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Chief-Inspector Conquest

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Chief-Inspector Conquest

Post by Karen on Fri 15 Jul 2011 - 8:03

THE MOST FAMOUS DETECTIVE RETIRES.

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The most famous detective of the world has resigned. This is Chief-Inspector Conquest, of Scotland Yard, whose experiences, extending over thirty years, would fill a dozen exciting volumes. Detective Conquest it was who effected the arrest of Russell and Whistler, Leo Serne, and many others of the most notorious English criminals. By his many surprising clever captures he earned for himself the name of the ablest detective in Europe, and got promotion till he was practically the head of the great establishment known as Scotland Yard. When Mr. W.E. Gladstone was "shadowed," the statesman fearing assassination, as the results of certain developments which need not now be mentioned, it was Mr. Conquest who was the "shadow," often in disguises that puzzled even the Premier himself. It is said that now he has resigned from the force the detective will write his memoirs, to secure which a London publishing house has offered him a very large sum of money down and a handsome royalty on all books sold.

Source: Clarence and Richmond Examiner, Saturday 7 October 1899, page 4

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Fatal Fire in the Strand

Post by Karen on Tue 7 Feb 2012 - 21:12

THE FATAL FIRE IN THE STRAND.
PROCEEDINGS AT BOW-STREET TODAY.

Leon Serne and John Goldfinch were charged, on remand, at Bow-street, Police-court, today, with setting fire to 274, Strand, and thereby causing the death of two boys, sons of the prisoner Serne.
W. Dork V. Winkle, of the Continental Hotel, Euston-road, who last week gave evidence to the effect that Serne had asked him if an explosion would take place in the event of his turning the gas on and leaving a lighted candle in the room, was recalled and cross-examined by Mr. Geoghegan. He deposed that he had known Inspector Conquest (the officer in charge of the case) for six months. He had never driven out with him. Witness had been sentenced to five years' penal servitude. He had never been convicted in Antwerp.
How many fires have you had in houses you have occupied? - Two. I was not living in the houses at the time. I sent in the claims to the Insurance Company, and was paid. The last fire was three months ago; a pair of curtains in the servant's room was burnt. Prior to that there was a fire at 30, Lower Kennington-lane.
Did you agree with and give your manager an undertaking to pay him all damages in the event of a fire taking place? - Yes; the fire occurred after he had left. A manager named Goodwin was charged and fined 50 pounds for keeping a disorderly house. Witness was discharged. He knew an inquest was held on the two boys. He afterwards wrote a letter to Inspector Conquest. He had given information to the police before. He wrote to Inspector Conquest because a man wrote to him and said he would write to Scotland-yard, and say that he (witness) knew of the fire at Serne's, unless he paid 10 pounds.
Re-examined by Mr. Matthews - Before Serne was taken into custody the witness had purchased from him some cigars and a marble slab, which was said to be a "misfit." Serne gave him a receipt for the money which he paid to him. The man came to him and said that if he did not pay 10 pounds he would make a statement to Scotland-yard.
Cornelius Deatridge, a waiter, of Richmond-road, Islington, deposed that he became acquainted with Serne in the middle of August last. Serne visited a man named Leutgaart at 3, Mapleton-place. Witness was present at one of the meetings, when the name of Mr. Lewis was mentioned as being a gentleman who would lend money to Leutgaart. An appointment was made for Serne to go with Leutgaart to Lewis's. Leutgaart was unable to keep the appointment, and gave witness certain instructions. He went to 274, Strand, and saw Serne. The first-floor back room was fitted up as an office. After the general conversation, witness asked him how he got on. He said he would get about 400 pounds in a fortnight or three weeks. Witness understood it would be the sale of "Capuala." He said, "Don't you think I should get 100 pounds from the superior landlord if this house were burnt down? Witness said he did not understand the meaning of it. He said the house was very old and rotten. He said if the house was rebuilt he would continue the business in the same place. Serne did not suggest in what way the house was to come down before it could be rebuilt.
(The case is proceeding.)

Source: The Echo, Friday November 11, 1887, Page 3

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Re: Chief-Inspector Conquest

Post by Karen on Tue 7 Feb 2012 - 21:24

RAID ON A LONDON CLUB.

On Saturday evening the police took possession of the upper part of the premises, 319, Strand, situated in close proximity to the Church of St. Mary-le-Strand. The ground floor of the premises is occupied by Mr. Skinner, tobacconist, while the first floor constitutes the "Newmarket Club." On the police entering the place, there were upwards of forty persons present engaged in playing cards, including the game of baccarat. There was also money on the tables, and all the appliances in view for carrying on an extensive gambling business. Inspector Conquest took possession of the money. Several of the members made attempts to escape by the door; but their attempts were futile, owing to the body of police there to prevent them passing. In due course they were conveyed to Bow-street Police-station, each defendant being guarded by a constable. They proceeded to the station in single file, followed by a large crowd of people. Some of the men were conveyed in a cab. In a very short time Bow Street presented quite an animated scene, numbers of persons arriving to make enquiries, or to offer bail for captured friends. The formalities connected with the acceptance of responsible persons to enter into recognisances occupied those interested until an early hour on Sunday morning. With one exception, the whole of the defendants were released, on condition that they appeared before Mr. Bridge on Monday morning to answer the charge of being on premises used as a gaming house, for the purpose of gaming. On Monday, Johnson, the proprietor of the club, and those arrested in the raid, were charged before the stipendiary at Bow Street with being concerned in gambling. After some evidence had been given, the case was adjourned till Tuesday next, and the defendants were admitted to bail.

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Re: Chief-Inspector Conquest

Post by Karen on Tue 7 Feb 2012 - 21:34

PICKPOCKETS ABOUT YESTERDAY.
TWO "SUSPECTS" AT BOW-STREET.

Nearly the whole plain-clothes staff at Bow-street were engaged under the direction of Inspector Conquest in the endeavour to protect the spectators and processionists at the reception of the Irish Members from the attempts at robbery by the thieves who, it was thought, would inevitably mingle with the crowd. This morning it is reported that no less than four watches were stolen outside No. 11, Endsleigh-gardens, where Mr. Sullivan made a temporary halt. The only persons arrested, however, were two youths, giving the names of Fordham and Needham, and who stated that they resided in Hoxton. In this case a young woman complained of having lost her purse while standing outside the house. Two officers, named Nicholls and Pedder, arrested the prisoners, and testified before Mr. Vaughan, at Bow-street, today, that they saw the robbery effected. - Fordham, in defence, alleged that he was looking up at the sky, and waiting for Mr. Sullivan, when the officer seized him. - The complainant, who had lost 13s. 9d. and a gold ring, stated that she was hustled by the prisoners, and then missed her purse. - Detective Pedder received a blow upon the ear, which sent him staggering, as he was about to arrest Needham. - In reply to the Magistrates, both prisoners wanted it "settled here," but they were remanded for inquiries.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday February 14, 1888, Page 4

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Re: Chief-Inspector Conquest

Post by Karen on Tue 7 Feb 2012 - 21:55

AN ALLEGED FORGER'S DEN.

