Books




Face of Winifred May Davies
Latest topics
» Why Jesus Is Not God
Mon 17 Apr 2017 - 0:09 by Karen

» The Fourth Reich
Fri 14 Apr 2017 - 14:14 by Karen

» Allah, The Real Serpent of the Garden
Tue 7 Mar 2017 - 11:45 by Karen

» THE INNOCENCE OF JEWS
Sat 4 Mar 2017 - 12:06 by Karen

» Hillary Clinton (Hillroy Was Here)
Fri 28 Oct 2016 - 17:38 by Karen

» Alien on the Moon
Thu 20 Oct 2016 - 21:57 by Karen

» Martian Nonsense Repeats Itself
Thu 20 Oct 2016 - 18:43 by Karen

» Enlil and Enki
Fri 7 Oct 2016 - 17:11 by Karen

» Israel Shoots Down Drone - Peter Kucznir's Threat
Wed 24 Aug 2016 - 22:55 by Karen

» Rome is Babylon
Sun 24 Jul 2016 - 21:27 by Karen

Links












Gallery



Missing Articles of 1889

Page 2 of 2 Previous  1, 2

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Mon 6 Feb 2012 - 18:20

July 8, 1889

PLUMERVILLE'S EX-MAYOR.
His Diaphanous Explanations of the Causes of Clayton's Murder.

While Palmer and I were speaking we were joined by C.D. Armstrong, who was Mayor of Plumerville at the time Clayton was killed, and who is now a Justice of the Peace. He is a typical Southern villager, and had the usual rough and slouchy way of dressing which the countrymen throughout the State generally adopt. He was badly in need of a clean shave.
Mr. Armstrong was not at all backward about expressing his opinion of the Clayton murder and ballot-box stealing. He had been speaking but a few minutes when it became evident that his feelings towards the Plumerville "gang" were most friendly, and that he did not intend to say anything which might throw suspicion upon his friends. It was likewise apparent that he had also adopted the "Clayton militia" theory as accounting for the murder of John M. Clayton.
"Well, sir," he began, after some desultory conversation had taken place. "John M. Clayton didn't have an enemy in this county. He was a very popular man among the Democrats who knew him. For instance, he would join in with the Democrats in Pine Bluff and make a compromise or a breakwater, as it were, for the Democrats in Jefferson County. He was a very different man from Powell Clayton. I don't see the consistency of making political capital out of the murder; it doesn't assist the Democratic party any," he went on. The ex-Mayor probably meant by this rather involved expression that he did not think the Democratic party could have gained any advantage by the killing of Clayton.

THE USUAL THEORY.

"The shooting was done by some misguided fellow," he continued. "It looks reasonable that Clayton was followed up to this place from some other part of the State by some one whom Powell Clayton's militia had wronged. I don't think any man could have been so far gone in wickedness as to have killed him just on account of politics. I can't tell what caused the murder, of course; no man can tell that except the murderer. I can't understand why a man should write the "Jack the Ripper, No. 2," letter unless he wanted to get even with Powell Clayton. I know nothing at all about who the men were who stole the ballot-box. I swore in Bill Palmer, Tom Hervey and William Hobbs as judges of election on the day the box was stolen. I think that these parties who have been indicted for stealing it were in bed at the time the box was taken, but I'm not sure of that. The Republicans at Little Rock have had all kinds of evidence. In taking the testimony in which Palmer, Hervey, Pate and Bently were indicted for stealing the box, four Republican witnesses, some of them niggers, swore exactly opposite about the same fact. One witness swore that the ballot-box had been taken down the railroad track towards Morrillton, about two and one-half miles from Plumerville, and there burned; another witness swore that it had been taken to a blacksmith's shop and there burned; a third witness said that it had been taken to Dr. B.G. White's cotton-gin, six miles from Plumerville, and a fourth witness swore that it was taken to Morrillton and had been burned there in the fireplace of some house. Now, how can such testimony as that be believed? Judge Cunningham's unjust charge also made things much worse for Conway County, and, as the two leading Democratic papers of the State in Little Rock published lies about the Democrats of Conway County, people in other parts of the country believed they were true."

Source: The World, Monday July 8, 1889, Page 3

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Mon 6 Feb 2012 - 18:20

July 9, 1889

London, June 25. - The name of the woman whose body was cut up and thrown into the Thames recently was Elizabeth Jackson. This fact has been established by scars on the body and by the clothing. The woman was of low character, and was in the habit of frequenting common lodging-houses in Chelsea. She was last seen alive on May 31. The theory that she was a victim of Jack the Ripper is again revived.
The police have abandoned the theory that Elizabeth Jackson was a victim of malpractice, and that her body was cut up in order to conceal the crime.

Source: The Daily Gleaner, Tuesday July 9, 1889

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Mon 6 Feb 2012 - 18:21

July 10, 1889

LONDON, WEDNESDAY, JULY 10.
RADICALISM AND ROYALTY.

