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Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

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Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Fri 15 Jul 2011 - 3:04

Detective's Retirement.
A SPLENDID CAREER.

By the retirement of Senior Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins the Council of Seven - a body which watches when London sleeps, and is hated by the criminal community the world over - is shorn of one of its most prominent members.
He is retiring on a full pension after 28 years' service, for 25 years of which he was attached to the Criminal Investigation Department.
Born at Bryanston, Dorset, in 1864, Mr. Collins was educated at the Stourpaine House School, near Blandford, and on leaving school assisted his father, who for 41 years was head game and park keeper to Viscount Portman on the Bryanston Estates.
In April, 1885, on the recommendation of Viscount Portman, Mr. Collins was appointed a constable at Bow-street, and within three years he showed that he possessed abilities which qualified him for the more delicate and intricate work of criminal investigation.
One of his first successes in that direction was the arrest of a daring safe thief. In August, 1888, the railway offices at Plymouth were broken into, and the sum of 620 pounds taken from the safe. A few days later, when it was reported that the man had fled to London, Mr. Collins was one of many officers detailed to search for the wanted man, and within a few hours he had run down his quarry at the Inns of Court Hotel with over 600 pounds of the stolen money in his possession.
When committing the prisoner for trial at the Exeter Assizes, the Mayor and justices particularly complimented Mr. Collins on his smartness.
At the trial the prisoner, who was defended by Sir (then Mr.) Charles Mathews, the present Director of Public Prosecutions, was sentenced to ten years' penal servitude.
A year later Mr. Collins was transferred to Albany-street, the headquarters of the S division, and in 1892 was promoted to sergeant, three years later being transferred to the Central office. Here he had many important cases to deal with; including bank frauds, confidence tricksters and long firm frauds.
In 1896 a delay in the arrival of a mail boat saved his life. He had been sent to South Africa to bring a prisoner home, and a delay on the part of the outward boat resulted in his missing the return journey on the ill-fated Drummond Castle, which went down with all hands off Ushant. Instead he had the companionship of a number of Jameson raiders, including John Drummond Hay, who had just been released by President Kruger.
In 1900, with the rank of detective-inspector, Mr. Collins was placed in charge of the detective section of the J division at Bethnal Green.
It was at the end of 1902 that a young married couple named Darby, with one little child of 18 months, disappeared suddenly from their little general shop in Wyndham-road, Camberwell. Their stock and furniture went as well. There was nothing unusual about this, however, and no one suspected that anything was wrong.
A month later, however, a man named Garland was murderously assaulted at Leyton by a man known as Edgar Edwards in Church-road, Leyton, in response to an advertisement that a general shop was to be let. Whilst the details of the business were being discussed, Edwards, who carried what appeared to be a roll of music in his hand, but really contained a sash-weight, made a sudden attack on Garland and almost killed him.
Garland, who was a strong, powerful man, managed to reach the street door and smash the glass. Passers-by rushed in, and Edwards tried to escape by the back way. He was arrested by Mr. Collins, and when the house was searched all the property of the Darbys was found there. A search of the house in Wyndham-road led to the discovery of a similar sash-weight hidden in a cupboard. Darby's friends were traced, but no news of the family could be obtained.
The garden at Leyton was then dug up, and 4ft. below the surface, in the centre of the garden, were found the remains of the Darby family in six sacks. The arms and legs had been sawn from the trunk, and the heads of the father and mother bore evident marks of brutal violence inflicted with the sash-weight. The little baby had been strangled by a cord.
Eventually Mr. Collins was able to prove the case up to the hilt against Edwards, who was hanged in Wandsworth Gaol in March, 1903.
In the same year, a young woman, sister of the licensee of the Lord Nelson, Whitechapel, was stabbed through the heart by a young costermonger named Slowe, with a knife stolen from a horse-slaughterer. The murderer was arrested by Mr. Collins, and was convicted and hanged at Pentonville in 1903.
Soon after, with a rise to the rank of divisional detective-inspector, Mr. Collins was transferred to the T division at Hammersmith.
In 1905 he had an exciting adventure at Fulham, when two burglars were arrested in the Greyhound Public House at two in the morning. The arrest was not, however, without a terrible struggle, and when searched one of the men was found in possession of a loaded revolver. They had with them a complete set of burglars' apparatus, including false keys, which were subsequently found to have been capable of opening the safe, which contained a large sum of money.
When rewarded with the rank of Chief Inspector, Mr. Collins was sent to Scotland Yard again, in 1907. When the mysterious robbery of 3000 pounds from the safe on H.M.S. Indomitable was reported to the Admiralty Chief Inspector Collins was sent to investigate it. After a rough journey on a torpedo boat from Sheerness he boarded the cruiser in a blizzard off Margate.
A long and tedious inquiry resulted in the arrest of three sailors at Portsmouth, all of whom were convicted, the ringleader of the gang getting seven years' penal servitude. In this case Mr. Collins recovered nearly 1000 pounds of the stolen money.
In the later months of 1908 Mrs. J.B. Joel, the wife of the South African millionaire, was terrified by an anonymous communication in which members of a gang known as the "Camerista Monenero" threatened to murder her husband unless they were paid 500 pounds. They explained in detail how members of the secret society had already drawn lots for the tasks imposed unless the demand was complied with.
They explained how a messenger would be sent with a cigar-box with a letter enclosed in which the money was to be placed, and that one of their emissaries had been closely in touch with Mr. Joel only the previous day. They requested that an advertisement be inserted in the "Daily Chronicle" as an answer to the request. The police were notified, and the matter was placed in the hands of Chief Inspector Collins.
As a result the following day the advertisement, "A, 19 - I agree," was published in the advertisement columns of the "Daily Chronicle" in reply to which Mrs. Joel received a letter stating that a member would call. When a man named Canham subsequently called at Mr. Joel's residence at Grosvenor-square he found Mr. Collins waiting to arrest him. Later his confederate, a man named Winborn, was also arrested, and after a long trial both were convicted and sentenced to penal servitude.
In 1911 Mr. Collins was sent by the authorities to the Esquimalt Dockyard, on the Coast of British Columbia, to assist Captain Gerald Vivian, R.N., who was investigating thefts of stores from H.M. ships stationed in Canadian waters. As a result of his assistance the thieves were discovered and convicted.
Mr. Collins was also often engaged in confidential inquiries throughout the country on behalf of various Government departments. He spent many weeks in the Midlands when the maiming outrages were being carried on, and quite recently he was sent to Dundee in connection with the Broughton Ferry mystery.
Mr. Collins has always taken an active interest in sport. Amongst the members of the Metropolitan Shooting League can be found some of the best "shots" in England, and through its instrumentality the Barclay Walker Challenge Shield, one of the finest trophies possessed by the Scotland Yard Rifle Club was offered.
Mr. Collins, who retires with the best wishes of all his comrades, intends to take a position as secretary to a landed proprietor.

Source: Sunday Times, Sunday 22 June 1913, page 2

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Sun 18 Mar 2012 - 6:44

A HACKNEY BURGLARY CASE.

At the London County Sessions, before Mr. Loveland-Loveland, K.C., William Reynolds, 19, furniture dealer, and Thomas Turner, 18, carman, pleaded guilty to having attempted to break into the shop of Edward James Molyneux, pawnbroker, of Mare Street, Hackney.
At the commencement of April so frequently were pawnbroking establishments broken into in Hackney that Detective-Inspector Collins caused special observation to be kept nightly by the officers under his direction. The prisoners were seen to attempt to burglariously enter Mr. Molyneux's premises, and were captured by Detective-Sergeant Nursey after the shop had been surrounded. The night previous, 17th April, the men had escaped by the skin of their teeth owing to a curious occurrence which was of a farcical character. The prisoners had been seen to climb like cats over the leads of a shop kept by Walter George Boulter, at No. 76, Clarence Road, and Detective Sergeants Handley and Brown and other officers were lying in wait for the burglars. Meanwhile two assistants had been awakened by an unusual noise, and suspecting burglars, had crept down to the private door, previously taking the precaution to arm themselves, one with a hammer and the other with a life preserver. Directly they opened the door the police pounced on them, and a serious struggle followed. The officers believed they had the burglars, and the assistants thought they were being attacked by the thieves. Blows were exchanged, and in the end, when the mistake was discovered, mutual explanations and apologies followed, but the culprits escaped in the excitement.
Reynolds was ordered 22 and Turner 12 months' hard labour.

Source: The Mercury, Saturday May 18, 1901, Page 5

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Sun 18 Mar 2012 - 6:55

LONDON COUNTY SESSIONS.
(North Division at Clerkenwell.)

FROM CLERGYMAN TO CRIMINAL. - James Coghlan, 57, clerk, was convicted of having stolen a purse and 3 pounds, belonging to Robert Emery, patent agent, of Piccadilly-mansions, Shaftesbury-avenue. - Detective-inspector Collins said that at the Old Bailey in January, 1889, the prisoner was sentenced to seven years' penal servitude for forgery, by which an old couple named Buckle, of Brixton, were defrauded of over 30,000 pounds, and died destitute. At that time the prisoner was a clergyman of the Church of England, but the witness believed he was afterwards unfrocked. In July, 1903, at Lewes Assizes, prisoner was sentenced to six months' hard labour for cheque frauds and obtaining money by false pretences. Since his release he had been associated with bogus companies. Mr. Loveland-Loveland, K.C., ordered Coghlan 18 months' hard labour.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly News, February 25, 1906, Page 20

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Sun 18 Mar 2012 - 13:19

THREAT TO KILL MR. J.B. JOEL.
500 Pounds Demanded as the Price of His Life.

CLEVER POLICE TRAP.
Two Members of Alleged "Secret Society" Arrested.

The strange story of an attempt to blackmail Mrs. J.B. Joel, wife of the great African millionaire, by threatening to murder her husband, was told on Wednesday at the Marlborough-street Police Court in the prosecution of Charles Winborn, a farrier of Eighth-avenue, Manor Park, and Arthur Thomas Canham, of Clive Cottage, Manor Park.
The arrest of the men was brought about through the insertion by the police of an "agony" advertisement in the "Daily Chronicle" in answer to remarkable letters which had been received by Mr. Joel's wife, and which were read in court.
Chief-inspector Collins, of New Scotland Yard, said that on Sept. 17 the Commissioner of Police received the following letter, which had been addressed to Mrs. Joel: -

The Camerista Monenero.

