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Missing Articles of 1888

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Missing Articles of 1888

Post by Karen on Tue 7 Feb 2012 - 10:18

August 1, 1888

WALKER & DALRYMPLE'S TEAS.
AGENTS APPOINTED, where unrepresented throughout the United Kingdom. Carriage paid on 40 lbs. and upwards. Prospectus and samples free on application.

Warehouses: 154, 155, 159, and 160, Whitechapel-road, and 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 11, and 12 Brady-street, LONDON.

P.O.O. payable at head office. Bankers, the National Provincial Bank of England.

Source: Supplement To The Pottery Gazette, August 1, 1888, Page 751

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Re: Missing Articles of 1888

Post by Karen on Tue 7 Feb 2012 - 10:29

August 7, 1888

MYSTERIOUS TRAGEDY IN WHITECHAPEL.
A WOMAN BRUTALLY MURDERED.

The Press Association says: - About ten minutes to five o'clock, this morning, John Reeves, who lives at 37, George-yard-buildings, Whitechapel, was coming downstairs to go to work when he discovered the body of a woman lying in a pool of blood on the first-floor landing. Reeves at once called in Constable 26 H, Barrett, who was on beat in the vicinity of George-yard, and Dr. Keeling, of Brick-lane, was communicated with, and promptly arrived. He immediately made an examination of the woman, and pronounced life extinct, and gave it as his opinion that she had been brutally murdered, there being knife-wounds on her breast, stomach, and abdomen. The body, which was that of a woman apparently between 35 and 40 years of age, about 5ft. 3in. in height, complexion and hair dark, wore a dark-green skirt, a brown petticoat, a long black jacket, and a black bonnet. The woman is unknown to any of the occupants of the tenements on the landing on which the deceased was found, and no disturbance of any kind was heard during the night. The circumstances of the tragedy are, therefore, mysterious, and the body, which up to the time of writing had not been identified, has been removed to Whitechapel Mortuary, and Inspector Elliston, of the Commercial-street Police-station, has placed the case in the hands of Inspector Reid, of the Criminal Investigation Department, and that officer is now instituting inquiries. Up to one o'clock no clue of any kind had come to the knowledge of the Commercial-street police authorities.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday August 7, 1888, Page 3

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Re: Missing Articles of 1888

Post by Karen on Tue 7 Feb 2012 - 10:43

August 9, 1888

THE WHITECHAPEL MYSTERY.
NO TRACE OF THE MURDERER.

INQUEST ON THE VICTIM.

Although two days have passed since the body of a woman - who is not yet identified - was found in the passage of 37, George-yard-buildings, Whitechapel, the discovery is still enveloped in mystery. The officials at the Criminal Investigation Department have been actively engaged in searching for a clue which may lead to the capture of the presumed murderer, but no arrest has yet been made. The inquest was opened this afternoon by Deputy Coroner Collier, in the library of the Working Lads' Institute, Whitechapel-road.
Inspectors Ellisdon and Reid watched the case on behalf of the police authorities.

DID NOT SEE THE BODY.

Elizabeth Mahoney said she lived at 47, George-yard-buildings. It was an artisans' dwellings house, and one of the rules was that all the lights should be put out on the staircases after eleven o'clock. Witness went out on Bank Holiday and returned with her husband about two o'clock on Tuesday morning. She afterwards went down the staircase again to get something for supper. She saw no one on the staircase, and heard no noise, but she admitted that she had no light with her, and it was possible for her to pass up the staircase without being aware of the body of the woman lying there.

SAW SOME ONE - "TOOK NO NOTICE."

Alfred George Crow, a cabdriver, said he lived at No. 35 in the same block of buildings. He returned home on Tuesday morning at about half-past three, and passed up the staircase in which the deceased was found. He noticed some one lying on the first landing. He took no notice of the fact, as people constantly slept on the stairs.

HOW THE BODY WAS DISCOVERED.

John Reeves, the man who first discovered the body of the deceased, was then examined. He said he lived at No. 37, George-yard-buildings. He was a waterside labourer. On Tuesday morning he left home about five o'clock to go to work. On reaching the first landing he found the body of a female. The woman was lying in a pool of blood, on her back. He did not examine her further. He was frightened, and gave information to the police.