John Sidney Cottan, aged 32, describing himself as an ornamental engraver, and giving an address at the Triangle hotel, Smithfield, was charged, at Bow-street police-court, on Thursday, with feloniously engraving upon a copper plate a promissory note of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, and having the same in his possession with intent to defraud, and with feloniously having in his possession forged notes of the Bank of England, well knowing them to have been forged. - The prisoner was arrested on Wednesday afternoon by Detective-inspector Conquest and Detective Collins at 85, Harrison-street, Gray's-inn-road. They proceeded to a back room on the second floor and knocked. The prisoner opened the door. His hands and face were blackened by ink, and he opened the door slightly. The officers forced their way in, and the witness said, "We are police officers. What are you doing here?" At the same time the witness picked up a plate (produced) from a bench directly opposite the window. It was a copper plate, on which was an engraved copy of a 5 pound Bank of England note. The witness said, "What is this for?" He replied, "We are getting out a scheme for Christmas." No other person was in the room at the time. The witness picked up one of the alleged forged notes. There were lines strung across the room, and notes were hung up to dry. The notes corresponded with the engraved plate, and were apparently forgeries on the Bank of England. Prisoner said, "We are going to put 'A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year' on the back." The witness said, "What do you mean by we?" He replied, "I work with the other man." The witness said, "What is his name?" The prisoner said, "N. Devon." The witness asked where he lived. The prisoner replied, "I don't know, somewhere in Clerkenwell." When asked where he could be found the prisoner replied, "I don't know; I picked him up in a public-house." In the room a large printing-press was found. It was 5ft. 8in. high, and 2ft. 1in. wide. There was flannel round the rollers, and some damped paper on the press similar to that of which the notes were made; also some blotting-paper saturated with water, and between each sheet some paper similar to that on which the forged notes had been engraved. Seven notes were hanging on the cords mentioned, and were quite wet. Six other notes were on another chair, and three were found in a cupboard, with 60 pieces of paper cut to the size of the notes. About a quire of similar paper was also found uncut. Engravers' tools and other things were found. When the witness entered there was a fire in the room, with a flat-iron being heated for the purpose of drying. The prisoner offered no resistance. - The prisoner was remanded.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, December 30, 1888, Page 8

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Re: Chief-Inspector Conquest

Post by Karen on Tue 7 Feb 2012 - 22:29

EX-CHIEF INSPECTOR CONQUEST.
BY ONE WHO KNOWS HIM.

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CHIEF INSPECTOR, or John Conquest as I best know him, has just retired from the Detective Department of Scotland Yard, with which he has been long identified as one of its smartest and most intelligent officers. After over twenty-eight years' continuous service, during which he has enjoyed the fullest confidence of his superiors, he relapses into private life to enjoy a well-merited pension.
Commencing his career in the D Division, John Conquest was in 1876 appointed Sergeant, in which position he remained until in 1878 the S.E.R. Company selected him as Chief Detective Officer. Four years later we find him appointed to the Criminal Investigation Department, Old Scotland Yard, organised by Sir Howard Vincent, Bart., M.P., where he was specially delegated to take charge of the arrangements for the protection of the late Right Hon. W.E. Gladstone during the dynamite scares in 1884, accompanying him constantly until he resigned the Premiership. His reminiscences of the Great Commoner should make interesting reading.
Again returning to Scotland Yard, he eventually became Chief Detective at Vine Street and Bow Street, to be ultimately appointed to the responsible post of Chief Inspector at New Scotland Yard.
Of Inspector Conquest's many experiences, some of which are known to the writer, may be mentioned the sensation caused in the Strand district by the arrest of Leo Serne, a barber, for setting fire to his house, and thus causing the death of his two sons (one an imbecile). Serne had insured the lives of the boys and his furniture and effects for about 700 pounds. After six days' trial, Serne was acquitted on the charge of murder, but, greatly to the surprise of everyone, kept in custody till the following sessions, when he was tried for arson and condemned to twenty years' penal servitude. The second trial lasted as long as the first, and nearly one hundred witnesses were examined.
Another important case was that of Charles Russell and William Whistler for a series of burglaries, the principal one being at a house at Audley Square, Park Lane, where 3,000 pounds worth of jewellery was stolen from the lady's bedroom. Russell, dressed as an old country squire, would go to West End house agents and get orders to view houses in wealthy neighbourhoods, usually choosing those in a terrace, where they are invariably of one build, so that by seeing an empty house he could draw a plan of the interior of any other house in the terrace, always particularising the lady's bedroom. A confederate lad would slip along the roofs into the garret window of the intended house, and then ransack the bedrooms whilst the family were at dinner. A code of signals, consisting of striking matches, was arranged, and it was through these signals that Inspector Conquest got on the burglars' track. He proved about fifteen or twenty burglaries of this class in three months, all done by this boy under the instructions of Russell and Whistler. Russell and Whistler were tried at the Central Criminal Court and sentenced to fifteen years each.
The most recent cases in which Inspector Conquest has been engaged are - first, the robbery of the silver ingots from the Midland Railway Company. It will be remembered how they were traced by him to various parts of London, some being found buried in the back garden of a house in the North of London, and some in a van which was being driven by the thieves in the Bow Road. One of these thieves was an old ticket-of-leave man, at whose house were found the proceeds of about twelve different burglaries. Since then the indefatigable inspector discovered that a private detective in the employ of the District Railway was habitually working with pickpockets on the line, and the so-called detective was sentenced to twenty-two months' hard labour.
In December, 1888, he arrested a man in the vicinity of Gray's Inn Road for manufacturing Bank of England notes. When he made the raid he found him actually at work printing them, some being then hanging on a line in the room to dry. This is the first case of the kind when the plates and all appliances for the manufacture of Bank of England notes have been found for the past thirty years. The forger got seven years.
These and many other such smart captures show that John Conquest was indeed a terror to criminals, and that he has earned the right to be respected by all just and honest men. Scotland Yard has indeed suffered a loss by the retirement of so keen-sighted and successful a detective, and, indeed, may not thank us for drawing the attention of the public to the withdrawal of one of their best safeguards. But it is right that a tried public official should receive due recognition, and I trust that Chief Inspector Conquest may live long to enjoy his pension. I may add that Mr. Conquest is I.P.M., Vitruvian Lodge, No. 87, and was one of the stewards at this year's festival for aged Freemasons.

Source: Black and White, August 19, 1899, Page 230

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Re: Chief-Inspector Conquest

Post by Karen on Wed 8 Feb 2012 - 12:59

THE FEMALE ERRAND "BOY."

