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William Henry Hurlbert

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Re: William Henry Hurlbert

Post by Karen on Sat 26 Nov 2011 - 12:40

THEY WANT HURLBERT.
British Authorities Apply for the Editor's Extradition.

PERJURY AND YET WORSE.
Positive Evidence, It Is Said, That He Is the Mysterious Wilfred Murray of the Gladys Evelyn Case - Graver Charges Broadly Hinted At.

NEW YORK, Dec. 11. - The World's London dispatch says that Detective Baker, of Scotland Yard, is now in New York seeking to arrest William Henry Hurlbert, the well known writer and editor, on a charge of perjury, alleged to have been committed during the trial of the suit for seduction brought against him by Gladys Evelyn.
This famous case has now assumed a phase which brings it into the sphere of diplomacy. The British under secretary of state for foreign affairs maintained that if ever a man deserved prosecution for perjury that man was William Henry Hurlbert, and called the attention of the foreign office to the fact that by the extradition convention signed in Washington on July 12, 1889, perjury or subordination of perjury was among the crimes included in extraditable offences as between Great Britain and the United States. It was finally decided by the foreign office that demand should be made upon Secretary Blaine for the surrender of Mr. Hurlbert, and Scotland Yard dispatched Detective Baker to New York to shadow Hurlbert and nab him when everything was ready.

Is Hurlbert Wilfred Murray?

Little can be learned as yet about the details of the evidence on which the British public prosecutor bases such extreme proceedings, but on the highest authority that it is so complete as to amply justify them. Three women have come forward who assert that they have had intimate relations with a gentleman who gave his name as Wilfred Murray. Each of these women has produced written documents purporting to come from Wilfred Murray, but which the Scotland Yard officials claim they can prove were written by Mr. Hurlbert and which no ingenuity on his part will enable him to wriggle out of.
These letters have been compared by the best experts on handwriting in England with the indecent letters sent to Gladys Evelyn, and also with other letters known to have been in Mr. Hurlbert's handwriting and addressed to some of the leading men in England. The experts are unanimous that the writing is by the same person. These three women and their companions also recognize Mr. Hurlbert's photograph as that of the man with whom they have carried on intrigues. Another important fact is that in two of these cases Mr. Hurlbert passed himself off as Wilfred Murray.

Some Grave Charges.

Further charges have been made against Mr. Hurlbert of a nature too grave for publication, but for the present the public prosecutor is confining his case to the charge of willful and corrupt perjury, believing that charge ample to insure Mr. Hurlbert's extradition.
Reliable reports say that the leaders of the Liberal Unionist party are especially bitter against Mr. Hurlbert since his exposure in court and the subsequent investigations. His book called "Ireland Under Coercion" had made him a champion among Mr. Chamberlain's followers, and they backed him financially.
Mr. Hurlbert endeavored to make himself indispensable to Lord Hartington, Lord Stalbridge (who is a brother of the Duke of Westminster and also a former whip of the Liberal party) and Lord Wolmer. He lauded them pretty heavily when he wrote his book on Ireland, but did a still smarter thing when he induced them and other leading members of their party to buy for him on trust a large number of shares of a well known news agency in London, which he pledged to utilize in the Liberal Unionist cause.

Prominent Men Implicated.

Mr. Hurlbert secured the chairmanship of this news agency at a salary of 8,000 pounds a year, though he took no active part in its management. In fact, it was through his connection with this news agency that Mr. Hurlbert's London address was traced by Gladys Evelyn and at least one other woman, who believed she had claims against him.
Among other prominent men who will be associated with Mr. Hurlbert if his business transactions are dragged into court is the Comte de Paris, who financed the publication of Mr. Hurlbert's recent book urging the abolition of the French republic and the restoration of the monarchy.
It is impossible yet to predict what revelations will be forthcoming or how many prominent people will be implicated if Mr. Hurlbert is ever again brought to justice in an English court, but this much remains certain - the public prosecutor will get him if he can.

Hurlbert Has Disappeared.

On inquiry at the Lennox hotel in New York it is learned that Mr. and Mrs. Hurlbert left that place of residence about two weeks ago and gave no direction for the forwarding of their mail. So many letters have since arrived for Mr. Hurlbert that it has been necessary to send them to the dead letter office.

Source: The Ogdensburg Journal, Saturday December 12, 1891

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Re: William Henry Hurlbert

Post by Karen on Sat 26 Nov 2011 - 12:45

HURLBERT IN A MONASTERY.
Received as a Redemptorist Lay Brother in Rome, It Is Said.

LONDON, May 26. - A London paper - The Morning - publishes a surprising story about Mr. William Henry Hurlbert.
It says that Mr. Hurlbert has been received as a lay brother in a Redemptorist monastery in Rome.
The paper also says that he will not be admitted to the priesthood.
The police are inclined to the opinion that Hurlbert is in Mexico or South America. If he can be found in Italy measures will be taken for his extradition.

Source: The Ogdensburg Journal, Friday May 27, 1892

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Re: William Henry Hurlbert

Post by Karen on Mon 28 Nov 2011 - 9:20

It would seem that political interests ran in the Hurlbert family, as his brother was a member of Congress from Illinois and the Secretary of War:

CANDIDATES FOR THE VACANT PORTFOLIO.
[Special Despatch to The Graphic.]

WASHINGTON, June 20. - There is much gossip touching the correspondence which is known to have taken place between President Grant and Secretary Bristow. It has not yet been given to the press, and may not be published for some time to come, but there will be a great pressure to get it before the public, as it is said to be somewhat unusual in its character.
There is also much gossip touching the successor to the retiring Secretary. The names of John A. Kasson, of Iowa, and Stephen A. Hurlbert, of Illinois, are mentioned. It is a curious circumstance that the latter, though a Republican, is a brother of William Henry Hurlbert, editor of the Democratic World.
The most likely rumor is, however, that Secretary Chandler will be transferred to the Treasury Department, and a new Secretary of the Interior be appointed. Ex-Governor E.D. Morgan has been mentioned in connection with the Treasury portfolio; but he is believed to be ineligible, as he has relations with a large mercantile house in New York at the present time; and besides, his appointment would give two Cabinet ministers to New York, which is not considered a suitable arrangement. MOULTRIE.

[Regular Press Despatch.]

WASHINGTON, June 20. - Secretary Bristow has accepted an invitation to address the ratification meeting in Cincinnati to be held on Friday or Saturday night of this week, and leaves with his family on Wednesday. The President yesterday afternoon addressed a letter to Secretary Bristow formally accepting the latter's resignation. Both the President and Secretary Bristow decline to make the correspondence public.
It was stated last night on good authority that the President will today nominate J.D. Cameron to be Secretary of the Treasury and Stephen A. Hurlbert, member of Congress from Illinois, to be Secretary of War.

Source: The Daily Graphic, Tuesday June 20, 1876, Page 902

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Re: William Henry Hurlbert

Post by Karen on Fri 2 Dec 2011 - 6:04

LAURENCE OLIPHANT AND "THE PRIMATE."