There was a great cry and little wool in the House of Commons yesterday in the nomination of the Members for "the Royal Grants Committee." It does not matter much whether the Government side of the House preponderated to the extent of one Member or three Members in the constitution of the Committee. When Members assume semi-judicial functions by accepting positions on Committees of Inquiry, they subordinate party feeling, or they should do, to the claims of facts. They are nominated first to inquire, and then to report to the House. Their chief duty consists in getting at the facts, and facts generally speak for themselves. There are two classes of facts connected with the subject matter of inquiry, one of which will come within the province of the Committee, and the other will be beyond their reach. They will have to inquire into Royal Grants, how many of them, and when granted, and they may recommend what provision should be made for the immediate future. But there is another class of facts still more entitled to investigation, but which will receive no attention. Certain Radicals are half horrified at the idea of granting additional pay to the ever-increasing members of the Royal Family. But is there not an ever-growing spirit of flunkeyism in the public mind? The Queen is the fountain of Honour, and this fountain is ever ready to be turned on to the ever-increasing number of people who hunger and thirst after titles. It does not matter who is Prime Minister - it may be Mr. Gladstone or Lord Salisbury - they both alike use with an unstinted hand the privilege of extending the dominion of Privilege. Mr. Gladstone has used the power more than any Prime Minister of modern times, not because he is particularly dominated with the spirit of Privilege, but because there were more Liberal and Radical expecters of titles than there were in the Opposition camp. Where one man has got a peerage or baronetcy from Mr. Gladstone's recommendation, a dozen have been bitterly disappointed. At the present moment, many wealthy Liberals are doing their best for the return of Mr. Gladstone to power, in the full hope that they will be rewarded by a title of some kind. This ineffaceable desire to get within the charmed circle of Privilege is not bounded by any political party opinion. It exists in both parties, and particularly with wealthy Radicals; and while it abounds, grants to Royalty - the central sun of Privilege - will be freely distributed, whoever may inquire, and whatever the inquirers may report. Let a member of the Royal family go to the East of London, where Radicalism is in the ascendant, and he is greeted with universal cheering. Let the Prince of Wales go to Whitechapel on some public occasion, and let the Bradlaughs, and the Laboucheres, and the Storeys, and the Cosshams, and the Cremers go in full force in opposition, and they would find themselves uncomfortably eclipsed. We only indicate the condition of things which exists today, not in West London merely, but in East London; and as in West and East London so everywhere, even in Northampton, Leicester, Sunderland, and Bristol. Here there is a class of facts into which the Committee, about which so much fuss was made yesterday, will not inquire, but it is a class of facts which dominate those which will be reported on.

Source: The Echo, Wednesday July 10, 1889, Page 2

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Mon 6 Feb 2012 - 18:21

July 14, 1889

Yesterday the police of the R or Westcombe-park division forwarded information to the district coroner that on the previous day their attention was called to there being the dead body of a man on the foreshore of the river Thames. His throat was cut, and he had evidently been dead for some time. The body was removed to the Charlton parish mortuary. The police describe the body as: Aged about 38, length 5ft. 9in., complexion fair, bald on top of head, moustache and tuft on chin brown; dressed, blue serge jacket, cord trousers and vest, Oxford striped shirt, white flannel undershirt, brown merino socks, leather strap around the waist, heavy lace-up boots, and black silk handkerchief round the neck. On the body being searched there was found 2s. silver, 3d. bronze, a brass tobacco-box, and a red handkerchief.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, July 14, 1889, Page 12

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Mon 6 Feb 2012 - 18:22

July 15, 1889

Found Guilty of Manslaughter.

WINNIPEG, Man., July 15. - The trial of Fisk, better known as "Jumbo," for the murder of Squaw Rosalie at Calgary, resulted in a verdict of manslaughter. The squaw was found in a room occupied by Jumbo in a condition much resembling that of Jack the Ripper's victims. The defense endeavored to establish that she herself was a party to the crime. The first jury acquitted the prisoner, but the judge refused to accept the verdict. The jury then disagreed and was discharged. A new jury was called and presented the court with the result above stated.

Source: The St. Paul Daily News, Monday July 15, 1889

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Mon 6 Feb 2012 - 18:22

July 16, 1889

East London Church Fund.
KENSINGTON RURAL DEANERY.

We have been asked to insert the following, which we have great pleasure in laying before our readers: -
The Bishop of Bedford is paying this Rural Deanery a compliment, as he is holding two meetings within the Deanery during the present month.
There appeared in "THE KENSINGTON CHURCHMAN" of the 1st inst. a notice of a meeting to be held at Kensington Town Hall on the 17th July, and the London Diocesan Magazine not only gives notice of this one, but also of a drawing room meeting on the 24th July at No. 1, Ladbroke Gardens, at 3:30 p.m.
We wish the Bishop every success at both meetings, and that a fair instalment of the 20,000 pounds required may be provided. This sounds a large sum, but a consideration of the Bishop's needs will make it appear a very moderate requirement. The Bishop now has 1,500,000 souls committed to his charge; very nearly double the number which was under the charge of his predecessor, the present Bishop of Wakefield. A parish priest, if he has not a curate for every 1,000 parishioners, considers himself undermanned, and, taking this as a recognised proportion, the Bishop would require 1,500 clerical assistants. Let us, however, assign one such assistant to every 2,000 of the population, and he would then require 750 helpers. But how does the case now stand? From a printed paper in circulation we learn that he has 118 clergy, and 87 deaconesses, laymen, mission women, and parish nurses, a total of 205 clerical and lay helpers for - to quote the words of the paper - "the welfare of the spirits, souls, and bodies" of this multitude, almost all of whom, if not absolutely poor, are of the poorer classes. Poverty, however, is not the worst he has to confront; there is crime, and some of the most startling crimes which have lately almost caused a panic have been in localities under his charge.
The Bishop's effort is - again to quote the paper - "to maintain in the first place, and upon a Divine level of its own, the Gospel and Sacraments of Jesus Christ, beginning, continuing, and ending all work in Him. As loyal and practical members of a church which must preach a present salvation, we reject no opportunity of developing social, educational, and recreational agencies for the good of the people. We fear no experiment which is justified by church order and common sense, and we work not on the chance that something may be saved, but on the principle that nothing be lost."
How can these things be done in Whitechapel, Spitalfields, Bethnal Green, Limehouse, Poplar, Isle of Dogs, Shoreditch, &c., &c., without the help of the wealthy West End? And yet in time even these poor parishes may possibly get on without extraneous help. The Bishop wants 20,000 pounds. This comparatively large amount, if sub-divided among 1,500,000, would be more than produced if every one of them were to contribute a farthing a week for thirteen weeks. Two pints of "four-penny" foregone during a year, and the money given to the Bishop's fund, would be more than the amount now asked for. But till that time comes the strong must bear the infirmities of the weak, the West must aid the East. Truly may it be said of East London "the harvest is plenteous, but the labourers are few" and we all know - but do we all practice? - the divine injunction which follows those words "are not such labourers worthy of their hire?"
This Rural Deanery can do much. If she will do what she can at these two meetings, the Bishop is not very likely to be dissatisfied. The meeting at the Town Hall is an open meeting, that at 1, Ladbroke Gardens, requires tickets, which the Diocesan Magazine states can be obtained by application to the Secretary of the Church Fund, 26, St. Mary Axe, E.C., or to Mr. Trevor Crispin, 1, Ladbroke Gardens, W.

