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Dr. Gabe of Mecklenburgh Square

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Dr. Gabe of Mecklenburgh Square

Post by Karen on Wed 20 Jul 2011 - 10:05

Dr. Gabe was present in Miller's Court on the morning of November 9, 1888 and it is unknown as to why a doctor of the Society of the Prevention of Cruelty to Children would be present there that day, unless a child was involved somehow. Here is an article which makes mention of Dr. Gabe and his work

CHELSEA CRUELTY CASE.
PRISONERS TO BE SENT FOR TRIAL.

At Westminster Police-court yesterday, the coachman, John Wheatley, and his wife, Susan, lately living at Clabon-mews, Chelsea, were brought up in custody before Mr. Shiel, on remand, for further examination on the charge of ill-treating and neglecting their children, Maude and Albert, aged respectively 13-1/2 and 12-1/2, so that their lives were endangered. - Mr. Moreton Phillips prosecuted on behalf of the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, and Mr. Dutton defended the prisoners. - Much evidence has already been given of a sensational nature, the children, who presented a frightfully emaciated appearance, having deposed to long confinement in a small, ill-lighted room, practically unventilated, and to being fed on water porridge. They also said that, with only a chemise or shirt on, they were tied by ropes to nails in the wall, in such a position that for many hours at a stretch they were compelled to stand. The female prisoner, who has a baby in arms, is step-mother of the two children, who have, it is stated, an elder brother away in Canada through the agency of Dr. Barnardo's Home, where he was received as a waif.
Mr. Dutton said he desired to have an opportunity of cross-examining the children.
Charlotte Holyland, a nurse, deposed that on May 7 she went to Clabon-mews to nurse Mrs. Wheatley in her confinement, and attended her six consecutive days. Witness went into three rooms, but never into the "middle" room, where she had since heard that the children were confined.
Mr. Phillips: During the whole time of going to the house in this way did you ever see the two children who gave evidence here last week?
Witness: No, never. I did not know from either of the defendants that there were such children living in the house.
Lucy Robinson, wife of a coachman, living in Clabon-mews, next door to where the accused lived for fifteen months, deposed that she never saw or knew of the girl Maude till she saw her in court. Mrs. Wheatley said she had a daughter who was away. Prior to seeing the boy Albert in court, witness last saw him in June 1895, when he went to school. Witness visited Mrs. Wheatley during her confinement in May on ten or eleven occasions, but never saw or heard of Maude or Albert.
Albert Boothroyde, a groom in Mr. Ralli's service, who lived over the same stables as the Wheatleys for ten weeks prior to the removal of the two children, deposed that he had never seen them, though he had seen two younger girls named Flossie and Lucy. He had no idea when he passed and repassed defendants rooms of the existence of the boy Albert or of the girl Maude.
- Cross-examined: He went out early and came home late.
Selina Wheeler, wife of a coachman, formerly residing in Clabon-mews, deposed that she visited the female defendant about twenty times between January and May of this year. Mrs. Wheatley said her elder children were away in the country. Witness never once saw the boy or girl.
Dr. Gabe, of Mecklenburgh-square, said the children Albert and Maude had been under his care since the date of their removal on May 30. There was absolutely no organic disease, and their extreme emaciation was

DUE TO STARVATION.

While under his care they had immensely improved. The girl had gained 16-1/2lbs., and the boy 19lb. exactly. (Sensation.)
The girl Maude Wheatley was recalled for cross-examination. She said she ran away from home four times, commencing three years ago. She had stolen money and played truant at school. She denied having ever been punished for stealing her schoolmates' books.
Mr. Dutton: What for? - Witness: for stealing their lunches.
The girl, replying to further questions, made the admission that she had once said she did not care if she were outraged. Her stepmother did not beat her for this, but for not getting through her work. She denied that her clothes were taken away from her to be washed because she had persistently refused to wash them. The nails used for the ropes in the "middle" room were similar to those used for hanging clothes. They were fastened to the window-sill. The ropes had been taken down at the time of the visit of Mr. Roberts, the society's officer.
Mr. Dutton: Is there any truth in this tying up business at all - is it not your