A reporter of THE SUN found Mr. William Henry Hurlbert at the residence of Mayor Cooper in Washington square.
Mr. Hurlbert, said the reporter, can you, as an old friend of the late Laurence Oliphant, throw any light on this question of the relations between Mr. Oliphant and Mr. T.L. Harris, the so-called "primate of the new life," now in California?
"I knew Oliphant intimately," said Mr. Hurlbert," and my friendship with him dates back to a period before the civil war, when, with the younger brother of Lord Ampthill, now Lord Arthur Russell, he visited the Pringles in South Carolina, and made friendships in this country which he kept up throughout his curiously varied career. But neither I nor any one who knew and loved Laurence Oliphant as a man of the world, can throw any light on his relations with Harris."
Why not?
"Because those relations were in their nature occult. In more than one published work Oliphant himself tried, and in my judgment signally failed to throw light on them. I don't believe he was ever any more able to account to himself for his faith in "the primate," than Dr. Johnson would have been to account for his belief that in some way concerned his happiness not to pass a post in the street without putting his hand upon it."
In other words, you think, as some people in California seem to think, that he was a dupe and a victim?
"Not exactly. Oliphant came of a superstitious race. The Oliphants originally went, I believe, from Denmark to Scotland. They connect their family name in some incomprehensible fashion with the Danish Order of the Elephant which, as you know, is a sort of Scandinavian Order of the Garter. Their annals in Scotland are like the annals of other Northern families, full of ghostly traditions. Their is a house of theirs in which, I have been told, the skeleton of a woman, her long, dark hair flowing still in long tresses over her fleshless shoulders, was found by some workmen only a few years ago, prostrated upon the floor of a secret chamber concealed in one of the massively thick walls of the dwelling. Of course, the ghost of that lady has walked in that house for several centuries, and, I dare say, still walks there. Sir Walter Scott certainly would have believed this, and Sir Walter was not only a poet and a man of genius, but a lawyer and a writer to the Signet, or something of the sort. Furthermore, Laurence Oliphant was familiar from his childhood with life in India, where, as Sir Alfred Lyall tells you in his marvelous poem, "The Meditations of a Hindoo Prince," deities swarm in the tree tops. All of this means only that there ran through Oliphant's nature a vein of mysticism such as predisposes men of intellect and of sensibility in an age of agnostic tendencies to "take up," as did the unbelieving Lord Herbert of Cherbury, with signs and wonders and special revelations. I think Oliphant's faith in "the primate" and "the life" and "the use" had this root and no other. Harris was to him an "avatar." And not the first. Sir Frederick Bruce, Lord Elgin's brother, who was Minister at Washington, told me that when Oliphant was a very young man, went out with Lord Elgin to India, the commander of a man-of-war which was taking them out complained to Lord Elgin that his private secretary was interfering with the discipline of the ship. "Pray, how?" asked his lordship. "By worshipping one of my boatswains," replied the irate officer. "He gives the fellow ten shillings to sit in a chair and let him bow down and worship him, on the pretence that a divine spirit has entered into him. Jack don't understand anything about the divine spirit, but he is glad of the shillings, out of which he can get spirits more to his taste; and, in short, your Mr. Oliphant will have the whole fore-castle full of divine spirits if you don't put a stop to it."
Did you ever talk with Mr. Oliphant about "the primate" and "the life?"
"Never willingly. But I have many letters from him full of queer excerpts; and once, when we were living together in London, next door to Percy Doyle in Half Moon street, he kept me up nearly all night reading to me an extraordinary series of poems, three or four hundred of them, which he told me he had written, as I remember, under the inspiration of his spiritual bride. Miss L'Estrange, his first wife, was then living, but, as I understood it, the terrestrial marriage was in no way inconsistent with another marriage in the other world. I am told that in California the disciples maintain that Oliphant was known in their fold as "Woodbine." My recollection is that in London Oliphant himself told me that "Woodbine" was the name of this extra-terrestrial bride. Be this as it may, the poems I refer to were composed, as he told me, at Brockton under this inspiration."
Have they ever been published?
"I do not think they have? Some of them were remarkable for beauty of thought and of expression. Most of them seemed to me as incomprehensible as the prose of Oliphant's prose work, "Smypneumata," composed, as he averred, under the inspiration of his terrestrial wife, Miss L'Estrange, either just before or just after her pathetic death in Syria. What most struck me in the poems was the fact that many of them were written in a really musical metre, whereas in the normal state of his faculties Oliphant could no more turn out a metrical stanza than carve a statuette. If he composed them, as he doubtless did, it must have been in a state of mortal "exaltation," and I regard the composition of these poems as one of the strongest possible proofs that Oliphant's belief in "the life" was as genuine, whenever it supervened upon him, as Joan of Arc's belief, for example, in her "voices."
It is said in California that Lady Oliphant, his mother, led him into this belief in order to save him from the evil influence of a siren who had lured him into a life of dissipation.
"That is absolute nonsense. Oliphant has given the true story of his "conversion" in his own very curious and characteristic book, "Piccadilly." He never was a "dissipated" man in all his life. From his earliest youth he was an active, energetic worker in the world of diplomacy and of letters. His services in the East are matter of record. His first book, "A Journey to Katmandu," gives a fair notion of them, and no man who reads his "Moss From a Rolling Stone" can need to be told that the writer had no leisure for dissipation. In London, as a very young man, he was one of the most active contributors to the Owl, a paper which had a real influence in the minor sphere of British politics and was an effectual ally of Lord Palmerston and of Lord Palmerston's very clever wife. At that time, too, Oliphant formed his close intimacy with Delane of the Times. As a matter of fact, it was Oliphant, I believe, who led his mother as he led his wife - not his mother, who led him - into the fold of Harris. It is a great pity he did not live to write the autobiography which I know it was his intention to write."
Have you read the biography which his namesake, the novelist, has just published?
"I have not yet had time to read it. Mrs. Oliphant, the mother, is a woman of ability and insight, and has no doubt done the best that could be done with her materials. But she had no special knowledge of Oliphant. His cousin and executor, Arthur Oliphant, was very glad to have the work done by her, however, if only to prevent its being taken in hand by some less competent and trustworthy woman. But nobody except Oliphant himself could ever have told the story of his life as it ought to be told to make it of real value."
Do you know Mr. Oliphant's second wife?
"I never saw her till not long before his death, when I had a very interesting conversation with her before going up the stairs to see Oliphant himself, then lying ill with what proved to be his last illness at Mr. Walker's house in Norwood. None of his friends ever knew her before that time, and I think she only met him just before they sailed together from New York on his return from his last visit to America. They landed together in England, and were married by a registrar, I think, at Malvern only a few weeks before his death. I saw her again and for the last time on the day of his funeral at the house of Sir Mountstuart Grant Duff - York House at Twickenham. Sir Mountstuart and Lady Duff, who sympathized with Oliphant as to "the primate" and "the life" no more than I ever did, but loved and valued him as I did for his gifts and humane qualities insisted most kindly and generously on having him brought to York House to be attended there by the best physicians in London, and there he died. York House two centuries ago belonged to the Duke of York, afterward James II, and there the Princess Anne was born, who grew up to marry "Est-il-possible? George" of Denmark, and to die as Queen on her father's throne."
The second Mrs. Oliphant I see now calls herself Mrs. Templeton.
"Yes. After Oliphant's death she went out to look after his affairs at Haifa, of which, of course, she knew nothing. With her went some female relatives of her own, and two persons, an ex-clergyman of the English Church, Mr. Smith, and a youth who acted as his clerk, I believe, Mr. Templeton. Mr. Smith had been associated with Oliphant in the management of his affairs at Haifa, where he transacted what in New England would be called, I suppose, a "general business," with the Arabs. When news reached Syria of Oliphant's fatal illness, Mr. Smith and his clerk, Templeton, came on to England. I saw them both at York House on the day of the funeral. As to what happened in Syria after their return thither with Mrs. Oliphant and her kinswoman from Indiana, the friends of Laurence Oliphant in England and America knew, I think, next to nothing. But some time ago we heard that Mrs. Oliphant had married young Mr. Templeton and returned with him to Paris, where I believe they are now living. THE SUN republished the other day a letter about Oliphant and Harris written by Mrs. Templeton to the London Times. I read it with interest, but I don't know that I have any clearer notions after than before reading it, of the true relations between "the primate" and my departed friend. When Oliphant came back to England after the death of his mother, I was there and saw him. He told me what had happened in regard to his financial relations with "the use"; but he wound it all up by assuring me that he still believed in "the life," and that an agreement had been come to between "the primate" and himself under which the "primacy" of the West should remain with Harris, and the "primacy" of the East with Oliphant. "I see," I replied. "He is to rule the Latins and you the Greeks. He is to be Pope and you to be Patriarch."
"I have not given you much light, I fear," said Mr. Hurlbert, "but perhaps no one could give you more. It is a case of the invisible Spanish fleet."
Mr. Hurlbert left town on Thursday for New England. When asked if he had anything to say about the recent case with which his name has been connected he replied: "I can only say to you as I have said to all other reporters who have put the same question. I have nothing whatever to say. I am having inquiries made on certain points of interest to me, and if I learn anything which can interest other people I will let you know it."

