the money I sent you last?"
"Done with it? Spent it, of course.
A family cannot live on nothing. It was not much for you to give - you, who live in luxury; you, whose husband is rich; you -"
"My husband is very far from rich, and if he were so, it would benefit you in no way. Every farthing I have given you for your wife was my own, made by my own work. I, a woman, worked to help a woman, as I would a man, but not such as you."
"Whatever you may have given, you owed to my wife."
"I owed her!"
"Yes, for taking from her what was hers by right."
"Shall I let this brute go on speaking to her?" said Stephen to himself, holding the edge of the seat tightly in each hand.
"And now that she is ill and in want, you in your prosperity grudge a little help to her and her hungry children."
"I have lowered myself by listening to you thus far," said Millicent, "in order to see if you would not in time say what I expected of you - what I waited for. Now that you have done so, I will answer you fully, this once, and never speak with you again. I feel that you can not have lived your life without someone's having called you "liar and coward," or without your knowing that many had a right to do so; therefore I will not pause to add my testimony to theirs. When your first letter came last year, addressed to my husband, "to wait an answer," he was away from home. To save time, I, contrary to my inclination, opened your "appeal." It contained a manly reference to your wife, and my husband's regard for her in past years, and a cringing demand for money for her and your children, if not for you, and it ended with a suggestion as to the possible unpleasant consequences to his domestic happiness if the subject of your letter became known to me. Every detail of the story, as far as it concerned himself, my husband had long since told me, and no mud thrown by you could shake my trust.
"You lie when you say that I took from your wife what was hers by right. My husband once loved her with all his heart and soul, and she made him suffer bitterly. But he had loved her, as I say, and for his sake I consented (if the miserable story should ever reach his ears to give him further pain) to help the woman who had repaid his love with betrayal, his confidence with treachery, but who had been dear to him before he gave to me what I took from no one else. You lie again when you speak of her present suffering and the wants of her children - silence!" as the man attempted to speak. "Do you think in dealing with one like you I should take no steps to verify your statements! Of the two children that lived with you and that you call hers, only one was your wife's, and has been dead six months, you cur! And your wretched wife flung from her my husband's love and trust, not for the love of another man, but for life with you, who dragged her to the mire in which she died nearly a month ago! Nearly a week since I had proof of all I am saying, and my only reason for consenting to see you again, as you asked, was to tell you of this, and also to warn you that if you ever communicate with or molest me or my husband in any way, I have means to make that your last public performance for a considerable time."
As she said the last words, Millicent rose, walking straight up to and getting into the train that had just run into the station. The man she had been speaking with sat still while she moved away, but as she opened the carriage door he started up with an oath, as if to follow her. Stephen Mostyn's umbrella becoming unfortunately mingled with the swearer's legs, he was precipitated painfully on to the platform as the train left the station, and Stephen bounded up the steps to the surface of the earth.
Mrs. Mostyn had dressed for dinner that evening, and was sitting by the fire when her husband came in.
"Well, Stephen, when you do follow my advice you do it generously, I must say. Have you been out ever since I saw you last?"
"Very nearly."
"And walking, or in the underground, or on the top of a bus?"
"A little of all three and the club to finish with."
"Well, and have you found your plot?"
"Yes, but I can't write it now, so am not much better off than before."
"Good gracious! why?"
"Because," said Stephen, bending and kissing her eyes, "the story is so pretty that I have no words in which to tell it; no character that I have hitherto conceived is good enough to play a part in it; no incident that I have known or imagined but seems poor and tedious beside it."
"Then it is very good?"
"Perfect!"
"And is it real or ideal?"
"Both."
"Won't you tell it to me?"
"Some day."

Source: The Saint Paul Daily Globe, Monday Morning, March 3, 1890, Page 6

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Tue 28 Feb 2012 - 5:09

March 4, 1890

WILL TROUBLE THE SPORTS.
The Chartiers Dog Fighters Run Down by Agent Sam O'Brien.