IMAGINATION

and your brother's?
Witness: It is true. I said the last time I was tied up was in February.
Mr. Dutton: And your brother says that was before last September.
Witness said that she might have made a mistake as to the date. She was quite sure that she was not making another mistake when she said she had been locked in the room by her father for periods of three days and a week, and fed twice a day. It was the fact that she was expelled from a school for dishonesty, and that she had taken money belonging to her stepmother. With her younger sister, also a thief, she had put stolen money down a drain in the street. On many occasions her clothes were taken from her so that she should not run away.
Re-examined, the girl said that her elder brother, referred to as being in Canada, ran away because he was treated so cruelly.
Mr. Shiel said he had made up his mind to send the case for trial, but there must be a further remand.

Source: Daily Mail, Saturday June 20, 1896, Page 5

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Re: Dr. Gabe of Mecklenburgh Square

Post by Karen on Thu 21 Jul 2011 - 13:05

SHOCKING NEGLECT AND ILL-TREATMENT OF CHILDREN AT WILLESDEN.
A SHARP SENTENCE FOR BRUTALITY.

James Dunsby and Esther Weston, of 12 Meyrick Terrace, labourer and laundress respectively, were charged on remand at Harlesden, yesterday, before Messrs. Bird, Willans and F.A. Wood, with that, having the custody, control or charge of four children under the age of 14 years, to wit: Frederick Dunsby, 10 years; William Dunsby, 7 years; Mary Jane Dunsby, 5 years; and Beatrice Weston, 8 months, they did, on various occasions between the 10th April and 10th September, 1891, unlawfully and wilfully illtreat and neglect the said children in a manner likely to cause them unnecessary suffering or injury to their health.
Dr. Sampson now appeared for the man Dunsby.
Mr. Morris stated that the baby was still alive.
Mrs. Eliza Matthews said that she lived at 50, Mayo Road. Some months ago she had occupied half of the same house with defendants. She was there when the baby was born. It was a very fine child. It was very badly treated when a month old, being often left all day with the boy Freddy, and no food left for it. Mrs. Weston used to have one tin of condensed milk per week for it. She had heard her say to the children that if they wanted any tea there was plenty of cold water. Witness had said that as long as she had any tea in her pot she would give them some - and did so. On Sundays Dunsby used to see that there was a joint of meat for dinner, and insisted upon having the children sit down with him, as it was the only time he was at home during the week. Weston would then take up the plates and things and throw them through the window. Witness had heard her say afterwards, "You little wretches, do you think I'll let you sit there and eat a good dinner, while my children are in the Union, eating suety pudding?"
Mr. Morris then said that he would call Dunsby's sister-in-law who would give them a little of the history of the family.
Mrs. Dunsby, sister-in-law of the prisoner, said that the latter's wife died four years ago. His mother looked after the children then until he went to live with Weston. Up to that time they had been well looked after.
Mr. Morris said that he would now make a rather unusual application to the Bench. He did not wish to pre-suppose the Bench's judgment, but if they were to find the prisoners guilty they might have a difficulty in awarding a suitable punishment, as their powers were limited in that direction. But he would apply for permission to withdraw the charge concerning the two boys, and then if that was allowed, he would apply for fresh summonses, returnable immediately, for those cases so that the Bench could inflict a separate punishment in each case.
Mr. Sampson opposed this, but the Bench granted Mr. Morris's request.
Mr. Sampson then said he would put his client, Dunsby, in the box.
James Dunsby said that he was a labourer in the employ of the Willesden Local Board, and had been for a long time. He allowed this woman from 21s. and upwards per week. His wages were 24s. a week. He had to go to work at six o'clock in the morning and returned about half-past nine in the evening. He was not aware that the children were so illtreated by the woman.