Madam, - Our letter to your husband having been ignored, we now write to you giving you an opportunity of saving him. It has been decided that unless the sum of 500 pounds be paid to use within two weeks, preparations will at once be made for the death of your husband. Lots have already been drawn, and a brother of the society is now waiting for his orders to proceed. Little did he think how near to him was that member last Wednesday for the purpose of knowing him, and he is still near him, willing to kill him if he has to give his own life in doing so to force the demands of our society.
If you do not agree to let us have the money we shall not molest you in any way now or after the death of your husband as it will make others who are asked more careful how they treat the Camerista Monenero.
If you agree send your reply to A 19, special column, "Daily Chronicle," on or before Friday next. No further letters will be sent to you. - Yours, the C.M.

Inspector Collins said that in consequence of that letter the police caused a notice to appear in the "Daily Chronicle."
This was in the form of the following advertisement: -

A 19 - I agree.

Following that (continued the inspector) a second letter was received by Mrs. Joel as follows: -

Madam, - Yours seen. Will send messenger to your house on Tuesday next at eight p.m. Have the money ready - one half in notes of 5 pounds, the other in gold, made up in 25 pound packets. The messenger will bring a box and wait. Now, consider a lot before you attempt to discover us, or call the police to do so. They might get one or even a hundred, but there are more of the Camerista Monenero then left to carry through what has been started, and there will be no more chance of paying for your safety.
If everything is done honourably you and yours will never be troubled by us, and at any time you want any assistance you can command the whole of the Camerista Monenero by calling through "The Daily Chronicle" special column on A 19.

The Police Trap.

Following the receipt of the second letter, Inspector Collins said that on Tuesday evening he, in company with Detective-Inspector Lawrence and other officers, went to 34, Grosvenor-square, and was there when the prisoner Canham called. He was admitted and shown into a room where witness and Mrs. Joel were seated. He was carrying in his hand an empty cigar-box, and attached to it was a third letter addressed to Mrs. Joel, which was in the following terms: -

Madam, - Remember, if this is not carried out by you honourably, you will also bear the consequences. Our messenger at each corner he passes will pass one of our members, and if he is followed the box will never be called for; we shall then have a double duty to perform. - Yours, A 19, G.M.

Inspector Collins said he asked Canham where he got the cigar-box from, and the man replied: "I met a man in Romford-road, and he asked me if I wanted to earn five shillings, and told me to take the box and note to 34, Grosvenor-square, and wait for an answer."
When told that he would have to go to the police-station Canham made a long statement which the witness did not at present propose to give in evidence. Subsequently Canham said, "I may as well tell you the truth. The two letters sent to Mrs. Joel were written by Winborn. I posted one of them. He was going to give me half the money I got." Witness gave directions for the arrest of Winborn.
The accused were remanded without bail.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly News, September 27, 1908, Page 7

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Sun 18 Mar 2012 - 18:48

London's Latest Tragedy.

[img][/img]

What appears to have been one of the most revolting and sensational murders perpetrated in this country for many years was discovered last Tuesday evening at 89, Church Road, Leyton. Edward Edwards (34), described as a grocer, the tenant of the house in question, was at the time in custody, having been remanded on a charge of assaulting John Garland by striking him over the head with a heavy instrument. Acting upon information received, the police visited Edwards's house, where, buried in the back garden, they found six sacks, containing the remains of a man, woman, and child and a quantity of blood-stained clothing and other effects. On the following day the bodies, the limbs of which had been dismembered with a saw, were identified as those of William John Darby, twenty-six, grocer, lately residing at 22, Wyndham Road, Camberwell, his wife, Beatrice Darby, and their three months old child, Ethel Beatrice Darby, the last-named having been strangled by a man's white cotton handkerchief, which was tied tightly round the neck. Further inquiries elicited the fact that some few weeks ago Mr. Darby advertised his Camberwell grocery business for sale, and that Edwards came forward as the purchaser and entered into possession, subsequently removing some of the furniture and effects to Leyton. About the same time the Darby family disappeared from view, and the neighbours concluded that, having disposed of the business, they had left the district for good.

Dramatic Police-Court Scene.

When, on the last day of the Old Year, Edwards was brought again before the Stratford magistrate, charged on remand, with unlawfully and maliciously wounding John Garland by striking him on the head with a piece of iron, and inflicting grievous bodily harm at Church Road, Leyton, on Dec. 23, he looked round the court in seeming surprise at its unusually crowded aspect. A further remand on the charge of assault having been granted, the clerk rose, and, addressing the man in the dock, told him he was further charged with feloniously killing and slaying William John Darby, Beatrice (his wife), and their infant daughter, on or about Nov. 28, it was supposed, at 22, Wyndham Road, Camberwell. "Sure, Sir, there is some great mistake!" exclaimed Edwards, and he appeared to maintain an attitude of dazed astonishment while Detective-Inspector Collins, remarking that the charge as read was one of murder, and that it would be necessary to put all the facts before the Public Prosecutor, asked for a further remand, which Mr. Chapman the magistrate, at once granted.

How the Murders were Done.

The post-mortem examination of the three bodies, which revealed the position and nature of the wounds, suggests the theory that the crime was deliberately planned, and carried out with methodical precision. Mr. and Mrs. Darby had received crushing blows on the skull, and the baby had a wound over the eye insufficient to cause death, but sufficient to produce unconsciousness. The legs of the man and woman had been neatly severed from the trunks, first by a knife cutting through the flesh to the thigh-bones and then by a saw which sundered the bones. The legs were again severed at the knee-joints and the arms removed from the trunks with the same apparent skill and knowledge of anatomy. Finally, the heads of the adult victims had been removed from the bodies and all the remains placed in sacks in an indiscriminate manner. The doctors remarked that the hair of the dead woman was done up with hairpins in the usual everyday fashion, and this, taken in conjunction with the fact that the baby's body was fully clothed, gives colour to the supposition that the unfortunate people were not murdered in their beds.

Mr. Garland's Strange Story.

Mr. John Garland, the victim of the assault, which it is alleged was committed by Edwards, is rapidly recovering in West Ham Hospital. To a Press representative he unfolded a remarkable story of his dealings with the accused man. "I first heard of Edwards," he said, "from one of the regular trade agents. I wanted to dispose of my grocery business, and Edwards was put into communication with me as an intending purchaser. On Dec. 23 I met him by appointment at Church Road; the house appeared to be empty or to have very little furniture in it, and we sat waiting for a man who, according to Edwards, was to come over from some property of his in Clapton and undertake repairs. It was our intention on the arrival of this man, to go to the agent's office in the City; but he never came. We sat chatting for more than an hour, and I pointed out that we should miss the train if we waited longer. We agreed to go, and just as I moved to the door I received a terrible blow on the back of my head. Of course, I never suspected anything wrong, and it came like a thunderbolt. I fell down almost unconscious, and remember the man standing over me raining heavy blows on my head and shoulders. By what I thought was a dying effort, I got on to my feet, and we had a fearful struggle. I managed to smash the glass pane of the door with my hand, and can just remember some men coming in before I lost consciousness." Mr. Garland, who is a man of exceptionally powerful physique, will, (it is hoped, be well enough to appear at the adjourned proceedings on Jan. 21.

Source: The Penny Illustrated Paper and Illustrated Times, Saturday January 10, 1903, Page 20, Issue 2172

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Sun 18 Mar 2012 - 22:52

POLICE COUNCIL OF SEVEN.
SENIOR CHIEF OF THE C.I.D. RETIRES.

SPLENDID CAREER.
HOW NOTORIOUS MURDERER WAS CAUGHT.

[img][/img]

By the retirement of Senior Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins, the Council of Seven - a body which watches when London sleeps, and is hated by the criminal community the world over - is shorn of one of its most prominent members.
He is retiring on a full pension after twenty-eight years' service, for twenty-five years of which he was attached to the Criminal Investigation Department.
This detective "cabinet," which works in secret, as at present constituted consists of Sir Melville Macnaghten, assistant commissioner and chief of the detective branch; Mr. McCarthy, the detective superintendent and executive chief; and Chief-Detective-Inspectors Collins, Bower, Divall, Ward, and Wensley. Eight years ago, at the instance of the Home Office, the number of chief inspectors was increased from three to five, so that one or more senior officers could always be available to assist the provincial police in the investigation of any particularly baffling crime.
At first it was found that the provincial police did not invoke the aid of Scotland Yard until their own efforts had failed and possible clues had been disturbed, but an order was afterwards issued that if more than twenty-four hours had elapsed since the commission of the crime a "chief" should only be despatched after the request had been considered by the Home Office and the Commissioner.
Born at Bryanston, Dorset, in 1864, Mr. Collins was educated at the Stourpaine House School, near Blandford, and on leaving school assisted his father, who for forty-one years was head game and park-keeper to Viscount Portman on the Bryanston Estates.
In April, 1885, on the recommendation of Viscount Portman, Mr. Collins was appointed a constable at Bow-street, and within three years he showed that he possessed abilities which qualified him for the more delicate and intricate work of criminal investigation.
One of his first successes in that direction was the arrest of a daring safe thief. In August, 1888, the railway offices at Plymouth were broken into, and the sum of 620 pounds taken from the safe. A few days later, when it was reported that the man had fled to London, Mr. Collins was one of many officers detailed to search for the wanted man, and within a few hours he had run down his quarry at the Inns of Court Hotel with over 600 pounds of the stolen money in his possession.
When committing the prisoner for trial at the Exeter Assizes, the Mayor and justices particularly complimented Mr. Collins on his smartness.
At the trial the prisoner, who was defended by Sir (then Mr.) Charles Matthews, the present Director of Public Prosecutions, was sentenced to ten years' penal servitude.
A year later Mr. Collins was transferred to Albany-street, the headquarters of the S division, and in 1892 was promoted to Sergeant, three years later being transferred to the Central office. Here he had many important cases to deal with, including bank frauds, confidence tricksters, and long firm frauds.

How He Missed Doomed Boat.