Source: The Kensington Churchman, July 16, 1889, Page 70

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Mon 6 Feb 2012 - 18:26

August 1, 1889

HORRIBLE BUTCHERY.

Body of an Unknown Man Found on the Banks of the Souris River Murdered.
A Regular "Jack-the-Ripper" Job in Assiniboia - The Remains Horribly Hacked.

Indecent Assault Case on Trial at Rat Portage - Probably a Case of Blackmail.
The MacLeod's of Scotland Will Visit Manitoba in the Interests of Crofter Immigration.

CARNDUFF, Assa., July 29. - The body of a man, unknown at present, has been found on the banks of the Souris River murdered. The remains look as if a man like "Jack-the-Ripper" had been at work. The abdomen had been cut open and the interior organs and entrails scattered about.

Source: Manitoba Daily Free Press, Thursday August 1, 1889

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Mon 6 Feb 2012 - 18:27

August 4, 1889

SEEN IN WHITECHAPEL.
The London Stews where Murder Stalks Undetected.

NO PLACE IN THE WORLD LIKE IT.
A Blot on the Face of Civilization - The Dull Police of London - A Remedy for the Social Cancer.

London Letter in the Boston Herald.

Ten days have passed, leaving behind them no clew to the Whitechapel murderer. Ten days have passed and the name of the eighth victim, her story and her horrible death are all but forgotten. Whitechapel itself lives on, unheeded by the greater London, and outside of its own boundaries it will scarcely be thought of again until the fiend's steel takes another human life. The police have done nothing, they merely stand and wait. To be sure, the force in Whitechapel has been increased both by men in uniform and by men in mufti, but the re-enforcement is not large enough to do what is required of it. All that the police seem to do is to watch. Watching Whitechapel is like watching the edges of a vast swamp. It is almost vain to hope that the heavy-booted constables will catch Jack the Ripper red-handed, for their ponderous footfalls sound the signal for a criminal's flight. Perhaps they have more than once alarmed Jack the Ripper, and enabled him to get safely away. As for the so called vigilance committees, some idea of their usefulness may be gathered from the fact that one of their chiefs destroyed the letter which he claims to have received from the assassin, giving warning of the renewal of operations in July. These committees meet in public houses, patrol the streets unarmed, save for sticks and knuckle dusters, and, with the exception of three or four whistles distributed among every dozen members, they have no means for calling aid in case of an emergency. It is idle to say, as some people do, that Whitechapel has become unnerved, excited and frantic because of the mysteriously committed crimes. Another community might become so affected by similar causes, but Whitechapel cannot be it is out of the question. England should look Whitechapel squarely in the face and see the horrible blotches that disfigure it, but England does no such thing. She does not wish to attend her modesty, and therefore she sentimentalizes and talks of sending missionaries and blankets. The fact is that too much sentiment has been wasted over Whitechapel, and some missionaries there have done more harm than good. Whitechapel must be understood before it can be helped. The few outsiders who understand it are just as powerless to help the dismal region; but take a few basketfuls from the ocean of misery, but the vast depths remain. There are respectable people in Whitechapel among the trades folk and better working classes, perhaps there are even some comfortable people among the former, and there are some brave people doing battle with wretchedness there, but all of these can be counted without much difficulty. Whitechapel has been extensively written about during the past year, but rarely has any writer probed its lowest strata or detected the undercurrents of its evil life. You are told that Whitechapel is desperately poor, but it's idle to lump poverty in a single phrase and leave it there. You are told that Whitechapel abounds in crime, and you are left to infer some direct inevitable connection between poverty and the worse of vice. But look Whitechapel squarely in the face, and you will see something worse than thievery there, something worse than throat-cutting. Fastidious England is wrong. The lowest classes in Whitechapel are not immoral. They do not know what morality means, they are unmoral. From among their women Jack the Ripper selects his victims. These women of Whitechapel streets are the very worst products of the genius civilization of the Nineteenth Century.
What saddens you most in Whitechapel are the legions of children in the gutter. Children swarm in that district weeds in untended fields. There are almost as many children as paving stones in the streets, they are unguarded, uncared for, dirtier than pigs, and as vile in every habit as their elders, and they no sooner enter their teens than they increase their rum. Girls of 13 and 14 handle their own babies in Whitechapel alleys. "Impossible," cries the British matron; "neither the law nor the church permit child marriages in England." Perhaps not, but neither the law nor the clergy have anything to do with these affairs in Whitechapel. When legal age permits the clergy to interfere, these bad matters are generally made worse. The well-meaning and reverend blackgowns induce the offending young people to marry. They marry them in batches a dozen couples at a time, then the legal living together is even worse in result than the illegal. One squalid room serves as a home for all and a breeding place for children, who come faster than the means of support; indeed, the father could scarcer support himself to begin with. Cleanliness is unknown, decency unheard of, there is only bestial poverty and ignorance.
The parents take to drink, and the children follow them, the sons become ruffians, and the daughters worse than ruffians. The faces of thousands of children in Whitechapel streets have only this school of life. They will soon give birth to tens of thousands more, who will multiply and intensify. Best end wretchedness. Their elders are already without shame, just as they are without soap. The gospel is wasted on them, so are blankets, so is money. You cannot treat them like other people because they are unlike any other people on the earth. They live and cheat and steal and fight and kill without compunction, because they have no conscience. They have no reverence for human life, which is the cheapest thing in Whitechapel. You may pity those people; perhaps you can find it possible to sentimentalize over them, but it is absolutely impossible to like them or to repress feelings of deep disgust when you see them. On the other hand, it is quite as impossible to blame them. They are creatures of their surroundings; they are absolutely the scum of civilization. That civilization should produce scum, and such scum, is the severest criticism of such vaunted developments of the human race. A public that dares not call a spade a spade refuses to look Whitechapel squarely in the face, and to apply a remedy to the manifestations of social dishes there.