Cross-examined by Mr. Morris: He was at home on Sundays except when he went out for a walk. He was not aware that the children had no bedclothes. He knew the boys' heads were in a bad state because he had cut their hair.
Mr. Morris said he had no more evidence to put before the Bench, and as the woman had no legal adviser he had no doubt the Bench would hear what he had to say. With regard to his promise to bring evidence as to the children being insured, he had brought it, except for the baby, which he found was not, but he had found that such evidence could not be produced until after conviction.
Esther Weston said she had never left Dunsby's children without food or her baby without milk. She had not knocked them about. They would run the table and play and scream, but she had not knocked them about.
Cross-examined by Mr. Morris she admitted that she had been warned by the Society's officer and a medical man that if the children were not treated better these proceedings would be taken.
The Bench said that they were clearly of opinion that the charge had been proved against the woman. She would be sentenced to three month's hard labour. The man would be discharged.
The fresh summonses which had been taken out for neglecting and illtreating the boys were now heard.
Inspector Larter, of the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, said that on the 9th September he went to the prisoner's house. He found the bed in which the children slept in a filthy condition. The two boys were very thin and dirty, and their heads in a filthy condition. William had a black eye.
Dr. Roberts said he went to the house on the 9th inst. with Inspector Larter. He corroborated his evidence. One of the boys was suffering from eczema.
Mrs. Miles spoke to seeing Weston punch Frederick in the back and kick him down the passage, saying "You ________! I'll kill you!" As soon as their father was gone to work on Monday morning Weston took their boots off and sent them to the pawnshop.
Mrs. Matthews was put into the box, and spoke again to the children being left all day with no food. They had asked her for food, and when she had given them some they ate it ravenously. She had seen the boys pick old crusts from the field at the back of the house. On the Easter Monday they were out all day, and when they came home Weston said to them "Has that _______ been feeding you up again!" On Sundays Dunsby would see that there was a good dinner, but Weston would throw the things through the window when he insisted on the children having some of it.
Dr. Gabe, of Mecklenbugh Square, medical officer to the Society, corroborated Dr. Roberts' evidence. With regard to the baby, which was still at the Society's Shelter, it was still alive, but there was not much hope for it.
Mr. Sampson, on behalf of Dunsby, said he would admit having corrected the boy, but it was because he had been foolish enough to believe what the woman told him about the boy stealing some money.
The Bench said that if Dunsby did not know of the treatment of the children, he ought to have done, and there was no doubt that he had assaulted the boy with the buckle end of a strap. He would be fined 40s. or a month. With regard to Weston there was not the slightest doubt that she had neglected and illtreated the children in a most shameful manner. They were sorry that the law did not allow them to inflict a heavier sentence. She would have three months hard labour, to follow immediately the previous sentence.
Mr. Morris then applied for permission for the Society to have the custody of the children, and that an order be made upon the parents to contribute something for their maintenance.
The Bench made the order for the custody of the children, and said that for the maintenance a summons had better be taken out.

Source: The Middlesex Courier, September 25, 1891, Page 3

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Re: Dr. Gabe of Mecklenburgh Square

Post by Karen on Sat 23 Jul 2011 - 2:04

SHOCKING NEGLECT AND ILL-TREATMENT OF CHILDREN AT WILLESDEN.