Source: The Sun, Saturday June 27, 1891, Page 6

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Re: William Henry Hurlbert

Post by Karen on Fri 2 Dec 2011 - 9:44

HURLBERT'S CAREER.
STRIKING INCIDENTS IN THE LIFE OF A BRILLIANT MAN.

Oakey Hall on the Late William Henry Hurlbert - A Life of Wasted Opportunities and Dissipated Talents - "The Elbows of the Mincio."

Concerning the late William Henry Hurlbert, the brilliant journalist and former New York editor who recently died in Italy, Hon. A. Oakey Hall says in the New York World:
"Shortly before the civil war, when at The Times office I was introduced to him by Henry J. Raymond, whose intimacy I had then begun to fully enjoy, and almost immediately after the foundation of the Manhattan club as a Democratic foil to the Union League club, I met Mr. Hurlbert very frequently. On the introduction I was struck with his personality. Bulwer, in his "Pelham," had a heroine who doubted the cleverness and capacity of handsome men, but I soon found reason to doubt her assertion in the company of "young" Hurlbert.
"He was a strikingly handsome cavalier and as a bachelor "fancy free" - high forehead, brunettish, fascinating eyes, winning tones of voice, with musical inflections; perfect taste in dress, erect, manly and voluble, without gab or repetition of ideas and full of sparkling topics and references and as skilled in repartee as at that era was New York's professional wit, John Van Buren.
"After the introduction and alone with Mr. Raymond he gave me all the points of personal history that are now widely known of Mr. Hurlbert - how he was a South Carolinian of excellent family, how he had been a prior student at Harvard, and had graduated both at its baccalaureate and its twin adjuncts of divinity and law seminaries, but had adopted what is now known as the profession of journalism; how for a time he had been an amateur diplomatist as an attache of an American legation on the continent, and there acquired knowledge of several languages; how his contributions to magazines and reviews, both in poetry and prose, had already attracted attention for style and scholarship; how useful he was in an electric way to a newspaper as an editorial writer fertile in expedients, quick at scholarship, reminiscent of history, apt at illustrations and au courant with the transpiring of events abroad and at home and extremely ready in rapid comment - indeed, in the writing against time upon emergencies of late news. Raymond, whose foible and often detriment was his impressionability and capricious enthusiasm, showed the highest admiration of his new recruit upon the staff.
"I was then district attorney and much in society. There I found Hurlbert already a lion. I am now speaking of over 30 years ago. The Mrs. Leo Hunters of fashionable society were eager to capture him. He was found to be volatile without flippancy, insinuating with a delightful flavor of well tempered impudence, a well guarded flatterer, a graceful dancer, ready to play conversation battle-doer with even the burstsome or twaddling shuttlecock, and when supper was over or "the cloth removed" was like the Yorick of Poole's Hamlet travesty - a right good, jolly fellow who ever after was apt to keep the table in a roar of laughter.
"In the Belmont set, the Dr. Ward set and the sets championed by Mrs. Dr. Parker, Mrs. Sam Barlow, Mrs. Haight, Mrs. Parish, etc., he became an arbiter elegantarium. Hurlbert was perhaps as much a forerunner of Mr. Ward McAllister as John the Baptist was of the Christian church. I found that he was worthy in a social sense of all the praise, and indeed worship, which Gothamic Mrs. Leo Hunter awarded him.
"It was while Hurlbert was editorial writer on The Times, and substantially taking Raymond's place while H.J. was abroad, that the famous incident known as "the elbows of the Mincio" and "the sympathies of youth" occurred. As I have heard the version both from Raymond and Hurlbert, the references are authentic. Hurlbert was a double thinker like Dumas and C.P.R. James and many literary celebrities. He was one who could ply two pens on two subjects as a juggler can keep two oranges on several plates. One night he had to write one leader on a battle in the Austro-Italian war, in which the historic battle of the Mincio had just occurred, and another leader referring to a public educational subject. One set of compositors was receiving his copy of the former and another set his copy of the latter subject, and Hurlbert was alternating his pen and papers between the two. By a coincidence of numbering pages, by the similarity of handwriting and by the blunder of a printer's devil some paragraphs of each copy got mixed and improperly banked, so that the phrase "elbows of the Mincio" - meaning picturesquely the two arms of the river at a certain local point - became prefixed to the phrase at the end of the upper printed line, "and the sympathies of youth." This conjunction was intensely amusing - the proof-readers perhaps looking rather upon the etymology of their copy than upon its applicability. Besides the hour was late, and perhaps the managing editor was tired and sleepy.
"Bennett the elder and one or two other lesser editorial writers then took up the blunder. He was then shuffling Raymond, and of course The Times as well, and his paragraphs on the matter were trenchantly personal. Of course that Hurlbert was the writer soon became known, and on him the chaff fell as blindingly as the real stuff falls from a bolter in a flour mill. He took it in good part, and with reference to The Times being out of joint and that he was no cursed sprite to set proof-readers aright, he laughed it off. But inasmuch as he had been known on that evening - as was often his practice and indeed an often enforced necessity - to have just exchanged knife, fork, spoon and green glass for book, in which brand of wine he was one of the best experts in the city, bar even Royal Phelps and Mr. Belmont - the chaffing inference was, as he himself was reported to have said, that the hic, hoc was the result of the hand hoc (k)."
Mr. Oakey Hall's reminiscences of Hurlbert afford an interesting insight into his character, seen from the bright side. There are other sides, according to the tales of others whose feelings do not prompt such friendly treatment of their subject as that which Mr. Hall gives to him.
At one time a daily newspaper in New York used to regale its readers at intervals with long dissertations concerning Hurlbert, all of which hinged on his alleged kleptomania. Mr. Hurlbert would take other men's trousers, according to the assertions published over and over by Mr. Jones of The Times. Others who shared Mr. Jones' gloomy view of Hurlbert's character have frequently discoursed on Mr. Hurlbert's kleptomania, ornamenting their discourse with many anecdotes, including one which told how a certain woman had failed to receive a certain present because the man who had promised it to her had not had an opportunity to revisit the dwelling in which he had seen it.
Taken altogether, it is difficult to imagine a character more interesting than that of the man whose career has been outlined above. He could write good verse and brilliant prose, tell good stories and make friends as fast as he met men and women. He could produce a fine imitation of a rare wine by mixing up base ingredients at a jolly dinner or fill English statesmen with admiration by his solemn anti-Irish orations as gloomy London banquets. His mind was of that rare variety combining great brilliancy with profound knowledge.
Every step in his early mental development promised great achievements and future fame. But the hopes of all his friends were unfulfilled. It is charitable comment enough to say that his was a life of wasted opportunities and of dissipated brilliancy.