Whitechapel is overpopulated, but this condition is due to the most reckless improvidence, born of ignorance and lack of any responsible moral sense. This is the key to the utter degradation of Whitechapel. There is no mystery about it. It is all as plain as day. Let the moralists put aside their false modesty and tackle the evil as it stands. Let the reforming radicals who are always lamenting the condition of the east end of London take their self-imposed charges in hand and apply their powers to cure the chief cause of the woe, the want and the crime. Whitechapel grows steadily worse from this very cause.
Tonight I have seen hideous sights there. Most of the adult female creatures there would welcome death, I think, even at the Ripper's knife. They are vermin living among vermin. Vermin-covered Whitechapel is a sickening place at any time. It is incomparably so Saturday night. It is bad enough on the broad, bright, high street, but behind that, on either side, it is cruelly dismal. I have walked among its purlieus 10, 15, 20 minutes at a time without hearing or seeing policemen in either uniform or in plain dress. It is impossible to mistake a London policeman in plain dress, for his manner and his walk betray him.
The London police are dull, heavy fellows, with no detective capacity worth mentioning. Their superior officers, if not dull, are heavy, fettered with traditions and hopelessly bound with red tape. Scotland Yard not only refuses information but resents being asked; it scorns suggestions and absolutely declines to afford the press any facilities whatever for the investigation of the Whitechapel murders, and hunting the Ripper. It is jealous of outside efforts, and does not know what to do on its own account. Its present method of guarding Whitechapel is demonstrative, but not particularly useful. Attention is chiefly paid to the scenes of former murders, as if Scotland Yard innocently suspected that Jack the Ripper would revisit them. I know at least one beat which a policeman covers in three-quarters of an hour, affording ample opportunity for the commission of any crime. Miles of Whitechapel byways are wretchedly lighted, and it is easy enough to kill and butcher there, with scarcely any possibility of detection.
Some one asks why the police do not institute a house to house search after a murder by Jack the Ripper, but law forbids the police searching a house without a warrant from a magistrate. There are 8,000 houses in Whitechapel and to search them all would require 8,000 warrants. Before they could be drawn the murderer could be 8,000 miles away. Some one else asks how is it that nobody hears the shriek of the Ripper's victim, but it is extremely unlikely that the victims have time to shriek, so quickly is the murder done. But if they rent the air with cries no one in Whitechapel would heed them. Cries of "Murder!" and calls for the police are so common in Whitechapel that nobody notices them. They are the constant accompaniments of drunken brawls. I heard such cries tonight up teeming courtyards, but nobody stirred, for the men and women there are always howling. At every corner there is a brawl.
Tonight the public houses are filled with poor looking people, and publicans do more business than any other tradesman in Whitechapel. There are stuffy, garish taverns everywhere, and this is their gain night. The men are guzzling, the women are guzzling and bawling, and there are almost as many babies and little toddling youngsters as there are adults in the bar-rooms. It is a frightful and revolting sight. There are none of the decent poor among this riotous lot. These creatures are not honest workers. They are hardly like human beings. For the most part they are English born. That they should be born as they are, that they should live as they do, and die as they do in the gutter, the docks and the river, is a disgrace to English civilization. Perhaps Jack the Ripper will bring this fact home to English minds and warn the rest of humanity. Meanwhile this mysterious assassin remains undiscovered, and there is no present hope of finding him. Will he follow his last year's method and kill another woman before the month is over? If he does, he will probably escape unhindered. A well known lunacy doctor in London promises positively to catch Jack the Ripper within six weeks if Scotland Yard will render assistance, but Scotland Yard refuses it and will not even take a hint.

Source: The Syracuse Standard, Sunday August 4, 1889, Page 3

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Mon 6 Feb 2012 - 18:27

August 5, 1889

STILL SEARCHING FOR THE WHITECHAPEL MISCREANT.
THE DIFFICULTY OF THE POLICE.

THE FEELING IN THE DISTRICT.
IS THE MISCREANT A RESIDENT?

Though nearly three weeks have elapsed since the murder of Alice Mackenzie in Castle-alley, the police are evidently and admittedly as far off from obtaining a clue to the murderer as when the George-yard and Buck's-row outrages, following close upon the heels of each other, first warned London of the existence of a murder fiend in its midst. For this result the police are not (so at least the Chronicle, which today again devotes considerable attention to the crime, asserts) altogether to be blamed; on the contrary, so great is the anxiety evinced in the force concentrated in and around Whitechapel to lay the murderer by the heels, that many constables have lately been utilising the time ordinarily devoted to rest by patrolling the streets in their private capacity. And if to this is added the fact that, at the present time, the comparatively limited area in which all the murders have occurred is literally swarming with police, that nearly every lodging-house of doubtful character has its detective in almost constant residence, and that every piece of information tendered, however absurd and improbable on the face of it, is being sifted and followed up in the most painstaking manner by the authorities at Leman-street and at Scotland-yard, there is but one conclusion to be arrived at - that everything is being done by the police in the matter that is at all possible.