Yesterday afternoon Agent O'Brien and Assistant Agent Berryman, of the Humane Society, went to McKee's Rocks to take a look at the dog fight between "John Sullivan" and "Jack the Ripper." They found the fight in progress in a barn. There was a big crowd present, too large for two men to raid, and the agents adopted their old plan of taking names. In the course of the fight P. Demnarst, who was handling Sullivan, had the first joint of the second finger of his left hand bitten off.
After the fight Agent O'Brien went to the office of Squire Mills Bryan, at McKee's Rocks, and made an information against P. Demnarst as the owner of Sullivan and J. Daly as the owner of Jack the Ripper, charging them with dog fighting. While he was engaged Demnarst came into the office and was arrested. He remarked that "O'Brien was a wolf," and gave bail for a hearing. Daly was also arrested and put under bail.
Agent O'Brien has the names of 40 persons, against whom he will bring suit. The crowd was better than the average one in a financial way, and there will be a neat sum collected in the shape of fines.

SULLIVAN WON.
He Defeats Jack the Ripper in a One-Sided Battle.

There was quite a large crowd of sports present to witness yesterday's dog fight in the West End between Sullivan and Jack the Ripper. The dogs are owned by local parties and the battle was for $250 a side. They fought some time ago, when The Ripper was the victor.
Yesterday, when the dogs were put into the pit, they each weighed within a few ounces of 35 pounds. The betting, which was exceedingly spirited, was at the rate of $20 to $15 on Sullivan. The favorite fully justified the odds, as he fought with the best of it from the start. He escaped punishment and chewed The Ripper up terribly. The dogs were scratched seven times and in the eighth scratch Jack the Ripper turned tail and refused to fight longer. The victory was then awarded to Sullivan. The fight lasted about an hour.

Source: The Pittsburg, Tuesday March 4, 1890, Page 6

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Tue 28 Feb 2012 - 5:25

February 12, 1890

Page 8 Advertisements Column 1.

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 25, 1890

CLEARING SALE OF DAIRY STOCK,
HORSES, PIGS, TRAPS, HARNESS,
FARM IMPLEMENTS, DAIRY UTENSILS,
POULTRY, &C.

MESSRS. H. MATSON and CO., associated with the NATIONAL M. and A. COY OF N.Z., LIMITED, have received instructions from C. O'Neil, Esq., to

SELL BY PUBLIC AUCTION,
On the above date, the whole of his

LIVE AND DEAD STOCK, AT HIS FARM, AVONSIDE, Comprising:

VEHICLES.

2 WHITECHAPEL CARTS (Boon & Stevens).
2 MILK CARTS.

All in first-class order.

Source: Press, Volume XLVII, Issue 7473, 12 February 1890, Page 8

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Tue 28 Feb 2012 - 5:28

February 22, 1890

NEWS IN BRIEF.

"Jack the Ripper" has threatened to visit Liverpool.

Source: Evening Post, Volume XXXIX, Issue 44, 22 February 1890, Page 1

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Tue 28 Feb 2012 - 8:11

March 11, 1890

PHILANTHROPY IN ACTION.

ECHOES FROM TOYNBEE HALL.

The Toynbee Travellers' Club of Working Men starts on its pilgrimage to Siena on the 2nd of April. The London contingent numbers fifty, that from Manchester is sixty; and two gentlemen have given eight pounds towards assisting some very poor but worthy students to go upon this pleasant tour. The library has increased since last year by nearly 800 volumes, and now possesses 4,353 books. It is essentially a students' and not a merely recreative library, in which the models of the great institutions at Oxford and Cambridge are followed by endeavouring to employ it as an instrument by which lecturers and teachers can train their hearers to secure for themselves extended advantages in critical research. More standard works in almost all branches of literature are required. The St. Jude's Picture Exhibition opens on the 25th inst., and though we do not as a rule refer here to Royal ceremonies of opening, an exception may be made in this instance, for two reasons - that the Duchess of Albany will perform it, and that she has lent pictures for it. Mrs. Barnett does not intend to invite people from the West-end to meet Her Royal Highness, but will give the cards of admission to her poorest Whitechapel friends and parishioners. The display is expected to be a very good one.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday March 11, 1890

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sun 4 Mar 2012 - 0:45

March 24, 1890

Jack the Ripper.