In 1896 a delay in the arrival of a mail boat saved his life. He had been sent to South Africa to bring a prisoner home, and a delay on the part of the outward boat resulted in his missing the return journey on the ill-fated Drummond Castle, which went down with all hands off Ushant. Instead he had the companionship of a number of Jameson raiders, including John Drummond Hay, who had just been released by President Kruger.
In 1900, with the rank of detective-inspector, Mr. Collins was placed in charge of the detective section of the J division at Bethnal Green, one of the largest divisions in London, extending as far as Loughton, in Essex. At that time crime was rampant throughout North-East London, but with the arrival of Mr. Collins the number of serious offences gradually decreased.
It was at the end of 1902 that a young married couple named Darby, with one little child of eighteen months, disappeared suddenly from their little general shop in Wyndham-road, Camberwell. Their stock and furniture went as well. There was nothing unusual about this, however, and no one suspected that anything was wrong.
A month later, however, a man named Garland was murderously assaulted at Leyton by a man known as Edgar Edwards. Garland had called at Edwards's house in Church-road, Leyton, in response to an advertisement that a general shop was to be let. While the details of the business were being discussed, Edwards, who carried what appeared to be a roll of music in his hand, but really contained a sash-weight, made a sudden attack on Garland and almost killed him.
Garland, who was a strong, powerful man, managed to reach the street door and smash the glass. Passers by rushed in, and Edwards tried to escape by the back way. He was arrested by Mr. Collins, and when the house was searched all the property of the Darbys' was found there. A search of the house in Wyndham-road led to the discovery of a similar sash-weight hidden in a cupboard. Darby's friends were traced, but no news of the family could be obtained.

Bodies Buried in Garden.

The garden at Leyton was then dug up, and four feet below the surface, in the centre of the garden, were found the remains of the Darby family in six sacks. The arms and legs had been sawn from the trunk, and the heads of the father and mother bore evident marks of brutal violence inflicted with the sash-weight. The little baby had been strangled by a cord.
Eventually Mr. Collins was able to prove the case up to the hilt against Edwards, who was hanged in Wandsworth Gaol in March, 1903.
In the same year a young woman, sister of the licensee of the Lord Nelson, Whitechapel, was stabbed through the heart by a young costermonger named Slowe, with a knife stolen from a horse-slaughterer. The murderer was arrested by Mr. Collins, and was convicted and hanged at Pentonville in 1903.
Soon after with a rise to the rank of divisional detective-inspector, Mr. Collins was transferred to the T division at Hammersmith. Here many serious cases were brought under his notice.
A Kensington lady was robbed by a foreign waiter. Whilst taking her tea he purloined her handbag containing over 2,100 pounds in Bank of England notes. No suspicion attached to the foreigner at first but a blotting pad gave a clue. The waiter was arrested, and Mr. Collins traced and recovered 2,000 pounds of the money which the man had sent by registered post to Munich. The thief received a sentence of twelve months' hard labour.
On another occasion Mr. Collins traced a clerk to a well-known West End firm, who had absconded with nearly 250 pounds, the proceeds of a cheque cashed at the bank, to Grantham, where he was arrested, and afterwards recovered over 100 pounds of the money which was hidden in a cartridge box in a hedge-row a mile out of the town.
In 1905 he had an exciting adventure at Fulham, when two burglars were arrested in the Greyhound Public House at two in the morning. The arrest was not, however, without a terrible struggle, and when searched one of the men was found in possession of a loaded revolver. They had with them a complete set of burglars' apparatus, including false keys, which were subsequently found to have been capable of opening the safe, which contained a large sum of money.
In the White-Slave traffic Mr. Collins had done a considerable amount of good work. He arrested and secured the conviction of a notorious female trafficker, who from a house in Fulham trapped young girls, who were supposed to be attending shorthand classes, but instead visited the woman's house, changed their clothing, and were taken to the West End.

Trip on a Torpedo Boat.

When rewarded with the rank of Chief Inspector, Mr. Collins was sent to Scotland Yard again, in 1907. When the mysterious robbery of 3,000 pounds from the safe on H.M.S. Indomitable was reported to the Admiralty Chief Inspector Collins was sent to investigate it. After a rough journey on a torpedo boat from Sheerness, he boarded the cruiser in a blizzard off Margate.
A long and tedious inquiry resulted in the arrest of three sailors at Portsmouth, all of whom were convicted, the ringleader of the gang getting seven years' penal servitude. In this case Mr. Collins recovered nearly 1,000 pounds of the stolen money.
In the later months of 1908, Mrs. J.B. Joel, the wife of the South African millionaire, was terrified by an anonymous communication in which members of a gang known as the "Camerista Monenero" threatened to murder her husband unless they were paid 500 pounds. They explained in detail how members of the secret society had already drawn lots for the tasks imposed unless the demand was complied with.
They explained how a messenger would be sent with a cigar-box with a letter enclosed in which the money was to be placed, and that one of their emissaries had been closely in touch with Mr. Joel only the previous day. They requested that an advertisement should be inserted in the "Daily Chronicle" as an answer to the request. The police were notified and the matter was placed in the hands of Chief Inspector Collins.
As a result the following day the advertisement, "A 19 - I agree" was published in the advertisement columns of the "Daily Chronicle" in reply to which Mrs. Joel received a letter stating that a member would call. When a man named Canham subsequently called at Mr. Joel's residence at Grosvenor-square, he found Mr. Collins waiting to arrest him. Later his confederate, a man named Winborn, was also arrested, and after a long trial both were convicted and sentenced to penal servitude.
It transpired during the hearing of the case that the same couple were in communication with Lord Lonsdale, who had recently been the victim of an impudent robbery suggesting that the property could be returned provided a large sum of money was paid.

Mission to Canada.

In 1911 Mr. Collins was sent by the authorities to the Esquimalt Dockyard, on the Coast of British Columbia, to assist Captain Gerald Vivian, R.N., who was investigating thefts of stores from H.M. ships stationed in Canadian waters. As a result of his assistance the thieves were discovered and convicted.
In the last few years it has fallen to the lot of the retiring chief inspector to give instruction to young detectives, and many rising officers owe their success to the thorough training they received when under Mr. Collins's supervision.
Mr. Collins was also often engaged in confidential enquiries throughout the country on behalf of various Government departments. He spent many weeks in the Midlands when the maiming outrages were being carried on, and quite recently he was sent to Dundee in connection with the Broughton Ferry mystery.
Mr. Collins has always taken an active interest in sport. Amongst the members of the Metropolitan Shooting League can be found some of the best "shots" in England, and through his instrumentality the Barclay Walker Challenge Shield, one of the finest trophies possessed by the Scotland Yard Rifle Club, was offered.
Mr. Collins, who retires with the best wishes of all his comrades, intends to take a position as secretary to a landed proprietor.
He has received numerous commendations and rewards from judges, magistrates, juries, the Commissioner, the Director of Public Prosecutions, and Government departments. He possesses the police medals for Queen Victoria's Jubilee, 1887, with a bar for the Diamond Jubilee ten years later, and King Edward's and King George's Coronation medals, as well as one presented to him by the Scotland Yard Rifle Club as a mark of esteem for the interest he has taken in the Club. He served under no fewer than five Commissioners, including Sir Edward Henderson, Sir Charles Warren, Mr. James Munro, Sir Edward Bradford, and Sir Edward Henry.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly News, March 2, 1913, Page 4

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Mon 19 Mar 2012 - 23:58

"TO DO JUSTICE."
Scene in a Police Station.

A VIOLENT PRISONER.

Conflicting stories of a violent scene in Ilford Police Station were related this morning to the magistrates at Stratford Police Court.
William Stringer, a bricklayer, of Birkbeck-road, Ilford, was charged with being drunk and disorderly and assaulting Sub-Divisional-Inspector Collins and Police-Constable Killick, 247 K.
According to the police evidence, prisoner on Saturday night called at the Ilford Police Station and asked to see the sergeant. He was drunk, and when asked what he wanted he replied, "Nothing." He was told to go out, and he did so, but as he commenced to use bad language he was arrested. Then he became very violent, and when placed in the station dock he kicked Constable Killick. Inspector Collins went to the officer's help, and then the prisoner kicked him on the leg. He was seized, and struggled so much that it took five policemen to get him into the cells.
The prisoner, on oath, denied the charges brought against him, although he admitted that he had had a "drop too much." He went to the station, he said, to complain about a robbery, and no sooner had he intimated his intention than he was told to go out and "wait a minute." He was doing so when a constable came out, caught hold of him round the neck, and put him inside. Then he was shamefully treated, constables got hold of his throat and he lost all his breath, and "thought he was dead."
The Clerk: Why should the police act like this? - I refused to acknowledge the charge.
Did you assault the police? - I may have done in self-defence.
Mr. G. Baker (the chairman): Is anything known against him? - Sergt. Cuddon, 59 K (handing up a list of convictions): Yes, Sir.
Mr. Baker: I see you have had seven years for manslaughter, as well as other sentences? - Yes, but the manslaughter case was brought before Parliament, and I was released. If I hadn't been "in" before I would not be here now. The police have an animosity against me, and that's why I was arrested.
Mr. Baker: You will have to go to gaol for two months' hard labour.
Prisoner: It is rather severe, and I went to the station to do justice.
Mr. Baker: Not so severe as you deserve, I think.

Source: The Echo, Monday September 19, 1904

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Tue 20 Mar 2012 - 0:49

BURGLARY AS A SCIENCE.
SENSATIONAL SEQUEL TO ATTEMPT AT BIRMINGHAM.

THREE MEN ARRESTED IN LONDON.
DETECTIVES STRUGGLE WITH A BOOKMAKER.

There was a sensational sequel in London yesterday to one of the most daring burglaries that have occurred in recent years in England.
Acting under the instructions of Chief Inspector Collins and other officers of Scotland Yard, in conjunction with Detective-Inspector Wright, of the Birmingham police, three arrests were made in London.
One of the men made a desperate resistance, and in the struggle furniture and windows were smashed.
Another man who was also detained was released yesterday afternoon.
The police attach so much importance to the arrests that a special call of detectives from all parts of London was made, and nearly one hundred officers attended at Cannon-row Station for the purposes of identification.

WALL CUT THROUGH.
Once Inside, Intruders Burn Hole Through Two Inches of Steel.