James Dunsby and Esther Weston, of 12, Meyrick Terrace, labourer and laundress respectively, were charged on a warrant at Harlesden yesterday, before Messrs. Bird and F.A. Wood, with that having the custody, control, or charge of four children under the age of 14 years, to wit, Frederick Dunsby, 10 years, William Dunsby, 7 years, Mary Jane Dunsby, 5 years, and Beatrice Weston, 8 months, they did on various occasions between the 10th April and 10 September, 1891, unlawfully and wilfully illtreat and neglect the said children in a manner likely to cause them unnecessary suffering or injury to their health.
Mr. H. Morris, who prosecuted on behalf of the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, said it appeared that Dunsby was a widower with three children, Frederick, William, and Mary Jane. Mrs. Weston was deserted by her husband some years ago and left with six children, five of whom are now in the Hendon Union Workhouse. She had been living with Dunsby for about two years. Beatrice Weston, the baby, aged 8 months, was the child of both of them. Dunsby himself could not well be charged with more than thrashing the boy so as to give him a black eye with the buckle end of a strap, for he was at work all day and allowed the woman 20s. a week.
Inspector Larter, of the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, said he visited the prisoners' house on the 9th inst., and saw Frederick Dunsby, William Dunsby, and Beatrice Weston. They were all in a filthy condition. The room in which the man and woman slept was clean, and had a good bed. The room in which the children slept was fairly clean, but the beds were in a very dirty condition. There was a bed, a cot, and a chair-bedstead. There was bedding here, but only a palliasse and a pillow, and no covering. Frederick had the remains of a black eye, was very dirty, covered with flea bites, had bruises on the thighs, loins, and buttocks, and his head was infested with vermin. He stated to witness in the presence of the woman that he was sent to Harlesden the previous Saturday; his mother had sent him for a small parcel, but he did not spend any of the money nor kick any of the things about, but the parcel came open, and he picked the things up as best he could and took them home. William's head was full of vermin and sores, and his body was covered with flea bites. In the evening he returned with Dr. Roberts, who examined the four children. Mary Jane he saw in the evening; she was very dirty and troubled with vermin and flea bites. The baby was very dirty and thin. It was afterwards found to weigh 7-1/2 pounds. It was afterwards removed to the Society's headquarters at Harpur Street.
Mrs. Sarah Ann Miles said that a few weeks ago she lived with these people. The woman was continually beating the children. She did not see it but heard the beating and screaming. The woman would say to them "If you holler, you _______ , I'll kill you." She could swear to the voice. One day she saw the woman punch the boy Frederick in the back and kick him down the passage, saying, "I'll kill the ______." They could hear the beating and screaming in the street, and people gathered to listen. She had herself taken the baby some milk because it was neglected. The parents were away on Bank Holiday last and remained out all night leaving the children to themselves.
Mrs. Hart, mother of the last witness, said that on the 8th inst. she heard loud shrieks at prisoners' house. She called to Mrs. Weston and asked her what she was doing to the poor children, and said she would tell Dunsby of her.
Mrs. Marlow said she lived in the same house with the prisoners. She testified to the cruel beatings to which the children were subjected. She did not dare to remonstrate with the woman. It was done when she was in her drunken fits, which generally lasted from Saturday till Tuesday. She had seen the children run to the dust-heap when Weston's back was turned, and pick out anything edible they could find. She had also seen them take lettuce-leaves from the chicken-house which had been there three days, and eat them.
Dr. Roberts said that on the ninth inst. he examined the children at Inspector Larter's request. Frederick was very emaciated and dirty; was covered with flea bites. He could not remember the state of the child's head. William was in a similar condition, and his head full of vermin. Mary Jane was also suffering from flea bites, and also vermin. She weighed only 34 pounds., whereas she ought to have weighed 43 pounds. The baby, Beatrice, was suffering from rickets, caused by improper feeding or no feeding at all. It ought to have weighed 15-1/2 pounds. He had seen Elijah John, the woman's own child, and it was in fairly good condition.
Dr. Gabe, of Mecklenburgh Square, medical officer to the Society, said the children were now under his care at the Society's shelter, at Harpur Street. He corroborated Dr. Roberts' evidence. The baby was in a dying condition. Frederick was troubled with vermin in his head, although Dr. Roberts did not remember so.
Mr. Morris said that if the baby died the case would assume a very different aspect, and therefore he would respectfully ask for a remand.
The remand was granted.

Source: The Middlesex Courier, September 18, 1891, Page 6

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