The excitement caused by this inhuman monster is hardly equaled by that produced by the great discovery of Dr. Miles, the Restorative Nervine. It speedily cures nervous prostration, change of life, pain, dullness and confusion in head, fits, sleeplessness, the blues, neuralgia, palpitation, monthly pains, etc. Mr. John S. Wolf, druggist of Hillsdale, Mich.; Talbott and Moss of Greensburg, Ind., and A.W. Blackburn of Wooster, O., say that "the Nervine sells better than anything we ever sold and gives universal satisfaction." Dr. Miles' new illustrated treatise on the nerves and heart and trial bottle free at L.O. Gale's drug store.

Source: March 24, 1890


Last edited by Karen on Sun 4 Mar 2012 - 0:51; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sun 4 Mar 2012 - 0:51

April 2, 1890

"Jack the Skipper."

The crank who throws women to the ground and then disappears without attempting to rob or hurt them, is still abroad in the city, and defies detection as effectually as the famous Jack the Ripper. Another report of his exploits has reached the police headquarters, the complainant living, as before, in the vicinity of the Adeline street station. The man has been dubbed "Jack the Skipper," because of his peculiarities.

Source: Oakland Daily Evening Tribune, Wednesday April 2, 1890, Page 8

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sun 4 Mar 2012 - 1:05

JACK, the Ripper, is as good at the art of concealment as Silcott. He is still at large and the London police are still in pursuit, if bewilderment can be said to be pursuit.

Source: Sunday Morning Constitution

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sun 4 Mar 2012 - 1:15

April 15, 1890

The ratepayers of Whitechapel are alive to the advantages of a free library in their midst, and the liberal spirit in which they have agreed to undertake the burden of a yearly payment of 1,600 pounds is an agreeable sign of the intellectual growth for which provision must be made in poor districts of the metropolis. The commissioners appointed by the ratepayers have acquired a site in Whitechapel High-street, one of the most crowded of London thoroughfares. The public, we learn, have subscribed 3,000 pounds towards the building fund, and one gentleman has generously offered 1,000 pounds to complete the sum of 5,000 pounds required. For this sum, therefore, the honorary treasurers of the fund ask. Each giver, they point out, will now literally give twice, as his pound will again another pound. There must be many who will hail an opportunity of bringing to bear the influence of good books upon the denizens of Whitechapel.

Source: Charity, April 15, 1890, Page 266

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sun 4 Mar 2012 - 5:40

April 6, 1890

THE BEST CART TO USE.

The Whitechapel cart is by most drivers considered best for tandem work. The wheels should be 5 feet 4 inches in diameter, and the driving seat 5 feet 10 inches from the ground. The slant of the seat is a matter of individual preference, but the majority seem in favor of a moderate angle. For a ponies' tandem wheels 4 feet 10 inches in diameter are large enough, and will bring the seat about 5 feet 4 inches from the ground. A wide cart is far better, safer and more comfortable than a narrow one. In a tandem cart it is often desirable to take four people and for the time being dispense with a servant. The narrow cart makes it necessary to sit close, which is uncomfortable except for engaged couples, and is at all times inconvenient for the driver.
If the cart is not well-balanced, the owner will be uncomfortable until he has sold it, and if its fault is that of tilting back, the chances are that the servant will slip off the back seat into the mud and ruin his livery. Many of the best carts are fitted with a lever by which the body can be shifted forward or backward on the shafts. By it the balance can be more easily secured than in any other way. If the team is to be a ponies' tandem, fourteen hands is the right height, and if horses are chosen, 15.3 is about the thing.

Source: New York Daily Tribune, Sunday April 6, 1890, Page 19

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sun 4 Mar 2012 - 6:13

March 28, 1890

Page 2 Advertisements Column 4

ESTABLISHED 1861.

MATHEWS,
COACHBUILDER,
KING STREET, DUNEDIN.

FOR SALE AND MADE TO ORDER.
SPRING CARTS, VILLAGE CARTS,
WHITECHAPEL CARTS,
STATION WAGGONS, SPRING DRAYS,
EXPRESS WAGGONS,
DOUBLE BUGGIES, SINGLE BUGGIES,
FAMILY WAGGONETTES.

Coach-painting and Repairs by first-class workmen and at the Lowest Possible Charges.

Source: Clutha Leader, Volume XVI, Issue 819, 28 March 1890, Page 2

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sun 4 Mar 2012 - 6:45

April 21, 1890

RAID ON A WHITECHAPEL CLUB.
Prisoners in the Police-court.

At the Thames Police-court, today, Hyman Ernstein, 25, described as a tailor, of 13, Fieldgate-street, Whitechapel; and George Brook, a clerk, of 2, Eliza-place, Sarah-street, Hoxton, were charged with keeping and using 13, Fieldgate-street, for the purpose of common gambling; and the following persons were charged with using the same: - Michael Figgit, tailors' machinist; Davis Levy, upholsterer; Simon Levy, machinist; Morris Nathan, upholsterer; Frank Roslanda, machinist; James Gardener, upholsterer; Arthur Stiller, printer; Isaac Solomon, tailor; Colman Levy, machinist; David Goldman, tailor; Samuel Bird, machinist; Samuel Silverman, tailor; William Finberg, boot laster; Tenebone Lovett, machinist; Morris Goldberg, machinist; Israel Metz, machinist; and Israel Silverberg, a baker. - Mr. St. John Wontner, who was instructed by the Chief Commissioner of Police, prosecuted; and Mr. John E. Waters defended the first two named prisoners. - Mr. Wontner, in opening the case, said the prisoners were arrested under a warrant of the Chief Commissioner of Police. There had been numerous complaints about these premises, with the result that when the order was issued on Saturday night the whole of the prisoners were arrested. When the place was searched, a cloth, marked out in beds, was found, this showing that the game of faro had been carried on. In addition to this, a large number of playing-cards were found. He should only give sufficient evidence that day to enable summonses to be issued against the prisoners.
Superintendent Thomas Arnold, H Division, said that in consequence of complaints made to him he caused observation to be kept on 13, Fieldgate-street. The result he reported to the Commissioner, who issued an order. With that order he entered the premises on Saturday night, in company with Inspector Reid and other officers. He went to a room at the back of the restaurant in the yard, and there found all the prisoners. Ernstein and Brooks were sitting at a table, and the other prisoners round them. About 30s. in silver was lying on the table, as well as cards. He saw gold picked up. Ernstein was acting as banker, and Brooks as croupier. He told them that they would all be arrested, and for some time confusion prevailed. He did not hear Ernstein admit he was the occupier of the premises. At the station the prisoner said he did not keep them, and Brooks said he was "only playing along with the others there." The place was afterwards searched. On a chair by the side of the table a baize cloth was found. It was marked out in chalk for faro play. He also found a large number of cards on the table and in the cupboard in the corner of the room.
In cross-examination, witness could not say if the cloth was in use that evening. There was no cloth on the table when he entered the room. The front part of the premises was a restaurant, and there was a sub-tenancy for the back portion. He did not believe Ernstein was proprietor of the restaurant.
Mr. Waters said there was no evidence whatever as to the proprietorship of the club.
- Mr. Wontner said that did not matter.
It was ultimately agreed to accept bail in 25 pounds each for Ernstein and Brooks and the other prisoners in their own recognisances of 10 pounds each, to appear today week.

Source: The Echo, Monday April 21, 1890, Page 2

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sun 4 Mar 2012 - 7:01

April 23, 1890

OPEN SPACES IN LONDON.

The Parks and Open Spaces Committee of the London County Council yesterday recommended the expenditure of 1,500 pounds, to be charged to capital account, for the improvement of Wandsworth-common. They also recommend the Council to undertake, at an estimated cost of 1,020 pounds a year, the future maintenance of the following places: -
Red Lion-square garden, Holborn; Winthrop-street playground, Whitechapel; St. Dunstan's church-yard, Stepney, garden; Limehouse churchyard garden; Holy Trinity churchyard, Tredegar-square, Bow, garden; Carlton-square garden, Mile-end; St. Paul's churchyard, Rotherhithe, garden; Spa-fields playground, Exmouth-street, Clerkenwell; Drury-lane playground, Russell-court; St. Paul's churchyard, High-street, Shadwell, garden; St. Bartholomew's churchyard, Bethnal-green, garden. The total acreage was nineteen acres. - To this an amendment was moved to the effect that the Council could not agree with the principle involved in the recommendation to take over places which were so purely local in their benefit that they ought to be maintained by the local authorities. - Lord Meath, in summing up the discussion on the matter, said that, being very much interested in the poor of London, he thought a stand should be made when a rich district refused to keep up its open spaces. But there were certain districts in the Metropolis so poor and over-rated that they could not be expected to do what the rich parishes should. In New York they had to spend something like $10,000,000 in pulling down houses for open spaces. In London, fortunately, we had a number of disused burial-grounds, which could be turned into open spaces. There were now about forty still closed to the public, some of which would, no doubt, be available. - After a protracted discussion the Council divided, with the result that the voting was equal, there being 43 for the amendment and 43 against. - The Chairman (Lord Rosebery) said he held a very strong opinion on the matter, but he would not vote. He preferred that the committee should take the matter back and remodel their report.

Source: The Echo, Wednesday April 23, 1890, Page 4

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Re: Missing Articles of 1890

Post by Karen on Sun 4 Mar 2012 - 16:16

April 28, 1890

PARLIAMENT. - HOUSE OF COMMONS.
BUDGET RESOLUTIONS - THE TEA DUTY.

(April 21st.) The House resolved itself into Committee of Ways and Means. - The resolution dealing with the reduction of the tea duty having been read from the Chair,
Mr. PICTON said that while a large number of persons rejoiced at the reduction of the tea duty, a good deal of regret was at the same time felt that the Chancellor of the Exchequer had frittered away the opportunity of conferring a very great blessing on the community. No doubt the abolition of one-third of the duty would confer some benefit on a large number of persons, but not exactly on the class whom the right hon. gentleman desired to benefit. The Committee would doubtless remember the eloquent language in which the right hon. gentleman insisted that the buyers of tea should stand out for their rights. The Chancellor of the Exchequer, in effect, said that all the buyers of tea should consider whether, by better organisation, which he took to mean combination, or by other means, which he took to mean boycotting refractory shopkeepers - (laughter) - they might not secure to themselves the benefit of this reduction. He was aware that there was keen competition in the wholesale tea trade, and doubtless enterprising merchants and middlemen would see that it was to their interests to give the full benefit of the reduction, but how far this observation would apply to shopkeepers, and those especially who sold to the poor, was altogether another question. To the people who bought their tea by the pound the reduction would be appreciable and welcome, but there were hundreds of thousands of people who bought their tea by the ounce, and in their case it was difficult to see how they would enjoy the benefit of the reduction. The Chancellor of the Exchequer said that tea was an article of primary necessity, and yet to the very poor the right hon. gentleman was content to go on imposing a duty of 50 per cent. The fact was that he was constrained to describe the right hon. gentleman's proposals as essentially a middle-class Budget, intended to benefit those people of moderate wealth, say with incomes between 500 pounds and 1,500 pounds or 2,000 pounds a year. It was of far less importance in affording relief to reduce the duty on inhabited houses than to abolish the tea duty. The inhabited house duty was not much felt, whereas the abolition of the tea duty would afford everyone relief. The tea duty pressed heavily upon every poor man, and more heavily upon the tea drinking of the very poor than upon the tea drinking of the rich. The right hon. gentleman had described it as a poll tax, and it was worse than a poll tax. Surely he would not stand up in these days and defend a poll tax. Then the uncertainty which the right hon. gentleman admitted was felt in the trade should be considered. No one supposed that the 4d. duty would last much longer, so that at a particular season every year the uncertainty as the retention of the duty would exercise a prejudicial effect on the market. The right hon. gentleman would have done much better if he had once and for all settled the question by sweeping the tea duty away altogether. Then, again, they were doing injustice to their great Empire of India by leaving this duty still outstanding. He would be the last to recommend differential duties, or that Indian tea should be charged less than Chinese. But having regard to the conspicuous growth of this trade in India, it was our duty to encourage this source of prosperity as much as possible. He hoped that in future Budgets this would be considered, and that the duty might be entirely swept away. With regard to the time when the change in the duty was to be made, he had been strongly urged to secure from the right hon. gentleman some little delay in making the proposed change. At the same time he trusted that the trouble these changes had occasioned would convince the right hon. gentleman that it was his first duty in the future to make use of whatever surplus might be assured in order to sweep away once and for ever a burden on an article which was a primary necessity of life, and which was unequal, unjust, and cruel to the very poorest members of the community.
The CHANCELLOR of the EXCHEQUER said that it would scarcely have been thought that the duty which had been denounced by the hon. member who had just sat down was one which had existed for twenty-five years at the amount of 6d., and that no serious attempt had been made during those years to diminish the duty. He had the good fortune to be the first Chancellor of the Exchequer who had been able to deal with this question by reducing the duty 33 per cent, and he ought not, therefore, to be the Chancellor of the Exchequer who should be singled out by the hon. member for maintaining the duty, while no attempt at the reduction or abolition of the duty had been made during the reign of previous Chancellors of the Exchequer. (Hear, hear.) The hon. member had urged that the duty ought to be abolished altogether, and that it was a poll tax for the retention of which there was no justification. When he (the Chancellor of the Exchequer) called it a poll tax he meant that it was a tax which was borne by almost every member of the community. This small tax was the only one of the Imperial taxes which rested upon the greater portion of the community, and if it were repealed a great number of persons would contribute not one single shilling to the revenue. It was clear that representation and taxation should go together, and that every person who exercised the franchise should contribute in some degree to the revenue. ("Hear, hear, and cries of "No.") He did not know whether hon. members thought that that portion of the working classes who did not smoke and who did not drink should contribute nothing to the revenue. (Home Rule cries of "Hear, hear.") If that were the view of hon. members he was sure it was not the view of the working classes of this country. (Ministerial cheers.) On the contrary, he believed it to be the general opinion that some small portion of every man's earnings should be contributed to the maintenance of the country. (Hear, hear.) A very large question was opened up, but he wished to protest against the view that this tax ought to be entirely swept away because it was a tax which rested, to a certain extent, on the working classes. The hon. member rather complained that the consumer would not gain by the 2d., but really his argument would almost go to the point that the consumer would gain very little indeed even though the duty were taken off altogether. The hon. member made a mistake of supreme importance in this connection. Tea was not always sold by weight at all, but by the packet. In Whitechapel an enormous quantity of tea was sold in ha'porths, and it rested entirely with the good faith of dealers whether they got honest quantity and quality. He thought the argument that the remission of 2d. would not benefit the consumer might be pushed a great deal too far, because, if it were well founded, it would almost go to show that you could never make reductions in articles of consumption. He believed that where competition was good and effective the consumers would get the benefit of the 2d., and he had heard already from many parts of the country that grocers had advertised that the price of tea of the same quality was even now reduced. Therefore in a vast number of places the 2d. would distinctly go to the working classes and to the purchasers of tea; where tea was sold by weight, not by packet, it was possible to give the working classes immediately and easily the full benefit, and he hoped it would be done. No, he owed an apology to a portion of the tea trade, who thought themselves aggrieved by certain words he used the other day. He had said that tea could be bought at 11d. and 1s., and was sold in places at 2s. and even 3s. He had received communications from grocers and others on the subject, and he had to express his regret if he had, even unintentionally, in any way exaggerated the situation. But there was a large quantity of tea that was dealt with in this way, that it was bought at 6d. or 7d., being separated into two qualities, of which the inferior would only cost 5d. or 6d. at most. That tea was sold somewhere. Was it sold to the better classes who could pay 1s. 6d. for it? While he expressed his regret to those to whom it was due, he was bound to say that he had in his mind dealers in distant villages, where there was no sufficient competition, and he knew as a fact that in a large number of villages tea of no good quality was sold at 3s. per lb. This was no new question, as for years past he had thought that the organs of distribution were too imperfect, and that the consumers generally did not get sufficiently the value of all the prices cut down. He had made inquiries since yesterday as to how tea was sold in the East-end of London. An officer connected with the Customs went round to twenty-four different places in order to see how the article was sold., and at what price. He bought a half-pennyworth of tea in each place and it had been weighed since, and the samples worked out at the following prices per lb.; - 2s. 8-1/2d., 3s., 9d., 3s. 7d., 3s. 11d., 2s. 11d., 2s. 10d., 3s. 7d., 4s. 3d., and 5s. Now, that that he called an unjust system for the organisation of distribution - (hear, hear) - and what he wanted to call attention to was this, that by the system of selling so much for a given sum dealers had it in their power to take the whole of the concession from the working classes.
Sir W. HARCOURT said: With reference to the aggrieved tea dealers he only hoped that they would show how completely they had been misunderstood by giving the consumer the real benefit of the concession. (Hear, hear.) The only criticism which he felt disposed now to make was that in the Budget there were rather too many small bites at too many cherries, and that he would rather have seen a larger dealing with a particular subject. He was sure that the Committee must feel that the tea duty could not remain in the future at the point at which it was now placed. - Mr. COSSHAM wished to draw the attention of the Chancellor of the Exchequer to the fact that the cost of collecting a 4d. duty upon tea would be as great as that of collecting a 6d. duty. He rejoiced in the fact, because it certainly indicated that the tea duty would have to go altogether in a very short time. (Hear, hear.) He himself was in favour of a free breakfast-table, because it was the poorest people who paid the largest proportionate share of indirect taxation. In the age in which he lived it was our interest to make the path of the poor smoother, and to remove the burthen of taxation from them to property. (Hear, hear.)
Mr. H. STEWART pointed out that upon tea siftings, which were largely used by the poor, and which were sold at 2d. per 1lb., the 4d. duty amounted to a tax of 200 per cent, whereas the rich man's tea, at 3s. per lb. only paid a duty of 20 per cent. The shopkeepers in the poorer parts of our towns sold their tea in halfpenny packets, and they were compelled to charge for their labour in making up the packets. It was therefore unfair to accuse them of exacting an undue price from the poor for tea. (Hear, hear.) - In answer to Mr. CRAIG, the CHANCELLOR of the EXCHEQUER said he would consider the question of the compulsory sale of tea by weight, though there were difficulties to be overcome. - The resolution was agreed to.
(25th) Mr. CHANNING asked the Chancellor of the Exchequer whether he had considered the complaints of grocers who had recently laid in large stocks of tea, and also of co-operative distributive societies who had large stocks of tea and currants; and whether he would, by a repayment of the whole or part of the duty, or by a postponement of the dates at which the new scales of duty were to come into force, minimise the loss to such traders and societies.
The CHANCELLOR of the EXCHEQUER: I am afraid I can only give the same answer as I gave yesterday. I would point out to the hon. member that in the case of co-operative associations the members will gain by the lower prices what the associations might lose in profit.
Mr. BRYCE asked at what date the reduction of the tea duties would take place.
The CHANCELLOR of the EXCHEQUER: The 1st of May.

Source: The London and China Telegraph, April 28, 1890, Page 378

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