TROUBLED BY SPIRITUALISTS AND THOUGHT-READERS.

The letters which continue to reach Superintendent Arnold at the Leman-street Police-station are both numerous and curious, and partake chiefly of the character rendered familiar to readers of the newspapers during the time when the murder scare was at its height in the autumn of last year. There are, for instance, no end to the letters from spiritualists and thought-readers, who profess in some cases to have seen the spirits of one or other of the murdered women, with whom they have entered into conversation as to the appearance of their murderer. The striking disparity evident, however, in these descriptions are sufficient on the face of them to condemn the letters and their writers as being absolutely useless for all practical purposes. Then there are the people who are morally certain that they know the author of these crimes; and though the police have taken the trouble to make inquiries, and even to shadow some of the persons indicated, the result has always been that explanations have been asked for and given calculated to clear them all from suspicion.

SEEKING A CHEAP NOTORIETY.

As was to be expected, too, there are a number of individuals whose chief mission seems to have been to attempt to attain cheap notoriety by addressing letters with a "Jack the Ripper" signature to the police-station, breathing threatenings and warnings. For a time the majority of these communications found their way to the waste-paper basket of the inspector's office, without any further consideration being bestowed upon them, but the nuisance became at last so unbearable that pains were taken to discover some of the writers, who have been permanently cured of their literary inclinations by a visit from a uniformed police-officer and a threat of police-court proceedings.

THE CALLOUSNESS OF CERTAIN WOMEN.

Next to the mysteriousness attached to the crimes, perhaps the most striking feature is the utter callousness of that class of women from whom the victims are recruited. They are to be found in hundreds in the lodging-houses in Spitalfields; but, beyond the fact that "Jack the Ripper" has been included in their vocabulary as a kind of bye-word applicable to a suspicious character, they are apparently as little interested in the recent murder, and are as careless of their personal safety, as any of the dwellers in the West-end. Notwithstanding the fact that the police have repeatedly warned them against walking the streets singly, they may be found on any night standing or loitering at the street corners of Whitechapel and Spitalfields away from all company. And it is in this very fact that the murderer - whoever he may be - knows that he has an advantage over the police.

IS THE MURDERER A RESIDENT IN THE DISTRICT?

It has been asserted that the murderer knows every nook and cranny of Whitechapel, and that therefore he must be a resident in that district. The police are not altogether inclined to believe this theory, because, as they point out, it is the business of these female outcasts to know every dark court and alley. Practically, these very women invite and give every facility to the murderer, and therein lies his advantage. Moreover, women of this stamp have - the majority of them - a kind of blind and unreasoning belief in fate. What their end may be seems (declares the writer in the Chronicle) a matter of the most supreme indifference to them. Whether they die a natural or a violent death, is, in their opinion, all a matter of luck, and in this connection is explained a fact which seems to have considerably puzzled the police lately. It may be recollected that beside the mutilated bodies of two of the victims at least, was found a farthing. If the pockets of women of this class were examined it would probably be found that a very large majority of them contained a similar coin, some defaced by a hole bored through the centre. This coin, in the opinion of these women, brings them luck, and just as a cabman on the receipt of his fare will expectorate upon it, so these outcasts, on issuing from their lodgings for their nightly prowling of the streets, may be seen to take out their coins and spit upon them "for luck," as they say.

Source: The Echo, Monday August 5, 1889, Page 3

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Mon 20 Feb 2012 - 9:39

November 14, 1889

Natural gas wells in many places are falling in pressure. Even the great Karg well, once the giant blower of them all, has weakened as Sampson did when shorn of his locks. It is now a well of low pressure. Another ripper at Somerset, Ind., gave completely out one night last week as suddenly as it started, and now it is said there is not a smell of gas in the well. The first intimation that the well was getting tired was the extinguishing of every gas stove in the town and the complete collapse of the well. Will they all do it? That's the question that agitates people living in gas towns. - New London Record.

Source: Daily Chronicle, November 14, 1889

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Mon 20 Feb 2012 - 9:46

November 17, 1889

A GOOD CAUSE WANTS HELP.

The "Female Outcast Free Shelter," which was of especial service to many poor homeless women, when the "Jack the Ripper" scare was at its height, is now in need of aid from the charitable. It has been, during the past summer, closed for repairs, and for the building of additions, among which will be a soup kitchen. Eighty females can now be accommodated nightly. They will, on entering at 7 p.m. give name, age, and last sleeping place. Their evening will be spent in a large, well-lighted room, provided with capital fires. Supper is to consist of a pint of coffee and a half pound of bread with either butter or dripping. There is plenty of hot and cold water in this establishment for the use of temporary inmates. It is claimed for the shelter that it has been the means of getting several young women into homes. Altogether, the shelter has many claims on philanthropic attention.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, November 17, 1889, Page 6

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Mon 20 Feb 2012 - 9:49

December 3, 1889

Not Jack the Ripper, but the Ripper Cigar. dtf

Source: Newark Daily Advocate, Newark, Ohio, Tuesday December 3, 1889

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Mon 20 Feb 2012 - 9:55

December 5, 1889

Women Mob a Ripper.