The story of the burglary is an extraordinary one. The scene of operations was in the very heart of the jewellery quarter of Birmingham. Messrs. Wright and Hodgkiss, goldsmiths, have a large establishment in Vyse-street, near Warstone-lane. Adjacent are some empty premises, and these the burglars used as their base. On Aug. 21 they entered Messrs. Wright and Hodgkiss's buildings by cutting through a wall of considerable thickness, displacing masonry sufficient to fill a couple of carts. They then attempted to gain access to the strong room, which is built of metal, and contained 40,000 pounds worth of gold articles and unfinished gold work.
The burglars began at the rear of the strong room, but, finding they could make little or no progress, they concentrated their attention on the large door of the room. This they attacked with an oxy-hydrogen blow-pipe of a new type. There were two large cylinders of gas and two lengths of metal-covered indiarubber tubing, with acetylene lights and blow-pipe.

Hole Through Steel 2in. Thick.

The door is made of two plates of steel, with a layer of asbestos between, the outer steel plate being about 2in. thick and the inner one 1/2 an inch thick. Notwithstanding the thickness of the outer steel covering, however, the thieves managed to make a hole in it, and after dislodging some of the asbestos they started to pierce the inner plate. Whether they were disturbed in their operations, or whether they were unable to maintain a pressure of gas sufficiently intense to melt the tough metal, is only known to the thieves themselves; but, whatever the cause, the thieves gave up their job, and devoted their attention to other parts of the building.
The office of the firm was ransacked, and a large safe in an adjoining room was opened by means of skeleton keys. Ledgers only were kept in this safe, but on Aug. 20, just before the office was closed, a diamond ring and a small amount of money were placed in it, and these the thieves of course appropriated.
The burglars left nothing to chance. They cut off the gas supply, and fixed up a portable electric installation communicating between the scene of operations and a room at the top of the building, where a man could be placed as in a watch-tower to signal at once any approach of danger. They also fastened several doors with rope so as to prevent anyone entering, and across the top of the main staircase they fixed pieces of rope a foot or so from the floor, so that any person entering might be easily tripped.
It was believed that the burglars were cracksmen from abroad, and that they were three or four in number. Towards the end of the previous week a man, believed to be a foreigner, approached the landlord of the empty premises with a view to becoming a tenant. He obtained possession of the keys, and on the Friday and Saturday he and some companions were seen about the premises. Several heavy boxes were delivered. These did not contain goods of trade as was supposed by neighbouring manufacturers, but an up-to-date set of burglars' tools, many of which were found on the premises by the police. The apparatus used at the door of the strong room was left behind. It is practically new, and must have cost 20 pounds at least.
The burglars must have been engaged throughout the whole of the day at their task, and it is computed that they spent nearly four hours in making the hole through the wall.

Purchasing the Apparatus.

Superintendent Daniels and Detective-Inspector Wright at once communicated with Scotland Yard, realising that the work was not that of novices by any means. Rather it represented that a number of expert American cracksmen, who were known to be in England.
Chief Inspector Collins, with Detective-Sergeant Cornish, had the matter in hand. Inquiries showed the metal cutter had been purchased from the British Oxygen Company in London, and that a well-dressed American, giving the name of "Fred Buck," had called there and purchased one of the cutters, attending the company's premises on two occasions for instructions in its use. He gave an address in the south-west district of London, and sent a carman with a plain van to remove the articles. Subsequently the address given was found to be a small hairdresser's shop, where letters were received. Other inquiries showed that the burglars had utilised a taxi-cab to take them to Birmingham with their apparatus.
The sequel occurred yesterday. Soon after midnight, Inspector Wright, Detective-Sergeants Cornish, MacEvoy, Goodwillie, and Detective Saunders stopped two men outside a house in Belle Vue-road, Wandsworth, and conveyed them to Cannon-row Station. Here one, a well-dressed, clean-shaven American, wearing a blue serge suit and straw hat, admitted that he was Frederick Duncan. He stated that he was forty-seven years of age, and a rubber merchant.
His companion was also detained for some hours, but he was able to satisfy the inquiries of the detectives, and left Cannon-row shortly before two o'clock yesterday afternoon.
At two a.m. the same officers fetched James Davis, a taxi-cab driver, of Grove-mews, Lisson-grove, out of his bed, and arrested him for complicity in the burglary.
Later in the day Detective-Sergeants Cornish and Stephens, and Detective Nicholls called at Vokes's house in Albert-road, Stroud Green. They were admitted by Mrs. Vokes, the husband still being in bed. Upon learning the object of their visit, Mrs. Vokes became excited and started screaming, attracting the attention of a large number of people in the vicinity, until quite a crowd had assembled in front of the house.
Meantime, Vokes himself, hearing the noise, awoke, and came rushing downstairs. As the outcome of the scuffle which ensued, Detective-Sergeant Cornish had his shirt collar torn off, several windows were broken, and the furniture was scattered about. A number of other officers soon arrived upon the scene, and Vokes, seeing that further resistance was useless, allowed himself to be taken into custody.
The three suspects, after being formally charged, were taken to Birmingham in charge of Supt. Daniels, and Inspectors Wright and May, of the Birmingham Police. Here they will be brought up at the Stipendiary's Court tomorrow, when some sensational evidence is expected, the cabdriver Davis, who at first denied his identity, having made an important statement.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly News, Sunday September 11, 1910, pp. 1-2

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Tue 20 Mar 2012 - 1:17

A BARMAID FATALLY STABBED.

A shocking tragedy was perpetrated in a small public-house in the Whitechapel Road called the "Lord Nelson," early on the morning of the 24th ult.
About twenty minutes after midnight a young labourer named Slowe, who was a customer at the house, came into the bar, and seeing the barmaid standing at the side door, suddenly ran over to her and struck her violently with both fists. It was not at the time seen that he had a knife in his hand.
Some of the customers strove to seize him, and the owner of the house, the unfortunate girl's sister, jumped over the bar and ran into the street, calling out to the bystanders to stop the man.
He ran across the Whitechapel Road, but after a short chase he was secured, and brought back to the house. Meanwhile the injured girl had fallen to the ground senseless, and, though promptly removed to the London Hospital, died on the way.
Slowe was taken to the police-station, followed by an angry crowd, who persistently hissed and hooted him.
The murdered girl had been throughout the evening in the most cheerful spirits, and had been laughing and joking with the customers, with whom she was very popular. It was not suspected that she was troubled or worried in any way.
On the following morning Charles Jeremiah Slowe, 28, dock labourer, giving his address at Rowton House, Whitechapel, was at the Worship Street Police Court, before Mr. Haden Corser, charged with the wilful murder of Mary Jane Hardwick, a barmaid at the "Lord Nelson," 299, Whitechapel Road, by stabbing her.
The prisoner seemed little concerned at his position, and kept his head down as he leant on the dock rail.
Inspector Collins, J division, said that shortly after three o'clock that morning, owing to information received, he went to the London Hospital, where he was shown the dead body of a woman with a wound in the chest about as broad as the blade of the knife produced, (a large-sized dinner knife, with the blade narrowed for nearly its whole length, as if from long use and grinding.)
The witness said he returned to Bethnal Green Police Station, where the prisoner was detained. He told Slowe that he had seen the body of a woman named Mary Jane Hardwick, a barmaid at the "Lord Nelson," 299, Whitechapel Road, and he (prisoner) would be charged with murdering her by stabbing her with the knife produced. The prisoner made no reply.
The inspector intimated that he would ask for a remand at this point, but the magistrate said there should be something shown to connect him with the act.
Mrs. Jane Starkey, a widow, of the "Lord Nelson" public-house, was then called. She said the deceased was her sister, and lived at the house, and acted as barmaid. She knew the prisoner as an occasional customer. On Wednesday night at ten minutes past twelve o'clock witness saw him enter the house. He entered at the front bar, and Hardwick was looking out of the side door. He went up to her and struck her right and left. She heard him say "I've got you now," and witness screamed as she saw him hit her.
He hit her with his right fist and then with his left, but witness did not see what he had in his hand, as he kept his left down. Witness jumped over the bar and the prisoner ran out. She ran after him, and called out to people not to let him go. Someone caught him and they brought him back to the house. Witness had gone back and found then that her sister was swooning.
By Dr. Morrison (second clerk): The witness saw that he hit her with his right hand on the left shoulder.
By the Magistrate: Witness had not seen the prisoner earlier in the evening, but was told he had been in about eleven o'clock.
Asked if her sister had any knowledge of the prisoner, the witness, who spoke in low tones, said she was sure her sister only knew him from serving him occasionally.
Inspector Collins said that, so far as could be ascertained, there was no reason at all for the crime. The constable who found the knife and to whom the prisoner was handed over was in court.
The Magistrate said at present no further evidence need be called.
Mrs. Starkey said she had never seen the knife before.
The prisoner, a short, swarthy man, was asked if he wished to put a question to the witnesses, and replied, "Not at present, sir."
He was remanded, and left the dock without any further remark.

Source: The Mercury, Saturday October 3, 1903, Page 2

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Tue 20 Mar 2012 - 1:29

SHOT THE COOK.
RESULT OF THE BUTCHER BOY'S MORNING CALL.

"Not this morning, thank you," said Mary Richardson, a young cook in service at 4, Lisgar-terrace, West Kensington, yesterday, when the butcher boy called for orders. The latter's answer was to raise a pistol and fire.
Harold Hughes, the boy in question, appeared later in the day at West London police-court to answer a charge of maliciously wounding, and further with carrying a pistol without a licence.
Prosecutrix said the bullet struck her on the mouth. When prisoner saw her lip bleeding he rushed forward and said he was very sorry. The shot, a small leaden pellet, was found on the doormat. The pistol, a toy affair, and a box of pellets were produced in court.
The witness said she and the prisoner had never quarrelled, and he was certainly very sorry for what he had done. She was not much hurt because the shot struck her teeth, but it might have been serious.
Detective-inspector Collins asked the magistrate to grant a remand in order that the solicitor to the Police Commissioners might be consulted with a view to a prosecution against the seller of the pistol. These pistols, added the inspector, were powerful spring pistols, and were really very dangerous weapons.
The magistrate adjourned the case for a fortnight, admitting the accused to bail.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly News, April 21, 1907, Page 3

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Tue 20 Mar 2012 - 21:58

RESENTING THE CONSTABLE'S INTERFERENCE.