The young woman, Lois Schwich, aged 21, who, for some months past, while wearing the dress of a boy, acted as an assistant and porter to Mr. F. Noble Jones, a glover, of Burlington-arcade, was again placed in the dock, at Marlborough-street police-court, on Wednesday, charged with having robbed her master of silk stockings, fans, and other goods to a large amount. The case excited unusual interest, and the court was crowded during the investigations. - The accused wore the same dress as when remanded last week - trowsers and vest, and black jacket, turned-down linen collar, and deer-stalker hat, and she maintained a passive demeanour as before. When offered a chair she declined to be seated, and stood during the hearing, leaning her left arm on the back rail of the dock. Altogether, her "make up" was perfect, and not one in a thousand would have judged her to be otherwise than a boy.
Mr. Abrahams, who defended, said that since the remand he had made an appeal to the public on behalf of the prisoner and her family, and contributions amounting to upwards of 10 pounds had been received. - Mr. Newton said that the case had excited considerable interest. Although contributions had been sent in, it must not be forgotten that the girl had endeavoured to fix her guilt upon an innocent person.
The assistants to several pawnbrokers were called, and they deposed to receiving pairs of silk hose, fans, and other goods in pledge, for small amounts, the names given being mostly those of Day and Mansfield. - Mr. Jones, the prosecutor, being recalled, said that he began to miss property soon after the prisoner entered his service. His suspicions were aroused, because articles which he had procured for special customers could not be found for delivery. They were stolen, in fact, soon after they were sold. - In cross-examination he said that he did not tell the prisoner's mother he would not prosecute her daughter if she told the truth. The police requested him not to say anything to the woman. Detective-serjeant Greete did say, he believed, it would rest with him (Mr. Jones) whether he would prosecute; but if she (the mother) was disposed to give information as to where the pawntickets could be found, most likely he would not proceed against her. The value of the goods missing he estimated at about 15 pounds. - Inspector Conquest, the Detective department, spoke to finding the pawntickets for the articles produced, when searching the rooms occupied by the family in Osborne-buildings, Marylebone. Some of them were discovered in an old box, and others were in drawers. - This was the case for the prosecutor, and Mr. Abrahams said he had no witnesses to call, and the prisoner's defence would be reserved. - The accused was committed for trial on this charge.
Mr. Newton then proceeded with another charge of felony against the accused. He said that Messrs. Goodman and Davis, tailors, of Oxford-street, had received the prisoner into their employ as an errand boy, and soon discovered that they were being robbed. Another errand boy was discharged on suspicion, but subsequently it alighted on the accused, who was found to be wearing a suit of clothes made of cloth which they had missed from their stock. The buttons bore the name of the firm. In some instances rolls of cloth had been unwound, and pieces taken out of the middle of them, and, as they were rolled up again, suspicion was averted for a time.
Mr. E.L. Goodman, of the firm of Messrs. Goodman and Davis, tailors, Oxford-street, said that in January last prisoner called upon them. Witness thought she was a lad. She asked to be employed as an errand boy, saying that her mother was engaged at a furrier's, but that it was such a precarious living for them, that she wanted to get constant employment. She said that she had never been out at work before, and that her age was 15. Very soon after she came to their shop they began to miss things. He suspected her and had her taken to the police-station in the Tottenham-court-road, but the inspector thought there would be some difficulty in his proving the case, and he refrained from prosecuting. The prosecutor discharged the prisoner at once, and paid her the wages that were owing to her. Afterwards there were no robberies at their shop, and things assumed their normal condition. Altogether property to the value of about 80 pounds was missed. - Two pawnbrokers' assistants produced two pairs of trowsers, which were pledged by a female, in the name of Aldous, in February last for 4s. each pair, as also remnants of cloth pledged in the same manner, all of which were identified by Mr. Goodman as his property.
Inspector Conquest said that most likely other charges would be forthcoming, and he asked for a further remand. - The Magistrate acquiesed, and the accused was removed; her mother, on the application of Mr. Abrahams, being allowed to have an interview with her in the cells.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, October 24, 1886, Page 4

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Re: Chief-Inspector Conquest

Post by Karen on Wed 8 Feb 2012 - 13:06

THE BLACKHEATH TRAGEDY.
MURDERER STILL AT LARGE.

This morning Inspector Conquest and Inspector Gummer attended Lee police-station in consequence of an intimation they had received that two arrests had been made last night by Detective-sergeant Pullen, of the R Division. The men were detained pending inquiries, but this morning Inspector Conquest thought it advisable to order their release, as there was no evidence to warrant their further detention.
Sergeant Pullen stated this morning that a thorough search of the house revealed the fact that nothing in the shape of valuables was missed. Since yesterday a purse has been found in the bedroom in which Mrs. Tyler was found dead. The purse was open and quite empty. There was nothing to show if it had contained money, but the police believe that a fairly good sum was taken away, as it is known that Mrs. Tyler always kept a considerable amount of money in the house.

Source: The Echo, Wednesday August 17, 1898, Page 3

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Re: Chief-Inspector Conquest

Post by Karen on Wed 8 Feb 2012 - 15:41

LONDON HOTEL ROBBERIES.
PRISONER CONFESSES.

Robert Holroyd Goat, who is charged with stealing a large quantity of jewellery and other valuables from various private hotels in Bloomsbury, was again brought up at Bow-street today. He describes himself as a draper's assistant, but gives no address.

THE PROPERTY STOLEN.

Miss Smith, daughter of the proprietor of the West Central Hotel, Southampton-row, said that on the 16th of August, the prisoner engaged a bedroom at the hotel. He left soon afterwards, and then a quantity of property was missed. - Miss Eliza Jefferson, of Clifton, said she was staying at the West Central Hotel at the time. On the evening of the 16th of August she found that a trunk and a portmanteau belonging to her had been opened. A number of articles, including two gold watches and gold and diamond rings, had been stolen. The property stolen was worth 50 pounds. The gold watch and seal produced belonged to witness. - Mr. Henry Dew, proprietor of a private hotel at 44, Upper Bedford-place, said that on Monday last the prisoner also engaged a bedroom at his hotel. The prisoner afterwards went into the drawing-room. He shortly afterwards left the hotel, and did not return. Mrs. Elizabeth Pigott said she was staying at 44, Upper Bedford-place. She and her husband occupied a bedroom next to the drawing-room. On Monday evening last they returned to their room and found two trunks had been opened. All the jewellery had been stolen, amongst which there were eight brooches in gold, silver, and mosaic, seven rings set with precious stones, a locket, and five bracelets, and a silver bracelet. Part of the property produced belonged to witness.

PRISONER'S CONFESSION.

Detective Nicholls deposed that at Hunter-street Police-station, whilst being detained, the prisoner said, "I had better make a clean breast of the whole affair. I have done all the jobs, and will try to think where the property is." - Detective-inspector Conquest said that, in consequence of the prisoner's statement, he went to 10, North Bank, St. John's-wood. He there saw Kate Seymour, who handed him over some jewellery, part of which had been identified by Mrs. Pigott. Inspector Conquest further stated that there would be a great many more charges against the prisoner from all parts of the country. - The prisoner was accordingly remanded until Friday next.

Source: The Echo, Friday September 14, 1888, Page 3

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Re: Chief-Inspector Conquest

Post by Karen on Wed 8 Feb 2012 - 16:07

THE STRAND FIRE.
PROCEEDINGS AT BOW-STREET.