MADRID, Nov. 30. - A man supposed to be "Jack the Ripper" was set upon by a crowd of women in the poorer quarter of the city this morning while he was in the custody of officers who were removing him from the jail to the court room, where he was to be arraigned on the charge of having recently committed a murder under circumstances resembling those of the Whitechapel murders in London. The crowd increased in numbers until it reached upward of 500, mostly women, and it was only through the utmost efforts of the governor of Madrid and a strong force of gendarmes that the prisoner's life was saved. As it was, he was so severely beaten that the services of a physician were necessary to restore him to a condition rendering the legal proceedings in his case possible.

Source: December 5, 1889

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Mon 20 Feb 2012 - 10:02

December 6, 1889

Jack the Ripper.

The excitement caused by this inhuman monster, is scarcely equaled by that produced by the great discovery of Dr. Miles - The Restorative Nervine. It speedily cures nervous prostration, change of life, pain, dullness and confusion in head, fits, sleeplessness, the blues neuralgia, palpitation, monthly pains, etc. Mr. John S. Wolf, druggist of Hillsdale, Michigan, Talbott and Moss of Greensburg, Ind.; and A.W. Blackburn, of Wooster, O., say that "The Nervine sells better than anything we ever sold, and gives universal satisfaction." Dr. Miles' new illustrated treatise on the Nerves and Heart and trial bottle free at J.J. Klopp's drug store.

Source: December 6, 1889

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Mon 20 Feb 2012 - 10:04

December 10, 1889

Not Jack the Ripper, but the Ripper Cigar. dtf

Source: Newark Daily Advocate, Tuesday December 10, 1889

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Mon 20 Feb 2012 - 10:07

December 11, 1889

Not Jack the Ripper, but the Ripper Cigar. dtf

The Ripper is the finest nickel cigar made. dtf

Source: Newark Daily Advocate, Wednesday December 11, 1889

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Mon 20 Feb 2012 - 10:22

December 23, 1889

The R.P.A. Doomed.

Saturday evening a caucus of prominent democrats of this city was held in Hon. J.J. McMaken's office. Among those present were Governor-elect Campbell, Hon. James E. Neal, Peter Schwab, County Clerk Welliyer, Commissioner-elect Beck, the democratic members of council and a number of others. The object of the meeting was to decide upon what steps to take in reference to the repeal of the "Ripper." Col. Neal presided. There was an undercurrent of feeling favoring the passage of a law whereby a police judge and a public prosecutor would be added to the officials of the city. This could only be done by a special act and this talk was speedily dispensed with. It was decided that the "Ripper" should be repealed and unconditionally, but the question as to what Mayor Dirk would do, came up for discussion and it was unanimously decided to appoint a committee of five to wait on his Honor and obtain his views.
The committee chosen, Col. James E. Neal, A.J. Welliver, E.E. Hull and Representatives Goldrick and McMakin waited on his Honor yesterday and a conference was held. The mayor promised the committee to give them a democratic administration and further said that all appointees submitted to council would be men of first-class character and democrats.
The question was propounded by Representative McMaken as to what he considered a democrat, and whether a man who voted against Governor Campbell was considered by him as such. The mayor answered the committee that he did not consider a voter a democrat who scratched Campbell, and that he would appoint no one who did so. He further added that he fully expected to give a clean democratic administration and expected to be held accountable for it. The committee was well satisfied with the result of the interview, and among the first acts of the next legislature will be the repeal of the notorious and unjust "Ripper" bill.
Council will probably have a large scope of authority through the passage of new ordinances and the new deal may be looked for early in January.

Source: The Daily Democrat, Monday December 23, 1889

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Mon 20 Feb 2012 - 10:27

December 25, 1889

A False Pretense.

"Well, my son," asked Jimmy Tuffboy's mother, "are you satisfied with your Christmas?"
"Yes, ma'am," replied Jimmy, "only the skates ain't nickel plated, and dad said he'd buy me a double ripper, an' I didn't see it."
"But I am sure you have been happy all day, James."
"I wasn't going to let the fellers know how bad I felt." - Exchange.

Source: Wednesday December 25, 1889

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Mon 20 Feb 2012 - 10:48

December 12, 1889

Has Jack Been Arrested?

LONDON, Dec. 11. - M. Gordon, chief of the Paris detectives, paid a private visit to London a few days ago, and reporters have been making the lives of men at Scotland Yard miserable ever since, not being able to extract the truth as to the purport of his visit. They have naturally invented an errand for him, in fact several errands, the most popular of which is that there is in custody in France a person who may possibly prove to be the perpetrator of the Whitechapel murders, who is still the object of the greatest dread to the London police, and whom the people still fear to hear from again every day.

Source: Manitoba Daily Free Press, Thursday December 12, 1889

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Mon 20 Feb 2012 - 13:11

December 2, 1889

Page 4 Advertisements Column 3

Every description of

REPAIRING, PAINTING, and TRIMMING undertaken, and those favoring the above with their Orders can rely upon being thoroughly satisfied, both as regards quality and workmanship.

A.F.S. has in stock and FOR SALE at REDUCED PRICES the following: -

CARRIAGES, WAGGONETTES,
LADIES' PHAETON, SULKIES,
WHITECHAPEL CARTS,
SPRING TRAPS, BAKER'S WAGGON
And SECOND-HAND SPRING CARTS.

The above being of first-class manufacture and low in price, he would recommend those about purchasing for the holiday season, to
COME AND SEE THEM.

Source: Nelson Evening Mail, Volume XXIII, Issue 306, 2 December 1889, Page 4

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Mon 20 Feb 2012 - 13:50

December 29, 1889

A POOR MAN'S PALACE.
How Besant's Dream Was Realized in East London.

LIFE IN THE JOYLESS CITY.
Brightened and Elevated by a Temple of Music and Art.