George Griffiths, an oil boiler, got six months today at the Wandsworth Court. He was behaving in a disorderly manner in Park-crescent, Clapham, when Constable Ellwood interfered to restore order. At once he struck him, knocking him down. Constable Collins then went to his brother constable's assistance, and was immediately kicked by the prisoner, who also kicked Ellwood under the chin and in the stomach. The result of his attack was that Collins received two wounds on the knee and one on the chin, and was unable to resume duty. - When he was sentenced a shriek disturbed the quietude of the Court, and then a woman was observed being led away by the officers.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday July 24, 1888, Page 4

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Tue 20 Mar 2012 - 22:21

A SALVATIONIST'S BABY

At North London police-court yesterday Martha Challenor, 19, a cadet in the Salvation Army, was charged on a warrant for that she "on March 23, at the Congress hall, Clapton, being then delivered of a child, unlawfully, by a certain secret disposition of the dead body of the said child, did endeavour to conceal the birth thereof." Mr. D.A. Romain defended; Detective-inspector Collins, J Division, conducted the case for the police. - Detective-sergeant Rosentreter said that at one o'clock that (Saturday) afternoon he went with Inspector Collins to the Congress hall, where he saw the prisoner and read the warrant to her. She made no reply. She was taken to the police-station and the formal charge was entered. She made no reply. - Mr. Fordham said he should remand the prisoner to Holloway in order that the case might be more fully gone into on another occasion, but as the young woman appeared to be in a weak condition she might be taken there in a cab. - Mr. Romain urged the magistrate to allow the prisoner out on bail. She was in a weak condition mentally and physically, and detention in a gaol, no matter for how short a period, might have a serious effect upon her. The girl had been well looked after by the Salvation Army authorities in the sick ward of the training home, and the police had been quite satisfied that she was in safe custody. Moreover, the girl's mother and father, who lived in Middlesbrough, were in court, and their presence might assist her recovery. - Mr. Fordham: I think she will be quite as well looked after in Holloway. I will direct that the attention of the doctor be called to the statement of Mr. Romain that the prisoner wants looking after mentally and physically.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly News, April 19, 1903, Page 13

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Tue 20 Mar 2012 - 22:32

A MOTHER'S NEGLECT OF HER CHILDREN.

John Mortimer and his wife, Isabella Mortimer, were charged at the West London Police-court, today, with neglecting their two children, named Walter, aged eight, and Ethel, aged six, thereby causing them unnecessary suffering. In the first instance the boy was found crouched upon a doorstep in St. Clement's-road, Notting-hill, cold and drenched with rain. He was taken to the station and charged, the magistrate afterwards remanding him, and granting warrants for the apprehension of the parents. It was now stated that the little girl was also found exposed and taken to the Kensington Infirmary, too ill to be brought to the Court. - Henry Cook, caretaker of some houses in St. Clement's-road, said the prisoners lodged in one. He had to turn them away through the woman returning home late at night in a state of drunkenness. On one occasion he found the children in a cellar, and he took them to the police. He also spoke of the mother's neglect to the girl, leaving her without food and in a dirty condition. - Police-constable Collins proved finding the girl crying, and wet through. He said he gave her his supper, and took her to the station. - Mr. Phillips, who represented the society, said the female had been in prison for one month for neglecting her children. Eight times the children had been taken to the workhouses. - Mr. Curtis-Bennet discharged the husband, and remanded the woman to ascertain the state of the girl.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday November 10, 1891, Page 3

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Wed 21 Mar 2012 - 20:52

HIGHGATE LICENSING SESSION.

Frivolous Objections. - In the matter of the Three Compasses, High Street, Hornsey, a notice of opposition had been given by the Bench on the ground that a woman named Smith had been served with drink. This woman had been sent to an inebriates' home. - Inspector Collins said there had been a mistake. He could not find that any woman had been served of that name. As a fact, that woman was arrested in Highgate. There was a woman named Beckett, but the landlord had refused her some time before. The house was well conducted. - Mr. Earles, the landlord, having been called forward, the chairman said, "You see the importance of this?" to which he made reply, "Yes, I should think I did." - The licence was renewed.

Source: The Mercury, Saturday February 28, 1903, Page 7

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Wed 21 Mar 2012 - 21:06

DIAMONDS IN A FIELD.
A REMARKABLE TALE.

David Birne, 24, a ring maker, of Jubilee-street, Mile-end, was charged at Clerkenwell police-court, on Tuesday, with stealing from 90, Hatton-garden, a tin box containing 73 diamonds, value 60 pounds, the property of Solomon Davis, diamond setter. - The prosecutor said the prisoner was in his employ as a diamond mounter for two months. On Aug. 4 Birne left suddenly, and afterwards the prosecutor missed from his office a box containing 73 diamonds. Information was given to the police, and Detective-sergeant Collins arrested the prisoner at Jubilee-street the previous day. He remarked that he was sorry, and said he took the diamonds because he was in want of money. He added, "After I stole the diamonds I sold one in Newgate-street for 12s. I afterwards took train to Cambridge, where I thought I could dispose of the remainder. Finding I could not, I walked to Buntingford, where I threw the diamonds over a hedge into a field. Birne told the magistrate that if a proper search were made he was sure the diamonds could be recovered. - Mr. Bros remanded him.
As a result of this statement a regular hunt for the diamonds was commenced on Thursday. But the hunters had reckoned without their host, or rather without the partridge shooters. Sportsmen were blazing away everywhere, and it would have been something like suicide to have searched for diamonds in the fusilade. Besides, there is a good choice of selection for the treasure hunters, and the odds are against them. Between Chipping and Buntingford, a distance of about two miles, the road is lined with plantations and high hedges. It is somewhere between these points that the booty lies waiting to be picked up, but exactly where no one knows. One old dame and her consort spent Thursday afternoon on the road, peering through the hedges every few yards, but, unfortunately, they were on the wrong side of the road. The inhabitants were anxiously awaiting the arrival of Birne, but he did not turn up. Many rumours were circulated that the precious gems had been recovered.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly News, September 4, 1904, Page 17

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Wed 21 Mar 2012 - 21:46

A GIRL'S DOUBLE LIFE.

Further remarkable evidence was given at the West London police-court yesterday, when Miriam Warton, aged 45, living at 23, Dancer-road, Fulham, appeared on remand to answer the charge of procuring Maud Hilt, aged 16, for immoral purposes.
Mr. Bodkin, instructed by Mr. Sefton Cohen, prosecuted for the Treasury; Dr. Cooney defended, and Mr. Oswald Hanson held a watching brief for parties interested. Sub-divisional Inspector Collins was in charge of the case.
It was alleged that the accused kept a disorderly house and enticed the girl Hilt and another girl named Sadie Hudson to the place while their parents thought they were at a shorthand class.
Maud Hilt, a dark, rosy-cheeked, attractive-looking girl, was the first witness. At the outset Mr. Bodkin drew attention to the fact that artists were in court sketching the witnesses, and suggested that the magistrate should forbid such "an act of cruelty." Mr. Lane, K.C. agreed, and said that he should be "much obliged" if the artists refrained.
The girl Maud stated that she was 16 last February, and have lived all her life in Fulham with her parents. She left a Board school at the age of 13, and then went to a school at Margate. She first made the prisoner's acquaintance about the autumn of 1902. She was introduced to her by the girl Sadie Hudson. Prisoner was then living at Colehill-lane, Fulham, and she and Sadie used to call there nearly every evening. She used to go errands for the prisoner.
Mr. Bodkin: Was there any particular sort of talk. - Yes, Mrs. Warton used to talk indecently.
In answer to further questions, the witness said her parents knew nothing about her visits to the prisoner's house. From 1903 to August of this year she never saw the prisoner, but she used to see Sadie in the holidays. She met the prisoner in August in the Fulham-road. She went at her invitation to her house in Dancer-road with Sadie. There was a girl named Hibbert and another girl named Lily living in the house. Several people - both men and women - visited the house. A man named Bert Griffin worked in the house; he did housework. He sometimes answered the door. On the second day she called at the house the prisoner said to her, "When Annie (one of the women in the house) first came here she only had an old green dress. Why don't you get fine clothes like her?"
Mr. Bodkin: Did she say anything to you about your clothes?
Witness: - Yes; she said we could keep the clothes at her house.
Mr. Bodkin: You were then attending a school of shorthand? - Yes.
Mr. Bodkin: Did she say anything about that? - Yes; when I told her I went to a school of shorthand she said, "Oh, that's no good."
Mr. Bodkin: Did you ever tell your parents that you were visiting at Dancer-road? - No.
Mr. Bodkin: Did you stay away from school? - Not until three weeks after I met Mrs. Warton.
Mr. Bodkin: And I suppose you gradually ceased attending the school? - Yes, I ceased going to the school on Sept. 18.
Mr. Bodkin: But you still left home as if about to go? - Oh yes; I used to go to Mrs. Warton's.
Mr. Bodkin: Was anything said about your name? - Yes; it was agreed I should take the name of Maud Dennis.
The witness went on to say that the prisoner instructed her to go to the Burlington-arcade, Regent-street, and Piccadilly. She went to Regent-street, and afterwards two men visited at 23, Dancer-road.
Mr. Bodkin: You were living at home all this time? - Yes; Mrs. Warton said it would be far better if I left home. She said I ought to quarrel with my parents and leave home.
Mr. Bodkin: Did she say anything about your age? - Yes; she asked me my age and I told her.
Mr. Bodkin: Was anything bought for you by her? - Yes; a red hat and a pair of brown boots (produced).
Mr. Bodkin: She actually paid for them? - Yes.
Mr. Bodkin: Did you go to the West-end often? - Yes, frequently.
Mr. Bodkin: Who went with you? - With Sadie, and sometimes with the prisoner.
The witness then went on to relate how she met Percy Cooper and went with him to his office. At the request of Mr. Hanson, the address was suppressed.
In answer to further questions, the girl went on to say that after her first visit to Cooper the prisoner gave her certain advice. She also took her to a furniture shop at Wandsworth, where she chose some furniture, which was to be placed in a spare room in the prisoner's house for witness's use. It was to be delivered on the Thursday, but she was taken away on the Tuesday. In all she took about 30 men to the house. Sometimes the men wrote and the prisoner opened the letters. The men gave sums from 10s. to 20s., which witness handed to the prisoner, who said she would put the money in the savings bank. The prisoner received 10s. in addition for the room which was her bedroom.
The prisoner took her to public-houses, and she drank port and sometimes lemonade. The witness added that an old gentleman, a whiskey distiller, used frequently to visit the house.
In further evidence witness related how (as already reported) her mother came to the house in Dancer-road and the prisoner, hearing the knocking at the door, said, "That's your mother knocking; you had better hide in the back-yard, and I'll answer the door and swear you're not in." The knocking went on, and later in the evening, the prisoner sent her out saying, "I think they're gone now. You tear round by the back, and if your mother asks you say I had you in for charity." She met her mother outside, and went home with her and told her everything.
In answer to Dr. Cooney, the witness said she had known Percy Cooper for eight years, just as long as her (witness's sister) had been engaged in his employment as private secretary.
Dr. Cooney: How far away is his office from your mother's house? - Oh, a few yards away.
Dr. Cooney: And that was where you went to when you were seduced by Percy Cooper? - Yes.
Dr. Cooney: You used to go with Cooper to a house in Rostello-road, Wandsworth? - Yes.
Dr. Cooney: What was the woman who kept that house? - An actress.
The witness admitted, in conclusion, that Sadie Hudson lived an immoral life in a disorderly house in Tamworth-street kept by a woman named Phillips.
The accused was remanded.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly News, November 18, 1906, Page 3

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Wed 21 Mar 2012 - 22:11

CLEVER CAPTURE OF A SUPPOSED BURGLAR.