Leon Serne and John Goldfinch were charged, on remand, at Bow-street, today, with wilfully setting fire to No. 274, Strand, and thereby causing the death of two boys, sons of the prisoner Serne. Mr. Charles Matthews prosecuted on behalf of the Public Prosecutor; Mr. Geoghegan and Mr. Lawless defended Serne; Mr. Freke Palmer defended Goldfinch.
Henry Lewis, of Alderley-street, Pimlico, deposed to the receipt of an application from Serne for a loan. The advance was refused unless previous bills were settled. This was done, and 80 pounds was advanced on a bill of sale on the furniture and lease. The security also included policies of insurance. - Cross-examined: He valued the security at 100 pounds.
P.C. Young produced plans of the scene of the fire. - By Mr. Geoghegan: From the gutter where Serne and his wife were rescued, to the ground was a distance of thirty or forty feet. There was a window about six feet below, by which the defendant and his wife were rescued.
Police-constable Ross deposed that he was on duty in the Strand, on the 19th, at about twenty minutes to one. He saw a light in Serne's shop. He tried the door, and found it secure. He looked through the window and saw two men sitting inside the shop. Serne was one of the men. Witness went away, and about five minutes afterwards he heard a policeman's whistle in Clare Market. He went there, and stayed half an hour. On his return he heard other policemen's whistles, and on arriving at 274, Strand, saw smoke issuing through the cracks. He tried to force the door, but did not succeed. He looked through the shop window. He saw small flames on the right hand side and to the left hand corner of the shop. He also saw a fire burning very briskly. There was nothing to connect the two fires; they were separate and distinct. Witness assisted in forcing the door of 275, and went upstairs.
By Mr. Geoghegan - He did not make a report to his inspector or anyone in authority. He did not go before the Coroner's Jury.
To whom did you mention what you have told us today - to Mr. Conquest (the Inspector in charge of the case?) - Yes.
Mr. Geoghegan - When? - Last Friday. I kept the information until then.
And this happened two months ago. How long have you been in the police? - Eighteen months.
Cross-examination continued - The blind was up in the shop, and the two men he saw were smoking cigars. One of the fires was near the doorway, and one at the side. The two fires were ten or twelve feet apart. There was little smoke.
Mr. Geoghegan - That was a suspicious circumstance, was it not? - Yes.
Then why in the name of common sense did you keep it to yourself so long? - I wasn't asked.
Then you mean to say that you don't make a report until you are asked? - I asked the Inspector whether I should make a report, and he told me that Police-constable 181 was making a report. I did not tell the Inspector what I had seen.
Did you know that Inspector Conquest had charge of the case at the inquest? - Yes.
Did you tell the Inspector when the inquest was going on that you had seen a suspicious circumstance? - No.
And until you saw Inspector Conquest you did not mention a word? - I did not.
(The report will be continued.)

Source: The Echo, Thursday November 3, 1887, Page 3

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Re: Chief-Inspector Conquest

Post by Karen on Fri 10 Feb 2012 - 20:42

WANDSWORTH POLICE COURT.

Ann Kenworthy, a laundress, was re-examined on three charges. - The prisoner was in the employ of Mrs. Connor, of Wimbledon-common, a laundress, who worked for Dr. John Henry Brydges, of Furze-bank, Thornton-hill, Wimbledon, and Mr. Henry Maynard, of St. Holborn's, Grosvenor-hill. In the former the prisoner received 11s. 4d. from Jane Platt, the servant, but she did not pay the money over to Mrs. Connor. From the latter she received a sovereign to get change, the amount due being 16s. 8d., but she did not return, nor pay the money to her mistress. The prisoner, who had stolen some handkerchiefs and a chemise belonging to Mrs. Connor, was found by Sergeant Conquest drunk in bed, in Kingston. - The prisoner asked the magistrate to deal leniently with her on account of her two young children. - Committed for trial.

Source: The Journal of the County of Surrey, Wandsworth & Battersea District Times and Putney, Roehampton, and Wimbledon News, Saturday November 16, 1878

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Re: Chief-Inspector Conquest

Post by Karen on Fri 10 Feb 2012 - 20:51

John Behagg, a labourer, living at Lewisham, was charged with stealing a sovereign the property of a lady named Louisa Eliza Brown, residing at 6, Halbrake-terrace, St. John's-hill. - The prosecutrix said on Saturday the prisoner assisted to remove her sister's furniture to 1, Alma-place. The bill amounted to 2 pounds 2s., but as she had not sufficient change she put down three sovereigns. The man who receipted the bill passed one sovereign to the prisoner to change. He returned in a few minutes and handed her a coin, stating that he could not change it as it was a bad sovereign. She looked at it and said it was not her money. - Sergeant Conquest produced the coin, which was a Crystal Palace medal. - The prisoner declared it was the same coin which he took off the table. - The sergeant stated that the prisoner told him that he took the coin to a public-house to change. Witness took him to the public-house, but the barman could not identify him. - Remanded.

Source: The Journal of the County of Surrey, Wandsworth & Battersea District Times, and Putney, Roehampton, and Wimbledon News, Saturday August 2, 1879

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Re: Chief-Inspector Conquest

Post by Karen on Sat 11 Feb 2012 - 1:52

POLICE COURTS.
SILK CLUB SECRETS.

WOMAN'S THEFTS FROM A CITY WAREHOUSE.

Elizabeth Stevens, married, aged forty-five, of Appleby's, Kingland-road, pleaded guilty at Mansion House yesterday to stealing large quantities of silk. Marie Dawtry, also married, living in Brook-street, Queen's-road, Dalston, pleaded guilty as a receiver.
Stevens had been for thirty years a trusted charwoman for Messrs. Hayes, Candy, and Co., silk merchants, of Friday-street, City. For five years she had been systematically robbing the firm of pieces of silk and supplying them to her silk clubs, of which she had organised many.
Each club consisted of thirteen women, who paid Stevens 3d. per week each, and drew lots to decide the rotation in which they should have the privilege of purchasing pieces of silk at the low rate of 1s. per yard. This material she had stolen from her employers, whom it had cost from 3s. 6d. to 5s. 6d. per yard.
She was ultimately detected on April 23 through the agency of ex-Detective-Inspector Conquest, who placed one of his assistants as "a new hand" in the packing department. The piece she was then carrying away was worth 50s., and other valuable pieces were found at her house.
Stevens's arrest led to the detection of Mrs. Dawtry, who had been concerned in the formation of three similar clubs during the past eighteen months.
It was thought that many hundred pounds' worth of silk had been taken.
Alderman Sir Thomas Crosby sentenced Mrs. Stevens to six months' imprisonment and Mrs. Dawtry to three months, each in the second division.

Source: Daily Mail, Tuesday May 12, 1908, Page 10

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Re: Chief-Inspector Conquest

Post by Karen on Sat 11 Feb 2012 - 1:57

Mr. Gladstone left Euston Station, London, by the 2:35 train yesterday afternoon in a saloon composite carriage, the only occupants of such were his man servant and Inspector Conquest. On the train arriving at Chester a small crowd gathered in front of the carriage, and heartily cheered the Premier, who bowed his acknowledgements. The carriage was at once attached to a special engine, and taken to Broughton Hall Station, whence Mr. Gladstone was driven to Hawarden Castle.

Source: The Edinburgh Courant, Friday October 10, 1884, Page 3

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Re: Chief-Inspector Conquest

Post by Karen on Sat 11 Feb 2012 - 2:05

John Russell, a joiner, was re-examined on the charge of stealing two 5 pound notes and 3 pounds in gold, belonging to Walter James Taylor, clerk to the Tax Commissioners, of 9, Lime-grove, Battersea-rise, where he (the prisoner) had been lodging. - Mr. Jones defended. - Detective Conquest said he found, in addition to the diamond ring which the prisoner had purchased, several neckties and other articles, all new. Since the prisoner had been in custody four new suits of clothes and a sealskin jacket had been sent to him from a tailor at Peterborough. He asked for a remand, as other property had been stolen. - Mr. Paget then remanded the prisoner, and refused an application of Mr. Jones to make an order for the delivery of the new clothes for the purposes of the prisoner's defence. - The detective afterwards said Mr. Jones had threatened to summon him for detaining the clothes.