Source: The Echo, Thursday August 9, 1888, Page 2

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Re: Missing Articles of 1888

Post by Karen on Tue 7 Feb 2012 - 12:30

August 10, 1888

THIS DAY'S NEWS.
WHITECHAPEL MYSTERY.

TWO SOLDIERS UNDER ARREST.
IDENTIFICATION OF THE VICTIM.

EXTRAORDINARY CONFLICT OF OPINION.

"No crime more brutal has ever been committed in the East-end," said a Criminal Investigation officer, this morning, "than the one at George-yard-buildings." The murder to which allusion was made was that of the young woman found in a block of model dwellings in Whitechapel-road, with thirty-nine stabs on her body - one over her heart, and others of a nature too revolting to admit of more than a passing allusion. Her name is now supposed to be Martha Turner but of this nothing positive is yet known, for, strange to say, no less than four persons, of different families, have come forward and positively identified the deceased, and are apparently ready to swear as to the accuracy of their assertions. The woman's features are rapidly changing from post-mortem appearances. As soon as she was discovered the police had a photograph taken of her body, but the features were so distorted - possibly by an agonising death - that some difficulty was at first experienced by her supposed friends in accurately recognising her. A man, who declares the deceased is his sister, not only recognises her face, but also asserts the boots belonging to her were those he had seen the murdered woman wearing.

A SINGULAR STORY OF THE OFFICERS.

"But what about the three missing persons?" asked our reporter of the officer, remarking that, as four people had claimed one body, there were evidently mysterious disappearances upon which some light might be thrown. "That I cannot say," was the answer. "Whitechapel is not like any other part of London, no portion of the Metropolis so crowded;" and the officer, in his own words, thus spoke: - "We have to be very particular about persons coming to identify bodies. I'll tell you why. Not long ago a man complained to the Thames Magistrate that he had lost his wife. What could His worship do? Well, it so happened that a young female dropped down dead near Great Alie-street. The husband and a woman, said to be her sister, declared that they recognised the body. "That's my missus," said the man, "That's her, right enough," added the sister. Very poor people. The body was buried by the parish, and the man, armed with a burial certificate, showing that his wife was dead, married again." "The 'sister' who came with him to the station?" interposed the reporter. "That I don't know; but he did marry, and his 'dead' wife turned up. Well, the bigamist pleaded that he'd actually buried his first wife, and produced a copy of the certificate of burial and other evidence. What could be done? The man was acquitted, though there seemed to me something queer about the whole business."

WAS THE MURDERER A SOLDIER?

The case in question is in certain respects one of a very puzzling character, owing to the fact that so many stab wounds were inflicted, and that no cries were heard, although the poor woman was on some stone steps, close to the doors of small rooms wherein several separate families resided. It now appears that on the night of Bank Holiday there were several soldiers in the neighbourhood, some of whom were seen drinking in the Princess Alice - two minutes' walk from George-yard-buildings - and other taverns near. With these soldiers were the deceased and another woman, the latter being known in the district, so it is said, as "Mogg" and "Pearly Poll." One of these men was a private, the other a corporal. It has been ascertained that only corporals and sergeants are allowed to wear side arms when on leave. This fact, of course, narrows the issue as to the possible identity of the assailant - presuming he was a soldier.

THE ARRESTS AT THE TOWER.

Inquiries were at once set on foot by the police and military authorities, with the result that it is stated two soldiers have been placed under military arrest at the Tower. The authorities decline to give their names unless some definite charge is formulated. "Pearly Poll" has been invited by the detectives engaged in the case to give what assistance she can in the matter, and it is now thought that the officers engaged in the case - amongst whom are Detective-inspector Reid, Detective Leech, and Detective-Sergeant Viner - have gained a substantial clue as to the perpetrator of the diabolical outrage.

THE VICTIM'S WOUNDS.

A perplexing feature in connection with the outrage is the number of injuries on the young woman's body. That the stabs were from a weapon shaped like a bayonet, is almost established beyond doubt. The wound over the heart was alone sufficient to kill, and death must have occurred as soon as that was inflicted. Unless the perpetrator were a madman, or suffering to an unusual extent from drink-delirium, no tangible explanation can be given of the reason for inflicting the other thirty-eight injuries, some of which almost seem as if they were due to thrusts and cuts from a pen-knife. On the other hand, if the lesser wounds were given before the one fatal injury, the cries of the deceased must have been heard by those who, at the time of the outrage, were sleeping within a few yards of the spot where the deed was committed.

THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF THE OUTRAGE

are at present as mysterious as those connected with the brutal and yet undiscovered murder perpetrated a few months ago, also in Whitechapel, where some miscreant, in the dead of night, murdered a woman in the street by thrusting a walking-stick or other blunt weapon into her body with great violence. For ferocity the two cases are somewhat analogous, and some of the Scotland-yard experts in tracing criminals and fathoming crime incline to the opinion that one man is responsible for the two crimes.

Source: The Echo, Friday August 10, 1888, Page 4

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Re: Missing Articles of 1888

Post by Karen on Wed 8 Feb 2012 - 19:37

August 12, 1888

TRAGEDY IN WHITECHAPEL.
A WOMAN STABBED IN 39 PLACES.

About 10 minutes to five o'clock on Tuesday morning a man, who lives at 47, George-yard buildings, Whitechapel, was coming downstairs to go to work, when he discovered the body of a woman lying in a pool of blood on the first-floor landing. Reeves at once called in Constable Barrett, 26 H, who was on his beat in the vicinity of George-yard, and Dr. Keleene, of Brick-lane, was communicated with and promptly arrived. He made an examination of the woman, and pronounced life extinct, giving it as his opinion that she had been brutally murdered, there being knife wounds on her breast, stomach, and abdomen. There were 39 wounds in various parts of the body, which was that of a woman apparently between 35 and 40 years of age, about 5ft. 3in. in height, complexion and hair dark; with a dark green skirt, a brown petticoat, a long black jacket, and a black bonnet. The woman was not known to any of the occupants of the tenements on the landing on which the deceased was found, and no disturbance of any kind was heard during the night. The body was removed to Whitechapel mortuary.
Mr. George Collier opened an inquest on the body on Thursday at the Working Lads' institute, Whitechapel. She was stated to be Martha Turner, aged 38, a single woman, lately living at 4, Star-place, Commercial-road, but previous to calling the first witness the coroner said that the body had been identified that morning, but he had just been informed that two other persons also identified it as quite a different person, and under these circumstances he thought the question of identity had better be left till the last.
Elizabeth Mahony, of 47, George-yard-buildings, Whitechapel, the wife of a carman, stated that on the night of Bank holiday she was out with some friends. She returned shortly before two in the morning with her husband, and afterwards left the house to try and get some supper at the chandler's shop. The stairs were then perfectly clear of any obstacle, and were the same on her return. She and her husband heard no noise during the night, but at 10 o'clock she was told that a murder had been committed in the building. There was no light on the staircase. The spot where the body was found had been pointed out to her. She was sure it was not there at two o'clock as she went in, as it was in the wide part of the stairs, and quite in the dark.
Alfred George Crow, a cabdriver, of 35, George-yard-buildings, deposed that on Tuesday morning he returned home from work at half-past three. On his way up the stairs he saw somebody lying on the first landing. It was not an unusual thing to see, so he passed on and went to bed. He did not know whether the person was dead or alive when he passed.
John Saunders Reeves, 37, George-yard-buildings, a waterside labourer, deposed that on Tuesday morning he left home at five o'clock to go in search of work. On the first floor landing he saw a female lying in a pool of blood. She lay on her back, and seemed dead. He at once gave notice to the police. The woman was a perfect stranger to the witness. Her clothes were all disarranged, as if she had had a struggle with some one. The witness did not notice any instrument lying about.
Police-constable Barrett, 226 H, deposed to being called by the last witness to view the body of the deceased. She was lying on her back, and before she was moved a doctor was sent for, and on arrival pronounced life extinct. The woman's hands were clenched, but did not contain anything. Her clothes were disarranged.
Dr. Timothy Robert Keleene, 28, Brick-lane, stated that he was called to the deceased and found her dead. He examined the body and found 39 punctured wounds. There were no less than nine in the throat and 17 in the breast. She appeared to have been dead three hours. The body was well nourished. He had since made a post-mortem examination, and found the left lung penetrated in five places, and the right lung in two places. The heart had been penetrated, but only in one place, otherwise it was quite healthy. The liver was healthy, but penetrated in five places, and the spleen was penetrated in two places. The stomach was penetrated in six places. In the witness's opinion the wounds were not inflicted with the same instrument, there being a deep wound in the breast from some long, strong instrument, while most of the others were done apparently with a penknife. The large wound could have been caused by a sword bayonet or dagger. It was impossible for the whole of the wounds to be self-inflicted. Death was due to the loss of blood consequent on the injuries.
At the conclusion of this witness's evidence the inquiry was adjourned.

