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Alice Carroll

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Alice Carroll

Post by Karen on Fri 20 Jan 2012 - 0:16

THE DUBLIN CONSPIRACY.
THE ATTEMPT ON MR. FIELD.

A FENIAN BROTHERHOOD.

At the Kilmainham court-house, on Saturday, four of the 20 prisoners charged with conspiring to murder Government officials were placed in the dock, together with Miles Kavanagh, carman, charged with the attempted assassination of Mr. Field, the special juror. The four were Joseph Hanlon, Joseph Brady, Tim Kelly, and John Dwyer.
The first witness was a girl of about 16 named Alice Carroll. She said on the evening of Monday November 27, she was going down Hardwicke-place when her attention was directed to an outside car with three passengers and driver, which was going fast. It pulled up at the end of Hardwicke-street, and three persons - the prisoners Brady, Kelly, and another got off. These men went in the same direction with witness, and passed her. When she returned after a short delay in a shop on the opposite side, she saw them standing opposite Mr. Field's house. Mr. Field at the time was crossing the top of Hardwicke-street. As he stepped off the crossing to the path Brady attacked him either with a cane sword or dagger, she could not say which, but she saw something glittering in the light. When attacked he raised his umbrella to strike Brady. Brady caught Mr. Field under the arm, and struck him with the weapon about the face and neck. Mr. Field then fell. Kelly and another man were close by. The other man was not among the prisoners. Two men came along and picked Mr. Field up. When down he was stabbed in the back, she could not say whether by Brady or the other man. After the two strangers picked up Mr. Field, his assailants got on the car and drove away. She identified Kavanagh as the driver of the car. She had seen him standing all the time beside his car. - A severe cross-examination failed to shake the witness's evidence, which was given in a rather flippant manner.
A boy named Michael Farrell saw a car in Hardwicke-street about the time of the outrage, with three men on it, whom he did not identify. Kavanagh was the driver.
Mr. William Connelan, a clerk, came up just after the committal of the outrage, and saw a man coming away from the spot where Mr. Field lay, and get on to a car and ride away. That man was Timothy Kelly, and he had a bright weapon in his hand, partly concealed. Another man bigger than Kelly, also accompanied him.
James Egan saw a car drive away from the spot containing about four men. One of them lost his hat, which witness picked up and gave to the police.
All the other prisoners were then put in the dock together with the five charged with the attack on Mr. Field, and the charge of conspiracy was proceeded with. William Lamie, an "informer," was called. He said he joined the Fenian Brotherhood in 1867. He had a brother-in-law named Poole, who took him to meetings of the Irish brotherhood in Cuff-lane. Poole held the position of "C" under a "B" named McGarry. He knew Daniel Curley, but could not identify him as being in the dock. Poole fell out with Curley, and he and witness left the Cuff-street party and attended meetings at North Lotts, where James Burn was the "centre" and Poole was appointed "the B north centre." Burn was arrested, and George Ward was made "centre" in his place. He in his turn was arrested, and Poole became "centre." After the murder of a man named Kelly in Seville-place, Ward and Poole were arrested, and witness became "centre." He used to attend meetings at 51, York-street, where he met Michael Fagan, Sylvester Kingston, and Joseph Mullett. At a meeting in Aungier-street he met those three again, and also Pat Delaney, James Lee, Bob Farrell, and James Bolan. Mullett was in the chair. A "vigilance" was formed. Complaint was made of the conduct of Poole, and the chairman said the vigilance would attend to the matter. The members of the organisation used to pay "civil money," to defray expenses of the brotherhood and to buy arms. At a subsequent meeting Delaney's arrest was spoken of and also Mr. Mallon's endeavour to put them up for perjury, and it was mentioned that he must not have the chance, that was, that he must be assassinated. The vigilance was broken up and was afterwards reappointed. Each centre had to supply two men, and select them himself. Witness introduced Bolan and another man, who were sworn in. That was about a week before the Abbey-street affair.
Inspector Fogarty then gave evidence as to the seizure of arms in Brabazon-street in December, 1881, at the house of the prisoner Whelan. Whelan and Daniel Delaney attempted to keep out the police.
An adjournment then took place, counsel for the Crown stating that on the next hearing he hoped to connect some of the prisoners with the Phoenix Park murders.

STARTLING REVELATIONS.
ACTIVITY OF THE POLICE.

The Dublin correspondent of the Boston Herald says that Fitzpatrick, who was employed as secretary to the prisoner Mullett, is, he believes, in custody as an informer. There is a Fenian edict against Fitzpatrick's life, on suspicion of having betrayed the secrets of the organisation. The informer Farrell will be asked, on cross-examination, if he was present at the Tighe-street murder, and then if it was he who carried the body of Andrews who was there assassinated down into the street below, where it was deposited on the sidewalk. A person familiar with Delaney, the man who is supposed to be another informer, and who was sentenced to 10 years' imprisonment for attempting to shoot Judge Lawson, declares positively he has seen him in the street during the past week, having hair dyed, and otherwise disguised. It is also stated that an attempt will be made to identify the most prominent prisoner as the man who twice put his head in at the window of Lord F. Cavendish's carriage, and asked which of those occupants was the Chief Secretary. One other attempt to murder Mr. Forster has been described to the correspondent by a well-posted informant. Mr. Forster was driving home at midnight. His carriage went along the banks of the Liffey, where the wharf lies from whence Guinness's stout is shipped. One idle vessel contained a sentinel whose duty it was, on seeing a certain light further down the river, to pass on, and thus indicate the coming carriage. Just as the match ignited, a gust of wind blew it out, and while he was fumbling for another match the vehicle rushed by. This makes four separate attempts on Mr. Forster, this escape being the narrowest of all.

The Freeman's Journal of Saturday contained the following: The detective department is still keenly on the track, and they seem to lose no opportunity to further their case. Interrogating and watching those whom they suspect has been their daily, their hourly task, and they have managed to "pick up" a cab-man with a white horse whom, it would seem, they suspected of being none other than the driver, named Yoke, requisitioned on the occasion of the attempt to assassinate the ex-Chief Secretary, Mr. Forster, and alluded to in part of Robert Farrell's evidence. The driver is James Fitzharris, whose cab, drawn by a white horse, is owned by a man named Farrell. Fitzharris has been no fewer than six times "wanted" and found since the Phoenix Park murders, and he has been four or five times in what he terms the "Star Chamber of the Castle." Few cabmen are better known in the city than James Fitzharris. He passed by the cognomen of "Skin the Goat." When "Skin the Goat" was arrested he was driven by Detective-Sergeant Pitman to the Lower Castle Yard, where Mr. Mallins, chief of the Detective Department, entered the cab with the subordinate officer, and directed Fitzharris to drive to Kilmainham. On arriving at the county prison the cab was driven through the van entrance into a courtyard, where at the time stood another cab in charge of a boy (unknown to Fitzharris) and an outside car driven by a lad named Ned Ennis. The car and mare were the same as those driven by Mike Kavanagh, who was mentioned in Robert Farrell's testimony as having driven to Frederick-street on the night of the attempted murder on Mr. Field. The other personages in the courtyard were some detective officers, Alice Carroll, and a little boy, both said to be material witnesses. In a few minutes after Fitzharris had entered the courtyard, the informer Farrell emerged from the prison, and at once proceeded to have a really good look at the "Goat." He was accompanied in this by a tall, good-looking, fresh young fellow, whom Fitzharris did not know. Under the second cab in the yard Fitzharris states that he recognised an old hollow-packed mare that he used to drive some time ago. Robert Farrell was placed on the driver's seat, beside Fitzharris and the latter was told to drive round the yard. This he did several times, but Farrell, he says, seemed not to have ever seen him before. Alice Carroll and the little boy with what Fitzharris describes as "shuttyup eyes," also had an extra good look at the cab-driver during his rotations round the prescribed courtyard. This over, without any apparent result, Mike Kavanagh (arrested last Thursday week), was brought out of the prison and placed on the driver's seat of the outside car formerly driven by him. He, too, was directed to drive round the yard, which he did several times, Farrell, Miss Carroll and the "shutty up eye" boy all attentively engaged in watching him. He states he has reason to believe that Pat Delaney, convicted for the attempt on Mr. Justice Lawson, had a peep at him through the window.

Source: The Centaur, Saturday February 3, 1883

N.B. If the witness Alice Carroll was only 16 years of age in 1883, that would put her year of birth at 1867 which would be much too young for her to be Mary Jane Kelly.

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Re: Alice Carroll

Post by Karen on Fri 20 Jan 2012 - 1:32

IRISH REVELATIONS.