Source: The Journal of the County of Surrey, Wandsworth & Battersea District Times, and Putney, Roehampton, and Wimbledon News, Saturday November 11, 1876

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Re: Chief-Inspector Conquest

Post by Karen on Sat 11 Feb 2012 - 2:13

TWO DISTINGUISHED DETECTIVES.

At Scotland-yard, in the presence of a number of the chief officers of the Criminal Investigation Department, Chief Superintendent Swanson made presentations to two retiring officers - Chief Inspector Conquest and Inspector Brockwell - both of whom have been instrumental in bringing many criminals to justice. Chief Inspector Conquest, who was one of the most respected and ablest members of Scotland-yard, received a handsome cruet-stand, and Inspector Brockwell was presented with a time-piece. Mr. Swanson explained that these presents were given by the Criminal Investigation Staff as some small expression of the esteem and regard in which Messrs. Conquest and Brockwell were held by their companions in the work of detecting crime. He spoke in detail of the record of both officers, whose expression of thanks closed a pleasant incident. Chief Inspector Moore, of Scotland-yard, retires next Saturday.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday October 3, 1899

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Re: Chief-Inspector Conquest

Post by Karen on Sat 11 Feb 2012 - 2:18

Police Promotion. - Detective-Inspector John Conquest, who is a well-known in connection with the outrage by three masked burglars at a Lewisham's jewellers shop, has been promoted to the rank of chief-inspector at Scotland Yard.

Source: Blackheath Gazette, Friday October 1, 1897, Page 5

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Re: Chief-Inspector Conquest

Post by Karen on Sat 11 Feb 2012 - 2:24

THE FORTUNE OF A DETECTIVE. -

Charles Stuart, of 54, Fonthill-road, Finsbury park, was charged with professing to tell fortunes by means of handwriting. In consequence of advertisements which appeared in several newspapers, Inspector Conquest communicated with the prisoner, and in reply received a letter which stated that his future life would be unsettled, but that he would meet with success, and that his handwriting indicated imagination, generosity, hope, impulsiveness, tenderness, judgment, enthusiasm, and firmness. The officer afterwards arrested Stuart, and discovered at his lodgings a number of letters from females enclosing stamps.
- Sir John Bridge remanded the prisoner.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, July 12, 1891, Page 3

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Re: Chief-Inspector Conquest

Post by Karen on Mon 13 Feb 2012 - 22:36

THE BLACKHEATH TRAGEDY.
POLICE WITH A CLUE.

INQUIRIES AT DEPTFORD.

The mystery surrounding the death of Mrs. Tyler still remains to be cleared up, but, says the London News Agency, inquiries made this morning not only tend to confirm the theory of murder, but go to prove that it has been the work of a gang. Last night Inspector Stevens of the R Division, effected several arrests of persons of whom he had some suspicion in consequence of robberies which have taken place in the neighbourhood of Lea, Blackheath, and Lewisham. The persons arrested, however, managed to give satisfactory accounts of their doings, and were released this morning. Detective-Inspector Conquest, of Scotland-yard, visited the scene together with Inspector Stevens, Detective-Inspector Gunner, and Inspectors Vagg and Pullen.

A Visit to Deptford.

In consequence of information supplied to Mr. Conquest, a visit was paid to a certain part of Deptford. There a man was inquired for, but it was ascertained that upon his knowing that there was a likelihood of a police visit he decamped. Inspector Conquest attaches considerable importance to this, and it is understood that in all probability an arrest which will tend to clear up the mystery in a great measure will be effected in the course of the next twenty-four hours.
The police are very reticent in giving information, and the part of Deptford in which this man lives is kept secret. It is understood, however, that the suspect lives in a house some distance off the High-road, Deptford, in one of the lowest parts of the parish.

Mrs. Tyler's Valuables.

With regard to the property in the house at the time of the murder, a representative of the London News Agency had an interview this morning with Mr. Jenkins, auctioneer and surveyor, of Lewisham, High-road. Mr. Jenkins, it appears, shortly after the death of the murdered woman's husband, took an inventory of the valuables belonging to the late Mr. Tyler, for probate purposes. At present it is impossible to gather the exact value, but it was understood that the plate in Mrs. Tyler's possession at the time of her death would realise some 500 pounds. Inspector Stevens this morning stated that as a result of the investigations and search made at the house, the opinion is that nothing has been stolen.

The Police Theory.

The police theory is that just at the point where the murderer was likely to make off with the booty he was disturbed by the rushing of firemen and policemen to a fire which had broken out close by. This would probably be after the murder had been done, and in order to escape detection he cleared off whilst the rush was taking place along the road.

Distinct Foot Prints.

With regard to the point that the police believe the murder to be the work of a gang, the impression prevails that the foot marks outside the house itself are distinct, and show signs of several persons having been concerned. So far as the interior of the house is concerned, there is no other indication than that one person had been in.
Inspector Conquest favours the idea that the woman was disturbed in her sleep by the murderer entering the room in order to secure some valuables which she had there under lock and key, and when she made her presence known by arousing from her sleep, the murderer attacked her, though not with the intention of taking her life.

Special Patrols.

Special constables in private clothes are on patrol throughout the residential part of Blackheath and Lea. Last night a draft of about twelve was put in, and it is understood that these will be kept up under orders from Scotland-yard for some considerable time.

SURROUNDED BY MYSTERY.

We announced yesterday that a tragedy of a sensational character was reported as having occurred at Blackheath early in the morning. There is still a great deal of mystery surrounding the case, and while one most circumstantial account says that the old lady was strangled, another story contradicts it, and says that the death is due to heart disease.

An Escape Theory.

The fact that little or nothing is reported missing from the house can be easily explained. At a short time before daybreak a hayrick on the Manor Park Farm, adjoining the house, caught fire, probably through spontaneous combustion. The blaze evidently attracted the attention of the burglar, who, being alarmed as he heard the people running along the road, made his exit as quickly and as quietly as possible. He left the house by means of the kitchen door, and crossed the garden, for among the flower-beds the Scotland-yard detectives discovered a few clearly-defined footmarks. Of these they made careful plaster casts. They followed the tracks as far as the fence leading to the land beyond, but here they were lost, as the ground, hardened by the hot sun of the past week, retained not the slightest tell-tale traces.

Mrs. Tyler's Relatives.

Upon the news of the murder being received by one of Mrs. Tyler's relatives in the City that gentleman immediately telegraphed for her two daughters - Miss Tyler and Mrs. Huxham. Miss Tyler arrived at Blackheath in the course of the afternoon, but the first intimation her sister had of the terrible tragedy was in the columns of one of the evening papers which she purchased upon seeing the murder announced on the bills.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday August 16, 1890, Page 3

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Re: Chief-Inspector Conquest

Post by Karen on Tue 14 Feb 2012 - 1:25

THE SOCIETY DIVORCE CASE.
A MYSTERIOUS VISITOR.