POPULAR CONCERTS IN ENGLAND.
[WRITTEN FOR THE DISPATCH.]

[img][/img]

An Impossible Story. This is what Walter Besant calls his novel, "All Sorts and Conditions of Men." To those easy-going people who are disposed to accept things as they are merely because they are, and to believe that because certain conditions always, have been they always will be, the story does seem an Impossible one. To those social optimists whose latest fad is the doctrines enunciated in "Looking Backward," and who find it no trouble to believe that in the year of grace 2000, society will be constituted and run on the Bellamy model, Besant's impossible story should seem very possible, for it certainly does not propose to inaugurate such radical changes as does the Boston iconoclast. But to that other portion of the people who, while recognizing and deploring existing evils, do not expect human nature to be changed and society transformed by some mysterious process, and who are glad to note any step toward improvement, there is encouragement in the knowledge that the cardinal feature in Besant's dream, the "Palace of Delight," that grand and beautiful gathering place for the poor, the tired, the sad, the heart-hungry of that great hive of industry, East London, has had its partial, if not complete, realization in the People's Palace, a magnificent structure facing the Mile End road, and which was opened to the public by Queen Victoria in her jubilee year of 1887.

[img][/img]

"The Joyless City" is the name that has been given to East London. It includes Whitechapel, Mile End Road, Stepney Bow, Shadwell and the adjoining districts. Nearly two millions of people inhabit East London. It is the home of

A THOUSAND SMALL INDUSTRIES.

Here is furniture making, gold beating, glass blowing, cigar and cigarette making, handloom weaving, match and matchbox making, brewing, tanning, sugar making, jam making, chemical manufactures, comb making, mat making, walking stick making, feather dressing, pewterers, cork cutters, workers in sealing wax, shellac and zinc, and numberless others - the larger industries furnishing employment to a score or a hundred hands in single establishments, the smaller to six or a dozen, or sometimes carried on by individuals. Much of the work is done at the house of the toiler. Competition is keen, the smallness of the establishments and the diversity of industries prevent combination of the workers, and cheapness is gained at the expense of bodies and of souls. Here the "sweating" system flourishes in all is odiousness, and between the upper millstone of necessity and the lower one of competition unfortunate women who must earn their bread are ground to powder.

[img][/img]

It is an unlovely section - an ugly wilderness of bricks and mortar, remote from parks, gardens, libraries, theaters, concert halls and the other means for healthful recreation and innocent enjoyment which the inhabitants of more favored parts of the city have at their command. The houses are small and mean, the streets narrow. Whole families live in two or three rooms, sometimes in but one. Social gatherings are out of the question. The pavilion theater and one concert hall are about the only places of amusement in Whitechapel. The museums and picture galleries are too far away to be enjoyed. The only pleasures of the people of that section must be gathered on the streets or at the bars of the public houses which abound in great numbers.
Surely no where in the world was there a wider field for practical philanthropy than in East London. Nor has it been neglected, for, from the seed sown by Walter Besant, in the "Palace of Delight," which, in his novel, he puts into the heart of Angela Messenger, the heiress, to erect, has sprung the palatial building called the People's Palace, which was built by funds subscribed by the public, the Drapers' Company having alone contributed 300,000 pounds. It fronts on the Mile End road, the great highway of half a million people, and when the vast rotunda, with the pillared front and two tall towers, is completed, it will be one of the architectural sights of London.

NIGHT IN THE PALACE.

Night is, of course, the time to visit it, for then those for whom it was designed are there enjoying its pleasures. At 9 o'clock the scene is at its best. A penny admits us to the courtyard, which is thronged with young people listening to the Palace band discourse popular airs, and scores of couples waltz around on the smooth asphalt in unchecked gaiety. Threading our way through the merry crowd, we enter the Queen's Hall, a magnificent auditorium 130 feet long, 75 feet wide and 60 feet high from the floor to the center of the roof. Around it are the statues of 23 queens, while throned above the entrance, Victoria, in robes and crown, scepter in hand, gazes with marble smile upon her humble subjects.
The hall is filled with a strange company. Many of them are neatly and even well clad, but the majority wear their working clothes. There are a great many old men and women, their bent forms and wasted figures showing how bitter has been the struggle of life with them. Mothers with a whole brood of children, men with hard hands and broad shoulders, and, of course, the young "chaps and their girls" are there in great numbers. It is, indeed, a typical East London audience.
An organ recital has just closed, and the Scots Guards' band is playing a march, followed by a rattling medley of Sullivan's airs. The applause dies away and a young lady comes out on the stage and sings an Italian song. It might be thought that such music would be above the tastes of the audience, but the prolonged cheers and handclapping shows this to be a mistake, and in response the singer comes back and sings, "Home, Sweet Home." Perhaps few audiences ever had so few among them who knew what a home, as all that the word should imply, meant, as has this one, but as she sings they think, not, perhaps, of the dingy tenement where, amid a poverty almost squalid, they fight that "battle for bread which is like the savage's hunt for food," but of the home everyone builds for himself in his heart and hopes, and when the last strain dies away there goes up such a burst of applause as almost makes the marble queens tremble on their pedestals.
Near us sit two old women, poorly clad, whose worn faces and gnarled hands tell that their lot is not an easy one. Beneath the eye of one is a discoloration which speaks, perhaps, of a drunken husband or an unfilial son. Their bonnet strings are unloosed, and they lean forward with their elbows on their knees in contented comfort.
"Hi wish hi could sing like that, Hann," said one. "When hi were a gell hi could sing a bit, but now, bless yer, hi can't sing no more nor a sparrer."
"No more could she, Sary," replied Ann, "hif she's 'a 'ad your Willum and height kids to look after. Still I like to 'ear 'er."
"Yes," said "Sary," with a sigh. "It makes one forget one's troubles for a bit."
Surely if the Palace of Delight makes its citizens forget their troubles for a time it is accomplishing its work.