The important revelations which during the last three weeks have been gradually disclosed in the Court-house of Kilmainham have been deservedly followed with eager interest by the public attention. It has become clear that the Government are at last on the track of the secret organisation which has so long terrorised Ireland with impunity, and it seems probable that some at least of the actual perpetrators of the murders, which have roused so much horror and indignation, will be brought to justice. But it must not be forgotten that the inquiry is as yet only in its preliminary stage. The question at present is only that of committing for trial the twenty-two men who are in custody. Neither side is bound as yet to disclose its full case. The Crown may have much more to tell us than has yet appeared against the prisoners; and there may, on the other hand, be more to be said in defence of the prisoners or in distrust of the evidence against them than their counsel have yet thought necessary to allege. We are bound to reserve our judgment for the issue of the final trial, and to remember that we are still imperfectly acquainted with the evidence that may be produced on either side. But, meanwhile, it may be useful, and will certainly be interesting, to gather up the results of the examination, so far as it has already proceeded.
These results divide themselves into two distinct portions. They are partly general, and partly particular. They show, in the first place, the existence, and in some degree disclose the mode of action, of a secret society which plans and directs assassination; and, in the second place, they indicate the application of this method to certain particular cases.
The first part rests upon the evidence of Farrell and Lamie. If we may trust these witnesses, an elaborate machinery of assassination seems to have been developed out of the Fenian organisation. Both witnesses had been Fenians for many years, and both had been gradually drawn within the more esoteric lines of the conspiracy. According to their story, there exists within the Fenian lodges a body known as the Inner Circle. Its professed business is the assassination of Government officials. Great caution is shown in the selection of this terrible company. Each one of its members knows only two others, the one who introduces him, and the one whom he himself is allowed in turn to introduce. Apparently it is only from the former that he ordinarily receives his orders, though sometimes another authority may intervene. Curley, for instance, introduced Farrell, and commonly directed him where to go and what to do; but sometimes he received orders also from Mullett. Mullett acted in two capacities, both as a general Fenian "Centre" and as one of the "Inner Circle;" and for each of these offices he used, when he gave instructions in writing, fictitious names. For the former he signed as "Salmon," for the latter as "Fisher," the names, perhaps, indicating a transition from a passive to an active condition, from being one of the caught to one of the catchers. It is not quite clear whether the secret organisation described by Lamie is identical with this, or whether it is a subordinate branch directed to special objects. He has told us of a "Directory," which issues orders, and a "Vigilance Committee," whose business it is to see that these orders are executed. One of these Vigilance Committees, which was subsequently broken up, consisted of nine "centres," each of whom appointed two men selected from the rank and file, who were all sworn to obey the commands of the chairman. It acted under a directory, whose chairman was the same Joseph Mullett, who appears in Farrell's evidence as an authority of the Inner Circle. Whatever may be the precise relations of these various bodies to each other, it is evident that a secret conspiracy exists, pledged to carry out assassination on orders from its chiefs, the ramifications of which extend far and wide, and present an aspect as formidable and mysterious as was ever devised by the ingenious brain of a novelist.
But the evidence is not limited to the disclosure of the secret society. It goes on to connect it with three definite crimes; one happily frustrated, the second partially, and the third only too completely successful. These are an attempt on the life of Mr. Forster, of which nothing was generally known before, the assault on Mr. Field, one of the jury who condemned Michael Walsh, and - most important of all - the double murder in Phoenix Park, which electrified the world, on the 6th of last May. The plot against Mr. Forster seems to have miscarried only a day or two before he finally left Ireland and his post at the Castle. On a Monday morning late in March or early in April, Farrell received orders to stop the Chief Secretary's carriage "on the bridge," and was told that Kelly and Brady would "do the remainder." But Farrell was apparently not up to his work, and let the carriage pass without recognising it. Another appointment was made for the afternoon at the corner of John-street. This time the carriage was to be identified by being immediately preceded by a cab with a white horse. The cab with the white horse came by, but Mr. Forster had somehow got in front of it. Farrell got on the cab, joining Brady and Kelly, who were already there, and followed Mr. Forster's carriage, till it turned in safety into the Lord Lieutenant's lodge. Another appointment was then made by Curley for the following morning, but Farrell failed to keep it, and could tell no more of this matter.
He had not, however, yet parted company with the Inner Circle, for he was told off, on the night of the attack on Mr. Field, to stand at a certain point, revolver in hand, ready to shoot a policeman if he attempted to arrest any of the party. Mullett, Curley, Brady, Kelly, Hanlon and Kavanagh who drove the car are the parties implicated by him in this transaction. Farrell, however, had to leave before the time came for action. But his story is confirmed by the remarkable evidence of the girl, Alice Carroll, who actually witnessed the assault, and knew well by sight, though not by name, Brady and Kelly, and a third man not yet in custody.
Brady - if the evidence is to be believed - was concerned not only in these two attempts, but in the actual murder of Lord Frederick Cavendish and Mr. Burke in Phoenix Park. Here, however, he is associated with another set of names. Two brothers, James and Peter Carey, were concerned with a house in South Cumberland-street. A poor man, Fitzsimon, rented the top story of this house. Above his ceiling was a loft accessible only by a trap and a ladder. James Carey was in the habit of visiting this loft, bringing his ladder with him and taking it away again. Peter Carey did the same on one occasion, accompanied by his son and a stranger. Moved by curiosity or suspicion Fitzsimon in July last, piled a chair on a table and climbed up into the loft. There he found, hidden under some rubbish, a Winchester repeating rifle and two formidable knives, eleven inches long and keen as razors. They were produced in court and described by a medical witness as surgical knives used in excision of the hip joint or amputation of the thigh. The surgeons who had examined the bodies of the two victims deposed that the wounds and the cuts in the clothes were exactly such as might have been inflicted by knives like these. So far the evidence goes no further than to justify inquiry into the acts and motives of the Careys. They may fairly be called on to explain the meaning of their visits to the loft which contained these effective weapons. But others among the prisoners were connected with the murder by more direct testimony. Stephen Hands, walking through the Park with his wife, on the evening of the fatal 6th of May, saw eight men lying on their faces on the grass slope, four on each side of the road. One of the men, however, lying so close to the road that Mrs. Hands had to draw back her dress to avoid brushing his face, allowed his features to be seen, and both Hands and his wife identified him with Edward O'Brien, one of the prisoners in the dock. Both also saw Brady standing by a car in the road near the horse's head. Identification after a single chance meeting must always be a matter of some uncertainty, but both these men are described as having features not easily to be forgotten by any one who had once looked at them. Brady is a big man, with large jaw and reckless expression, while O'Brien is "a cadaverous-looking creature with sunken eyes and attenuated "visage," and a pallid complexion that presents a ghastly contrast with his black bushy hair and beard. In regard to one of them, the evidence of the Hands is corroborated by that of Godden, who saw a car driving rapidly past just after the murder, with Brady sitting on one side of it. Another witness, Powell, saw four men the same evening under a clump of trees, two of whom he identified as Brady and M'Caffrey.
The general impression that we derive from all this is that the Government have in their hands a clue which will enable them to unravel the formidable conspiracy, which has hitherto defeated the law, and to convict some at least of the agents who have been employed by it. For this result we cannot be too thankful. It means at least the possibility of the restoration of peace and order to the distracted island, and the establishment of the tranquility and security for life and property, under which alone the great remedial measures lately passed can have any chance of producing their intended effects. But we cannot help seeing that it is only the agents, and not the principals, who have yet been apprehended. The prisoners are all artisans and labourers - carpenters, bricklayers, stonecutters, with one or two clerks. These are not the men who are likely to have devised the elaborate organisations which we have described, or even to have arranged unprompted the details of the crimes in which they are supposed to have been concerned. But their apprehension may very well lead to further results. The Government have evidently several informers at command; and when once the fear of mutual treachery and a confidence in the power of the law to protect traitors from the vengeance of their companions have taken possession of the conspirators, we may hope that further disclosures will be made which will reveal the brains that have planned, as well as the hands that have carried out this atrocious system of organised murder.

Source: The Guardian, Wednesday February 7, 1883, Page 200

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Re: Alice Carroll

Post by Karen on Fri 20 Jan 2012 - 23:18

Ireland.

At a meeting of the Privy Council in Dublin on Saturday Sir Edward Sullivan, Master of the Rolls, was appointed Lord-Chancellor.
Mr. Edward M'Mahon, of Dublin, has, with Mr. Parnell's approval, come forward as the National candidate for Limerick. The Liberals have agreed to unite with the Conservatives in supporting Mr. James Spaight, the candidate of the latter party.
The Lord-Lieutenant has issued a circular defining the duties of the divisional magistrates, who are to supersede the special resident magistrates, and are to carry on in the main the system which was for the time administered by the latter in the disturbed districts. The new officials will have the direction of the police and military patrols, and a general supervision over the districts entrusted to them. The resident magistrates are to return to their ordinary judicial work, leaving the detection of crime to the police, though the divisional magistrate has authority to direct them to make investigations in special cases, as well as to attend places in which he may deem their presence to be desirable. The divisional magistrates will be stationed at Mullingar, Arklow, Waterford, and Cork. The special resident magistrates did their work well and effectively in times of the greatest difficulty; their is still work for their successors, and a prospect of more in the immediate future, if dangers which are threatening do not pass off. The murder of Sullivan, which we reported last week, has been followed by several minor agrarian crimes, and Mayo, Clare, and Limerick are again in such an unsatisfactory state that additional constabulary have been sent into certain districts in these counties. A correspondent of the Pall-Mall Gazette probably does not exaggerate when he says that the secret organisations in the worst districts in the west have not yet been really grappled with, and are but waiting for a chance to break out again.
The proclamation of a meeting of the National League, which was to have been held on Sunday last at Miltown Malbay, marks the quarter from which a new tide of lawlessness may be brought back over the country. We know something of the share that the Land League had in spreading agrarian crime; we can see from the speeches delivered even on Sunday last that the National League is substantially the old organisation risen up and endeavouring to go abroad under a new name. The question which the Executive have to consider is whether the old forces have lost their danger in what are in many respects new times. Ireland has reasons now to remain quiet that she had not three years ago; but agitation has become so much a national habit that a call to arms may renew the conflict that has so lately closed. Though the meeting in Clare was prohibited, the National League was allowed to assemble its followers in Carlow and at Bandon. At the latter place Mr. Sullivan, M.P., and Mr. T.P. O'Connor, M.P., denounced the Land Act, and urged Roman Catholics and Protestants to unite in shaking off the rule of England which had destroyed the "Manchester of Munster." At Tullow, in Carlow, Mr. Biggar, M.P., delivered a still more inflammatory speech. After bidding his hearers to put no trust in the promises of Mr. Chamberlain and Mr. Herbert Gladstone, he said no settlement of the land question was possible till the land was parcelled out at prairie value. As to outrages, of course he should have to speak against them; but at the same time, if a member of the League took land from which another had been evicted, he thought he ought to be asked to cease to be a member, and he thought that he was a man with whom he should not be inclined to associate. The proper way was to keep them outside in their social arrangements, and to some extent in their business arrangements. If a man offered a cow for sale in a fair, and that cow had been grazed on such a farm, he should not be inclined to have anything to do with the man. If those before him would impress such men with the conviction that they were not acting as their own friends, or as friends of the country, a deal of good might be done.
The Nationalists are about to hold a series of meetings in Ulster, where, in addition to the danger of spreading Nationalist aspirations and morals, there is every prospect of serious collisions with the Orangemen, who have put out notices calling on the members of their party to resist the invasion of their province by the Parnellites. At Dungannon, which is threatened with a League meeting on Thursday, the authorities have thought it necessary to apply for reinforcements of troops and constabulary.
As special anxiety is felt with regard to the proceedings of the League in the northern province, it is fortunate that the arrangements of the Lord-Lieutenant have at this time taken him to that part of the country, where he will be able personally to observe the course that affairs are taking. Lord and Lady Spencer will be present at the opening of the Portrush Electric Railway on Friday, and will return to Dublin on the following day.
The Invincible conspiracy is still brought before the public by one event and another. In addition to the approaching trial of O'Donnell, who is, so the Irishman says, to be defended at any cost, as the man who has committed the most popular murder since Head-constable Talbot was shot in Dublin, the names of Mr. Field and Alice Carroll recall the crimes of Carey and his fellows. Alice Carroll, it appears from the reports of the police-courts, is threatened by the roughs as an informer. Mr. Field's case is much more serious, his health and his business have been ruined, and though 3,000 pounds is due to him under an award as compensation, a committee, headed by Lord Ardilann, has decided that efforts must be made to give him immediate assistance.
The inquest on the bodies of Patrick Furlong and James Whelan, who were supposed to have been poisoned during harvesting in county Wexford, has been concluded. The medical evidence showed that the meat supplied to the deceased and the rest of the harvesters came from a heifer which had been affected with splenic fever, a poisonous disease, but not easily distinguishable from dry murrain, which is not regarded as unfitting the animal for human food.

Source: The Guardian, September 26, 1883, Page 1409

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Re: Alice Carroll

Post by Karen on Sat 21 Jan 2012 - 1:10

Ireland.

The defeat of the Government candidate at Mallow was not unexpected, but the manner of it was. Both sides were taken aback, on their own confession, by the result of the poll. Mr. O'Brien had stronger personal claims, he belonged to Mallow, while Mr. Naish was a stranger; he had all the orators and newspapers of the Irish National League to back him, while Mr. Naish's candidature was advocated by spirits less fiery, and of necessity constrained; still, though many of such minor causes no doubt contributed to the result, the main cause that carried the election was political - that is, opposition to the present method of governing Ireland and the present relation of the two kingdoms. The victorious party have made haste to attribute their success to hatred of the Prevention of Crimes Act. There is no question that it is, thanks to Lord Spencer, an operative act. The sight of men actually hung for agrarian murder, the taxing of districts to compensate the families of those who have been murdered, and the clear proof given in several proceedings that even Irishmen are not privileged to incite to sedition and crime, are all of them hateful to the political convictions, or projects, of the men who lead popular opinion out of Ulster. It seems that those who were once supporters of the Liberal party are being daily carried away into the ranks of the "Irreconcilables," and that the next general election is likely to add immensely to our difficulties in legislation and government. A great accession of numbers to Mr. Parnell's followers would be full of danger to party government. The effect of the election on the Liberal party is different at the two ends of the camp; at one we hear that it is a lesson to be firm now that we have been just, and at the other there is a demand that we should cease to try and punish wrong-doers, as we are not strong enough to do it - in fact, that the Prevention of Crimes Act should be abandoned. The constituency which for the moment occupies such a prominent place is in itself insignificant enough, numerically small, and representing only the interests of a country town. Of the 288 names on the register 161 were polled by Mr. O'Brien, Mr. Naish having only 89 supporters, including the bulk of the Conservatives. At the last election Mr. Johnson, the Liberal candidate, was elected against a Home Ruler by 201 votes against 72.
While the National League was carrying all before it at Mallow the Government was asserting itself in the Court of Queen's Bench in Dublin, where the three judges decided that the Attorney-General's application to have Messrs. Davitt, Healy, and Quinn bound over to be of good behaviour should be granted. The questions before the Court were -
(1) whether the jurisdiction alleged existed;
(2) whether it ought to be exercised against the defendants.
The Court answered both of these questions in the affirmative and unanimously. Agreement of opinion, especially on the first question, was very desirable. It was held that the Court of Queen's Bench had a common law jurisdiction which empowered it to bind over persons to be of good behaviour, as well as to keep the peace. The Court further found that the speeches of the three defendants, that had been given in evidence, amounted to incitement to sedition and crime, which, according to the text-books, was a proper cause for the exercise of the jurisdiction. Messrs. Davitt and Healy were ordered to enter into securities to keep the peace for twelve months, in the sum of 1,000 pounds each, and to find sureties in an equal sum. Quinn was bound over in half the amount. A week was to be given before the orders went out, to allow the defendant's time to decide whether they would find the money or undergo the alternative of six months' imprisonment as ordinary criminals.
The examination of the prisoners charged with conspiracy to murder Government officials and others was resumed on Saturday. The proceedings were moved to Kilmainham to avoid the necessity of carrying the prisoners through the city. The evidence offered on this occasion by the Crown was directed first to show that certain of the prisoners were concerned in the attack on Mr. Field, and afterwards to give further proof and particulars of the existence of the general conspiracy. The principal witness in the first matter was a girl, Alice Carroll, about seventeen years of age, who swore that she had seen the attack on Mr. Field, and identified three of the prisoners, whom she had previously known by sight, as having been concerned in it; one of them, Kavanagh, was, she said, the man who drove the car on which the attacking party escaped. An attempt was made in cross-examination to shake her testimony by impeaching her character; but though she admitted that she went occasionally to public-houses, she asserted that she did so only when sent there on errands from her home. She had, however, said nothing of what she now deposed to her parents, and had betrayed by inadvertence only the fact that she had any information to give. Her evidence was confirmed by a boy of fourteen, and a solicitor's clerk; the former identified Kavanagh as the driver of the car, the latter had seen Kelly with a weapon in his hand leaving the place where Mr. Field had fallen, and subsequently driving off, losing his hat (which another witness picked up) as he climbed on to the car. The evidence against the whole set of prisoners of being members of an assassination conspiracy was then continued by a man named Larnie, who said that he had been for many years a member of the Fenian Brotherhood, of which several of the prisoners were to his knowledge also members. He described the formation of vigilance committees on certain occasions, the object of the committee being, as he clearly understood, the assassination of some disobedient member of the society, or public servant, who had made himself obnoxious to the conspirators. After a police officer had deposed to finding twenty-two rifles, and other arms and ammunition, in the house of one of the prisoners, the case was further adjourned till Saturday next, when, as the Crown Prosecutor said, evidence would be produced throwing great light on the mystery of the Phoenix Park murders.
As Lord Spencer was riding through Dublin with an escort on Monday, two men in North Frederick-street were observed to suddenly make a movement, as if, as was supposed, to draw a revolver. A man who had been watching them drew to them the attention of a policeman, who arrested the suspected individuals. They refused to say who they were, but at Summer-hill police-station it was found that they were two of the Marines, and they were at once released.
Mr. Shaw and Colonel Colthurst, with several local members, took part in a conference of tenant-farmers, held at Belfast last week, to consider what amendments Parliament should be asked to make in the Land Act. Resolutions embodying several important amendments were carried. Colonel Colthurst, in speaking to the resolutions, said he should like to see a tenants' defence association started, and Mr. Shaw advised the farmers not to put all their trust in the Whigs, as the Conservative party might do even more for them. The next day there was a meeting of the Evicted Tenants' Fund in Cork, at which Mr. J. O'Brien referred to the speeches of Mr. Shaw and Colonel Colthurst. He twitted them with being afraid to address their own constituents in county Cork, with denouncing the Whigs, and yet holding aloof from popular movements, and he called upon the farmers to take steps to induce these members, who no longer represented them, to resign.
While the county constituency is denouncing its representatives, all parties in and about Cork are uniting to forward the proposed Industrial Exhibition, which is to be held in July next. Up to this time the project has been so favourably received that its promoters hope to have it supported not by the south alone, but by the whole kingdom.
An assault on an unpopular warder of the convicts at Spike Island threatened to develop into a general mutiny. The arrival of the military quelled the disturbance, fortunately before any lives were lost.
Much destruction has been caused in a valley between Castlerea and Ballinagar by a bog sliding down over the fields, and covering the road to a depth of 10 feet. One farmhouse is quite surrounded, and the family had to leave behind a cart in which they had put some of their furniture. The cause is believed to be defective drainage, the water having scarcely any outlet, and great quantities of bog are being carried toward Ballinasloe by the river.
Mr. Tuke makes a fresh appeal for subscriptions to his emigration fund, and gives the most satisfactory testimony to the success which has attended its work hitherto by giving numerous cases in which those who have emigrated have prospered so far as to be able to send substantial assistance to their relations at home.
The Chief Secretary, being exposed to a cross-fire from two "influential deputations" on the Sunday closing question, says that, as it is impossible to please both parties, he has arrived at the conclusion that the only thing to do is to do what is right. From the prominence he gave to compensation, it looks as if the interests of the public-house owners were about to be disturbed. The prospects of the Sunday Closing Bill are indeed hopeful, if, as Mr. Dickson says, three-fourths of the Irish members are ready to join him in supporting it.

Source: The Guardian, January 31, 1883, Page 161

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Re: Alice Carroll

Post by Karen on Wed 23 May 2012 - 12:42

THE GOVERNMENT REWARDS.

The following are some of the rewards which have been made in connection with the Phoenix Park murders and the successful investigation of the case: -

Robert Farrell.........................1000 pounds
Alice Carroll...........................500 pounds
Kavanagh (and pardon)...........500 pounds
Lamie...................................250 pounds
Smith....................................250 pounds
Noud.....................................10 pounds
Huxley....................................250 pounds
Emma Jones.............................100 pounds
Mottley (and passage paid)........250 pounds
Hand and Wife..........................300 pounds
Joe Hanlon................................50 pounds
Treynor.....................................20 pounds
M'Keown and M'Eneny (each) and passage paid...........60 pounds
Godden......................................250 pounds
Superintendent Mallon..................1000 pounds
Four members of his staff (each)....100 pounds

Source: Daily Telegraph, Issue 3789, 6 September 1883, Page 4

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Re: Alice Carroll

Post by Karen on Wed 23 May 2012 - 12:51

The following are the rewards which have been made in connection with the Phoenix Park murders and the successful investigation of the case: - Robert Farrell, 1000 pounds; Alice Carroll, 500 pounds; Kavanagh, 500 pounds and pardon; Lamie, 250 pounds; Smith, 250 pounds; Huxley, 250 pounds; Emma Jones, 100 pounds; Mossley, 250 pounds and passage paid; Hand and wife, 300 pounds; Joe Hanlon, 50 pounds; Treynor, 20 pounds; Noud, 10 pounds; M'Keown and M'Enerey, each 60 pounds and passage paid; Godden, 250 pounds; Superintendent Mallon, 1000 pounds, and four members of his staff 100 pounds each. It is stated that the Government have obtained some new information which will enable them to make a strong case for the extradition of Tynan and Walsh.

Source: Wanganui Herald, Volume XVII, Issue 5127, 1 August, 1883, Page 2

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Re: Alice Carroll

Post by Karen on Wed 23 May 2012 - 13:03

THE PHOENIX PARK MURDERS. - A Home paper says the following are the awards which have been made in connection with the Phoenix Park murders and the successful investigation of the case: - Robert Farrell, 1000 pounds; Alice Carroll, 500 pounds; Kavanagh, 500 pounds and a pardon; Laurie, 250 pounds; Smith, 250 pounds; Noud, 10 pounds; Huxley, 250 pounds; Emma Jones, 100 pounds; Mottley, 250 pounds and a passage paid; Hand and his wife, 300 pounds; Joe Hanlon, 50 pounds; Treynor, 20 pounds; McKeown and McInerney, each 60 pounds and passage paid; Godden, 250 pounds; Superintendent Mallon, 1000 pounds; and four members of his staff, 100 pounds each.

Source: Colonist, Volume XXVI, Issue 3712, 13 September 1883, Page 3

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Re: Alice Carroll

Post by Karen on Thu 24 May 2012 - 16:01

Law and Crime.
EXECUTION OF FAGAN.

The third execution in respect of the Phoenix Park murders took place at Kilmainham Jail last Monday morning, when Michael Fagan, blacksmith, aged twenty-four, was hanged in the presence of the prison officials and clergy. Death is stated to have been instantaneous, and the Coroner's jury which subsequently assembled had no hesitation in certifying that the sentence had been properly carried into effect.

REWARDS TO DUBLIN WITNESSES.

The Dublin Express says the witness Patrick Farrell, who first gave evidence in court as to the conspiracy to murder, though he knew nothing of the murders in the park, will receive 1000 pounds. The Lord Lieutenant has been, we believe, induced to deal more liberally with him because he voluntarily gave information before he was arrested, and put the police on the track of the conspirators.
Michael Kavanagh, the carman, will receive 250 pounds. He stood in a different position, having been one of the conspirators engaged in carrying out the plot. By turning approver he saved his life, and that was taken into account in measuring his reward. He and Farrell will leave the country.
The girl Alice Carroll will receive 500 pounds, and the money will be invested for her until she is of age.
The Careys will receive some portion of the reward, but as they were involved in the conspiracy, especially James Carey, they will not get a large sum.

THE GALWAY CONSPIRACY.

The twenty prisoners from county Galway charged with conspiracy to murder will be tried at Galway Assizes in July.

A SERIOUS RIOT

occurred at a fair held last Saturday at Moniven, county Galway. The police arrested the ringleaders, but they were rescued by the mob. Reinforcements having arrived, the police charged and dispersed the rioters and made several arrests. One civilian, it is feared, was mortally injured, and several policemen were seriously hurt.

ATTEMPTED MURDER NEAR KILLARNEY.

Joseph Sullivan, rent-warner and bog-ranger to the Earl of Kenmare, was fired at and wounded at noon last Sunday, about three miles from Killarney, whilst proceeding to mass. The shot lodged in the lower part of his body. The would-be assassin is reported to have been disguised, and to have fired from ambush.

Source: The Penny Illustrated Paper, Saturday June 2, 1883; Page 346; Issue 1144


Last edited by Karen on Thu 24 May 2012 - 19:51; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Alice Carroll

Post by Karen on Thu 24 May 2012 - 19:49

THE MURDER LEAGUE IN DUBLIN.

The examination of the Fenian conspirators was resumed last Saturday before Messrs. Keys, Q.C., and Woodlock, in the Court House of the County Prison at Kilmainham, an arrangement by which the authorities avoid the risk of conveying the prisoners at each hearing two miles through the city to the police-court. Mr. O'Donel, the chief police magistrate, sat as a spectator on the benches behind his colleagues, where were also Mr. Jenkinson, Chief of the Criminal Investigation Department; Colonel Bruce, Inspector-General of Constabulary; and Mr. Harrel, the new Chief of the Metropolitan Police. To the right were seated the Counsel for the Crown, Mr. Murphy, Q.C., and Mr. P. O'Brien, Q.C. and the Crown Solicitor, Mr. Bolton; and at a table to the left the counsel for the defence, Dr. Webb, Q.C. and Messrs. Adams, O'Byrne, and Killen. The gallery to the left above the jury-box was crowded with the friends and female relations of the prisoners. Five only, among whom was the carman Kavanagh, appeared in the dock at the opening of the proceedings, the charge in their case, as explained by Mr. Murphy, being no longer one of conspiracy to murder, but of actual attempt to murder Mr. Field. The first witness called was Alice Carroll, a good-looking, saucy girl of seventeen, who bandied retorts with the counsel with perfect self-possession, and unhesitatingly identified Brady and Kelly as two of Mr. Field's assailants, together with a third man not in the dock, and Kavanagh as the man who drove the car. "Joe Brady," whom she knew from having seen him at Mullett's shop in Dorset Street, where her people dealt, had been the first, she said, to stab Mr. Field, and when he was down he was stabbed again, but whether by Brady or Kelly she could not say. Michael Farrell, a lad, identified Kavanagh as the car-driver he had seen that evening in Hardwick Street waiting outside a public-house with Kelly and Brady; and Connolly, a solicitor's clerk, whom the cries of "Murder!" and "Police!" had attracted to the spot, deposed that he saw Kelly make his way through the crowd, and spring upon a car on which a stouter man was already seated, handing at the same time some weapon to the latter, who instantly covered it with his coat. As Kelly sprang he slipped and lost his hat; and a hat which no one in the crowd would claim was picked up, and identified in the Court by another witness, P. Egan, a provision dealer. When running after the car, Connolly had been stopped by a man who came before him, and inquired "What's up?" At this stage of the examination the other fifteen prisoners were marched into the dock, and evidence as to the nature of the organisation was given by an approver named W. Lamie, a brother-in-law of Joseph Poole, who had himself been appointed a centre when Poole was arrested on suspicion for the murder of Kenny in Seville Place. Joe Mullett, according to Lamie, was chairman of the Directory, and there was a "Vigilance Committee" composed of nine centres, each of whom named two men from the rank and file. The men thus nominated were sworn in before the chairman, and had thenceforth only to obey his orders. What they had to do "was understood." The members paid "civil money" for the general expenses and a penny a week "arms money." A further remand was granted till Saturday (this day), a wish at the same time being expressed both by the Bench and by the prisoners' counsel that the prosecution would soon be able to shorten the period of the remands; and bail was refused for one or two of the prisoners who were said to be simply members of the Fenian Brotherhood.

Source: The Graphic, Saturday February 3, 1883; Issue 688

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Re: Alice Carroll

Post by Karen on Fri 25 May 2012 - 14:50

EXECUTION OF TIM KELLY.

Timothy Kelly, one of the Phoenix Park assassins, was executed within the walls of Kilmainham Jail, Dublin, last Saturday. He made no statement. Kelly was the youngest of the band of murderers who assassinated Lord Frederick Cavendish and Mr. Burke, and his conviction was only obtained on the third trial. There was the usual assemblage outside the jail at the time of the execution, but no demonstration calling for the notice of the authorities. In all, six men were condemned to death for complicity in the crime of May 6, 1882; one was reprieved, and the execution of Kelly completes the hangman's part in the terrible drama - at all events, for the present.

THE PHOENIX PARK MURDERS.
GOVERNMENT REWARDS.

The following are the rewards which have been made in connection with the Phoenix Park murders and the successful investigation of the case: - Robert Farrell, 1000 pounds; Alice Carroll, 500 pounds; Kavanagh, 500 pounds and pardon; Lamie, 250 pounds; Smith, 250 pounds; Noud, 10 pounds; Huxley, 250 pounds; Emma Jones, 100 pounds; Mottley, 250 pounds, and passage paid; Hand and wife, 300 pounds; Joe Hanlon, 50 pounds; Treynor, 20 pounds; M'Keown and M'Enery, each 60 pounds, and passage paid; Godden, 250 pounds; Superintendent Mallon, 1000 pounds; and four members of his staff, 100 pounds each.

THE INFORMER CAREY.

At the Dublin Police Court on Tuesday three ejectments or summonses, issued in the name of the son of the informer, James Carey, were entered on the list. The defendant's are Carey's tenants, who since he became an informer, had stated their determination not to pay rent to him. None of the parties, however, appeared, and the cases fell through.

Source: The Penny Illustrated Paper, Saturday June 16, 1883; Page 379; Issue 1146

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Re: Alice Carroll

Post by Karen on Fri 25 May 2012 - 14:52

Thomas Caffrey, whose execution is fixed for Saturday, was visited on Wednesday by his mother and step-brother.
The friends of Timothy Kelly are making strenuous exertions to obtain signatures to a petition asking for a commutation of his sentence on the ground of the convict's extreme youth. Their efforts, however, have met with but small success.
The witnesses in the recent Phoenix-park trials are being rapidly sent out of the country. Mottley, the hatter, who identified Timothy Kelly, with Kavanagh, Neale, James Murray, Emma Jones, and the gardener Huxley have all left the country. Mottley received 200 pounds; Neale, 100 pounds; Murray, 100 pounds; and the two others considerable sums. The informers, Joseph Hanlon, Michael Kavanagh, and Joseph Smith, have also been settled with, and they left the country on Wednesday. The witness Farrell will receive 1000 pounds in consideration of the fact that he came forward to inform the authorities before he was arrested. Kavanagh, the carman, received 250 pounds. The girl Alice Kelly will receive 500 pounds. It will be invested for her until she comes of age. The two Careys will be rewarded by small sums, and the Government have also marked in a suitable manner their sense of the valuable services rendered by Mr. Mallon, Superintendent of the Detective Police.
Arthur Forrester, whose name was so prominently mentioned during Fagan's trial, has, it has now been ascertained, escaped to France.
The car on which the murderers were driven by Kavanagh has been returned to Madame Tussaud's, the proprietors of which have now also secured the mare, together with Kavanagh's clothes and the identical whip used by him on the occasion.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, June 3, 1883, Page 12

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Re: Alice Carroll

Post by Karen on Fri 5 Apr 2013 - 21:10

THE ARRESTS IN DUBLIN.
THE PHOENIX PARK MURDERS.

Saturday, the 10th, again saw the Courthouse at Kilmainham crowded to its utmost capacity, and hundreds who would gladly have submitted to any amount of crushing and squeezing even to get a glimpse of the prisoners were turned away from the doors. Rumours during the week that more revelations were to be made, raised public curiosity to an inordinate pitch, and before twelve o'clock every inch of room in the body of the court and galleries was filled,
and among the occupants of the latter were many ladies. Lord Carrington, Lord Bangor, the Hon. Mr. Montmorency, Colonel Bruce (Inspector-General of the Royal Irish Constabulary), Mr. Jenkinson (chief of the Irish Criminal Department), Colonel Carington, M.P., were among the auditors. Detectives and constables, some in uniform and some in plain clothes, maintained order, and also kept clear the way leading into the building from the crowds who literally
besieged its entrance.

The magistrates, Dr. Keys and Mr. Woodlock, took their seats at half-past twelve o'clock, when the following prisoners were placed in the dock: - Fitzharris, the carman recently arrested; Thomas Doyle, an artisan, arrested on the previous day; Patrick Delaney, undergoing penal servitude for the attack on Judge Lawson (he was placed outside the dock, in front of it); James Carey, T.C., 40; Lawrence Hanlon; Daniel Delaney, house carpenter, 37; Timothy Kelly, coachbuilder, 20;
James Mullett, publican, 30; Joseph Brady, stone cutter, 22; Joseph Mullett, clerk; Edward O'Brien, shoemaker; Michael Fagan, blacksmith.

The prisoners exchanged the usual greeting as they took their places in the dock, displaying all their former nonchalance and indifference of demeanour. Great sensation was produced in court when Michael Kavanagh - who last Monday stood in the dock - walked up the steps to the witness chair. The effect on the occupants of the dock was electrical. Every eye was riveted on him as he mounted the few steps leading to the chair on the witness table. Kavanagah looked neither to the right
or to the left. He hurriedly seized the Testament which the Clerk held out to him, and, having taken the oath, seated himself in the chair, turning sharply round, facing the Crown counsel.
Kavanagh is about 28 or 30 years of age, an intelligent-looking man, with black hair and small black beard. He was very pale, and as much as possible kept his face turned from the prisoners in the dock. Only on one occasion did they take any notice of him - namely, when Doyle met a statement of his with the exclamation, "That's a lie."

We take the following account of the day's proceedings from the Times of Monday: -

The first witness called was MICHAEL KAVANAGH, car owner, who deposed that on May 6 he was at the Phoenix-park. He was engaged at Wrenn's public-house in Dame-street, whence he drove first to Kelly's (another public-house) in Thomas-street, and thence to the Royal Oak, in Park-gate-street. His passengers were Joe Brady, Tim Kelly, and two others whose names he did not know, but whom he knew by appearance. "One of them," said he "is there," pointing to Patrick Delaney. "The other is not there."
He knew Brady and Kelly before. Entering the park by Island-bridge-gate, he drove straight along the Conyngham-road. He came round the road opposite the Viceregal-lodge, and turning to the left, wheeled round the Phoenix monument, coming back towards the main road to near the Gough monument. Nearly at the Gough statue the four men got down. One of them, he could not say which, on the journey said, "There was no sign of "Skin." He knew the man who went by that nickname; he was the owner of a cab. His
nickname was "Skin the Goat," and he was the prisoner Fitzharris. Witness saw this man approaching in an opposite direction. Witness's four passengers got down either then or immediately before. He stopped on the side of the road, with the horse's head towards Dublin. After some time he reversed the position, putting the back of the car towards Dublin. He was close to the path. The cab passed him and stopped a long way beyond him, facing to Dublin. On a seat beside the road he saw Pat Delaney sitting, and
on a seat opposite Mr. James Carey (whom he pointed out in the dock). Brady and the other two went along the road towards the Phoenix, telling him to wait there, as the other men (those on the seats, Delaney and Carey) might want him. He spoke to Delaney, and asked what mission they were on, and he replied, "Watching the Secretary." He did not know which Secretary. His mare was then feeding with a nose-bag, and he returned to her. A gentleman whom he did not know spoke to James Carey. After that Delaney told him
to look sharp, and he took the bag off the mare, and drove up the road towards where Brady and the others were. Carey and the other man sat on one side of the car. At that spot there were several men, among them Kelly. After he was told to look sharp he saw two gentlemen walking arm-in-arm on the left foot-way. One was a good deal taller than the other. One, the taller, was gray. He was inside, towards the grass. He soon passed them. The fourth man on the car was in the crowd with Brady and Kelly. When he came to the crowd
he pulled up and the two men (Carey and the other) got down. Some of the group said, "It was the tall man." Witness did not get down, but stayed on the side of his car. He was told to go up a little further, and he did so. He could not say which of the men said, "It was the tall man." Carey and the other man on his car were then on the ground with the others. As he was driving them to the group either Carey or the other man raised a white handkerchief. From the time he started with Carey and the other man he never got off. He
knew a carman named Nowd, who passed him while he was feeding the mare, driving towards town. He spoke to witness. He had one passenger, a Mr. Nolan, whom witness knew. He saw either two or three persons on bicycles coming from the Phoenix towards town. Just about that time he heard one of the gentlemen say, "Oh!" He looked round and saw the gray gentleman lying on the road. The other was standing with an umbrella in his hand in the road. He did not see him fall. The four men he had driven out then got on his car,
he taking the driver's seat. He drove down the Fifteen Acres as fast as he could drive. Brady sat on his right hand. He turned to the right outside the gate, and crossed the Liffey at a bridge of which he did not know the name. He took the first turn on the right after going out of the park gate, then turned to the left and crossed the bridge. He drove towards Inchicore by a route which he did not know, directed by Pat Delaney. The first place he knew was Roundtown. He did not stop there, but drove to where the Palmerston tram stops.
Tim Kelly got off there. He could not tell whether he said anything to the others. He drove on to a publichouse in Leeson-park, the first house to the left after crossing Leeson-bridge, where all got off. He had some drink. Brady then paid him 1 pound, and he drove home. At some part of the route which he did not know a carman belonging to Baggott-street stand passed him. Next day (Sunday) Brady came to him in Townsend-street and gave him 2 pounds. He afterwards bought witness some harness. After some time he got his car repainted, sending
the mare to grass. She was a brown mare. On the night of the 27th of November when Field was attacked, he was at the college. Brady engaged him there. They drove to Fleet-street. Another man got on the car with Brady. He was in the dock - the second man in the corner (Daniel Delaney). He then drove to Hardwicke-street, where they got down, and one (he could not say which) told him to wait there. He waited at the corner in Hardwicke-street, near Dorset-street. Tim Kelly and Hanlon were at Hardwicke-street. He had seen them previously on the quays
speaking to Brady and Delaney, and all had a drink together. He had seen Hanlon in the exercise yard of the gaol since. Asked to point him out in the dock, he said he could not; he was not there. Joe Brady and Tim Kelly returned after a short time and got up on the car, he sitting on the driver's seat, and told him to drive off quickly. Kelly had then no hat; Brady had one. Witness wore that day a white hat, which he changed with a man for a brown one. Kelly wore witness's hat part of the time. He drove past in the direction of Dorset-street, and heard
some parties roaring "Murder." Taking the first turn on the right, he drove towards Seville-place, under the bridge, out on the quays, and across the swivel-bridge. Thence he went to Moss-street, and lastly to a hatter's at the head of Townsend-street, where they both got off and went into the hatter's. Kelly came out with a hat on. They then drove to the gas works, where they threw into the basin the "swords, or whatever they were," they had. He and Brady previously wrapped them in a newspaper. Witness threw them in, throwing them nearly as far as he could.
Thence they drove to the corner of Hatch-street, where he got money. Before the 6th of May he had been once or twice in the park with the same four men on his car. On those occasions he entered the park by the front gate. Before that May he had been sworn a member of the society. With him there was a man named Tom Doyle. He identified Doyle, the latest captured prisoner in the dock. Next evening he was told by Doyle what he would have to do. (Doyle: That's a lie.) Doyle told him he would have to drive members of the society to boats or anywhere they wanted to go.
Before he was sworn in Doyle told him Kelly was in the society. Kelly afterwards swore him in. He was to pay 1d. or 2d. a week to the society. He knew James Mullett. Doyle told him Mullett and a lot of big people were attached to it. He first drove Kelly with Joe Brady. He then drove them to North Anne-street, thence to the corner of Capel-street, where two persons whose names he did not know got on the car. ("There is one - Pat Delaney.") The other was the strange man of the park. Next they drove to John-street - a street off Barrack-street. He remained there
about two hours and a half. The men were on the quay. When they came back he had a drink with them in a public-house at the corner, but did not remember the conversation. Brady always paid for the drink. He could not say how long before the 6th of May was his first drive to the park. He knew a constable named Guy, and met him in the park on that occasion when driving the four men. On the 6th of May he was about an hour in Wrenn's, in Dame-street. He crossed thence to the Munster Bank and saw the procession pass. In Dame-street he was speaking to a Mr. Motley, and aftewards
to Mr. Cummins. The four men who afterwards drove to the park were then at Wrenn's. They got up at Sycamore-alley. One (he could not say which) told him to pull over to the Munster Bank side. Thence they drove to the Royal Oak, in Barrack-street. On one occasion he drove on a Saturday with Joe Brady to near the convent in Baggot-street. This was before the attack on Mr. Field and after the park affair. He drove Joe Brady, Fagan, and a big man with gray whiskers. They got down and walked around the corner. They afterwards got on the car again, and drove to Bridge-street. There
one of them got down - Fagan. He drove thence to Portobello Hotel. They went there to get drink, but got none. Mr. Mullett gave him some in a black bottle. From Portobello he drove up the road from the tramway to Terenure. Mr. Mullett went away and came back again. He drove from Terenure to the corner just at York-street. There they got down and entered a house, but he did not see what house they went into. One of them came out to call him to the second publichouse in York-street. He got drunk and drove home. He drove Brady to Baggot-street on another occasion. It was after that
Sunday in the same week. He drove him to the same place and met Fitzharris there. He had a car with him. (The prisoner Fitzharris: You are a liar.) Timothy Kelly and the big man was there. He knew Joe Mullett and Daniel Curley, but was not sure whether he had seen them there. On that second occasion - that is, the one after the Sunday - he went into the first publichouse off the square, in Baggot-street. He was in that house more than once. Fitzharris brought him in the second time. He asked Fitzharris about his business and he said it was Judge Lawson.
Cross-examined by Dr. Webb, who desired that Daniel Curley might be placed in the dock - he turned informer on last Thursday. That was the first time he had any communication with anyone about giving information.
The prisoner Doyle declined to ask the witness any questions, as also did Patrick Delaney.
Cross-examined by Mr. Walsh: He was "fetched" to the Castle the Monday morning after the park occurrence, when he said he knew nothing about it. On a subsequent day - a "Baldoyle day" - he was again examined at the Castle. Since Christmas he was there again with his horse and car, and examined, but could not say how many times - not ten, but possibly four or five times, and each time he said he knew nothing. At the Castle he saw some of the witnesses examined here, and among them Alice Carroll. He was arrested two or three days after last examination, but didn't know how many weeks
he was in prison. He believed two Sundays had elapsed.
The prisoner Fitzharris declined to ask any questions.
Mr. Walsh: On your oath, did you state to anyone you were offered 500 pounds and your liberty? - I did not, on my oath.
By Dr. Webb: When I was identified at the Castle two other carmen were brought in with me. I knew one, named Smith, but not the other. The little girl Brophy was there, and identified Smith as the man who drove the car.
Re-examined by Mr. Murphy: At Hardwicke-street I stopped opposite the first house on the left hand side of the Dorset-street and Frederick-street corner. I don't recollect seeing Mary Brophy that night.

Mr. JOHN MOTTLEY, a hatter, deposed to seeing the last witness in Dame-street, after the Lord Lieutenant's procession passed on the 6th of May. He was at Wrenn's. He spoke to Kavanagh. There were then no persons on his car.
Mr. Cummins, a pawnbroker, also deposed to seeing Kavanagh in Dame-street on the 6th of May.
Both before and after this witness was examined, Dr. Webb objected to the relevancy of the evidence, contending that it was not admissible legally, and even, if admissible, was surplusage.
Mr. Murphy emphatically said they furnished important links in the chain of evidence, and that he would trace the progress of Kavanagh and his passengers step by step to the scene of the murder. This elicited a burst of applause, promptly checked by Dr. Keys saying if it were repeated he would declare the sitting private.

WILLIAM NOWD, 29, the carman referred to by Kavanagh in his deposition, corroborated his statement. Kavanagh halloed to him, otherwise he might have passed him by.

SAMUEL JOSEPH JACOB, a lad about 17 years of age, deposed that on the evening of the 6th May he was in the park, on the road near the Viceregal lodge, going from the Phoenix towards town. Where the Chapelizod road turns off from the main road he saw a group of men wrestling. At first they were all together in one group. Two of that group fell on the ground - one at a slight interval before the other. When he came up to the bodies, one was on the road, the other on the gravel pathway. When the two men fell he glanced away for a moment and saw some of the others get upon a car which was nearer
the Phoenix than the place of the struggle. He had not noticed this car before. After the men fell, one of the others, going from one body to the other, seemed to hit it. The others ran to the car and got upon it. He went from the one above the road to the other. He then ran to the car, got on it, and it drove away very fast along the Chapelizod-road. Witness saw no other outside car along that road. He counted either four or five besides the two who fell. There might have been more, and some might have passed out of his sight when he looked away. There was a clump of trees near the bodies. When he
approached the first body, which was entirely on the road, there was no sign of life in it. From his position, he saw blows given, but did not notice any knives. The second body, lying on the pathway, had a wound in the neck. The throat was cut. It was from that body the man went to the other body. Before he came up two men passed by, one in front of the other; both passed close to the bodies on the pathway opposite him. He saw the men on the car as they turned into the Chapelizod-road. Two young men on bicycles passed after he came up to the bodies; and about the same time a countrywoman (the Mrs. Sharpe
of the witness Hands) passed and spoke to him. The driver, when the man got up, was in the driving seat. The horse was dark-coloured. He could not recognise either the driver or the other men on the car. One of the men on the bicycles remained with witness; the other went to give an alarm.

The Court then adjourned to Thursday, an application by Dr. Webb that the adjournment should be de die in diem being for the present refused, but the Crown counsel promised that the proceedings should be expedited as much as possible.
There was no demonstration by the people outside as the prisoners were removed to the gaol.

Source: Aberystwyth Observer, 17 February 1883, Page 3

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Re: Alice Carroll

Post by Karen on Sun 7 Apr 2013 - 8:44

The "Dublin Express" says the witness Patrick Farrrell, who first gave evidence in court as to the conspiracy to murder, though he knew nothing of the murders in the park, will receive 1,000 pounds. The Lord-Lieutenant has been, we believe, induced to deal more liberally with him because he voluntarily gave information before he was arrested
and put the police on the track of the conspirators. Michael Kavanagh, the carman, will receive 250 pounds. He stood in a different position, having been one of the conspirators engaged in carrying out the plot. By turning approver he saved his life, and that was taken into account in measuring his reward. He and Farrell will leave the country.
The girl Alice Carroll will receive 500 pounds; the money will be invested for her until she is of age. The Careys will receive some portion of the reward, but as they were involved in the conspiracy, especially James Carey, they will not get a large sum.
Messrs. Healy and Davitt will be released this week from gaol.
Arthur Forrester, whose name was so prominently mentioned during Fagan's trial, has, it has now been ascertained, escaped to France.
Michael Ryan, a farmer, was brought up at Newry on Monday charged with having beaten another farmer with a stick in a fearful manner, fracturing his skull, and otherwise inflicting dreadful injuries upon him, so that he became paralysed, and lies in a hopeless condition. Ryan was remanded. The assault arose out of a dispute about land.

Source: Pebrokeshire Herald and General Advertiser, 1 June 1883, Page 4

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Re: Alice Carroll

Post by Karen on Sun 7 Apr 2013 - 8:46

THE IRISH CONSPIRACY.

At Dublin, on Saturday, the twenty prisoners who stand charged on remand with being members of an organisation established for the purpose of assassinating Government officials in Ireland were brought up for further examination in the County Court House, adjoining Kilmainham Gaol. When they were first charged they were examined at the Northern Divisional Police Court; but in consequence of the extreme
difficulty of conveying so many prisoners through the streets, and with a view of avoiding any demonstration, it was arranged that they should be on Monday arraigned in the court alongside the gaol, to which they could be brought without even coming to the view of the outside public.
The names and description of the prisoners charged are as follows: - James Carey, town councillor, builder, 19A, Denzille-street; Joseph Hanlon, carpenter, 29, Camden-street; Lawrence Hanlon, carpenter, 29, Camden-street; Peter Doyle, coach-builder, 14, Wexford-street; Thomas Martin, compositor, Fontenoy-street; Joseph Brady, stone-cutter, 22, Anne-street; Timothy Kelly, coachbuilder, Redmond-hill, John Dwyer, tailor,
6, Chatham-street; Henry Bowles, tailor, 11, Fishamble-street; Edward M'Caffrey, van-driver, 21, Peter-street; Joseph Mullett, clerk, 3, Temple-cottages; James Mullett, publican, 12 Lower Bridge-street; Peter Carey, mason, 7, South Gloucester-street; William Moroney, shoemaker, 19, Bride-street; Daniel Delaney, carpenter, Mount-street; Patrick Whelan, clerk, St. James's-terrace, Dolphin's Barn; George Smith, bricklayer,
living at the rear of Shelbourne-road; Edward O'Brien, shoemaker, Old Kilmainham; and Michael Fegan, blacksmith, residing off Buckingham-street. Dr. Keys was the presiding magistrate, with Mr. Woodlock and Mr. O'Donel, the chief police magistrate of the city. Mr. Murphy, Q.C., and Mr. P. O'Brien, Q.C., instructed by Mr. Bolton, Crown Solicitor, and Mr. S. Lee Anderson, appeared for the prosecution on behalf of the Crown;
whilst the prisoners were represented by Dr. Webb, Q.C., Mr. Richard Adams, and Mr. J. O'Bryne (for Timothy Kelly and Edward M'Caffrey), Mr. P. Keogh representing Patrick Whelan.
At half-past twelve Joseph Brady, Timothy Kelly, Michael Fegan, John Dwyer, and Joseph Hanlon were brought into court.
Mr. Murphy, Q.C., said the prisoners Joseph Brady, Timothy Kelly, John Dwyer, and Joseph Hanlon were the prisoners who were in the dock, and they were charged with having attempted to murder Dennis Field, on the 27th of November. The other prisoners would not yet be brought forward, though the evidence might refer to them. The charge was then entered as follows: - "That the prisoners did conspire with others to murder certain public
officials and others and in pursuance of the said conspiracy did, on the 27th of November, 1882, feloniously wound on Dennis J. Field, with intent to murder him."
Alice Carroll, a girl aged sixteen years, residing at 13, Lower Eccles-street, deposed that she recollected the 27th of November. I left my father's place at ten minutes past six o'clock. I went to No. 10, Gardiner's-place, and from that I came back to Wren's public-house, Dorset-street. When I came out I had a 5 pound note. I then came to Hardwicke-street, where I saw an outside car with three passengers and a driver. When I saw it first
the car was in motion and was going fast. It pulled up at the end of Hardwicke-street. I saw three persons get off the car. I knew two of them, but not their names. I used to see them at Jas. Mullett's, 4, Lower Dorset-street. I know the names of two of the prisoners, Joe Brady and Timothy Kelly. When the car stopped the two men got off, and passed me as I was going to Hutchinson's in Frederick-street. They passed me as I came back to Hardwicke-street.
I saw them following Mr. Field. As Mr. Field went over the crossing Joe Brady dug at him to assassinate him, with either a sword-cane or a dagger. I saw the weapon glitter in the light. When attacked Mr. Field was within a couple of doors of his own house. He raised his umbrella to strike Brady, who again struck him. When this happened two other men were near Brady. Timothy Kelly was one of them. I do not think he is in court. Brady stabbed Mr. Field two or three times.
After he had fallen he was again stabbed either by Joe Brady or Timothy Kelly. Brady and Kelly then ran and jumped on a car in Hardwicke-street, which drove away. One of the men lost his hat. I know the driver of the car; one of the prisoners, Kavanagh.

Joseph Conolly stated in examination: I reside at Willough Bank, Royal Canal. Frederick-street lies on my way home. I went through it on the evening of November 27. I had three persons in my company, and we kept on the right hand side. I heard shouts of "Murder" and "Police," and ran to where there were a lot of people at a lamp a little above Hardwicke-street. I saw a person in a sitting position, and a man standing behind him, who pushed through the crowd and passed me.
He had a bright instrument in his hand partly concealed under his coat. He went to a car in Hardwicke-street, threw the bright thing in and attempted to get up. In doing so he lost his hat. Another man in the car had something like a revolver in his hand. He wore an ordinary Jerry hat. The car went through Hardwicke-street round Baker's Corner, and down Dorset-street. I ran after it for about fifty yards, when a man in Hardwick-street put his hand on my shoulder and said "What is up?"
I recognised the man as Tom Kelly. I was not able to see the man who drove the car.
James Egan stated: I am a provision dealer, and reside at Phibsborough. I remember on the evening of the 27th of November going to Drumcondra from the Post-office by Hardwick-street. I reached Hardwick-street about six o'clock. When near Hardwick-street I heard cries of "Police" and "Murder." I ran in the direction, and saw a car in Hardwick-street with about four men on it. In Frederick-street I picked up a hat. (The hat was here produced and identified.)
At this stage of the proceedings the other prisoners were ushered into the dock under a heavy escort. A great sensation was caused as the witness Lamie got upon the table, as it was generally stated that he was an approver. The prisoners smiled and chatted to each other as they entered the jury box and took their seats.
Wm. Lamie, examined by Mr. Murphy, said: In the year 1867 I resided in Dublin. I joined the Fenian Brotherhood, or Irish Republic, and was sworn in a member of it. My brother-in-law, James Poole, took me to meetings at Cuffe-lane. Poole was a "C" under Jimmy Garrett. I know a man named Daniel Curley. I cannot see him in court. Brady and Billy Marony used to attend meetings at 10, Peter-street. I afterwards attended meetings at North Lotts. James Bryan was centre there. Poole was
"No. 1B" in sub-centre there. I cannot say when it was I went to North Lotts. I kept no dates. It was a short time before the murder in Skittle-alley. I mean the murder of Bailey. I know a man named Jim Byrne. He was the centre at North Lotts, and occupied that position when he was arrested. George Ward was made centre in his stead. I recollect hearing of the murdered man named Kenny, near Drogheda Station, Seville-place. Ward and Poole were arrested for the murder. I, after this, became centre.
I know a house at 51, York-street. It was kept by a man named Nugent. I attended a meeting on a Sunday there as district centre. The other men there were Michael Fagan, Joseph Mullett, and Sylvester Kingston. I knew Joseph Mullett before, but had never attended a meeting with him. I afterwards attended a meeting at 73, Aungier-street. Joseph Mullett, and Sylvester Kingston, Pat Delaney, James Lee, Bob Farrell, and James Bowlan were present. Joseph Mullett took the chair. There was a discussion over
Joe Poole and other parties, and it was arranged to appoint a vigilance, which is to execute anything required by the directory. Joseph Mullett was chairman of the directory. I was summoned to these meetings - privately and verbally. I was summoned by Sylvester Kingston, Joe Mullett, and made some observations about Poole. He said the matter would be dealt with when the Vigilance was formed. I used to pay money - "civil money" - to defray the expenses of the organisation, and also money, if we wanted to purchase
arms. I saw Mullett at the centres when the prisoners Joseph Mullett, Delaney and Bob Farrell were there. I gave Mullett 4s. "civil money," and got the receipt produced, "Salmon from Joe Mullett, Dec. 31, 1882." I afterwards saw him at Farrell's public-house in Capel-street. All except Farrell were present at the meeting. The conversation was about Delaney, who was brought up before Judge Lawson. It was said Superintendent Mallon would put them up for perjury and it was stated that he might not get the chance. By
that it was meant that he would be assassinated. (Laughter from the prisoners.) The prisoners cross-questioned the witness as to the exact words that were used. He said that the word assassination was not used; but it was said that a new Vigilance was appointed after the Abbey-street affairs, and was selected out of nine centres, and two men would be appointed from each. I attended the swearing in of the Vigilance, and introduced Hawkes and Devine. I am a tailor. I became a member of the Fenian Brotherhood in 1867.
Cross-examined by Mr. Keogh: I have been in England a good deal. A week ago I turned an informer. I have not found it a lucrative trade. I am a married man and have children. I informed the Crown I would give evidence about a week since. I turned informer to a policeman. I had no hope of a reward. I have never read of a reward being offered for information.
By Mr. Keogh: I am married to Poole's sister. I saw Poole a week ago in Kilmainham. It was after I saw him I turned informant. I did not expect any reward.
Mr. Keogh: And you do not expect any reward, you say? - I do not.
Do you think there is a man in this court that does not dub you a perjured liar when you say you do not expect a reward? Do you think anyone believes you?
Witness: I do not know.
Cross-examination continued: I never had any money from the Fenian organization.
Inspector Richard Fogharty, of the A Division, examined by Mr. Peter O'Brien: About eight o'clock one day in December, 1881, I went to a house in Brabazon-street with other constables. The house I went to belonged to the prisoner Whelan, with whom I had a conversation. I went upstairs afterwards, and found arms in two rooms. We were first prevented from going there by the prisoner Whelan and another man named Hanlon, whose name I have since discovered was also Whelan. The prisoner Patrick Whelan said to me when I was going
into the room, "What brought you here?" I replied that in consequence of what we heard we came to search for arms. He then commenced to call us "dirty Paddies," and that we were doing the Castle work. When we went in we pushed in the door of the top front room, and Patrick Whelan claimed the room as his. He said I ought to go and search Bailey's room first, and I did so. Daniel Whelan, another man, who I thought was a brother of Patrick Whelan, claimed another as his, and there we found a large quantity of arms, including 22 rifles
stitched in canvas bags. I also found some bayonets, a pike, some revolvers, cartridges, and about 100 bullets, and 1,000 rounds for the revolvers. I also found three flasks of powder and a box of books. I found a letter on Whelan, and on going to his address in Keppel-street discovered some arms.
Cross-examined by Mr. Keogh: Whelan was arrested, committed for trial, but discharged by the Crown, and afterwards arrested under the Coercion Act. The whole matter was gone into before Mr. Curren. I believe that at that time Whelan lived at Dolphin's Barn, and that although he claimed a room at Brabazon-street, he did not reside there.
The prisoners were then formally remanded till next week.

THE STATE OF IRELAND.

As the Lord Lieutenant, guarded by an escort of cavalry, was riding through the City on Monday afternoon, on his way to Phoenix Park, two men, who were standing on the footpath in North Frederick-street, through which his Excellency was passing, were observed to suddenly make a movement, as if, as was supposed to draw a revolver. A man who had been watching them at once communicated to a policeman his suspicion that the men intended assassinating his Excellency. The constable thereupon arrested the suspected individuals, who refused to say
who they were or to give any account of themselves. They were taken to Summer-hill Police-station, where it was found that instead of two assassins the police had arrested two of the Marines. They were, it is needless to say, at once released from custody.
Two birdcatchers discovered near Limerick on Monday, partially concealed in a ditch off the public road, the dead body of a man, whom the constabulary subsequently ascertained was one John Lilias, an agricultural labourer, who has been missing since Friday. The circumstances of the case, and especially the position in which the body was discovered, are considered suspicious. The County Coroner has been communicated with.
Mr. Clifford Lloyd, Special Stipendiary Magistrate, was summoned suddenly to Dublin on Monday for the purpose of conferring with the Lord Lieutenant with respect to the condition of his extensive district, which includes the counties Limerick, Clare, and Galway. A number of detectives guarded Mr. Lloyd at the Railway Station, and some escorted him to Dublin. It is said that the existence of an Assassination Club in Limerick has been discovered.
Several persons in the New Pallas district have refused to pay the Police Tax levied by order of the Lord Lieutenant. Proceedings have been taken for the recovery of the tax, which is of a very serious amount. Mr. Marshall Lloyd Apjolen, who is Boycotted, came into Court at New Pallas on Monday guarded by constables, armed with rifles and revolvers. He applied for 1,250 pounds as compensation for losses sustained by having his property maliciously injured.
Another man, named Raferty, has turned informer against the five men arrested for the murder of Doherty at Corigan, co. Galway. It is stated that several arrests will take place during the week for the double murder of Mr. Burke and Corporal Wallace at Castle.
A police patrol, near Mallow, have succeeded after an exciting chase, in capturing three moonlighters. The Prisoners, despite several attempts to deprive the constables of their rifles, were finally secured and lodged in a police hut. They were brought before the magistrates on Monday, and remanded to the Petty Sessions.

Source: Pembrokeshire Herald and General Advertiser, 2 February 1883, Page 4

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Re: Alice Carroll

Post by Karen on Mon 8 Apr 2013 - 10:03

THE PHOENIX PARK ASSASSINATIONS.
JAMES CAREY, T.C., TURNED APPROVER.

The recent proceedings at Kilmainham in connection with the magisterial inquiry into the Phoenix-park murders have been of the most startling kind, and the disclosures perhaps the most important, that have yet been made.
The initiated knew for certain that a new surprise was in store, and they knew the nature of the surprise. It had leaked out that Mr. James Carey, T.C., had become an approver, and that in fact he had separated his interests from
that of the men who up to then had been his fellow prisoners. Carey's behaviour in the dock had been such as to favour the belief that he would become approver, and it is an open secret that he offered his evidence to the Crown some time
before it was thought desirable to accept it. While his place was in the dock he kept himself, as far as possible, in the background, and as far as possible he kept aloof from his companions in guilt. When first the charge, then only of conspiracy
to murder, was made against him a few weeks ago, he muttered threats about an action for false imprisonment. Since then he has, on each occasion, displayed greater anxiety than any of the other men in the dock; indeed, having regard to his recent evidence,
some at least will be inclined to arrive at the conclusion that it was not on a sudden that he first contemplated the betrayal of his companions. According to his own statement he was but a supernumerary. The great head and director of the actual proceedings
in all the attempts to murder Mr. Forster, and in the actual assassination of Mr. Forster's successor and of Mr. Burke, was Daniel Curley. It is found that Daniel Curley takes an active part in the actual work of "removing" the Chief and Under-Secretaries while
the "supernumerary" looks on at a comparatively safe distance of 150 or 200 yards. Mr. Carey's very deliberate timing of all his movements on the 6th of May will hardly assist in freeing him from suspicions of this character. But the value of his evidence, corroborated
as it is in almost every particular by independent witnesses, will be but little affected by these circumstances. Nor would it be fair to lose sight of the position in which the evidence already given had placed him - that it placed his life in imminent jeopardy, and that, therefore,
it is not necessary to be searching for any motive more ignoble than a desire to secure his personal safety. His own view of his position, elicited by way of reply to an observation by Dr. Webb, counsel for some of the prisoners, is that he is no informer; that he never got anyone
arrested, and that he has gone into the witness-box to save innocent men. The prisoners, of course, took a very different view of the matter. They called him a perjured scoundrel, and at more than one stage of the proceedings they hissed him, and they were numerous enough - twenty-two in all -
to make the demonstration unmistakable - a demonstration which so far as a court of justice is concerned, is probably without precedent. The Court sat with unusual punctuality, and a statement made by Dr. Keys, Q.C. (who, with Mr. Woodlock, presided at the inquiry), and the subsequent explanations
of Crown Counsel, virtually exonerated everybody from blame for past want of punctuality. Counsel, it appears, had been waiting in court for the magistrates, while the magistrates had been waiting in their own room until the information should be conveyed to them that counsel were ready. Mr. O'Donnel,
as at the former sittings, sat beside his brother magistrates, but took no part in the proceedings; and Mr. J.A. Curran, Q.C., to whose energetic and skilful inquiries at the preliminary investigation in the Lower Castle-yard - "Star Chamber inquiry" was the phrase applied to it by those opposed to it -
the institution of the present proceedings and the success with which they have been attended is largely attributable, was present in court for the first time. The court was not so crowded as on former days. Among those present were Mr. Jenkinson, the Hon. Major Boyle, Mr. Courtenay Boyle, Private Secretary to
the Lord Lieutenant; Mr. Harrell, Chief Commissioner of Police; Dr. J.K. Ingram, F.T.C.D., Sir T.S. Forster, C.B.; Colonel Bruce, Inspector-General R.I.C.; Sub-Inspector Dunsterville; R.W. Holmes, Treasury Remembrancer; Major Gamble, &c. Alice Carroll, the young girl of 17, who was examined on a former day and
identified Joe Brady as having been present at the attack on Mr. Field, occupied a seat in one of the galleries beside a detective.
The entrance of the prisoners was watched with extraordinary interest, and as one after another, to the number of twenty-two, passed into the dock, their features were eagerly scanned.
Scarcely had the door of the crowded dock been closed, and scarcely had sufficient time elapsed to allow of anyone but those who were in the secret discovering who was absent, or whether there was any absentee, when James Carey, without being called, walked jauntily up on the witness table, and took his seat in the witness
chair. The prisoners, if not actually in the secret, seem to have been in expectation of this new phase of the case, for they manifested much less surprise than upon the occasion of the appearance of any of the approvers who came on the table at the previous sittings. Besides, they are probably becoming more or less resigned
to the prospect before them. Carey had scarcely answered half-a-dozen questions when Dr. Webb took occasion, as he had done over and over again in respect of the other approvers, to remind the Court that the law regarded the witness as an "infamous witness," to which Mr. Murphy retorted that there was bad language as well as
bad law to be found in law books. Carey took the matter coolly enough, and proceeded calmly and quietly to answer Mr. Murphy's questions. He did so in a very low voice, a matter which formed a frequent subject of complaint on the part of the prisoners' counsel, who somewhat unreasonably insisted that it was essential a
witness of this kind should "speak up," while Crown counsel just as unreasonably allowed the witness to proceed in a tone so low that it was with difficulty that even the magistrates, much less the prisoners' counsel, could hear him. As to the prisoners themselves, they could scarcely have heard a tithe of his evidence. James Carey,
according to his statement in the witness-box, has been for over twenty years connected with the Fenian Brotherhood. When, early in his statement, the well-known name of Thomas Brennan, formerly secretary of the Land League, was mentioned as having for a year or so been secretary of the Brotherhood, the interest of the audience
was aroused considerably; and when, later on, the name of Mr. P.J. Sheridan (Mr. Parnell's pacificator-general of Ireland) was introduced the interest became still more intense. Some other names, familiar to those who passed through the Fenian movement in 1867 and the subsequent amnesty movement, were also mentioned - notably those of
Thomas Brennan, James O'Connor, and John Nolan - the latter for years the most active spirit in the whole proceedings. The funds appear to have been always at a miserably low ebb, while the only organisation was the organisation of the Fenian Brotherhood - an organisation which, by all accounts yet given, did not while it was purely
Fenian take any cognisance of outsiders, and held "courts-martial" only on "informers." Indeed it is obvious from Mr. Carey's statement - and in this respect at all events it is confirmed by the evidence of the informers already examined - that the Brotherhood had but a precarious footing in the country, and was, in fact, on the verge of
extinction at the time that the "inner circle" or Assassination Society was formed. Up to November, 1881, when this "new departure" took place, the society does not appear to have been in receipt of any funds from outsiders, and to have been entirely dependent on the petty twopence a week received from the members. But from that time -
from the time that a "Mr. Walsh" came over (from the North of England, the witness believed), and proposed the formation of the new organisation which was to "make history," by "removing all the tyrants from the country," there was no lack of funds. Walsh handed over 50 sovs. on his very first visit, and subsequently large sums in notes
and gold were furnished, and Carey was told on one occasion by "No. 1," a gentleman who appeared a little later on the scene, that "there was no limit" to the funds, and he might have 1,000 pounds if he required it. Whatever amount of credence people may be inclined to give to the view which Carey and some of his associates took of the
matter - namely, that the funds came from the Land League - there will no doubt be a general concensus of opinion that there was no good reason why at that particular period the Fenian factions in America should have taken a sudden fit of generosity, and that the organisation which supplied the funds so lavishly, whatever may have been
its identity, was a home, and not a foreign organisation. The Inner Circle was duly formed in November, 1881, with Carey, Curley, James Mullett (publican), and Edward M'Caffrey as its leaders. They were furnished with two names that had been selected by the London "Heads" - Mr. Forster, who got precedence, and Earl Cowper, who was then
Lord Lieutenant. The "Irish Invincibles," as the new body was termed, lost no time in going to work, for in the first week of December, 1881, they were already out in the park endeavouring to "make the acquaintance" of Mr. Forster and of Mr. Burke, whose name they of their own notion added to the list of the doomed. It is, perhaps, a consolation
to learn upon such good authority that the total number of the "Irish Invincibles" in Dublin did not exceed about thirty, of whom something like five-sixths are now accounted for by the men in the dock and the men who have turned approvers. If Mr. Carey's identification is correct, he was introduced in the Angel Hotel to "Father Murphy," alias
Mr. P.J. Sheridan, of Tobercurry, at an interview at which "Mr. Walsh" and Daniel Curley were also present. At this interview Sheridan was disguised as a priest. Sheridan's movements at this time baffled the ingenuity of the detective police. He stated that he was going down to the country to establish a branch of the new organisation.
In the following February Sheridan, again disguised as a priest, met the witness and others in the Midland Hotel. They complained to him that arms which he had promised had not been sent, and he promised to remedy the complaint. He also suggested that Mr. Clifford Lloyd "and men like him" should be placed on the list for "removal." The arms were
shortly afterwards forthcoming. A woman, who Carey was told was the wife of Frank Byrne, the secretary of the Land Confederation of Great Britain, came to his house one morning at half-past eight o'clock, bringing with her a rifle (slung round her neck by a cord), two revolvers, and about six knives, together with 4,000 rounds of cartridges.
Ten days later she came again with a like consignment, save that there were on that occasion only four knives. He distributed the weapons, keeping one of the rifles for himself - the one that had been produced in court. The next person to come on the scene is a gentleman whose name the witness never ascertained, but whom he says he would know if he
saw him, and who signed himself "Number One." The witness then described the several attempts to assassinate, or rather the efforts made to get an opportunity of assassinating, Mr. Forster. His narrative in this respect was very much a repetition of that of the informer Farrel. On one of these occasions, when they were waiting for Mr. Forster in Brunswick-street,
the thoroughfare leading to Westland-row Station, there were ten of the "Invincibles on the spot armed with six or seven revolvers and some knives. On another occasion they watched for Mr. Forster's departure for four successive evenings. On the last of these nights, when Mr. Forster actually did leave Ireland, some of the party went up on the railway platform,
but Mr. Forster did not arrive in the carriage. There were only his wife and a young lady in it. Had he been in it, added the witness, "he would not be alive now." "Number One" told them that Mr. Forster would not return to Ireland, and as Lord Cowper had also gone they turned their attention to Mr. Burke. With this view they were in the park on the morning of the
5th of May expecting to meet him on his way into town, but they missed him. They were again in the park in the evening to the number of about twenty, and again they missed him. Next morning Carey came across a Mr. Burke, brother of the late Under-Secretary, and therefore "the wrong man," as the witness expressed it. Indeed Mr. Burke's appearance was not sufficiently
known to any but one of the gang - a man named Joe Smith, who worked in the Castle. Smith was got hold of in the afternoon of the 6th of May by Carey, and they, with Joe Hanlon, at 10 minutes to 5 o'clock left Parliament-street for the park, Smith, in Carey's opinion, not knowing what was about to occur, and knowing only as he believed that he was taken there
because he knew Mr. Burke's appearance. Carey and Smith sauntered about the Polo Ground looking at the polo match until Curley came up, and administered what may be taken as a reproof to them for their want of vigilance. The other men had arrived on the scene in the meantime, and had gone further on than where Carey and Smith were standing. Eventually Mr. Burke
and Lord F. Cavendish were seen approaching. Carey got on the car, gave the signal - the waving of his pocket-handkerchief - drove up to where Brady and the others were, and told him to mind that it was the man in the grey suit. Asked what he was to do with Smith, Brady replied, "Tell him to go to ______." And then Brady, having also added that he (Carey) was not
wanted there, the witness turned back towards the cab which was in waiting, and got into it; not, however, until he saw the two gentlemen meet their assailants, who, as a car had just passed, allowed them to pass through their ranks, but immediately doubled round on them. Looking back a second time he saw Brady put his left hand on Mr. Burke, and strike him down. That
was all he saw, he added; but in answer to counsel he proceeded to supplement his narrative by the narrative given to him the same night at nine o'clock by Daniel Curley and by the account given to him an hour later by Joe Brady. There is a grim humour almost in Brady's "annoyance and excitement" when he found that Lord F. Cavendish did not run away, but when Mr. Burke
was attacked, turned round and struck Brady with his umbrella, exclaiming, "You ruffian!" and there is a ghastly horror about his going over, "after he had settled" Lord Frederick Cavendish, to Mr. Burke (whom Tim Kelly had been "settling" in the meantime), and cutting the deceased gentlemen's throat. On the following evening (Sunday) Joe Brady, in the presence of Carey,
"No. 1," and Curley gave a complete history of the affair in McCaffrey's house. At a subsequent "meeting" the knives were produced, and it was proposed to destroy them, but the witness "thought bad of destroying them," as he "wanted to send them to the exhibition." Carey, it should be added, had been rather an active member of the Irish Home Manufacture Association, who
claimed to have been the principal agency in the promotion of the exhibition. At one of the meetings of that association, when it was proposed to pass a resolution condemning the Phoenix-park murders, Carey, who was in the chair, said they should condemn outrages and suggested the passing of a resolution to that effect - a resolution which was understood to be adopted although
at a subsequent meeting the fact was questioned.
The following day's proceedings, as was well understood beforehand, were really the "fag end" of the preliminary investigation. The case for the prosecution had practically closed, and the opinion was against the supposition that Mr. J.J. Walsh, solicitor, who appears for Timothy Kelly and Edward M'Caffrey would "rush in" where Dr. Webb had "feared to tread." The Court sat punctually
at twelve, and Crown counsel followed immediately. A few minutes later the prisoners who had before been in the dock with the exception of Joe Smith, whose absence was subsequently accounted for, took their places in the dock, and when dock and gaolers' seats were all filled the men had scarcely space to move their elbows. Carey's entrance was the signal for sustained hissing on the part
of the prisoners - a demonstration which induced Mr. Murphy to ask that order should be preserved in the dock as well as in the other parts of court-house, and to add that if this were not done he would make "such application as he might think necessary," as definite a threat probably as the learned gentleman could well put forward under the circumstances. It appears that Carey, before entering
the court-house this morning, expressed his unwillingness to pass in front of the dock on his way to the witness-table - the ordinary and direct route. Mr. Harrell, Chief Commissioner of Police, told him he would have ample protection, and, accordingly, a line of policemen was drawn up in front of the dock as a guard. At the close of the cross-examination Carey walked across the table away
from the dock, and in the direction of the bench, and, leaping a barrier, made his way out without approaching the place where those of whom he was lately a fellow-prisoner were confined. He did not escape, however, without a shower of observations from the occupants of the dock. "Leave us a lock of your hair," said one; "What about your cocked hat?" said another; and "Oh; come this way way," said
a third. Carey answered only the last observation with "There is no necessity." His signature to his deposition drew from one of the prisoners "Don't put T.C. (Town Councillor) to that."
Mr. Walsh, though he persisted in his determination to cross-examine Carey, showed, it must be admitted, some discretion in the line which he took. He confined himself chiefly to Carey's motives in joining the Fenian organisation and to his sincerity, with the obvious object of implying that the motives of the prisoners in the dock in joining it might, by implication at least, be regarded as equally
honourable; and his suggestion at a meeting of the Irish Home Manufacture Association that a resolution should be passed condemning outrages was also the subject of a few questions, the result of which was to elicit from Carey that he sent in his resignation as a member of the "Invincibles" in June last, and that his resignation was accepted, but was not "fully confirmed." Carey, in re-examination by Mr.
Murphy, said that the assassination of Mr. Burke was resolved on on the 3rd of May. They got the order on that day, and he (Carey) had just before read in the Freeman's Journal on the 2nd of May that all the castle officials should be removed. The witness, in giving this piece of evidence, produced a newspaper, and appeared to be reading from it. The reading over of Carey's evidence occupied an hour and three-quarters.
When Carey had finally disappeared, in the manner already described, another witness, much to the surprise of the Court, took his place on the table. It was soon apparent that he was what is called an independent witness. His evidence was merely an identification of Fitzharris as having been in charge of a cab shortly after seven o'clock on the evening of the murders. When the witness turned round to identify
Fitzharris and pointed him out as "the man with the blue muffler in the third row" in the dock, Thomas Caffrey, who was standing in the front row, and who also wore a blue muffler of a very much more decided hue, opened his coat and ostentatiously displayed the muffler. The feature of Mr. Murphy's brief speech in asking that the prisoners be committed for trial was an expression of regret on the part of the Crown that
they had felt coerced in the interest of the public safety to accept the evidence of any accomplice in the crime. Dr. Webb's reply, scarcely less brief, touched only on two points - one, that the law regards an informer as an infamous witness, and one more pertinent to the stage in which the case was - namely, an appeal to the press to abstain from comment while the trials were pending. The precautions taken in the
neighbourhood of the court-house were on a much more elaborate scale than on the former days. The guard was doubled, and there was a large number of police in and around the court-house. At the time the prisoners were conveyed from the court-house to the gaol, after the proceedings were closed, a line of police was drawn across the open yard, so as to conceal the prisoners from the view of the public assembled outside.
Following hard on the above astounding revelations, the sitting of the court took place the succeeding day, and a few minutes before three o'clock in the afternoon the twenty-two men, who for such a long time have been so prominently brought before the notice of the public, were committed to take their trial, twenty-one of them on the charge of murder and conspiracy to murder, and one on the minor charge of treason-felony.
The proceedings presented no special feature of interest, it being necessary only to carry out the formal matter of reading over the depositions in the presence of the whole of the prisoners included in the indictment. The doors of the court were opened an hour earlier than had hitherto been the rule, and there was no crush, for it was known that the special passes which were granted on former occasions would not again be issued.
Notwithstanding this fact, however, the outside of the courthouse and gaol was patrolled by a very strong body of Marines, who walked about without uniforms, just like members of the ordinary public, and in addition there were the usual guards of soldiery and constabulary. Beyond those having business, there were scarcely more than a dozen spectators inside the court, and throughout the day this number was barely exceeded, except when
the relatives of the accused were allowed to enter. A few minutes after eleven o'clock Dr. Keys, Q.C., and Mr. Woodlock took their seats on the Bench, having been preceded by a few minutes by the counsel engaged in the case. The first thing done was in reference to the case of Whelan. It will be remembered that Mr. Murphy, on behalf of the Crown, promised that this prisoner would not be charged with taking part in the conspiracy, but merely
with treason-felony, and that reasonable bail for his appearance would be accepted. The presiding magistrate now pointed out a difficulty in the matter, by stating that in cases of treason-felony bail could not be given except by special license of the Lord Lieutenant or the Chief Secretary. The counsel for the defence having expressed a hope that their worships would send specially to the castle, in order to obtain the necessary document,
it was agreed that this should be done, and later on in the day the requisite authority came to hand. At ten minutes past eleven o'clock the twenty-two prisoners were brought into court and placed in the dock. Mr. Beard, the magistrates' clerk, then commenced reading the depositions, in the performance of which duty he was occasionally relieved by another gentleman. The prisoners throughout the whole of the reading almost continuously conversed
one with the other. At times there was a good deal of smiling, but on the whole the accused were much quieter in their demeanour than before. Brady had taken again to his overcoat, but there was no change in the attire of the others. Fitzharris was the man who appeared to be the most cheerful, there scarcely being a moment when his face was without smiles, except at one period, when he became very angry. Two or three officers sauntered
into the gallery, and one of their number was pointing out the prisoners to his friends, when "Skin the Goat" suddenly called out in a loud, sharp tone, "What are you pointing about?" This, however, was the only incident during the morning, and several of the privileged ones who had been allowed to come into the court got so tired of the monotonous repetition of what had already been published that they rose and went away.
Between one and two o'clock Mr. Byrne asked the magistrates to allow some of the relatives of the prisoners to go into the galleries, this being the last day of the preliminary inquiry. Dr. Keys at once accorded the necessary permission, and immediately thereafter the gallery at the back of the court was occupied by some dozen or so of women, several children, and one old man, all of them being connected in one relationship or another to one
or other of the prisoners. Upon gaining admission these people waved and kissed their hands to their friends below, and they in turn warmly acknowledged the greetings. Nothing else of an exceptional character now occurred until the prisoners were committed for trial. Upon being asked if they had anything to say, each replied "No." Before leaving the dock, they all shook hands with Whelan and with each other, and then, waving and kissing their hands
to their relatives in the gallery, they were conducted back to the gaol. It may be added that, unless a special commission is held in the interval, the prisoners will be tried at the April Commission. In the meantime the Crown witnesses are kept at Rosemount, close to the prison, and the house is carefully guarded by police. The approvers, for safety, are kept in the prison.

STATEMENT BY MRS. BYRNE.

To the special correspondent of the Cental News Mrs. Frank Byrne, on her arrival at the house of her father-in-law after her release, made the following statement:
"I was not at all surprised at my arrest after what I had seen in the papers, but I was not in the least upset, for I was confident that I could thoroughly establish my innocence. I felt also that Casey or Carey, or whatever his name is, would have to swear very hard in order to prove that he knew me. Those who arrested me - there were about six of them either in or about the house - were exceedingly kind. The incident created great sensation in the neighbourhood
where I live, and, notwithstanding that everything was done very quietly, a good many people must have seen the detectives prizing desks and examining papers in the bay windows of our house. I was treated also very kindly while at King-street, London, where I stayed all night. In fact Mr. Sheridan, of the Dublin police, and the English detectives treated me with every consideration. Arriving in Dublin I was taken to Exchange Court, and sat for a long time in the
inspectors' mess room, from the windows of which I could see everybody who came or drove into the court. I saw a cab drive up shortly after noon, and a woman got out of it, accompanied by detectives, and shortly after this I was asked to go into the outer office because I was supposed the inspectors were going to have their dinner. As I passed into the police office I saw the same woman whom I had seen getting out of the cab, and whom I believe to be Mrs. James Carey.
I did not take much notice of her, but I heard some whispering, and I heard the words "That is not the woman." Some time afterwards I was conducted to a cab and driven to Kilmainham Gaol by the English detective and Mr. Sheridan, of the Dublin police, who had brought me from England. I may say that when we left Euston there was not much notice taken of me, but on the journey it seemed to get known that I was in the train. Arriving at Kilmainham, I was taken to a small room,
and after I had been there some time a man dressed in a light tweed suit, whom I believe to be James Carey, was brought in by a prison official. He came in sideways, so to speak, and did not seem to look at me very much, and I did not take much notice of him. After that I was taken back to the castle, and there told I was to be released. Mr. Sheridan next took me to the Clarendon Hotel, and I waited there for a considerable time while the papers and documents which were seized
at my husband's house were fetched and returned to me. In the meantime the police had kindly sent for a friend of mine, with whom I came to Irishtown to my father-in-law. I believe all the papers taken from my husband's house have been returned to me, but I shall know better when I return to London whether anything is missing. All my expenses have been paid by the police, and Mr. Mallon gave me 7 pounds in order to defray my expenses back to London. I have received every consideration
at the hands of the police, and I have not been in the least degree disturbed by my arrest, because I was so conscious of my ability to disprove the calumnies spoken by the informer. I propose to return home tomorrow night, as I am anxious with regard to my sister and my children." During the narrative Mrs. Byrne wept slightly, but she remarked that these were the first tears she had shed since her arrest.

LADY FREDERICK CAVENDISH ON THE DUBLIN DISCLOSURES.

A letter from Lady Frederick Cavendish has been read at a meeting of the Skipton Liberal Association. It was written in answer to a request of the Rev. S. Lloyd, who had asked permission to dedicate to her a sermon upon the assassination of the late Chief Secretary. Lady Frederick Cavendish says: "The Dublin disclosures do indeed teach the awful lesson contained in the last verse of the third chapter of II. Samuel. You will, I am sure, forgive me if I beg you, before sending the MS. to the printers,
to look through it first, with the special view of seeing if there is any word that could be turned into a desire for vengeance. You will readily understand how I must shrink from any such feeling. I would rather, as far as I reverently may, adopt the Lord's Prayer on the Cross - "Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do." The law, I know, must take its course, for the sake of the unhappy country itself. I pray that neither the unspeakable greatness of my sorrow nor the terrible wickedness
of those men may ever blind either myself or any of the English people to the duty of patience, justice, and sympathy in our thoughts, words, and deeds with regard to Ireland and its people at large.
- Believe me, dear sir, yours truly, - LUCY CAROLINE CAVENDISH.
P.S. - I cannot say how deeply I feel at the kind sympathy shown me, most especially by Lord Frederick's constituents."

THE SEARCH FOR "NO. 1."

Notwithstanding several statements to the effect that the authorities have discovered the identity of "Number One," it is believed that the inquiries now being pursued have not yet resulted in anything sufficiently important to lead to hopes of his immediate arrest. There is no doubt that he is not now in the United Kingdom, and it is likely the Government will have to accept the evidence of persons in England against whom warrants have been issued to gain information regarding his name and whereabouts.
A growing opinion in Dublin is that the convict Walsh, who kept the Fenian arsenal at Clerkenwell, was in close connection with "Number One," and it may be from that quarter the much-desired solution of the mystery will come. Additional detectives from the Dublin Metropolitan Police Force have reached London, and the arrival platforms at Euston Station are being closely watched by detective constables.

Source: County Observer and Monmouthshire Central Advertiser, 24 February 1883, Page 6

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