His Name Studiously Kept Secret.
CABMEN AND THEIR STORIES.

A Description of Fares.

From the appearance outside the Law Courts it seemed as if public interest in the Hartopp-Cowley case had waned with the adjournment over the week-end, but when the jury met today for the eighth time there was a greater crowd inside Mr. Justice Gorell Barnes's court than ever.
Accompanied by her lady friends, Mrs. Sands arrived in court again differently dressed. This morning she appeared in a sealskin, with furs, and neatly-trimmed hat.
There was a little hitch at the commencement of the proceedings owing to the absence of a juror, but it was eventually agreed by both parties to go on with the case, and Emily Denison, whose cross-examination was not concluded when the Court rose on Friday, now continued to give some details as to how she became connected with the case.
She saw Mrs. Taylor, who asked her if she knew anything about Sir Charles Hartopp, and on her replying that she did, she went to Inspct. Conquest's office. Shortly after her first visit to the inquiry agent she received a wire from a Mrs. Stevenson, asking her to "come at once to my house." She went, and found that she was wanted to go to Brighton.
"With whom did you go?" asked Mr. Walton.
"Mrs. Taylor and Mrs. Stevenson," replied witness.
"Who gave you the money to pay for everything?" - "I had no money."
"Who paid then?" - "Mrs. Stevenson paid. "I suppose she got it from Inspector Conquest."
"How long did you have in Brighton?" "And what did you spend?" - "I was there a week, but I did not have any money."
"Was Mrs. Sands in when you left her?" queried the intervener's counsel, Mr. Rufus Isaacs.
"No. I believe she was staying at the Hotel Cecil," witness answered, and went on to state that she could not remember into whose service she went before being employed by Mrs. Sands. She certainly could not recollect the names of any callers.

Talking It Over.

It was true that they had talked the case over, whilst at Brighton. "Ah! I thought so. Women would," commented Mr. Isaacs.
"Now," said Mr. Inderwick, "can you tell us the name of the other gentleman who came to Mrs. Sands' whilst Sir Charles Hartopp was there. I don't want you to mention it, write it down on this slip" - and a piece of blue paper was handed up.
Witness wrote the name, and it was handed to the judge, who scrutinised it.
"I should like to see it," said Mr. Walton.
"Certainly," replied the judge, "but you had better not let it go further than necessary."
The note was passed down, and petitioner was allowed to see it. "I think counsel had better keep that, if possible," remarked the judge, and Mrs. Sands smiled as the blue slip was handed about.

Mrs. Sands' Cabman.

Then came Mrs. Sands' cabman to continue the story. He had driven her "reg'lar" from 1893 to 1898, with a break during her visit to Australia. He had set her down at Graham-street, Gloucester-terrace, Gloucester-place, to Pimlico, and later to 1, South-street, Thurloe-square.
"Have you driven her when she has had gentlemen?" Mr. Inderwick inquired.
"Yes, Sir," cabby quickly replied.
"Did you know their names?" - "Yes; some I knew, and some Mrs. Sands told me."
"Do you see anyone in court you drove with her?" - "Yes; Sir Charles Hartopp. I know him perfectly by sight, having driven him to the Turf Club and Half Moon-street many times."
Witness then detailed the instances on which he had driven Sir Charles and Mrs. Sands together. They went to Romano's on one occasion in 1897, and from Mrs. Stone's chambers. It was at that period that he used to be hired by the day by Mrs. Sands."
"When was that?" asked counsel.
"Well, about 1879," and, noticing the laugh, corrected himself - "I mean 1897."
"And when do you say Sir Charles used to go to Half Moon-street?" - "About 1998 - (laughter) - I mean 1898," said Mr. Law.
He had driven Mrs. Sands with so many gentlemen that he could not give all their names. He was certain that Sir Charles was the gentleman he drove on four separate occasions since 1897.
"And since that time you have driven Mrs. Sands with other gentlemen?" pursued Mr. Walton.
"Oh, scores!" came the emphatic response.
"And you have driven hundreds and thousands in the West-end since that time?" - "I'm not so lucky." (Laughter.)
"Five years is a very long time, isn't it?" - "Yes; especially when gentlemen keep you waiting a long time for your money."
It transpired, according to the cross-examination, that witness first heard of the case through the papers, and then he received a note from Inspector Conquest, and in July he went to his office.
"What did he say to you when you got in, "Here's a photo of Sir Charles Hartopp?" - "No. "Good morning," I suppose." (Loud laughter.)
Witness continued to say he did not know what he had been called to the office for, but when asked about the case, he remembered the occasions very well, for he used to be in daily attendance on Mrs. Sands.
Another cabdriver was called, and said he had driven Mrs. Sands regularly when she lived at No. 1, South-street. On several occasions he had driven her with gentlemen, and about 1900 he remembered driving Sir Charles and Mrs. Sands from Prince's Restaurant about three or four in the afternoon, setting them down in Thurloe-square. He was told to come back in the evening, and on doing so he took Sir Charles to the Turf Club.
Another time he drove the couple from Romano's in the Strand to South-street after midnight. Again, when he had driven Mrs. Sands home alone, he saw Sir Charles go into the house afterwards.
"Have you been seen about this case by anybody?" asked Mr. Priestley.
"About a fortnight ago," replied witness; "Mrs. Sands wanted to know what I knew about the case."
Mr. Priestley: "Well, what did you say?"
Witness: "I didn't know; and she asked me if I was going to be a witness, and, if so, what did I know about her."
"And you said -?"
"That I had been driving gentlemen with her."
"What did she say?"

Emphatic Language.

"She called me a liar; that it was a lie, and she could prove it. It was only one man she had been with, the one who she was devoted to, and who ruined her. She then called me a liar or a bally liar. I left the step."
"Did she offer any money?"
"No; but she said I was being bought over, and that she would have my licence taken away. She also told me she had been offered 3,000 pounds." (Laughter.)
"Do you know Mrs. Sands' servant?"
"Oh, yes; she told me all Mrs. Sands' business, and the gentlemen's names. The maid came to where we were talking near the door, at the time she was telling me off, and said, "Don't get excited, madam."
Mr. Walton wanted to know if witness had tried to sell Mrs. Sands a silver cigar-case, and he replied that he had, but the case was one he had received from a relative, and not one "which should have been taken back to Scotland-yard." Mrs. Sands would not buy it; and he had only taken it there because she was a good fare and paid well.
Mr. Isaacs: "Were you not hanging about the district, and Mrs. Sands accused you of it?"
Witness: "No, certainly not. I dropped my fares in the district."
"You did not tell her that you had heard from Law and that you were in this case as a witness; that you had been offered a handsome sum and thirty bob a day whilst the case lasted?"
"No; I never used those words. When I denied it Mrs. Sands said it was a d------d lie."
"Do you know Louisa Pratt?"
"I have seen her in court this week, and when I was speaking to Mrs. Sands she mentioned her name. Did I know her? I asked her if it was a girl who had been in her house and had got into trouble. She got excited and said, "You mean Mrs. Pratt. I would give her two years."
"That is all?" - "Well I left then."
Witness was again asked by Mr. Walton if he could remember how many times he had driven Sir Charles and Mrs. Sands, and answered about four. He could recollect the names of some of the gentlemen he had driven home with her, and was now asked to write them down.
This witness did, and besides Sir Charles Hartopp's name four others figured on the slip, and were made known to counsel. It was not true that Mrs. Sands had said to him, "You have only driven me with one gentleman. When you come to think they are alike." Witness did not agree that there was a similarity, and now added that he was driving Sir Charles 18 months before Mrs. Sands "found" this other gentleman.
"What is the difference between the two?" Mr. Inderwick wanted to know.
"Well, Sir, one had a very pale face," explained Colbourne, "whilst Sir Charles has a sporting face - a very red face," and witness left the box, enjoying the hearty laugh he had raised by his apt description.
His Lordship now announced that he had made inquiries as to the absence of one of the jurymen, and had found that he had met with an accident. The medical certificate had been forwarded; would they go on with the case?

Another Cabman.

Counsel unanimously agreed that the jury of eleven should continue the case, and more evidence of cabmen was called.
One man testified to having driven Sir Charles Hartopp with Mrs. Sands half a dozen times. He had been called to Prince's and to Romano's.
"Ah! Romano's is in the Strand, is it not; a lot of people go there?" said Mr. Walton.
"Yes; it's a very gay place," said the cabman, with a twinkle in his eye.
"Do you say Sir Charles went to a public restaurant with this lady?" - "Yes; in the height of the season."
"And you say you drove to Prince's, an even more generally known place than Romano's?" - "Yes."
Witness added that on two occasions he drove them to the Cafe Cavour, and to the Cabin. Sir Charles offered him a cigarette once, but he was not aware that petitioner did not smoke cigarettes.
He started his hansom three years ago, and before that had a four-wheeler. The drives he had spoken of were in the latter, as Mrs. Sands was nervous and preferred a four-wheeler." Since, he had driven her in his hansom, as he lived near Thurloe-square.
"When did you first hear of this case?" asked Mr. Isaacs.
"When I read of it in the paper, and went to Mr. Charles Wilson, at Grosvenor-square, and asked him if I could be of any service to him, as I knew Mrs. Sands and had carried her," replied witness, whose name is Harry Summerfield.
"Why did you go to Mr. Wilson?"
"Can't I go and see a gentleman if I like?"
"Did you go because you thought he would pay well?" the K.C. questioned, with fine sarcasm.
"Oh, no. I saw the name of Mrs. Sands, and went to him because he was mentioned," was the explanation given.

Parlourmaid's Story.

Maud Fleet, a shop assistant, was at one time in the employment of Mrs. Sands, as house-parlour-maid. "How long did you remain in her service?" questioned Sir Edward Clarke, and on the reply, "About eight months" being given, Mrs. Sands gave an indignant "Oh!" Louisa Pratt was cook when she was there.
"Did gentlemen come to the house?" - "Yes; several came there - at South-street."
These were generally shown into the dining and drawing rooms, but she could not say whether they went into any other room. Sir Charles Hartopp she had seen there twice. In fact, he had tea with her one afternoon, witness serving it."
The cabman Summerfield had asked her why she did not come to give evidence, and witness said she did not want to. "Mrs. Sands is in it," said he, "and Sir Charles Hartopp." She recognised the gentleman, but did not know his name until recently.
"Now, I put it to you that you were only at Mrs. Sands' a month?" said Mr. Isaacs.
"No," shortly replied the witness, and Mr. Isaacs, after conferring with Mrs. Sands, said "Sure?"
"Yes, for Mrs. Sands gave me a reference for eight months to a Mrs. Turner."
Mrs. Sands, at the front table, bit her lips in annoyance.

"Hounded By Detectives."

Sir Edward supplied the date of the witness's engagement with Mrs. Sands as being September 6th, and then called Mr. Francis Kalb (clerk to the respondent's solicitor, Mr. Wontner), who spoke of a visit to Mrs. Sands at Bedford Court Mansions on behalf of his firm. "I saw her and she seemed indignant at the inquiries made about her. She stated that she was being hounded by detectives, and wanted to know what it all meant. I told her I knew nothing at all about that. She then stated that she was separated from her husband, that she was a poor woman, and that as she had a certain allowance from her husband she did not want to lose it. She said she had something to tell me to Lady Hartopp's interest, and I said I had come for the purpose of obtaining information for Lady Hartopp's legal advisers. But she would not make a statement to me, thereupon I suggested she should write to her solicitors."
Eventually Mr. Wontner wrote suggesting that it "would be fairer" if Mrs. Sands employed a solicitor, and denied all responsibility of having been the cause of her annoyance.
"Do you mean to say that your firm did not make any inquiries before you went to Mrs. Sands?" - "Not to my knowledge; I think Messrs. Collier Bristow."
"What, Lord Cowley's solicitors!" - "Yes; I think so."
"Do you suggest that Lord Cowley's solicitors had any legitimate interest in taking steps to establish this cross-petition between Lady Hartopp and Sir Charles Hartopp?" - "I know nothing whatever about it."
"Is it a fact that several inquiry agents have been employed?" - "Two, I think - Inspector Conquest and a Mrs. Addey."
He could not tell how long Conquest had been employed, when he brought certain statements to his office. Mrs. Sands was the first to mention the inspector's name, but he could not fix a date when the inspector first took up the case. Mr. Wontner had made an affidavit on the matter, and had written to Mrs. Sands, suggesting that she should "not be put to any expense," if she went to a solicitor.
"It is rather odd," said Mrs. Sands's counsel, "that your firm should suggest that."
"She told us she was poor - that she had got rid of her jewellery - and could not afford to go to lawyers," answered Mr. Kalb.

Sir Charles in the Box.

That ended the respondent's case, and Mr. Lawson Walton called Sir Charles into the box to refute the charges.
"I think you made the acquaintance of Mrs. Sands some years ago?"
"Yes, about 1897. I met her at luncheon, and was introduced to her by some friends. I had occasionally met her at race meetings, and she was a lady who was well-known."
"Had you any conversation with her?"
"Only once or twice, and the last time was when she came to me to tell me about these divorce proceedings. I suggested that Sir George Lewis should be consulted."
Sir Charles then gave an emphatic denial to all the charges against him. He had never been with Mrs. Sands at any of her residences, at any restaurant, at any theatre, music-hall, or in any cab."
Sir Charles said if he went to the places mentioned he would have been recognised at once; he had never been out with a lady alone since his marriage, neither had he sent off a telegram signed "Charlie" since he was 14. He absolutely denied any impropriety with Mrs. Sands.
"Do you mean to say that the evidence by the six witnesses is untrue?" was Sir Edward's first question.
"Yes," quickly responded Sir Charles.
"You have known Mrs. Sands since 1897 - have you not spoken often to her?" - "Only at racing meetings. Once I went up to her when my dog went over and put his paws on her dress, but I never was on speaking terms with her."
"You knew she had no husband?" - "I never saw her husband, but I saw her with another gentleman."
The witness said, after a long hesitation, that he knew of neither of Mrs. Sands's residences. He only met her at Sandown, Kempton, etc., and once remembered making a bet for her at Sandown. He had never given her a cheque.
"You never met Mrs. Sands at any house in society where you and your wife were invited out sometimes?" suavely inquired Sir Edward.
"No," admitted the witness, slowly. "I can't say I did."
The advocate was persistent about petitioner's alleged visits to Romano's and Prince's, but the baronet maintained that his last visits to those places were a long time ago.

An Emphatic Denial.

When he went to Sir George Lewis he could not remember whether he gave him her address or referred the solicitor to the Red-Book. He did not know Mrs. Sands as passing under any other name, and was most emphatic in denying Sir Edward's suggestions that he had met her constantly.
"You have heard the evidence of the servants at South-street about your going up to the room, and another being kept waiting, and all that?" went on Sir Edward.
"It is an absolute lie," shouted Sir Charles.
"And the others -"
"The whole of the cabmen, the whole of the witnesses - it's one big concoction of lies," angrily protested the petitioner, and added that he only went to Sir George Lewis because Mrs. Sands said she was nervous, and not because he was at all apprehensive. "Mrs. Sands was very much upset at having her name dragged into the divorce court," continued the witness, "and as I was not the least apprehensive or interested I referred her to Sir George Lewis."
In answer to Mr. Walton, he said he was introduced to Mrs. Sands by a gentleman whose name he would rather write than say. There was some talk about Jubilee seats (this was in 1897), and it was only a casual introduction. He had not said anything or done anything whereby Mrs. Sands had taken the course she had in intervening.
Lord Annaly was called, and said he had known Sir Charles for a great number of years, and when he had been at their house he thought Lady Hartopp and Sir Charles got on remarkably well. His impression was that the petitioner was a very good-natured man, and certainly not irritable; he always spoke of her in affectionate terms.
Colonel Douglas Dawson, provisionally commanding at Dover, had been for 27 years a friend of Sir Charles. He was one of the joint hosts (with Sir John Willoughby) at Deauville. He remembered their being always on the best of terms, and they seemed affectionate. Whilst on a visit with him he recollected going one morning into Sir Charles's bedroom. Lady Hartopp was dressed, and seated on the side of the bed. "Sir Charles, as usual, was in bed, and the dog was lying on one side," continued the Colonel, "and I remarked what a happy family they seemed to be."
The case was adjourned.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday December 9, 1902

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Re: Chief-Inspector Conquest

Post by Karen on Tue 14 Feb 2012 - 2:08

"BANK NOTES" SEIZED.
CAPTURE OF SUSPECTED FORGER.

HOW THE ARREST WAS EFFECTED.

John Sidney Cottan, aged 32, describing himself as an ornamental engraver, and giving an address at the Triangle Hotel, Smithfield, was charged before Sir James Ingham, at Bow-street Court, today, with feloniously engraving upon a copper-plate a promissory note of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, and having the same in his possession with intent to defraud; and with feloniously having in his possession forged notes of the Bank of England, well knowing them to have been forged. - Mr. Freshfield prosecuted; Mr. Arthur Newton defended.
Mr. Freshfield said that the prisoner was arrested yesterday afternoon by Detective-Inspector Conquest and Detective Collins, at 85, Harrison-street, Gray's-inn-road; but on the present occasion it was only proposed to give evidence of arrest, and ask for a remand.
Mr. Arthur Newton, for the defence, assented.

THE PRISONER'S ARREST.

Inspector Conquest said that on Monday afternoon, accompanied by Collins, he went to 85, Harrison-street, Gray's-inn-road. They proceeded to a back room on the second floor, and knocked. The prisoner opened the door. His hands and face were blackened by ink, and he opened the door slightly. The officers forced their way in, and witness said, "We are police officers; what are you doing here?" At the same time witness picked up a plate (produced) from a bench directly opposite the window. It was a copper-plate, on which was an engraved copy of a 5 pound Bank of England note. Witness said, "What is this for?" He replied, "We are getting out a scheme for Christmas." No other person was in the room at the time. Witness picked up one of the alleged forged notes. There were lines strung across the room, and notes were hung up to dry. The notes corresponded with the engraved plate, and were apparently forgeries on the Bank of England. Prisoner said, "We are going to put 'A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year' on the back."

THE "OTHER MAN."

Witness said, "What do you mean by we?" He replied, "I work with the other man." Witness said, "What is his name?" Prisoner said, "Mr. Devon." When asked where he lived the prisoner replied, "I don't know; somewhere in Clerkenwell." When asked where he could be found, prisoner replied, "I don't know; I picked him up in a public-house." In the room a large printing-press was found. There was flannel round the rollers, and some damped paper on the press, similar to what the notes were made of; also some blotting-paper saturated with water, and between each sheet some paper, similar to that on which the forged notes had been engraved. Seven notes were hanging on the cords mentioned, and were quite wet. Six other notes were in another chair, and three were found in a cupboard, with sixty pieces of paper cut to the size of the notes. About a quire of similar paper was also found uncut. A work-bench was fitted under the window. Thirteen engraver's tools of various kinds were found together, with three bottles containing liquid, some charcoal, whiting, a leather pad, a tin of printing-ink, a cup with a small brush containing printing ink, some beeswax, a piece of indiarubber, and four pads covered with ink. A catalogue for printing-presses was also found, and an invoice of a second-hand copper-plate printing-press, representing the payment of upwards of 6 pounds. When witness entered the room there was a fire in the grate, with a flat-iron being heated for the alleged purposes of drying.

THOUGHT THE EXPLANATION RIDICULOUS.

By Mr. Newton - All the articles were lying about the room. There was a cupboard in the room, and a window without any blinds. The houses opposite were about one hundred yards away. One end of the string from which the notes were hanging was affixed to the window. The prisoner offered no resistance. The other rooms in the house were occupied by other lodgers. The invoice for the printing-press was in the prisoner's name.
Mr. Newton - Did he not say, "We meant to put them on the back of Christmas cards, with the words, 'Wishing you many of them.'"?
Witness - Certainly not. He said it was to form the portion of a Christmas card. I thought the explanation ridiculous.
Mr. Newton - Did he say, "Would any sane man mistake it for a genuine note?" - Certainly not.
Sir James Ingham - Very well. Upon that I will grant a remand.

Source: The Echo, Thursday December 20, 1888, Page 3

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Re: Chief-Inspector Conquest

Post by Karen on Tue 21 Feb 2012 - 13:47

From the International Police & Detective Directory:

108 INTERNAT'L POLICE & DETECTIVE DIRECTORY


London


John Conquest, 36 Great James Stieet, Bedford Row, London, England, W. C. 1.
(Pensioned Chief Detective Inspector, Scotland Yard.)

William Chamberlain, 48 Strand, London, England.

Justin Chevasse, 24 Berlford Street, London, England.

John Clements, 65 A HoII)orn Viaduct, E. C. I., London, E.iglancl.

Henry John Derby, 415 Oxford Street, London, England.

Dews Detective Agency, 50 Buckingham Palace, London, England.

William and Oscar Darling, 5 Henrietta Street, London, England.

Leonard Jolly Death, 12 Burnford Avenue, Fulham, S. W., London, England.

Emile Delvaux, 5 Green Street, Leicester Square, London, England.

Frederick Downess, 16 Basinghall Street, E. C, London. England.

Edward Drew. 64 Victoria Street, London, England.

Miss Kate Ea.'^iton. 10 Warwick Street, W. C.. London, England.

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