Source: Batavia New York Batavian, 1895

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Re: William Henry Hurlbert

Post by Karen on Sat 3 Dec 2011 - 4:19

FRANCE AND THE REPUBLIC.*

MR. W.H. HURLBERT has developed a singular taste for taking part in other people's quarrels. Some time ago he went to Ireland, stayed with prominent landlords in different parts of the country, carefully mastered their story, and then gave it to the world as the impartial observation of a disinterested American, a proceeding which won for him the warm approval of the whole Unionist Press. On the present occasion he has made France the scene of his operations, and has given us an account of French politics, as described by the Monarchists and Reactionaries, who offer a consistent opposition to the present regime. It is wonderful how the France of this narrative differs from that with which Mr. P.G. Hamerton, as keen an observer as Mr. Hurlbert, but of Republican sympathies, has made us familiar. A striking instance of Mr. Hurlbert's bias is to be found in the way he manipulates the electoral figures of 1885 and 1889 with a view of showing that the Republican strength had decreased and the Monarchical strength increased in the interval. In 1885, the figures were, all over France, Republicans of all shades, 4,377,068, and Monarchists and Conservatives 3,608,578, giving a Republican majority of 768,485. In 1889 the Republican total declined to 4,052,542, and the Monarchist and Conservative total to 3,144,978, while an entirely new factor appeared in the 629,955 votes given to Boulangists. By counting these Boulangist votes on the Royalist side, Mr. Hurlbert arrives at the conclusion that there has been an increase of Royalist and a decrease of Republican strength; but he has no business to do this, as the great majority of Boulangists were not Monarchists, but only discontented Republicans. So far, however, does prejudice carry him that he emphatically declares that the majority of Frenchmen are not Republicans at this day. If they are not it is difficult to know what they are. Monarchists they certainly are not. The upper classes are no doubt Legitimists, and in the bourgeoisie and the industrial centres, where the prosperous days of the Empire are remembered, there is a strong Bonapartist following; but the Monarchical idea inspires no enthusiasm in the nation at large, and the Right secured far more votes because of their Conservatism than because of their devotion to Monarchy. But for that devotion, in the opinion of many capable observers, the Right would have had a majority at the last two elections. As it was, the electors had to choose between Republican politicians of whom they disapproved and the supporters of a Monarchy of which they disapproved still more.
The best-founded charge which Mr. Hurlbert has to bring against the Republic relates to its management of the finances. He points out that the Conservative Republic of Theirs and Macmahon not only paid off the immense war indemnity, but on going out of office left a surplus of 98 million francs of receipts over expenditure, a surplus which two years of Republican administration converted into excess of expenditure over receipts of 475 million francs. Since then, according to the estimate of M. Leroy-Beaulieu, an impeachable Republican and a distinguished financier, France has been living at the rate of 500 million francs, or 20 million pounds, annually beyond her income. It is unfair, as Mr. Hurlbert does, to leave out of account that much. If this may be classed as capital expenditure upon works which are expected to be reproductive, but there can be no doubt that the fabric of French credit has been seriously shaken in the period by dangerous and unsound finance. And if we are to judge by Mr. Hurlbert's account of what has happened at Amiens, there would seem to have been the same mismanagement and extravagance in the matter of municipal finance.
No small part of the book is devoted to the religious conflict which has been going on in France during the past few years. Mr. Hurlbert is evidently a strong Roman Catholic himself, and his views throughout the book are largely coloured by this fact. He once heard a very eminent English public man, he tells us, "who is certainly regarded by great numbers of Englishmen as an authority without appeal," declare that very little importance ought to be attached to the religious sentiment in France, on account of its containing five millions of professed atheists. That this was a mistake of the eminent statesman is undoubted, for last census 35,000,000 odd described themselves as Catholics; 580,000 odd as Protestants; 40,000 as Jews, and only 82,000 as not professing any religion. Mr. Hurlbert is at great pains to show that there has recently been a religious revival in France, but with some knowledge of the country we should be inclined to say that in everything except nominal profession the English statesman was not so very far wrong. Baptism, marriage, and burial are the only three things that take the majority of town Frenchmen to church. In the country it is, of course, different. Education is the chief question round which the religious battle has been waged in France of recent years. The local schools in many district had long been in the hands of the nuns and Christian brothers, and of late years measures have been taken to replace them by lay teachers. Mr. Hurlbert violently denounces what has been done; but then all undenominational education is an abomination in his eyes. The expelled nuns and brothers have sought, where possible, to erect voluntary schools of their own, and the two schools exist side by side, as the Church and Board schools in England, only there is this important difference, that the French voluntary schools receive no aid from the State.
The main body of Mr. Hurlbert's book consists of a narrative of his travel in various parts of France, and he does well to remind us that Paris can no long be truly said to be France, and that account must also be taken of the provinces. He tells what he saw himself, and what the chief Reactionaries of the locality told him, and curiously enough introduces an account of all the local Revolutionary horrors he can lay hold of. It is a little too much to try and hold the Third Republic responsible for the excesses of the French Revolution.
When Mr. Hurlbert turns from social and political controversies to describe the social and economic condition of the country through which he passed his picture becomes much brighter, and one is almost tempted to wonder how a people so misgoverned manages to get along so well. The standard of comfort is higher and more widespread there than in any country of Europe except our own. It is, no doubt, a great misfortune to have a large party in the Chamber bent upon the overthrow of existing institutions, and therefore necessarily debarred from taking any part in the active management of affairs, and to this cause a large number of the evils to which Mr. Hurlbert calls attention are primarily due. The book has evidently cost Mr. Hurlbert not a little trouble, but it is ill-competed, ill-digested, and injudicial, and its descriptions of contemporary France can only be accepted with the largest reservations.

*France and the Republic. By William Henry Hurlbert. With a Map. London: Longmans, Green, and Co. 18s.

Source: The Nonconformist and Independent, June 5, 1890, Pages 521-522

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Re: William Henry Hurlbert

Post by Karen on Mon 5 Dec 2011 - 10:49

A CARD FROM MRS. HURLBERT.

To the Editor of the New-York Times:

I have just seen the statement of your London correspondent of June 30 concerning the appeal for a new trial made by the vile adventuress calling herself Gladys Evelyn! As your correspondent appears to be entirely ignorant of the real facts of the case, and as I cannot believe you would willingly wish to propagate falsehoods, I claim a statement in your paper.
In the first place, it was proved beyond controversy on the trial that Gladys Evelyn was living, sometimes as mistress, sometimes as his wife, with Jackson. At the very time she swore my husband was making her thirty-four different promises of marriage! It was also proved beyond controversy by the police certificate furnished by the steward of the Hotel Empire in Paris that Mr. Hurlbert slept at that hotel from Dec. 17 until Dec. 28, 1888, he being there at that time with me, yet Gladys Evelyn swore at the trial and in her affidavit that Mr. Hurlbert was with her in London at that very time. She, Gladys Evelyn, also addressed an envelope to me in September, 1889. This envelope contained another envelope addressed to Mr. Hurlbert. Within it were two enclosures, one saying that if 200 pounds were not immediately sent to a certain address in Bordeaux, letters, of which the writer enclosed a specimen, would be sent to "Mr. Hurlbert's wife." The other enclosure was a small note written in a hand remarkably like my husband's, but dated Brighton, Sept. 5 - a date on which it was physically impossible he could have been in Brighton, as he had breakfasted and lunched with me at home, and had gone with me by the 3 P.M. train into Oxfordshire on a few days' visit to Lord and Lady North. And yet, after all, this Gladys Evelyn swore in court that she never knew Mr. Hurlbert was a married man until April, 1890, and produces letters written by Wilfred Murray in July, 1890. As if any man in his right senses would write to a woman who had sent him threatening letters. Also, on several occasions when Gladys Evelyn swore my husband was in Paris with her and making a tour with her to Ghent and Ostend, he was with me in London. Not one particle or shred of evidence could she bring against him to support her lying charges. The wonderful similarity between the handwriting of Mr. Hurlbert and Wilfred Murray is proved by a letter I found in a book belonging to my husband which had been packed and stored for the last eight years, and which I accidentally found some time before I knew any trial would take place. This letter was dated Metropolitan Club, Washington, and related to the war between Chile and Peru, about which Wilfred Murray had obtained some information for Mr. Hurlbert, who was then editor of the New-York World. This letter was so like the writing of my husband that I myself could hardly have told the difference. It was signed, in full, Wilfred Murray. Mr. Hurlbert has come over to America on some important business, returns to London in the Autumn, which was delayed for weeks by this trial. So the remarks of your correspondent about his "getting off" are entirely unwarranted. Also your correspondent seems ignorant of the fact that a gentleman on retaining the services of the Attorney-General at once pays him his retainer's fee. Which Mr. Hurlbert followed within the week of the close of the trial by a check for his bill. As I cannot believe that the columns of your paper you would willingly make the medium for the propagation of falsehood against those who have incurred your personal or political enmity, I beg you will make this statement public.

KATHERINE HURLBERT.
TUESDAY, June 23, 1891.

Source: The New York Times, June 26, 1891

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Re: William Henry Hurlbert

Post by Karen on Mon 5 Dec 2011 - 10:58

WHY HURLBERT FLED.

HE KNEW WHAT WAS GOING ON AMONG LONDON AUTHORITIES.

LONDON, April 22. - The Hurlbert case is still causing agitation, and promises to be the subject of fresh inquiries in the House of Commons.
A correspondent of the society paper Pelican writes that certain officials who assisted in passing the extradition act between Great Britain and the United States, and who are fully aware of all its provisions, ostentatiously asked an American official here, an intimate friend of Mr. Hurlbert, as to the possibility of the extradition of Mr. Hurlbert; that the American official caused this interesting question to be cabled to Mr. Hurlbert's friends in New-York, and that Sergt. Baker's telegrams to the officials here were also cabled back to Mr. Hurlbert.

Source: The New York Times, April 23, 1892

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Re: William Henry Hurlbert

Post by Karen on Mon 5 Dec 2011 - 11:20

W.H. HURLBERT'S BRIDE.
MARRIED IN ENGLAND TO MISS KATHERINE P. TRACY.

LONDON, Aug. 9. - The marriage of William Henry Hurlbert, late proprietor of the New-York World, and Miss Katherine Parker Tracy, of New-York, took place today in Yorkshire and was a grand affair. The bridegroom left London at 4 o'clock yesterday morning to join the bridal party, assembled in Ernst Beckett Denison's mansion, Kirkstall Grange, near Leeds, and he confessed to a few friends who saw him off that he did not at all feel up to the mark. He said he had been suffering for a week from a horrible cold and catarrh. He had drank and sniffed a dozen different nostrums, all pronounced infallible, but had failed to find relief. He was full of gloomy forebodings, and said in answer to the cheering words of the friends who had remained out of bed to see him off that it was a bad omen for an old man to start on Friday to get married. Mr. Hurlbert travelled to Yorkshire almost alone, but at Kirkstall Grange, which is famous for its hospitality, he found a brilliant assemblage. The resident guests of Mr. Denison included Lord Houghton, Lord Lymington, Lord Rosebery, Lord Wemyss, the Count and Countess Gianotti, of Rome; Mr. and Mrs. William Beckett Denison, Mrs. Lee, (a sister of the bride;) John Osgood, Mr. and Mrs. Field, Mr. and Mrs. W. Story, of Rome; Robert Browning, and William Hurrell Mallock. Among the guests who were especially invited for the occasion were Lord and Lady Reay, Lord Stafford, Lord Dunraven, Sir Francis and Lady Sandford, Countess Feversham, Mr. and Mrs. J.C. Bancroft Davis, and Mr. and Mrs. George Augustus Sala.
The wedding service was solemnized in the little parish church of St. Chad's, by the Rev. Mr. Smyth. The happy pair came to the altar unattended by bridesmaids or groomsmen, and the bride was given away by J.S. Morgan. She was richly attired in a dress of white brocade silk, looped with feathers at the gathering points, trimmed with point d'Alencon lace, and with the corsage elaborately embroidered with seed pearls and diamonds. Her ornaments comprised a brooch, pendants and spray, in which huge pearls and diamonds were intermingled. The picturesque little church was crowded, and the choral service was beautiful. After the wedding there was a merry breakfast at the Grange, at the conclusion of which the bridal couple and Mrs. Lee started for a tour in the lake country of Cumberland. After a few weeks at Windermere, Mr. and Mrs. Hurlbert will go to Liverpool to see Mrs. Lee off for New-York, and will then make a Continental tour through Holland, the Rhine country, and the Tyrolean Alps, spending the Winter in Rome.

Source: The New York Times, August 10, 1884

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Re: William Henry Hurlbert

Post by Karen on Mon 5 Dec 2011 - 11:48

WILLIAM HENRY HURLBERT DEAD.

Passed Away at Cadenabbia, Italy, After a Long Illness, on Wednesday, Sept. 4.

LONDON, Sept. 6. - The Times will tomorrow say that W.H. Hurlbert died at Cadenabbia, Italy, Wednesday, after a long illness.

William Henry Hurlbert was born in Charleston, S.C., July 13, 1827. In 1855 he was a member of the staff of Putnam's Monthly, and dramatic critic of The Albion. From February, 1857, until after the Presidential election of 1860, he was an editorial writer on The New York Times. In October, 1862, he joined the editorial staff of The New York World. In 1876 he acquired an interest in The World, and, in 1883, sold it to its present proprietor.
These are the outlines of his career as a newspaper man, which was filled with interesting incidents. He was a graduate of Harvard College in 1847, he studied in Berlin, Rome, and Paris, he served in the Unitarian ministry, attended the Howard Law School, was imprisoned in the South in 1861, escaped through the Confederate lines to Washington, bought the Commercial Advertiser in 1864, intending to publish it as a free trade paper, and had to yield to his associates.
He went to Mexico in 1866 and was invited by Maximilian to the capital. He was a newspaper correspondent at the world's fair in Paris in 1867, and at the centenary festival of St. Peter at Rome. He accompanied the United States expedition to San Domingo in 1871, and published the most complete account of the island ever written. He wrote for The Edinburgh and other British magazines. He published "Gan-Eden" in Boston in 1854; "Gen. McClellan and the Conduct of the War," in 1864; hymns, poems, a review of the French Republic, impregnated with monarchical ideas, in a large volume, and prefaces, essays, and miscellaneous works of value.
He was in Egypt when the Suez Canal was opened and, as Paris had obtained the obelisk for New York. He gave his personal influence and that of his journal to the project, which was achieved by the liberality of William H. Vanderbilt.
His rooms in the old New York University Building were celebrated as treasuries paintings and scarce books. They were sold by auction when he went to London, after his retirement from the New York World, and brought prices according to their reputation, which was greater than their value. He was esteemed as a writer of rare ability; he had influential friends, and had been in the companionship of great men of his time, but a suit against him in London in 1891 made of him an exile. His defense was published in an octavo volume of 500 pages, in the form of a letter addressed to Lord Chief Justice Coleridge.

Source: The New York Times, September 7, 1895

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Re: William Henry Hurlbert

Post by Karen on Mon 5 Dec 2011 - 11:58

A Reminiscence of the Hurlberts.
The New York Times Saturday Review of Books:

In Mr. T.C. Evans's capital sketch of William H. Hurlbert (see The New York Times Saturday Review of Books of June 14) mention is made of the father of the journalist. The father kept a school at the corner of Tenth and Walnut Streets, Philadelphia, and the writer of this was one of the pupils. William Henry Hurlbert was a fine-looking, burly lad, and as a fighter could whip any boy in the school, but was by no means a bully. Athletics were just then beginning to be in vogue, and a tall Yorkshireman, Barrett by name, taught boxing, and William Henry was an expert. Among Mr. Hurlbert's pupils was Charles Godfrey Leland. As a lad Leland's artistic talent was conspicuous. We all used to delight in the pictures drawn by him, and still, after so long a time, I remember the strength and vigor of his sketches. Mr. Hurlbert, the head of the school, was a quiet, dignified, and scholarly man, a type of the old regime, and had gained the affection of all his pupils.

New York, June 22, 1902. B.P.

Source: The New York Times, July 5, 1902

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Re: William Henry Hurlbert

Post by Karen on Tue 6 Dec 2011 - 8:15

WILLIAM HENRY HURLBERT.

Nobody who knew william Henry Hurlbert can fail to receive from the announcement of his death in Italy a feeling of immense compassion and a new sense of the tragedy of human life. Of course, it is not the trite fact of mortality that is thus impressive. It is the fact that a man whom many of his survivors are ready to describe as the most brilliant man they ever knew, and not a few, of either sex, as the most winning, should not have won anything like the career that seemed to be open to him, should not indeed have won what can fairly be called a career at all, and should have closed an undistinguished life of nearly seventy years in exile and in dishonor.
But really this tragedy, composed, like all other tragedies, of "fate and of one's own deservings," had in the mixture of these ingredients more than is usual of the latter and less of the former. It was, one is inclined to say, because he could have done anything that he did nothing, nothing worthy of his powers. One book that is out of print and that was little more than a gush of youthful emotion, two others that are manifestly pieces of political hack work, such as in the last century were produced by hungry pamphleteers, and that encounter in this the jeers of a less respectful generation; these are the only memorials that are left of one of the quickest, most alert, and most versatile intelligences of his time. The comparison between him and the late George William Curtis is especially instructive. They were almost exactly contemporaries, both men of strong social inclinations and of high social qualifications, and both passionately addicted to the pursuit of literary excellence. Probably no one who knew them both would hesitate to give the less known man the palm for intellectual endowment and intellectual equipment, and certainly for specifically literary gifts.
But the one carefully "cultivated his garden." He was identified with generous causes and noble aspirations, and he died lamented by all of the generous and aspiring among his countrymen. The other was identified with nothing in his riper years, though in his youth he was an ardent Unitarian and an ardent Abolitionist. He frittered away his extraordinary endowment in a succession of journalistic tours de force, and to the larger public which knew and honored and lamented George William Curtis the death of William Henry Hurlbert will merely and vaguely recall the fact that he was mixed up in a shady lawsuit in London and that he spent his last years a fugitive from British justice.
It remains true that the tours de force were of an astonishing dexterity. In quickness of apprehension and retentiveness of memory nobody, not even of the most famous, was Mr. Hurlbert's superior. When he betook himself to journalism he became to his coadjutors a marvel and a portent. He delighted in intellectual feats as an athlete delights in physical feats, and that without thought of any audience. It is related how he had written a four-column obituary notice, stuffed with dates and figures, without looking at a book of reference or a memorandum. A favorite exercise of his, purely for his own amusement, as a juggler keeps three or four balls in the air, or a chess player plays half a dozen simultaneous games blindfolded, was to write two, or sometimes three articles at once, doing a page of each in turn. This feat, upon a very famous occasion and in the columns of this newspaper, he attempted and failed in because the conditions were not favorable. He made upon every one who met him the impression of an astonishing and unique personality, of a man who could do and be whatever he chose. But he never really chose to be or to do anything in particular. He was completely the slave of his own whims and caprices. The incident is entirely characteristic that is related of his absenting himself from a Harvard celebration in which he was the poet, to the great scandal of everybody concerned, because he resented the hat worn by the orator. Equally characterizing is the remark made by one who knew him well, who was asked, at the time of the trial in London, whether he thought Hurlbert capable of deliberate villainy, and who answered: "No, not so much because I think him incapable of villainy as because I think him incapable of deliberation." He did, as we have said, nothing really worthy of his powers, but the personal impression he made upon his personal acquaintances will abide with them as that of a man literally "egregious," very clearly distinguished from the herd of men, an unquestionable striking and interesting person.

Source: The New York Times, September 9, 1895

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Re: William Henry Hurlbert

Post by Karen on Tue 6 Dec 2011 - 23:56

WILLIAM H. HURLBERT.

Mr. Evans's Reminiscences of a Noted Writer and Journalist of the Past.

At some date which I cannot now recall, probably between 1875 and 1880, Mr. Charles A. Dana, one of the original editors of Appleton's Encyclopedia, requested me to write for him, for a new edition of that work then preparing, biographical articles of Manton Marble and William Henry Hurlbert. I immediately procured from both these gentlemen memoranda to serve as the basis of the articles which I did not write after all, absence abroad and other pressing duties forbidding. The notes sent me by Hurlbert I still retain, and as they present an outline of his career up to the date of their record under the seal of his own hand, they appear to possess sufficient interest to justify their preservation. I give them as they stand in his handwriting, except that I somewhat reluctantly modify an occasional whimsical locution, such as his discourse, written or spoken, was wont to wear as the plum pudding of Christmastide wears its decorating sprig of holly.
Born in Charleston, S.C., 1828. His father a native of Massachusetts, of an old Connecticut River family, graduated at Williams College, afterward President of Beaufort College, S.C., and for many years a resident of that State, where, with Judge Lee, the late J.L. Petrigru, and others of his intimate personal friends, he was conspicuous on the Union side in the controversies of 1830. William H. Hurlbert was carefully educated under the eye of his father, who removed to Philadelphia in 1831, and died there in 1843. As the grandson on both sides (his mother of Virginia) of Revolutionary officers, he was entitled to a cadetcy at West Point, which his family procured for him, but he declined to go there, and going to Harvard College, was graduated there in 1847 with high honors and a special reputation as a Grecian. He went through both the Theological and Law Schools of the University, and including a period of two years spent in Europe, partly at Cambridge, in England, and partly in traveling and society on the Continent, lived the life of a student, with Harvard for his headquarters, for ten years before adopting any profession in life. In 1855 he made up his mind to the profession of journalism. In the same year a book of his travels in Cuba in 1853 was published in Boston, and republished in London by the Longmans, in their "Travelers' Library." "Gan Eden; or, Pictures of Cuba," was a success at the time; its best fruit to the author being his introduction as a writer to The Edinburgh Review and to the acquaintance of Walter Savage Landor, who, always chary of his good words, wrote William H. Hurlbert a most encouraging letter, and invited him to come and see him in England, an invitation which on a subsequent journey to Europe he very gladly accepted and enjoyed too much to ever say much or to publish anything about it. In 1855 he was elected poet by the Phi Beta Kappa Society, and read a poem before that august society at commencement time which was published afterward at The University Press. Shortly after this he removed to New York and began his career as a professional writer in the capacity of one of the editors of Putnam's Monthly and a dramatic critic on The Albion, under the name of Hamilton. Young (editor of The Albion, translator of Beranger, and surly literary censor at large in that period,) "even spoke well of him in that capacity - also many other people, mostly muffs."

In the Spring of 1856 he went again to England and passed the rest of the year there and in Germany, being long the guest of his friend Charles Kingsley, "who is generally believed to have made William H. Hurlbert the hero of his American episode in "Two Years Ago," and seeing a good deal of the best people generally. One of his companions on the Continent was Lord Douglas, afterward Duke of Hamilton, who married a cousin of the Emperor Napoleon, and was universally recognized as one of the brightest and cleverest men of his time, though he himself protested that there were only two things which he could do perfectly well, "the one being to stew oysters, and the other to black his own boots." In October, 1856, William H. Hurlbert published an article on the political crisis in the United States, in The Edinburgh Review, which attracted extraordinary attention at home and abroad, and its author received the praises of Lord Macaulay and Prince Albert in England, and the compliment of an attack from Senator Butler of South Carolina in the United States Senate. It was strongly hostile to the claims of the South. William H. Hurlbert, partly from intellectual candor and partly from a passion for attacking the winning side, had avowed his hatred of slavery at a very early age, and had never wavered in it. The attack on Sumner also disgusted him, and as he was at that time of opinion that the Nation's danger threatened from the South he took sides for Fremont openly and vigorously. In the Spring of 1857 Henry J. Raymond made Mr. Hurlbert an offer to join THE TIMES, which he accepted and entered upon New York daily journalism. In 1858 he went again to England, and after passing the height of the season in London, he made a tour of Switzerland in company with Mr. and Mrs. Tom Hughes (Tom Brown at Rugby) and Lord and Lady Goderich, now Earl de Grey and Ripon, and lately War Minister of Great Britain. Joining Raymond at Heidelberg, the two traveled together in Germany, and in the Fall William H. Hurlbert came back to New York and resumed with THE TIMES. In 1860 he became convinced that the danger to the nation from the South was over, and that it was the Republican Party which threatened the country. This may have been wrong, but if so, men like Judge Kent, who had been a Fremont Elector in 1856, were wrong in the same way. William H. Hurlbert had charge of THE TIMES during the Italian war of 1859, and in 1860 made it for months virtually a Douglas paper. After the election of Lincoln he was so sure of coming mischief that he refused to continue in any way connected with the Republicans, and broke off his connection finally with THE TIMES. It was his misfortune or his quality to be incapable of partisanship. Irritated at the angry and vehement tone of the North he went South in the Spring of 1861, partly to see for himself the actual state of affairs there, and partly to arrange some family matters with his married sister, who resides in South Carolina. He was equally disgusted by the irrationality and extravagance of the Southern feeling, and in a long conversation with Toombs, then Secretary of State, at Richmond, plainly declared that if the South meant to fight for slavery the South was surely doomed to defeat, and must lose the sympathy of all Christendom. Returning to the North, he was arrested at Atlanta on suspicion of being a Northern emissary, and refusing to modify or explain in any way his individual personal position he was locked up in Richmond for several months. He demanded his release, and fought the Government of Davis in the courts, but was only released through the personal interference of influential Southern gentlemen in January, 1862, when he was tendered a passport to Europe on condition of giving a sort of parole. This he point-blank refused, and taking a small cottage in company with Commander Boutwell of the United States Navy, who had been detained under similar circumstances, he remained in the Confederate Capital until after the Peninsular campaign of McClellan, when, despairing of release in any other way, he took the matter into his own hands, left Richmond in the rear of Lee's advance upon the North, and after a perilous journey of four days, crossed the Potomac and reached Washington on foot. His elder brother was now a conspicuous Major General in the West, and every opportunity was afforded him to fill the character of a victim of Southern oppression. He simply stated the facts of his own experience and observation in the South during these most momentous fourteen months, and finding a state of things at the North which he regarded with as much abhorrence as anything he had seen at the South, and still believing the right of secession inherent in the Constitution, he threw himself openly into the opposition to Mr. Lincoln's Government, and joined the staff of The World. In 1863 Mr. Hurlbert made a visit to his Republican brother, then in command of the Upper Mississippi, and came back more hostile than ever to the war. In 1864, having made some money in Wall Street, he organized an association for the purchase of The Commercial Advertiser - expressly limiting his own share in the enterprise to its financial and commercial bearings. In the Summer of 1864 he published a book on McClellan and the conduct of the war, for writing which he had enjoyed excellent opportunities through a long and intimate acquaintance with the General himself. He had previously translated "Prince de Joinville's Campaigns of the Potomac" after a correspondence with the Prince, in which the latter expressed the warmest good will toward McClellan, and the greatest faith in his judgment and capacity as a soldier. For the first time, too, William H. Hurlbert went on the stump for McClellan in the Fall of 1864, and made some speeches considered good by persons of judgment. Since that time Mr. Hurlbert had been an open, earnest, and consistent supporter of the conservative Democratic principles and party. The Winter of this year - 1866 - he spent in Mexico under the most fortunate auspices for seeing that country. While in prison in Richmond he had written to Delane of The London Times that "the North is mad, but strong; the South is mad also, but feeble," and predicted that the "real troubles of the country would begin when the war should end," and he still refused to admit that even to secure the great good of the abolition of slavery it was right to violate the principles of the Constitution and to make war upon the South.

I was a resident in Washington in the year of Mr. Hurlbert's captivity and escape, and as soon as the way-worn refugee reached that capital I took him anew into custody and carried him off to my quarters, where I kept him four or five weeks. He had fled from Richmond at night, after a social occasion calling for evening dress, and he made the four day and night journey in this fragile regalia. It was no time to think of baggage or journeying conveniences. A rough country spread before him with specters of peril on every hand, but happily only visions, as the male population of that region who would joyously have slain any fugitive of his suspicious appearance had long before been absorbed into the Confederate Army. He bestrode the disbanded and furloughed army mules and the mule of civil life. He rode in country carts with wooden wheel tires drawn by lean Accomac steers, which displayed an unaccountable disposition to lie down while fording the swifter water courses, and to deviate into every perilous ravine along the wayside. He slept where he could; sometimes under the shelter of a roof, though it were only that of a negro cabin and sometimes with only the starred midsummer canopy over him. If he got a blanket or an old army overcoat to enwrap himself withal he counted it a stroke of good fortune. Thus enfolded his bosom may have swelled with the heroic thought that though a noncombatant and intent only on escape he

Lay like a warrior taking his rest
With his martial cloak around him.

It is not surprising that when he reached Washington, happily under the shelter of night, he stood in urgent need of rehabilitation. He found out his friend Riggs, the banker, and got some money, and the next morning, very early, was prepared to enter the local ready-made clothing market as a purchaser. Not much was to be got. The trade ran to military toggery. Civilian custom was perhaps looked on with suspicion, as if it carried a sign of Copperheadism or some other form of political heresy. Howbeit, Hurlbert succeeded in getting a partial suit of alpaca and an ornamented shirt with small, red horseshoes imprinted all over its visible surface, the whole surmounted by an inexpensive straw hat, which he wore as jauntily as if it had been the Sultan's turban. Thus attired and girt with the glowing ardors of morning he dawned on my rejoicing vision. I well remember it. He was in front of the old Metropolitan Hotel on Pennsylvania Avenue, whither summoned by the dawn I had come from my lodgings near by to get the morning papers. As before recited, I pounced upon him immediately and bore him to my fortress, and as we were then of like stature and dimensions his outfitting in proper raiment presented no difficulty. My next thought was for his inward well-being.

Wha could tell how Colin fared
When he was far awa?

I carried him away immediately to a famous restaurant kept by a colored man of so much renown in that period that I am ashamed to have forgotten his name, and then we breakfasted in a grandiose manner, Hurlbert bringing with him the appetite of Homer's heroes acquired in a long season of rather ill-fed captivity. His tale thereof was of incomparable interest and vivacity; news from within the rebel lines was hard to get; the budget he brought back was the most copious and various which had reached the capital since the war broke out. When it became known that he was my guest a good many persons of first, second, and other grades of magnitude came to see and hear him. Hanscom, correspondent of The Herald and also of some Boston paper, a well-known Washington figure of that time, always with Senator Douglas, brought in that distinguished man. Hurlbert had urged him for President in THE TIMES a year before; they met as friends and, in a sense, as political allies, and the great Senator listened to the tale of his bondage and his description of the rebel capital falling into shabbiness and semi-desertion, except for the soldier hosts which came and went, with much interest. Old General Spinner, the Nation's Treasurer of that time, he of the intricate signature, a bewildering hieroglyph to his generation, still occasionally to be seen on a Treasury note of old date, used to come over almost every evening, and was never tired of listening to the eloquent and vivacious fugitive. Of the interesting persons occasionally appearing in Washington in that period, I remember the Princes of France, father and sons, De Joinville, De Paris and De Chartres; Lord Hartington, not yet come to his lordship; Hawthorne, Caleb Cushing, Henry Ward Beecher, Bishop Mathew Simpson, N.P. Willis, Gottschalk, Walt Whitman, Edmund Clarence Stedman, Emanuel Leutze, the painter; Fred Cozzens, author of the Sparrowgrass Papers, and to a considerable number of these Hurlbert had an opportunity of reciting his story, auditors quite worthy of such a shining and attractive discourse. We one day had Charles Sumner for a companion of an hour, but that was at the Welker Restaurant, on Pennsylvania Avenue, where the great Senator came every day about 2 o'clock to partake in solitude of a somewhat lentern dinner. He had known Hurlbert years before as one of the most brilliant of Harvard graduates, and seemed glad to see him again, freed from the fetters of his imprisonment and with something of so much current interest to talk about. With his advancing years Sumner looked more and more like Burke; his countenance was noble and majestic, but seemed to wear an expression of physical suffering from which, I believe, in his later years he was seldom free. He was then drawing toward the close of his career, only a few more years remaining to him, and even so slight a memory of him as that which I preserve seems worthy of this passing record.
Hurlbert was much concerned as to his immediate future. He had parted with Raymond under circumstances which seemed to forbid renewed professional relations; no other journalistic place worthy of him appeared at the time to be open to him, and the situation was not without its embarrassments. Personally I felt quite well assured that while THE TIMES had not found him acceptable in giving to it its political direction and would not try him in that capacity again, it would always welcome him as a contributor, and I at once wrote to Raymond setting forth to him the particulars of the situation. His reply was immediate. "Tell Hurlbert to come to New York at once." A signal which he promptly obeyed, and wrote quite an extended series of letters for THE TIMES, giving a detailed history of his experiences in the South before, and after his imprisonment, written in his customary sparkling and animated style, and attracting at the time a good deal of attention. But his relation with the paper thus renewed was this time a transient one, and he presently drifted over to The World, with which thenceforward he was to be continuously associated till the close of his journalistic career.
My last letter from him, closing an occasional correspondence of thirty-seven years, was written from Cadenabbia, a small Italian town bordering the Lake of Como, and is in part as follows:

"My Dear -----: Your very welcome letter from the under world and the not less welcome volume reached me well and duly through my dear friends at Rome nearly three weeks ago. They would have been acknowledged from Siena, where we then were, but we were on the wing for the lakes and the Alps, and I wished to write to you fully and at leisure. "Instead of which," on the way hither, if you please, I walked at midnight suddenly in a strange house down a very steep flight of stone steps, and as you see am not yet in condition to put pen to paper with my own hand, though I broke no bones and am getting on wonderfully well, so my amanuensis intervenes simply to let me notify you that the arrow you shot over the roofs of the world has reached the heart of your friend. I wish I could have got both the letter and the book at Monte Carlo, for in that case I could have learned from G.A.S. (George Augustus Sala) why he left your kindly words unacknowledged. I saw him several times in Rome when he was very ill, and full of a book of his own which he published last Spring, but which I have not yet seen. Your account of your rural paradise is very pretty, and I sincerely hope that there are no serpents within a hundred miles of it. "Yes! I should be very glad to see your panel by Turner. My own "Venia" [a fine, large picture by that great master which Hurlbert possessed] is now on your side of the water, though I am looking at this moment at certain lights and shades playing over the distant landscape of this lovely place which recall its mystic charm to me so vividly that I could almost fancy it was hanging within my sight. Do you really mean that you are coming out to this part of the world? I need not say how cordially I should welcome the sound of your voice or how sincerely I always am yours as of old."

This letter bears the date of June 24, 1895, and Hurlbert's death took place only a few weeks later. The accident of which he spoke so lightly, and from which he supposed himself to be rapidly recovering, turned out to be much graver than he himself or those accompanying him imagined. It was, indeed, the immediate cause of his death, though others connected with the singularly embittered experiences of the last few years of his life may have been contributory thereto. It was a sombre ending of a life in the main as gay, joyous, and glittering as that of some bright plumaged and sweet-voiced Summer bird, and those on whom his companionship once shed its captivating influence can only hope, though his star at the last fell in stormy and disastrous eclipse and his grave is made in alien earth, that
"After life's fitful fever he sleeps well." T.C. EVANS.

Source: The New York Times, June 14, 1902

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Re: William Henry Hurlbert

Post by Karen on Wed 7 Dec 2011 - 20:48

The Case of Mr. Hurlbert.

NEW YORK, Friday July 5, 1861.

I have a curious piece of history to tell you respecting a gentleman somewhat widely known in the literary circles of London -- MR. W.H. HURLBERT. A native of Charleston, South Carolina, and a graduate of Harvard University, Mr. Hurlbert completed his education in Germany. After spending some time in England, where he formed a wide acquaintance and won some celebrity by his contributions to the Quarterlies, he returned to this country to pursue his favorite profession - journalism. He was connected with THE TIMES of this City, and was known as the most brilliant and facile writer connected with the City Press. Here, too, his great social qualities secured him a very wide and warmly-attached circle of acquaintances. At the opening of the last Presidential campaign, Mr. Hurlbert espoused the cause of Mr. Douglas with great warmth; and, in consequence of this fact, dissolved his connection with The Times, which was a leading Republican paper. When the idea of secession was first broached, he fell in with it warmly; and, deprived of the opportunity of explaining his views through the newspaper press, published one or two pamphlets warmly espousing the cause of the South, and arguing eagerly in favor of the recognition of the Confederate States. Finally, it is said, fearful that he had so far involved himself as to have become an object of suspicion, Mr. Hurlbert thought it expedient to seek an asylum in the section which he had so warmly defended. He went to Richmond, and thence traveled further South. It soon became known that an ex-editor of The New York Times was journeying through the Southern States, and immediately he became an object of suspicion. Vigilance committees were notified of his coming as he went from point to point and on reaching Atlanta, Ga., he was placed under arrest. A lively interchange of telegrams with Richmond ensued; and, although Mr. Hurlbert had friends at Court in the person of the Confederate Attorney-General and the Assistant Secretary of State, he was held a close prisoner, and taken to the capital, where he was thrown into the same jail which held several prisoners of war of by no means so refined a culture as himself. When first arrested he claimed to be bearer of dispatches to the French Consul at Charleston, but that gentleman denied all knowledge of him, and this plea did not save him. What his ultimate fate will be there is much anxiety to learn. Notwithstanding his southern birth and proclivities, he has been an uncompromising enemy of Slavery, urging its abolition very frequently and plainly, and the knowledge of this fact which will doubtless be developed will not tend to secure him a fair or unprejudiced hearing. It is not impossible that some of your readers may yet be able to say that the Southern rebels hanged an acquaintance of theirs on suspicion that he was a spy. Notwithstanding the harm which Mr. Hurlbert has worked the North, there is a feeling of anxiety here regarding the ultimate disposition which may be made of him. Should Mr. Davis and his coadjutors be deluded into the belief that he is not really what he asserts himself to be, they may hold him as a hostage for the safe release of Marshal Kane, of Baltimore. There was a suspicion here some months ago that Mr. Hurlbert furnished the London Times with some of the data which started that journal in its course of hostility to the Union. If this fact should be established in the course of the investigation which his case must receive, it would procure him a speedy release from durance, and make a permanent residence in the Confederate States desirable.

Source: The London Telegraph, August 3, 1861

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Re: William Henry Hurlbert

Post by Karen on Wed 7 Dec 2011 - 21:20

COUSIN OF J.P. MORGAN WILLS HISTORIC WATCH.
Mrs. Katherine Hurlbert Bequeaths Heirloom Presented by Louis XVI. - Relatives Benefit.

Mrs. Katherine Parker Hurlbert, cousin of J.P. Morgan, who died recently at her home in Rome, left a will made several years ago, which was filed for probate yesterday, naming William P. Hamilton of J.P. Morgan & Co. and the Bankers Trust Company as executors. Mrs. Hurlbert gave to William Hurlbert, great-nephew of her husband, "the gold watch presented to one of his great-uncles by Louis XVI of France, he being at the time American Commissioner at the signing of some treaty in Paris."
Mrs. Hurlbert left to her nephew, Lord Grimthorpe, and his sister, Countess Lucille Czernin, all pictures in the salon of the decedent in Rome and household effects in her apartment in the Palazzo Sciarro. Ilone Hurlbert, niece, got $250 and Mrs. Hurlbert's sapphire and diamond engagement ring, and Marie Routh, of Washington, D.C., got $250 "in memory of many happy hours spent with her dear sister."
Lady Grimthorpe receives a pearl necklace and pearl earrings, while all other jewelry, stock in U.S. Steel, the Santa Fe and the Northern Pacific railroads, and a mortgage for $9,000, are left to Count Czernin of Hluschitz, Bohemia, for the education of his three sons. The Countess Czernin gets the residuary estate in trust and upon her death it goes to her son, Manfred Czernin.
Mrs. Hurlbert asked that her executors "authorize my dear cousin, John Pierpont Morgan, to supervise the payment of legacies to my friends and servants in accordance with the lines of my will." The largest bequest to a servant is $1,000, to the butler, Guiseppi Ferretti, who was serving in the Italian Army at the time the will was filed.

Source: The New York Times, September 17, 1922

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Re: William Henry Hurlbert

Post by Karen on Sat 10 Dec 2011 - 9:50

Here is a picture of Stephen Augustus Hurlbert, the Republican brother of William Henry Hurlbert:

[img][/img]

[img][/img]

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Re: William Henry Hurlbert

Post by Karen on Sat 10 Dec 2011 - 10:00

Here is William Henry Hurlbert's name on a list of officers and graduates from Harvard University:

[img][/img]

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Re: William Henry Hurlbert

Post by Karen on Wed 28 Dec 2011 - 6:26

The Hurlbert Sensation.
WILFRID MURRAY DISCOVERED.

[SPECIAL.]
WASHINGTON, 6th September.

A reporter connected with a paper at New Orleans, named Murray, admits his connection with Hurlbert, but denies any knowledge of Mrs. Evelyn. In the action brought in London by the latter against Hurlbert, the defendant asserted he had been personated by his secretary, Wilfrid Murray. The existence of the latter was disbelieved, and a warrant was issued for Hurlbert's arrest, which he evaded by leaving England.

Source: Evening Post, Volume XLIV, Issue 59, 7 September 1892, Page 2

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Re: William Henry Hurlbert

Post by Karen on Thu 29 Dec 2011 - 8:24

I have located a photograph of William Henry Hurlbert:

[img][/img]

William H. Hurlbert

Newspaper editor.

Date: 1870 circa 5 years
Original Format: Carte de Visite
Item#: MES26980
Photographer: George G. Rockwood (New York)
Height: 1241px
Width: 762px

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Re: William Henry Hurlbert

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