TWO ARRESTS AT THE TOWER.

The case is in certain respects one of a very puzzling character, owing to the fact that so many stab wounds were inflicted, and that no cries were heard, although the poor woman was on some stone steps, close to the doors of small rooms wherein several separate families resided. It now appears that on the night of Bank holiday there were several soldiers in the neighbourhood, some of whom were seen drinking in the Princess Alice - two minutes' walk from George-yard-buildings - and other taverns near. With these soldiers were the deceased and another woman, the latter being known in the district as "Mogg" and "Pearly Poll." One of these men was a private, the other a corporal. It has been ascertained that only corporals and sergeants are allowed to wear side arms when on leave. This fact, of course, narrows the issue as to the possible identity of the assailant - presuming he was a soldier. Inquiries were at once set on foot by the police and military authorities, with the result that it is stated two soldiers have been placed under military arrest at the Tower. The authorities decline to give their names unless some definite charge is formulated. The two soldiers are said to belong to the Guards.
A perplexing feature in connection with the outrage is the number of injuries on the young woman's body. That the stabs were from a weapon shaped like a bayonet is almost established beyond doubt. The wound over the heart was alone sufficient to kill, and death must have occurred as soon as that was inflicted. Unless the perpetrator was a madman, or suffering to an unusual extent from drink delirium, no tangible explanation can be given of the reason for inflicting the other 38 injuries, some of which almost seem as if they were due to thrusts and cuts from a penknife. On the other hand, if the lesser wounds were given before the one fatal injury the cries of the deceased must have been heard by those who, at the time of the outrage, were sleeping within a few yards of the spot where the deed was committed.
The difficulty of identification arose out of the brutal treatment to which the deceased was manifestly subjected, she being throttled while held down, and the face and head so swollen and distorted in consequence that her real features are not discernible. There is little doubt, although she has been variously identified as a Mrs. Withers, and a Mary Bryan, that she is a woman known as Martha Turner. - Mrs. Bousfield, in whose house she lived till three weeks back, states that she had resided in her house for two months with Turner. The deceased had told her that her real name was either Staples or Stapleton, and that she had left her husband 13 years, and had taken up with Turner. Both she and this man got their living by selling trinkets in the streets, such as studs, links, chains, and menthal cones. She used to stand in Cheapside and various places, whilst Turner occupied other ground. Turner left her some few weeks ago, and then the deceased, who paid 2s. per week for her room, got two weeks in arrear, and as she could not pay she suddenly left. - In addition to being identified by Mrs. Bousfield, the deceased has already been identified by one or two other women, who saw her in the company of some soldiers at neighbouring public-houses. There was a dispute, and one of the soldiers struck the companion of the deceased a blow. This was just by George-yard, a long, dark thoroughfare, and it is believed that the deceased was forcibly dragged up to the place where she was found so brutally ill-treated and so fearfully wounded. The police have a description of the two soldiers who, as before stated, are believed to be in the Guards.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, August 12, 1888, Page 7

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Re: Missing Articles of 1888

Post by Karen on Fri 10 Feb 2012 - 12:43

August 15, 1888

THE MURDER MYSTERY.
ANOTHER PARADE OF THE GUARDS.

TWO CASES OF MISTAKEN IDENTITY.

At noon today there was a parade of Coldstream and Grenadier Guards at the Wellington Barracks, Pimlico. An officer in the Guards furnished our reporter with full particulars respecting so unusual an occurrence as a muster of the men for the purpose of the possible identification of one or more on a charge of murder. It seems that soon after eleven o'clock two police-officers - Inspector Reid and Detective-sergeant Caunter - arrived with Mary Ann Conolly (otherwise "Pearly Poll") and requested permission to make certain inquiries in regard to the murder of Martha Turner at Whitechapel on the night of Bank Holiday. The

"ASSEMBLY" CALL WAS AT ONCE SOUNDED,

and the men were drawn up in quarter-column, after which they filed through a passage, where Inspector Reid, Sergeant Caunter, and another police-officer were stationed with "Pearly Poll." The woman was asked to scrutinise the faces of the soldiers as they passed, for the purpose, of course, of seeing if she could pick out either of the men who were with her and the deceased on the night on which the murder was committed. After a small number had filed past "Pearly Poll" picked out a man, wearing stripes, and taken by her to be a corporal, as the one who went away with the deceased woman.