THE ONE-EYED CRITIC.

A gentleman with a black patch over his left eye and who, like Iago, is "nothing if not critical," does not join in praising the songstress, saying: "She does well enough for them as likes 'er, but hi don't. 'Er voice is fair, honly fair, and she can't 'andle it properly. Hit hall depends on the way a voice is 'andled. Now, you 'ad hought to 'ear Rose Nichols. There's a voice for you! And 'ow she can 'andle it! Is it hup? Hup she goes. Is it down? Down it goes, till you'd think she'd dropped it."
We express a polite regret at not having heard this vocal paragon, and he modestly continues:
"Hi'm a bit of a singer myself, but hi've just got hout the London 'Ospital, where hi've been for six weeks. Hi lost my heye, and since then when hi sing it makes my 'ead hache."
We had heard singing which affected the hearers that same way, but his case seemed a unique one, and changing the subject we asked him if the Palace had proved the benefit to the people its proprietors intended it to be. It was a pleasure to hear him answer heartily that it had, that it was steadily growing in favor, and was in every way a power for good. Nor was he the only one who bore willing testimony to its success. All with whom we spoke were instant in its praises.
"We 'ad the hold gell hout to hopen it for us," he said, with a backward nod in the direction of Her Majesty's statue.
"She's a pretty good queen, isn't she?" we ask. After a retrospective pause, which seems to take them all in from Boadicea down to Anne, he replies:
"We've 'ad wuss."
Leaving the Queen's Hall we enter a large temporary building, where is being held a representative exhibition of the industries and manufactures of East London, the exhibits being the work of the pupils of the technical schools of the Palace. It was an exhibition in itself. The skill displayed was remarkable, nor were there wanting evidences of a higher culture, for the paintings, water colors, etchings, brass work and other art and decorative exhibits showed no ordinary talent.

THE GYMNASIUM AND LIBRARY.

In the immense gymnasium the Palace Athletic Association were giving an exhibition to a large audience, while hundreds of men and boys were plunging through the waters of the swimming baths. The library and reading room had their full share of attendants, and the Technical school rooms were well filled with scholars. To give an idea of their scope, it may be mentioned that competent teachers instruct night classes of over 3,000 pupils in reading, writing, arithmetic, bookkeeping, French, German, elocution, civil service (covering the examinations in every branch), stenography, telegraphy, photography, land surveying, etching, wood carving, metallurgy, chemistry, upholstery, filing, fitting, turning, pattern making, molding and carpentering. For females there are classes in plain needlework, garment making, art needlework, dressmaking, millinery, cooking, ambulance, home nursing and hygiene, as well as the ordinary educational branches. There are also classes in vocal music, piano, violin and military band. The fees for instruction vary, running from 2 to 21 shillings a study for the three months' term. The average fee would be about 5 shillings, or $1.25. The classrooms are supplied with the most approved apparatus, the chemical laboratory and photographic rooms having most elaborate outfits. The instruction is mainly gratuitous, but for some of the higher branches paid teachers are employed. During each term some of the most distinguished men in London lecture on their specialties before the classes. In addition to these night classes, there is a course of day instruction which is largely attended.
But it must not be supposed that it is "all work and no play" at the People's Palace. There are amusements on every hand. The concerts in the Queen's hall, the gymnasium and the swimming baths have been spoken of, but these do not cover all the entertainments. There are shooting galleries, ball and bowling alleys, billiard rooms, flying horses, switchback railways, peep shows, punch and judy, tennis courts, and each has its crowd of attendants.

CLUBS GALORE.

There are the People's Palace Chess Club, Cricket Club, Choral Society, Volunteer Fire Brigade, Rambling Club, Military Band, Debating Society, Dramatic Society, Minstrel Troupe and Literary Society, the president of the latter being Walter Besant.
This is the People's Palace and its work.

[img][/img]

During the first year after its opening, over a million people availed themselves of its pleasures and privileges, and the attendance constantly increases. On the evening of our visit fully 5,000 people were present, and a more pleasant, cheerful, orderly gathering it was never our fortune to see. Cares seemed forgotten, troubles left behind, bickerings and jealousies and strifes ended for the nonce. All appeared bent on pleasure and improvement. Success to the People's Palace! It is an oasis in the desert of toil. It is a breathing place for those whose lives must be spent in pent-up tenement houses. It imparts new life and hope and spirit to hearts cast down with many cares. It eases the burdens on weary backs. "To it the lonely, the ignorant and the joyless may come and find delights beyond their hope."
As the student of the great labor question sees its towers rising from the ugliness of the "joyless city," a strong fortress against ignorance and vice and crime and degradation, and a beacon of promise to its toiling denizens, teaching them to live and not merely to exist, he takes heart and hope and cries out with Lowell:

"Surely the wiser time shall come
When this fine overplus of might,
No longer sullen, slow and dumb,
Shall leap to music and to light.

"In that new childhood of the world
Life of itself shall dance and play,
Fresh blood through Time's shrunk veins be hurled,
And labor meet delight half way.

HENRY HALL.

Source: The Pittsburg Dispatch, Sunday December 29, 1889

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Karen on Wed 7 Mar 2012 - 9:27

June 18, 1889

Wanted.

Wanted To Sell. Double-seated Buggy and strong Whitechapel Cart. Cheap. 163 Tuam street. 8940

Source: Press, Volume XLVI, Issue 7339, 18 June 1889, Page 1

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Missing Articles of 1889

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 2 of 2 Previous  1, 2

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum