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Halloween in Victorian England

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Halloween in Victorian England

Post by Karen on Wed 19 Oct 2011 - 20:33

Hallowe'en was celebrated at Balmoral Castle with weird effects seldom equalled. The Queen and Princess Beatrice remained interested spectators till the close. Two large processions, picturesquely attired, met on the Castle lawn, and Princess Beatrice lighted a great bonfire. A body of gorgeously dressed figures, with a band of music, then appeared; subsequently a witch was tried and condemned, and the effigy burnt. Afterwards there was a witch hunt. The Queen took great interest in the proceedings, which closed with drinking her Majesty's health and singing the National Anthem.

Source: The Centaur

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Re: Halloween in Victorian England

Post by Karen on Wed 19 Oct 2011 - 20:39

THE QUEEN AND ROYAL FAMILY.

The annual ceremony of Hallowe'en was celebrated on Monday night at Balmoral, with the customary festivities.
The Prince and Princess of Wales left Paris on Sunday night upon the conclusion of their week's visit to the French capital, and reached Charing-cross station at a quarter to seven on Monday morning.
The Princess of Wales, with the young princesses, arrived at Sandringham house from London on Tuesday evening.
The Court on Friday went into mourning for 10 days for the late Duke Frederick William Alexander of Wurtemburg, first cousin to her Majesty.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, November 6, 1881, Page 7

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Re: Halloween in Victorian England

Post by Karen on Wed 19 Oct 2011 - 20:43

On Monday night Halloween was kept in the usual manner at Balmoral - that is to say, with a large bonfire, a procession with torches, the hunting and burning of a warlock, and a dance round the fire. The Queen, the Princess Beatrice, and the Duchess of Connaught were present at the sports. Sir Garnet Wolseley arrived in the afternoon and had an interview with the Queen. In the evening he dined with the Royal family.

Source: The Guardian, November 1, 1882, Page 1522

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Re: Halloween in Victorian England

Post by Karen on Wed 19 Oct 2011 - 20:59

HALLOWEEN AT BALMORAL.

Agreeable to the expressed wish of the Princess of Wales, her Majesty advised the celebration of Hallowe'en at Balmoral on Monday night last. The Princess of Wales greatly desired to see the solemnisation of the festival in full character. It was a very grand display. It began shortly after dark. There were some three to four hundred persons present at the festivities. These consisted of the gamekeepers, gillies, servants, and tenants, with their wives and families, on the Royal estates. One brigade of torchbearers emanated from the Castle, another, and perhaps the larger, started from the head gamekeeper's house (Mr. D. Stewart), and when the bodies joined there could not have been fewer than at least two hundred torches. The night was fine and dark and still, and heightened the splendour of the brilliant display, which perhaps has never on any previous occasion been eclipsed at Balmoral Castle. At the head of the procession, which marched through the grounds in beautiful array, preceded by the Queen's pipers playing lustily on the national instrument, were the Princess of Wales, the young Princesses, and the Princess Beatrice, each of whom carried a flaming torch aloft. Arrived at the Castle, and the several circuits having been made by the gay company, the Princess Beatrice and the Princess of Wales approached the huge pile erected on the Green, on the west side of the Palace, and applied their torches. As the blaze mounted, the torchlight dance commenced around the flaring, crackling mass, in the presence of her Majesty, and the Princess of Wales, the Princess Beatrice, as well as most of the ladies and gentlemen of the Royal household, engaged heartily in the dance. Refreshments were liberally supplied during the proceedings. Scarcely had the dancing abated when there broke within the circle of light a fantastically dressed company in charge of "The Witch," enthroned on an improvised carriage, and preceded by musicians. The cortege approached the fire, passed round it and round it again, and at length pitched her sable witchship into the burning mass. After numerous toasts had been drunk, amid deafening cheers, to "The Queen," "The Princess of Wales," "The Princess Beatrice," &c., the proceedings were wound up as usual by a ball, merrily kept up for a few hours, and honoured by the Royal party.

Source: The Colonies and India, November 3, 1877, Page 7

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Re: Halloween in Victorian England

Post by Karen on Wed 19 Oct 2011 - 21:05

Court, Official, and Personal News.

Her Majesty arrived at Buckingham Palace on Saturday evening, having left Balmoral for the season on the previous night about eight o'clock. The only stoppage worthy of notice on the journey was at Lancaster, where her Majesty partook of breakfast, and where the Corporation presented an address to the Sovereign. Before her departure from Balmoral on Friday night, the Queen witnessed a torchlight procession of Highlanders, being the old Highland custom of celebrating Halloween.

Source: The Nonconformist, November 6, 1867, Page 917

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Re: Halloween in Victorian England

Post by Karen on Thu 20 Oct 2011 - 1:26

Halloween at Balmoral.

Halloween was celebrated at Balmoral Castle in a quaintly weird fashion. Two large processions, picturesquely attired, met on the Castle lawn, where the Princess Beatrice set light to an enormous bonfire. There were other droll figures, gorgeously attired, a band of music, a "witch hunt," the trial of a witch, and thereafter the burning of the effigy. The Queen remained an interested spectator of the proceedings during the whole time.

Source: Brief: The Week's News, November 7, 1879, Page 446

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Re: Halloween in Victorian England

Post by Karen on Thu 20 Oct 2011 - 1:30

THE COURT.

The Queen on Saturday evening witnessed from Balmoral castle, the old Highland custom of keeping Halloween by the lighting of bonfires and by a procession of torches, followed by reel dancing.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, November 7, 1869, Page 6

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Re: Halloween in Victorian England

Post by Karen on Thu 20 Oct 2011 - 1:33

Epitome of News.

Her Majesty the Queen was present on Monday night at the celebration of Hallowe'en by the tenants and servants at Balmoral.

Source: The Nonconformist, November 4, 1874, Page 1063

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Re: Halloween in Victorian England

Post by Karen on Thu 20 Oct 2011 - 1:40

THE QUEEN AND ROYAL FAMILY.

Halloween was celebrated in the usual manner on Monday evening. The servants and tenants carrying torches walked in procession up to the castle, where a bonfire was lighted and reels were danced. Her Majesty, Princess Beatrice, and the ladies and gentlemen of the household were present.
The Queen and Princess Beatrice are, according to the latest arrangements, expected to leave Balmoral on the 19th inst., and arrive at Windsor Castle on the following day.
The Princess of Wales and family left Marlborough house for Sandringham yesterday morning, the Prince following in the evening.
A telegram from Ottawa says it is stated that the Princess Louise will not return to Canada this winter.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, November 7, 1880, Page 7

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Re: Halloween in Victorian England

Post by Karen on Fri 21 Oct 2011 - 0:27

HALLOWE'EN AT BALMORAL CASTLE.

The old Scottish festival of Hallowe'en, the observance of which has gradually been falling into neglect in Scotland, has of late years been revived on Deeside, and this year unusual preparations were made at Balmoral castle to celebrate the occasion. Shortly before six o'clock on Friday night the cottagers, gillies, and labourers from the eastern part of the Balmoral estate mustered some distance to the east end of the castle, and four abreast, each man carrying a torch. In this form they proceeded up the western avenue, and were met by her Majesty, who, in her carriage, was escorted by the tenantry on the western part of her domains, also carrying torchlights. The two bodies here joined, and all marched in the direction of the castle, headed by the Queen's pipers, playing appropriate airs. On arriving at the main entrance to the castle her Majesty alighted from her carriage, and, preceded by the pipers and followed by the large body of torch-bearing tenantry, walked on foot by the west side of the castle. Having completed the circuit of the castle, the procession again halted in front of the principal doorway, where dancing was begun, to the strains of the bagpipes, by the light of a bonfire. Reels and strathspeys followed each other in quick succession, her Majesty remaining an interested spectator until a late hour in the night.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, November 9, 1873, Page 5

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Re: Halloween in Victorian England

Post by Karen on Fri 21 Oct 2011 - 0:35

THE COURT.