"THAT'S HIM," EXCLAIMED SHE; "I'M POSITIVE."

The suspect was temporarily detained, and the filing by of the others continued. When a few more had passed, the woman, scanning the features of every one intently, pointed to a private as being the second man. She positively declared that he accompanied her to a house in the district where the murder took place. "Are you positive?" was asked, and "Pearly Poll" nodded, and replied, "Certain." The military authorities immediately placed all the books, showing the time at which the suspected men left and returned to the barracks on the night mentioned, at the disposal of Inspector Reid and Sergeant Caunter. It was pointed out that the "corporal" was but a private with good conduct stripes, a man of exemplary character, who was in the barracks by ten o'clock on Bank Holiday night. Other

EVIDENCE AS TO HIS INNOCENCE,

and also respecting the private's movements on the night of the crime, was also forthcoming. The former man was at once exonerated, while the second, also a man of exceptionally good character, was formally told that further inquiries must be instituted. These inquiries were duly conducted, and he, too, was told that no stain rested upon him, as it was

CLEARLY A CASE OF MISTAKEN IDENTITY.

It is asserted that, as "Pearly Poll" has "identified" two innocent men, who could not have been in Whitechapel at the time she says, the police will not further seek her aid in elucidating the mystery. Neither of the men wore side-arms when they left the barracks on Bank Holiday, and could not possibly have been in each other's company. The authorities say that they must now look elsewhere for a clue. This clue cannot, they assert, be given by one whom they at first considered the most reliable witness.

Source: The Echo, Wednesday August 15, 1888, Page 4

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Re: Missing Articles of 1888

Post by Karen on Fri 10 Feb 2012 - 13:03

August 18, 1888

THE WHITECHAPEL MYSTERY.

The murder of the young woman supposed to be Martha Turner, which occurred at George-yard-buildings, Whitechapel-road, still continues to be shrouded in mystery, and up to the present there is no decided clue as to the perpetrator of the foul crime.
Inspector Reid and the other officers engaged in the case have in no way relaxed their efforts to trace the criminal, and on Monday morning the inspector, accompanied by "Pearly Poll," who was in the company of the murdered woman, proceeded to the Tower, where she was confronted with every non-commissioned officer and private who had leave of absence at the time of the outrage. They were paraded at the back of the Tower, unseen by the public - of whom, on Monday, a large number frequented the historic structure - and "Pearly Poll" was asked, "Can you see either of the men you saw with the woman now dead?" "Pearly Poll," in no way embarrassed, placed her arms akimbo, glanced at the men with the air of an inspecting officer, and shook her head. This indication of a negative was not sufficient. "Can you identify anyone?" she was asked. She exclaimed, with a good deal of feminine emphasis, "He ain't here." The woman was very decided on this point, and the men were then dismissed, while the two men upon whom a faint shadow of suspicion had rested were considerably relieved at their innocence being declared. As soon as the murder was known the suspected corporal was interviewed by the police and questioned. He had his bayonet with him when on leave at the time of the outrage, but this he at once produced, and no trace of blood was discovered upon it. His clothing, too, was also examined, and upon it there was no incriminating blood-stain. After the parade, Adjutant A.W. Cotton, the officer in command, stated that all the men were now entirely exonerated; indeed the men were themselves most anxious to afford every facility to the police, and give all the information in their power to assist the officers of justice in their investigation.
There have been many visitors to George-yard-buildings with the rather morbid purpose of seeing the place where the deceased was discovered. Here there is still a large surface of the stone flags crimson-stained. It is at the spot where the blood oozed from the poor creature's heart. The police authorities regard as little short of marvellous the fact that no dweller in this model block heard any disturbance. Mr. Francis Hewitt, the superintendent of the dwellings, who with his wife occupied a sleeping apartment at nearly right angles with the place where the dead body lay, procured a foot-rule and measured the distance of his sleeping apartment from the stone step in question; it was exactly 12 ft. "And we never heard a cry," remarked Mr. Hewitt. Mrs. Hewitt observed that early in the evening she did hear a single cry of "Murder." It echoed through the building, but did not emanate from there. "But," explained Mr. and Mrs. Hewitt in a breath, "the district round here is rather rough, and cries of "Murder" are of frequent, if not nightly, occurrence in the district."

Source: The Mercury, Saturday August 18, 1888, Page 7

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Re: Missing Articles of 1888

Post by Karen on Fri 10 Feb 2012 - 13:47

August 19, 1888

THE WHITECHAPEL MYSTERY.
TWO SOLDIERS WRONGFULLY ACCUSED.

The murderer or murderers of the woman found stabbed in 39 places at 47, George-yard-buildings, on Tuesday, the 7th inst., are still undiscovered. Suspicion having pointed to two Guardsmen, there was at noon on Wednesday a parade of Coldstream and Grenadier Guards at the Wellington barracks. Soon after 11 o'clock two police-officers - Inspector Reid and Detective-serjeant Caunter - arrived with Mary Ann Conolly (otherwise "Pearly Poll") and the "assembly" call was at once sounded and the men were drawn up in quarter-column, after which they filed through a passage, where Inspector Reid, Serjeant Caunter, and another police-officer were stationed with "Pearly Poll." The woman was asked to scrutinise the faces of the soldiers as they passed, for the purpose of seeing if she could pick out either of the men who were with her and the deceased on the night on which the murder was committed. After a small number had filed past, "Pearly Poll" picked out a man wearing stripes, and taken by her to be a corporal, as the one who went away with the deceased woman. "That's him," exclaimed she; "I'm positive." The suspect was temporarily detained, and the filing by of the others continued. When a few more had passed, the woman, scanning the features of every one intently, pointed to a private as being the second man. She positively declared that he accompanied her to a house in the district where the murder took place. "Are you positive?" was asked, and "Pearly Poll" nodded and replied, "Certain." The military authorities immediately placed all the books, showing the time at which the suspected men left and returned to the barracks on the night mentioned, at the disposal of Inspector Reid and Sergeant Caunter. It was pointed out that the "corporal" was but a private with good-conduct stripes, a man of exemplary character, who was in the barracks by ten o'clock on Bank Holiday night. Other evidence as to his innocence, and also respecting the private's movements on the night of the crime, was also forthcoming. The former man was at once exonerated, while the second, also a man of exceptionally good character, was formally told that further inquiries must be instituted. These inquiries were duly conducted, and he too was told that no stain rested upon him, as it was clearly a case of mistaken identity. It is asserted that as "Pearly Poll" has "identified" two innocent men, who could not have been in Whitechapel at the time she says, the police will not further seek her aid in elucidating the mystery. Neither of the men wore sidearms when they left the barracks on Bank holiday, and could not possibly have been in each other's company.

SCREAMS HEARD IN THE DISTRICT.

Screams, it is now said, were heard in the vicinity of George-street, where the unfortunate woman Turner met her death on Bank holiday, the 6th inst., the night of the crime. From this fact a theory has been advanced that the woman may have met her death in the vicinity, and not actually in George-yard-buildings, and that her body may have been dragged where it was discovered. Two significant incidents discredit this. First, a woman having 39 wounds would no doubt bleed severely, and there were no signs of a blood trail; next, it is at all events unlikely that the body would have been dragged up the numerous steps. However, it is now asserted that there were several rows in the immediate neighbourhood at about the time at which it is presumed the crime was committed. There was another row at about the same place on Wednesday night. It is said that during its progress some allusions to the crime were made. These were noted, and may prove of service to the police. There were extra police put on on Wednesday night, and some of them, up till nearly midnight, were engaged in inquiring as to who were engaged in the quarrel.
Mr. John Saunders Reeves and Mrs. Reeves, who occupy the top room at the end of the George-yard-buildings from the balcony outside their rooms, pointed out to the police the exact places whence on the night of the murder the terrible shrieks are said to have proceeded. Their balcony overlooks a part of Wentworth-street and George-street, where habitations and common lodging-houses of an olden time still stand. Mrs. Reeves says that it was between 11 and 12 when the first row occurred. Calls for help began. She and her husband could see when they went out on to the balcony the crowd by the closed iron gates, and the dead wall of Leterworth-buildings, in George-street. When that row had subsided she and her husband went indoors again. About 20 minutes past 12 they were disturbed again, and as there was some terrible screaming they went on to the balcony a second time. The row was then proceeding in Wentworth-street, which runs at right angles with George-street. The crowd moved off out of sight. Shortly before one there were again dreadful shrieks and cries of "Murder!" and she and her husband went out on to the balcony a third time. This time they saw that there were two rows going on, one in Wentworth-street and the other in George-street. The row in George-street this time was not many doors from the house where the murdered woman and her companion, "Pearly Poll," sometimes lodged, whilst the row in Wentworth-street was not far from a house in Angel-alley, which the woman "Pearly Poll" is said to have admitted that she visited that evening. These two rows, Mr. and Mrs. Reeves say, were of a very noisy and quarrelsome character. The crowds round surged backwards and forwards a great deal. At last the police came and dispersed the crowd. This did not conclude the riotous proceedings of the night. About two o'clock Mr. and Mrs. Reeves heard more screams. The screams this time were very piercing. Only a few roughs seemed to constitute this crowd, which seemed to be moving in the direction of George-yard. However, the noise soon lessened in volume, and Mr. and Mrs. Reeves then retired for the night. To these series of rows the police are directing attention.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, August 19, 1888, Page 2

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Re: Missing Articles of 1888

Post by Karen on Fri 10 Feb 2012 - 20:30

August 7, 1888

A SCENE IN SPITALFIELDS.

Julia Costello, Mary Ann Costello, and another young woman, were walking through Princes-street, Spitalfields at about eight o'clock last night, when they passed a house they style "a club for foreign Jews." Here they were assaulted by Mike Grayley, a German Jew, and a number of other men, who struck them with sticks and their fists. Grayley was charged with the assault at the Worship-street Police-court, today, and sent to gaol for twenty-one days, with hard labour.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday August 7, 1888, Page 4

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Re: Missing Articles of 1888

Post by Karen on Sun 12 Feb 2012 - 20:21

August 22, 1888

WHITECHAPEL DOMESTIC LIFE.
WIFE AND BROTHER ATTACKED.

THE WIFE'S EXTRAORDINARY EVIDENCE.

At the Thames Police-court, today, Richard Patterson, 28, described as a dock labourerer, was brought up on remand charged with attempting to murder his wife, Annie Patterson, by stabbing her with a carving knife on June 26th, at 18, Grove-street, Whitechapel. He was further charged with attempting to kill John Barry, by stabbing him at the same time and place. - Mrs. Patterson stated that on the day in question she came home very drunk, picked up a plate and flung it at her husband. He picked up a lamp and threw it at her. Witness went out the first thing next morning, and did not return until the evening, when she found the door shut. She burst it open, and when the accused and his little boy came up the stairs she spat in her husband's face several times. He struck her, and she threw several cups at him. Prisoner then went downstairs, and, upon returning shortly afterwards with witness's brother, John Barry, went to a cupboard and

TOOK OUT A CARVING KNIFE.

She did not see any more, or feel anything. She was cut three times - once on the finger and twice on the face, and also once on the arm, but she expected she got that when she tried to protect herself. Her husband, who was very drunk, inflicted the wounds, but she was quite as bad. - John Barry stated that the prisoner's wife complained to him of her husband's ill-usage, and witness said if he wanted to hit her he might use his hands. Prisoner got a carving-knife, and witness said, "What have you got that for, Dick?" Whereupon the accused stabbed him in the jaw with it. His sister screamed, and then the prisoner struck her with the knife. Witness

RECEIVED EIGHT WOUNDS.

Prisoner kept on stabbing him and his sister, and they were afterwards taken to the London Hospital, where witness remained for four weeks. Evidence of the nature of the wounds having been given by Mr. G.T. Giddings, house-surgeon at the London Hospital, the prisoner was committed for trial, a constable having stated that he gave himself up to him, saying, "I am the man you are looking for. I am Richard Patterson, I give myself up; I am tired of walking about."

Source: The Echo, Wednesday August 22, 1888, Page 4

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Re: Missing Articles of 1888

Post by Karen on Sun 12 Feb 2012 - 20:44

August, 17, 1888

THIS DAY'S NEWS.
THE MURDER MYSTERY.

A CLUE AT LAST.
THE POLICE FOLLOW IT UP.

The officers engaged in elucidating the mystery of George-yard-buildings, wherein Martha Turner was discovered murdered, have, it is believed, at last obtained a clue, though it is feared it is not of a sufficiently substantial nature to justify the belief that any immediate arrest will take place. Detective-Inspector Reid, Inspector Leech, Detective-Sergeant Caunter, and other Criminal Investigation experts, have visited every military depot in London. The names of those soldiers out on leave on Bank Holiday night were given by the commanding officers, and every assistance rendered to the police in questioning men upon whom the slightest suspicion might be supposed to rest. The authorities have lost all faith in "Pearly Poll's" assistance, inasmuch as the two men whom she picked out at the Wellington Barracks were proved to have been far away from the scene of the crime when it was committed. One of these soldiers, quartered at Pimlico, was certainly out all night on Bank Holiday, and that circumstance, coupled with the fact of "Pearly Poll's" certainty as to his features, at first placed him in rather an awkward position. However, he was able to prove that he was elsewhere - the truth of his story being placed beyond all doubt.

NO WEAPON DISCOVERED.

No weapon with which the murder could have been perpetrated has yet been discovered, though the sewers in the vicinity of George-yard-buildings have been searched. There has, however, as we say, been a clue discovered which may be of some service. A woman has, it is stated, come forward and asserted that at midnight a man took a bed in her house, which is situated in the neighbourhood, stating that he had lost his train for the country, and could not return that night. He was dressed in the uniform of a soldier. This story has been inquired into by the police, but the result is not yet known. Some importance, however, is attached to the clue.

"SOMETHING WAS GOING TO HAPPEN."

A statement was made this afternoon by Louisa Reeves, the wife of the dock labourer, who first discovered the body when leaving for her day's work shortly before five o'clock in the morning. Mrs. Reeves explains that the screams of "Murder!" she heard early in the night must have proceeded from George-street, and could not possibly have been heard by her if they had proceeded from the dying woman. Strange to say, during the night Mr. and Mrs. Reeves woke up several times under an apprehension that something was about to happen. Not a scream was heard by them when thus aroused from their slumber, for Mr. Reeves went to his door and listened. "I could not say why," remarked Mrs. Reeves, today; "but I knew something would happen out of the ordinary, for me and my old man were never so much disturbed before, though we almost nightly hear cries of "Murder!" and "Police!" We pay no attention to them whatever."

A DREADFUL NIGHT.

"But that night (Mrs. Reeves added) was a dreadful one. My husband thought of what I told him when he left for work - that I knew something was going to happen - for when he discovered the dead body he was afraid to come and tell me, for fear I should go into a fit. We weren't awoke by screams, but there was a something we could not understand, that seemed to tell us that trouble was at hand. That dreadful murder has disturbed us all here, and it will be some time before we quiet down and forget last Bank Holiday night."

Source: The Echo, Friday August 17, 1888, Page 4

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Re: Missing Articles of 1888

Post by Karen on Sun 12 Feb 2012 - 21:00

August 12, 1888

THAMES.

THREATENING TO MURDER. - John Henry Marler, 32, a sailor on board the brig Albert, then lying off the Isle of Dogs, was charged with assaulting Mary Jane Pascod; also with threatening to murder her, and with attempting to stab her, and cut her throat with a knife on board the Albert. - The prosecutrix said that she came to London from Shields with prisoner. Between 10 and 10:30 on Friday night she was on board when the prisoner caught her by the throat, threw her on to the deck, and threatened to run her through with a knife, which he had in his hand at the time. The previous night he threatened to do the same thing. At Shields the prisoner asked her to come to London, and he would marry her. She was afraid of him, and did not want to have anything more to do with him. Witness, who was 20, came to London without her parents' knowledge or consent. - John Stacey, labourer, said he acted as watchman at the wharf off which the Albert was lying. On Friday night he saw the accused, who was the worse for drink. He said, "Stop me from going on board that ship tonight; if I do I shall kill that woman." Witness persuaded him to lie down, but he afterwards got up and went on board the Albert. Witness saw prisoner catch hold of prosecutrix, and say, "I will run this knife through you." He then raised the knife and witness caught hold of his arm. - Daniel Thorpe, a seaman, gave similar evidence. - Inspector Crawford, K division, said he went on board the brig. In answer to a question prisoner handed him two knives. When told the charge the prisoner used violent expressions. The young woman was taken on board as a stowaway, and unknown to the captain. - Mr. Lushington sentenced the prisoner to six months' hard labour.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, August 12, 1888, Page 12

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