The old Highland custom of All Halloween was kept as on previous years, on Monday evening, by forming a procession with lighted torches, after which a bonfire was burnt, and reels were danced in front of the castle.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, November 6, 1870, Page 3

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Re: Halloween in Victorian England

Post by Karen on Fri 21 Oct 2011 - 1:16

HALLOWE'EN AT BALMORAL.

Hallowe'en was celebrated at Balmoral Castle, with unusual ceremony, in the presence of her Majesty, the Princess Beatrice, the ladies and gentlemen of the Royal household, and a large gathering of the tenantry. The leading features of the celebration were a torchlight procession, the lighting of large bonfires, and the burning in effigy of witches and warlocks. Upwards of 150 torchbearers assembled at the castle as dark set in, and separated into two parties, one band proceeding to Invergelder, and the other remaining at Balmoral. The torches were lighted at a quarter before six o'clock and shortly after the Queen and Princess Beatrice drove to Invergelder, followed by the Balmoral party of torchbearers. The two parties then united and returned in procession to the front of Balmoral Castle, where refreshments were served to all, and dancing was engaged in round a huge bonfire. Suddenly there appeared from the rear of the Castle a grotesque apparition representing a witch with a train of followers dressed like sprites who danced and gesticulated in all fashions. Then followed a warlock of demoniac shape, who was succeeded by another warlock drawing a car, on which was seated the figure of a witch, surrounded by other figures in the garb of demons. The unearthly visitors having marched several times round the burning pile, the principal figure was taken from the car and tossed into the flames amid the burning of blue lights and a display of crackers and fireworks. The health of her Majesty the Queen was then pledged and drunk with Highland honours by the assembled hundreds. Dancing was then resumed, and was carried on till a late hour at night.

In a leader noticing the above celebration, the Daily Telegraph remarks: -

"Yet, in spite of these strange innovations, there was one old time-honoured custom characteristic of Hallowe'en, at Balmoral, that was not forgotten amidst the excitement of the novel ceremonies and the weird burnt offering. The health of her Majesty was pledged and drunk with "Highland honours" by the "assembled hundreds." There could be no doubt about the intense realism apparently of this part of the proceedings; and as little doubt that, in thus gracing with her presence an ancient national festival, her Majesty was extending a wise and kindly courtesy to her neighbours and dependents. For there is a great and generous idea and a noble purpose associated with the mere observance of Hallowe'en, which endears any recognition of the vigil to all warm-hearted and brotherly folks. It recalls to mind how in days of old on this night master and servant met on common ground, and all class distinctions were for once levelled and ignored if not forgotten. Nay it was at one time the practice for these distinctions to be reversed, for the laird and his lady and their family to receive the servants as guests in their company room, and not merely to treat them to the best in the way of viands and wine, but even to wait upon the happy serving men and women, in their own persons. Autres temps autre meurs. It would scarcely do for the majesty of England to fill a beaded bumper for the worthiest of gillies, or for a Princess of the blood Royal to carve with her own fair hands the fattest of haggis for faithfullest of grooms. It would not be discreet for great personages nowadays to "duck for apples" in the servants' hall, or join their scullions in burning the "weel hoarded nuts," whose behaviour when passed in company through the ordeal of fire was supposed on "Halloween" to prefigure the love-destiny of those who appealed to them as if they were Delphic oracles. But there are innocent gatherings, eccentric merry-makings symbolical of common interests, instincts, hopes, traditions, and "reverences," using the term in Goethe's sense - festivals which are to the rugged individuality of our provincial life even as bone of its bone and flesh of its flesh - recognition of which only binds more closely the Sovereign and the people with the heartstrings of mutual sympathy. Lovers of the simple past will, perhaps, not look kindly on the modern innovations with which the celebration of "Hallowe'en" at Balmoral seems to have been garnished. But the great and gratifying fact is that, in an age when picturesque popular festivals are apt to be ignored or forgotten, the Queen, as the representative of our national life, has, in a prominent manner, done her best to keep green the memory of this, the most ancient of them all."

Source: The Journal of the County of Surrey, Wandsworth & Battersea District Times, and Putney, Roehampton, and Wimbledon News, Saturday November 11, 1876

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