At Lambeth Police Court today, Henry Green, 48, a determined-looking man, was charged with burglary at the house of Mr. Rowe, at 165, Tulse-hill, and stealing plated knives, forks, spoons, clothing, food, and other articles, valued at between 15 pounds and 20 pounds. - Police-constable Collins, who was just off duty at half-past six yesterday morning, was about to enter his house at Loughborough, when he saw the prisoner carrying a bundle. On being questioned, the prisoner said it contained food. The officer told him he must take him into custody. Prisoner said, "Not me, you ----! I'll have a go for it." He then set upon the officer, and struck at him in a savage manner. The prisoner tried to get something from his pocket, but failed, and this was afterwards found to be a "jemmy." The policeman overpowered him, and blew his whistle, which brought another constable to his assistance. All the way to the station the prisoner was most violent, and said, "If it had been a country place two wouldn't have taken me. It's a good cop, so I'll go quietly." - Inspector Jury, amongst the property in the sack, found a piece of paper with the words written on, "165, Tulse-hill." He proceeded there, and found the side gate of the garden open. Upon an examination it was found that the bars of the pantry had been forced open, so as to give space for a man to get through. The dining-room and pantry were in great confusion, and the property mentioned in the charge missing. - Mr. Biron committed the prisoner for trial, and remarked that the constable Collins had acted with great courage.

Source: The Echo, Monday December 20, 1886

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Wed 21 Mar 2012 - 22:19

ILFORD CHILD'S DEATH.
Parents Charged with Manslaughter.

Edward John Hewitt, a labourer, of 7, Plymouth-terrace, Ley-street, Ilford, and Florrie Huberta Hewitt, his wife, were charged, at Stratford today, with the manslaughter of their daughter, Florrie Louisa Hewitt, aged five months.
At the inquest on the body of the child, held yesterday by Dr. A. Ambrose at Ilford, a verdict of manslaughter was returned against the prisoners, who before that had been summoned to appear at the Stratford Police Court for neglecting the infant.
The allegation is that the parents are addicted to drink, and that the child was frequently left alone and generally neglected. The medical evidence showed that there was no disease to account for death, which seemed to have been brought about by neglect and inadequate and improper feeding.
Sub-Divisional Inspector Collins deposed to arresting the prisoners on the Coroner's warrant. He took them to the Police Station and charged them, and they made no reply.
The prisoners were remanded, an application for bail being refused.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday September 23, 1902

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Wed 21 Mar 2012 - 22:46

RETIRED PLANTER ROBBED.
Sentence on Woman Who Stole 175 Pounds in Bank Notes in Villiers Street.

How a retired planter - Mr. Edgar D'Estiere - staying at the Bath Hotel, Strand, was robbed of bank notes to the value of 175 pounds was described at Bow-street yesterday. Josephine Thomas, aged twenty-one, of Temple-street, St. George's-road, was charged on remand with stealing the notes.
The evidence showed that early on the morning of Sept. 19 the prosecutor saw the prisoner in Villiers-street, and when she said she had had bad luck he gave her a shilling. Soon afterwards he missed his purse, which contained two 50 pound notes, fifteen 5 pound notes, and some gold. The police were informed and the number of the notes were circulated.
Later in the day the prisoner and a man drove in a taxi-cab from the Elephant and Castle to a pawnbroker's shop in Camden Town. The man entered alone and purchased a wedding ring and other articles in payment for which he tendered one of the stolen 50 pound notes. After making inquiries at a bank the pawnbroker's assistant accepted the note, and gave the man 40 pounds change.
Immediately after the man had gone the assistant received a message from the Bank to the effect that the note had been stolen. He ran from the shop and saw the prisoner and her companion driving away in a taxi. He managed to get the number, and entering another cab he started in pursuit, but near Euston Station he was obliged to give up the chase.
The driver of the first cab was interviewed by the police, and on the following afternoon, quite by chance, he saw the prisoner in a public-house, and gave her into custody. She was then wearing the wedding ring purchased at the pawnbroker's.
It was stated that since the remand the prosecutor had been obliged to sail for Australia, and would therefore be unable to attend the Sessions in the event of the prisoner being committed for trial.
Detective-Inspector Gough and Detective-Sergeant Collins said the prisoner was the associate of an ex-convict and thieves.
The magistrate said he would deal with the prisoner as a suspected person.
Mr. Lloyd Humphreys (who defended): That is not the charge.
Mr. Curtis Bennett: That does not matter. If the prosecutor had been able to remain in this country it would have been my duty to send the prisoner for trial on the clearest possible evidence of her guilt. Unfortunately the prosecutor, although I begged him to stay, in order to see justice done, has been obliged to go to Australia. The prisoner will be sentenced to three months' hard labour.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly News, September 29, 1912, Page 3

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Thu 22 Mar 2012 - 3:26

MURDEROUS ASSAULT ON A POLICE CONSTABLE.

At the Enfield police court, on Monday last, Thomas Head, of St. Mary's-gardens, Lower Edmonton, and Daniel McCarthy, of Chauncey-street, Hyde lane, Edmonton, were charged with murderously assaulting police-constable Hawkins, at the Green, Edmonton, on Sunday night.
P.C. Bradshaw, 504 N said that about ten o'clock last night (Sunday) he was informed that a man had been assaulted, and on proceeding to the spot found Hawkins, who was in private clothes, in a dazed condition. He took the prisoner Head to the police-station on suspicion where he was detained, and shortly afterwards said, "I saw Dan McCarthy knock the man down, I never saw any other man touch him, McCarthy lives in the Hyde, where the Pillar Box is, but I do not know the number where he lives." He went in company with P.C. Samuels and made enquiries and found the prisoner McCarthy at 40, Chauncey-street. He knocked at the door and someone inside said, "Who's there," and on being informed, the prisoner McCarthy rushed out of the back door in his shirt into P.C. Samuel's arms. He was taken into the house and allowed to dress. When charged at the police-station with assaulting P.C. Hawkins while off duty, he replied, "Yes, I did, but he swore at me first."
Sergeant Collins said he was on duty at the station when the injured constable was brought in, and he appeared in a dazed condition. He said both the prisoners had assaulted him.
Dr. William Jones, police divisional surgeon, Upper Edmonton, said he was called to see the injured man on Sunday night and found him in a dazed condition. On making an examination he found that his 9th and 10th rib broken, a large bruise on head and other injuries. It would be some time before he would recover.
The Bench remanded the prisoners, and refused to grant bail.

Source: Weekly Guardian, November 17, 1899

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Thu 22 Mar 2012 - 3:41

SHOCKING MURDER AT REGENT'S PARK.

Respecting the sad domestic tragedy at 31, Chalcot-crescent, Regent's-park (particulars of which were given in the later editions of The Echo yesterday), Elizabeth Rapley, mother of the deceased child, Winifred Rapley, was charged during the afternoon at the Marylebone Police-court with the crime, and also with an attempt to commit suicide by cutting her throat, upon which were some superficial cuts. - Police-constable Deering, 481 S, said he was called about a quarter after 11 that morning by the prisoner's husband. On reaching the house, witness found the prisoner sitting on a sofa in the second floor front room nursing the child in question. Dr. Barry, who had already been called in, found the child's throat cut, and directed its removal to the North-West London Hospital. Witness said to the prisoner, "Did you do this?" and the prisoner replied, "Oh; what have I done?" The child having been taken by another constable to the hospital, witness went into the back room on the same floor, and there discovered a razor with blood stains on it. - Detective-Sergeant Collins, S Division, said he had reduced to writing the statements of two persons who could give evidence in the case, but they were in such a nervous and excited condition that they could not be brought to the Court that day. - Inspector Kelloway, seeing some scratches on the left side of prisoner's neck, said to her, "How came you to have those cuts?" She replied, "Yes, I attempted to cut my own throat, with a view to destroy my own life as well." He had been informed that the child had died. The only remark the prisoner made when charged was, "Oh! my child; what have I done?" - In reply to a question by the magistrate, Sergeant Collins said he had heard that the prisoner had been drinking lately, and on Wednesday she was away from her home from 11 a.m. until a late hour at night. - Mr. Cooke remanded the prisoner.

Source: The Echo, Friday November, 1891, Page 3

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Thu 22 Mar 2012 - 3:47

THE KENSINGTON ROBBERY.
Another Arrest in Germany.

Robert Schwartz, aged 22, a German waiter, was formally brought up at West London today for committal on the remanded charge of stealing Bank of England notes to the value of 2,135 pounds, the property of Mrs. Catherine Madeline Burnett, of 19, Sinclair-gardens, West Kensington.
No evidence was taken, but Detective-Inspector Collins informed the magistrate that since the last hearing another person had been arrested in Bavaria in connection with the former arrest of the woman, Margaret Thaller. This was her husband, and it was also discovered that both of them were related to the prisoner, the woman being his sister. It was hoped that over 2,000 pounds would be recovered. The prisoner himself was "wanted" in Munich for fraud.
The magistrate committed the accused to the Central Criminal Court.

Source: The Echo, Thursday January 21, 1904

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Fri 23 Mar 2012 - 7:33

LEYTON GARDEN HORROR.
FAMILY BUTCHERED AND BURIED.

STRANGE DISCOVERY OF THE CRIME.

A crime recalling in its ferocity many crimes of the Deeming murders, came to light on Tuesday at Leyton, when the police found buried in the garden of 89, Church-road, the dismembered bodies of a man, woman, and a child. The victims were identified as: - William John Darby, 26, grocer, lately residing at 22, Wyndham-road, Camberwell; Beatrice Darby, 23, his wife; and their little girl baby of ten weeks. The occupier of the house in Church-road, Leyton, was a man named Edgar Edwards, 34 years of age, tall and dark, with a strong Scotch accent, and described as a grocer.
The story of the discovery has some strange features in it. On Dec. 23 an elderly man of the name of Garland was found suffering from severe injuries in Church-road. He managed to indicate that he had been attacked by Edgar Edwards. On Christmas eve, accordingly, this man was charged at Stratford police-court with assault, but as Garland was then in West Ham Hospital and too ill to appear, the magistrate remanded Edwards in custody. The latter volunteered the statement that he had only acted in self-defence, being first attacked by Garland; but this was regarded as curious, since he, a man of vigour, was without scratch, and Garland, on the contrary, a man of years and rather feeble, was so badly hurt. The police visited the house of Edwards, and, finding no one there, naturally turned to the neighbours. These, among other statements, mentioned as curious that considerable gardening operations had been going on for some weeks at the rear of No. 89, which has a piece of garden.
When the police searched the house they found amongst other articles a stout box which appeared, judging from the stains it bore, to have served the purpose of a table, and a number of letters which had reference to the business of a grocer named Darby, and further cards bearing Darby's business address. There was in the house a black mongrel dog, whose conduct attracted the attention of the police to the garden itself. The animal has since been recognised as the dog which belonged to the Darbys. A sharp pointed stick plied with vigour soon brought to light a spot where the soil seemed soft and pliable, and it was here that excavations were begun. At a depth of about five feet the police unearthed six sacks, containing the three bodies, which appeared to have been placed in the pit in two rows of three each. The bodies proved to be those of a man, woman, and child, and were terribly mutilated, the limbs being hacked off. The cause of death was apparent in the gaping wounds at the top of each of the skulls of the adults. A blow from some heavy blunt instrument had smashed the bone as one would smash an eggshell.
The features of the murdered persons were all well-preserved, and they did not appear to have been dead more than four weeks. The spot where the bodies were unearthed was, roughly, about the centre of the garden, movements of which would be visible to the neighbours on both sides. One incident related by the neighbours is believed to have some connection with the crime. There are three dogs in kennels at the back of No. 89, and within a radius of 200 yards. In fact, the sleeping quarters of one of these animals is not more than a few yards from the scene of the interment. One night, about a fortnight ago, all three, beginning about midnight, kept up a furious and continuous barking for some time.

IDENTIFICATION OF THE VICTIMS.

The business cards and other facts led to the identification of the bodies on Wednesday, and shifted the crime to Camberwell, for Mr. Darby was easily ascertained to have been in business at 22, Wyndham-road. This place was untenanted, and the police promptly forced an entrance. One room in the house bore evidence of having been the scene of a struggle. Blood was found on the floor, and in another part of the house the investigating party came across a heavy leaden sash weight. A portion of the cord to which it had been attached was still hanging to the thin end of it, and the heavier end was bespattered with congealed blood and hair.
Then piece by piece the following story was constructed: - Mr. and Mrs. Darby had been the tenants of the Camberwell shop for about 12 months, No. 22 standing at the corner of a narrow thoroughfare, known as Crown-street. The Darbys' immediate predecessor was a man named Pearce, whose name is still to be seen over the door. After a time Mr. Darby thought he would sell his business. He advertised it for sale in the following terms: -

GROCERY. - General and Provision; genuine business for disposal; doing 8 pounds to 10 pounds weekly; has done 18 pounds; price 60 pounds, all at, or close offer. - 22, Wyndham-road, Camberwell.

Several answers were received, and one of those who called in reply was the man in custody, now known as Edwards, although he then styled himself Londonen. After some discussion an arrangement was come to, with the result that Edwards entered into possession of the premises and contents, inclusive of the household furniture. After this date the neighbours have no definite recollection of seeing the young couple again. When the landlord called he found a hunchback, named Goodwin, in possession. The bailiffs were put in on a question of rent, and when they left the furniture was removed. The neighbours seem to have associated the disappearance of the Darbys with a question of debt, and there were some unkind remarks as to the Christmas club, into which customers had paid small sums of money. Edwards and the hunchback were seen to drive a covered van to the shop, and lift into it some furniture and a couple of boxes which were supposed to contain crockery ware. The window of the Plough and Crown beerhouse overlooks the backyard of 22, Wyndham-road. A sister-in-law of the licensee happened to be at the window, and she observed the two men at work removing the household furniture and effects. After that the little shop remained untenanted.

PRISONER IN COURT.

At Stratford police-court on Wednesday Edgar Edwards, 34, a grocer, of 89, Church-road, Leyton, was charged, on remand, with unlawfully and maliciously wounding John Garland, by striking him on the head with a piece of iron, and inflicting grievous bodily harm, on Dec. 23. There was a further charge as follows: - "Feloniously killing and slaying William John Darby, aged 26, Beatrice Darby, his wife, aged 28, and Ethel Beatrice Darby, aged ten weeks, on or

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about Nov. 23, supposed at 22, Wyndham-road, Camberwell."
As soon as the charge had been read by Mr. M. Chapman, the prisoner exclaimed, "Sure, sir, there is some great mistake."
Detective-inspector Collins stepped into the witness-box and said the charge as made out was one of murder, and he therefore asked that the prisoner be remanded on the original charge, that of wounding. He said that the whole facts would be laid before the Public Prosecutor. The bodies, said the Inspector, were found buried in the garden of a house occupied by the prisoner, and evidence would be adduced that in the house was found furniture and effects of the deceased persons. The bodies, added the inspector, were cut into eight pieces, and were in six sacks. The child appeared to have been strangled by something tied round its neck, and a bloodstained weapon was found in the house.
Mr. Chapman: You ask for a remand?
- Inspector Collins: Yes, sir.
Mr. Chapman then remanded the prisoner, who was at once removed.

THE ARREST OF EDWARDS.

It was on Dec. 23, that Garland called at the cottage in Church-road, Leyton. The man Edwards was in at the time, and he admitted him. It is stated that he came in response to an advertisement in reference to the sale of a grocer's business of which he is the owner. Both men proceeded upstairs, where they had an interview. It did not last long. At its conclusion both started to come downstairs, Garland being in front. While descending in the manner described, Garland alleges that he received a blow

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on the head from behind. At all events he was seriously injured. He did not, however, lose his presence of mind, although nearly stunned by the blow. He dashed down the remainder of the stairs shouting for help, and made a rush to open the front door. His cries for assistance were heard by a coal carter named Smith. He is in the employ of Messrs. Chandler and Son, whose business premises adjoin Worcester-villas. Smith, jumping from his vehicle on hearing cries of "Murder!" made a dash for the front door of No. 89. Finding it secured, he put his fist through the panel with the intention of pushing back the catch. Just at this moment the door was suddenly opened from within, and Garland, his face covered with blood, rushed out. He was weak and faint from loss of blood. A chair was procured, upon which he was seated. Many of the neighbours assisted in bandaging his wounds. Meanwhile the alarm had spread to the back of the house. Garland's cries had reached the stables of Messrs. Chandler. Several of the workmen rushed out and went towards the garden of No. 89. Edwards at this juncture made his appearance, but on seeing the men he returned to the house. The police were summoned, and a constable, entering by the back, proceeded upstairs, where he found Edwards in the apartment which served as a bedroom.

THE HOUSE AT LEYTON.

The accused's house at Leyton is just on the fringe of a well-populated district, is in a quiet lane, and overlooks some fields, and the garden in the rear is divided from the neighbouring gardens by open palings. At the further end of the terrace is a coal-yard. For some months No. 89 stood empty. It belongs to Mr. Bassett, a well-known auctioneer and house agent at Leyton, and to him Edwards at the beginning of December applied for the tenancy. He said he had kept a grocer's shop in Barnsbury-street, Islington, and he gave as reference, Mr. Darby, of 22, Wyndham-road, Camberwell. Mr. Bassett received a letter signed William John Darby, which was so satisfactory that Edwards was accepted as tenant. That this was a forgery is now clear. Mr. Bassett employed no sub-agent as has been erroneously reported.
On a Friday Edwards engaged an elderly man named Rawlings to dig the garden, and while he was so employed one day Edwards drove up in a cart drawn by a small pony. The vehicle had railing round it, and looked like a village butcher's cart. From this Edwards took a box, which he carried into the house. The following Monday he came again in the same cart, and brought with him six boxes. They were of the kind in which plums are usually sold, and were packed tightly with books, so much so, that many of the volumes overlapped the tops of the confining boxes.
"Come and give me a hand," Edwards said. Rawlings assisted to carry the six boxes into the back room, and then resumed his labours in the garden, which he manured very thoroughly. On the Tuesday Rawlings was anxious to complete his task. Edwards, however, had the keys of the house, and he did not put in an appearance at his customary hour. Accordingly, Rawlings relinquished thoughts of gardening for the day and went out with his dealer's cart. He returned in the afternoon, and on reaching No. 89 found Edwards already there. He had come this time with another vehicle. It was something like a grocer's cart or van, with a tilt or covering of white cloth enveloping its top. There was no name on the cart, to which was harnessed a chestnut horse. Edwards was alone, and at his request Rawlings assisted him to unload the contents of the vehicle, which consisted of household furniture and a few personal effects. These, which were of the most modest description, consisted chiefly of a bedstead, some bedding, a chair or two, and a looking-glass. All these articles were taken to the front upstairs room and placed there. This was the only furnished apartment in the house. After this neither Rawlings nor the other neighbours saw much of the new tenant of No. 89.
A blind was put on the back window on the first floor. Those in front of the house possessed venetian blinds, which were never drawn. As for the back windows on the ground floor, brown paper was made to serve as covering. Edwards did his own cooking, using a wood fire, and making personal excursions to the grocer's shop close by to purchase bread and milk.
Visitors to No. 89 appear to have been few. The neighbours remember but two, one of whom was the man Garland. The other was a lady, well-dressed and pretty. She was attired completely in black, and wore a black, smartly-trimmed sailor hat. She called at the cottage one afternoon soon after Edwards entered into possession. She remained a short while inside, went out and returned after the lapse of a few minutes. She has not been seen at the cottage since. A woman's black skirt has, it is stated, been found at the Leyton cottage. Mrs. Darby's relatives, who have examined it carefully, assert positively that it did not belong to the dead woman. The waist measurement of the garment, they say, is too small for Mrs. Darby, who was plump and robust looking. Its original owner consequently would have been a thinner woman. The woman seen at 22, Wyndham-road, after the disappearance of Mr. and Mrs. Darby, was Mrs. Goodwin, the wife of the hunchback.

PRISONER AND THE HUNCHBACK.

James Goodwin is also known as Meader, and he is said to have known Edwards for many years. According to the Daily Mail Edwards and the hunchback Goodwin were schoolfellows 30 years ago. They attended the Fellows-street school in Hackney-road, and also went to the same Sunday school. The prisoner's father then kept an oil-shop in Hows-street, Kingland-road. Goodwin himself, however, states that he is not sure of the man's name. He was accosted by him as an old friend five years ago while standing with a barrow in Shoreditch, and he said, "It's Harry Glanwell." The prisoner sought him out in that name on Nov. 28, but he says that he thinks his real name may be Smith. Between these two occasions, Goodwin avers, he had neither seen the accused man nor known anything of him. Edwards, or Glanwell, came to his house in Elsted-street, by the Rodney-road police-station, Walworth, and asked his wife if her husband was still "street working." He said, "I've come to see if I can do you a bit of good. Perhaps it will be an opening for you." He then proposed that she and her husband should give their house up and go into a shop he had taken to manage it for him. They did not actually move into the Wyndham-road house and shop, but they undertook to keep the shop open from eight o'clock in the morning until 10 o'clock at night. Edwards, so far as they knew, slept on the premises, for he "let them out" every night and let them in every morning from Dec. 2 to Dec. 10 inclusive.

THE MURDERED WOMAN.

Mrs. Darby's maiden name was Beatrice Kingswood. Previous to her marriage, about 18 months ago, she was employed as an assistant at Mr. Rollinson's furniture warehouse at Blackheath-hill, Greenwich. Mr. William Kingswood, of

[img][/img]

Lethbridge-road, Lewisham-road, Greenwich, is a pensioner of the London County Council, having been for 40 years stoker at the Deptford pumping station, under the old Metropolitan Board of Works. His daughter, about the beginning of December, wrote to her sister, Mrs. Baldwin, and asked her to go over and see the baby. Mrs. Baldwin replied that she would be over in a day or two, and went. When she got to the shop there was a man behind the counter, and when she asked where Mrs. Darby was he replied that she was out. He added that he had bought the business, but the furniture belonging to the Darbys had not been removed. Mrs. Baldwin, after waiting an hour or two to see if her sister would return, went home and wrote to her sister, but received no reply. Finally, she went again and found the shop shut.
For about three weeks nothing was heard, until last Monday, when a policeman brought some articles of jewellery, which the deceased woman's sister at once identified as part of her sister's property. As a result, Mrs. Baldwin went across that day to Leyton, and a large amount of property was there identified by the two sisters - Mrs. Baldwin and Miss Kingswood. Included amongst them were the deceased woman's wedding ring and a number of her wedding presents, including one from Mr. Rollinson.

THE POST-MORTEM.

The post-mortem examination of the remains took place in the mortuary at the back of the town hall, Leyton, on Thursday. It was made by Dr. Jekyll and Dr. Sandimans, of the West Ham Hospital. The body of the woman was that of a fine muscular female. The body of the man showed him to be of slight physique. The baby was a remarkably fine child. On the right temple of both the man and the woman was a great gash, which leads to the conclusion - owing to the similarity of the wounds - that the pair were simultaneously attacked. The whole frontal region of the woman's skull was also smashed in, and she had two severe wounds on the back of the head, also a bruise over the right eye. The forehead of the man bore three gashes in the flesh, and triangular fractures of the skull corresponding with the exterior wounds. There were also severe injuries over the eye. The baby had a bruise on the right temple, insufficient in itself to cause death, but sufficient to produce unconsciousness. Round the poor child's throat was tightly knotted a man's cambric handkerchief. It bore no name or distinguishing mark, and was neatly and evenly folded in three rolls, tied twice round the neck, and fastened in front of the throat in what is known as a "granny" knot.
The theory which the post-mortem examination suggests is that the crime was committed not while the family were in bed, as had been supposed, but during the day or evening. In support of this it is also pointed out that Mrs. Darby's hair was found fastened up as women usually wear it during the day, and that the baby wore its ordinary day garments.

THE INQUEST OPENED.

The inquest on the victims was opened at the Leyton town hall on Friday morning by Dr. Alexander Ambrose, the coroner for the metropolitan division of Essex.
The police were represented by Superintendent Pryke, local Detective-inspector Collins, who has charge of the case, Detective-sergeants Friend, Noel, and Savage, Sub-divisional Inspector Jenkins, and Inspector Young.
The coroner at the outset remarked that he only intended to hear evidence of identification, and then to adjourn to enable the inquiries to be completed by the police. He added that he had received notification from the governor of Brixton prison that Edwards did not wish to attend.
The one witness called was Alice Elizabeth Baldwin, a respectably-dressed lady, who said she resided at 31, Glenwood-road, Catford. She had identified the body of William John Darby as that of her brother-in-law, aged 26 years.
The Coroner: What was he?
Witness: A grocer.
Where did he live? - 22, Wyndham-road, Camberwell.
You identify the woman as your sister Beatrice Darby? - Yes.
How old was she? - Twenty-eight years.
And wife of William John Darby? - Yes, sir.
What is the baby's name? - Ethel Beatrice.
And the age? - Ten weeks.
This concluded the evidence, and Dr. Ambrose delivered the following notable comment: - There is one thing I would like to do before we go, and that is, to appeal to the Press. They have always upheld the standard of education and morality in this country, and the Press here is infinitely better than it is on the Continent, and I would appeal to them to abstain from publishing with minuteness the horrible and gruesome details of the case. I suppose the whole of the Press is represented, and I feel that if they agree among themselves they could advance the general good much better by not publishing all those gruesome details.
The inquiry was then adjourned till Wednesday, Jan. 21.

FURTHER DETAILS.

After the inquest it transpired that articles belonging to the Darbys had been pawned in Greenwich, Woolwich, Camberwell, Catford, Leyton, and Stratford. With reference to this matter Detective-sergeant Friend, an astute officer of the C.I.D. stationed at Leyton, accompanied by Mrs. Baldwin, sister of Mrs. Darby, visited Mr. Brassey's, a pawnbroker, of High-street, Stratford, where she was shown an umbrella which she at once identified as having belonged to her sister; this was pawned on Dec. 17 for 2s. 6d. in the name of "Edwards."
It has also transpired that a couch belonging to the Darbys, which was missing, has now been found in a second-hand auction room at Camberwell, and stained with blood and hair, and it is surmised that Mrs. Darby was killed on this couch.
Mr. Angus Lewis, the Assistant-Director of Public Prosecutions, has had the details of the tragedy placed before him, and has now practically taken over the conduct of the case. Edwards first wrote about Darby's business at Camberwell on Nov. 26, and either that day or the next he saw Goodwin or Meader, and made arrangements with him to take over the management of 22, Wyndham-road.
Helping them to fix negatively the actual date of the alleged murder of the Darbys, the police have discovered a traveller who called at 22, Wyndham-road on Dec. 1, and saw Mr. Darby there. Thus the date alleged in the charge against Edwards - viz., Nove. 29 - has to be amended.
With the remains in the garden were discovered sacks of clothing much stained and torn. In one cuff of a shirt was a spring stud corresponding to one subsequently found in the room at 89, Church-road, where Edwards had been sleeping.
In the local directory of Leytonstone for 1901 and 1902 the name of the murdered man Darby appears as keeping a china shop at 365, Leytonstone-road, and he is still well remembered by many of the present local tradesmen. His mother, a widow, lives at Woolwich-road, where for a number of years she has carried on a coffee-house.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly News, January 4, 1903, Page 5

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Sun 25 Mar 2012 - 4:51

THREATENING MR. J.B. JOEL.
Strange Story Told at Marlborough Street Police Court.

MYSTERIOUS SOCIETY.

Mrs. J.B. Joel entered the witness-box at Marlborough-street Police Court on Thursday to give evidence in the sensational charge against Charles Winborn, thirty-nine, a farrier, of Eighth-avenue, Manor Park, E., and Arthur Thomas Canham, twenty-two, of Clive Cottages, Manor Park, also a farrier, of being concerned in feloniously sending a letter to her on Sept. 15 demanding by menaces the sum of 500 pounds.
There was a further charge against the prisoners of maliciously sending to Mrs. J.B. Joel a letter on the same date threatening to kill and murder her husband.
The accused men, it is alleged, belong to a secret society known as the Camerista Monenero. On Sept. 17 they sent to Mrs. Joel a letter demanding 500 pounds within two weeks, otherwise preparations would, it was stated, be made for the death of her husband. The reply was to be made through the agony column of a newspaper.
Chief Inspector Collins of New Scotland Yard, took the matter in hand, with the result that the following letter was received by Mrs. Joel: -

Madam. - Yours seen. Will send messenger to your house on Tuesday next at eight p.m. Have the money ready - 200 pounds in notes of 5 pounds, and the other in gold in 25 pound packets. The messenger will bring a box and wait, and now consider a lot before you attempt to discover us or call the police to do so. They might get one or even a hundred, but there are more in the Camerista Monenero.
If everything is done honourably you and yours will never be troubled by us, and at any time you want any assistance you can command the whole of the Camerista Monenero by calling through the "Daily Chronicle" special column.

Following the receipt of this letter, Inspector Collins and Detective-Inspector Lawrence went to the house in Grosvenor-square, where Canham called with a box to which was attached another letter.
Canham, when arrested, said he was only a messenger, and was to hurry back to Manor Park and pass it to an address.

Winborn's Admission.

Detective-Inspector David Goodwillie described how at the station at Ilford Winborn said: -

I don't know what made us do it. We were both to get the sack when the business was sold. Canham got a lot of back numbers of "Lloyd's," and got Mr. Joel's address from the Sievier case. I am not sure what paper it was. It might not have been "Lloyd's," but it was some weekly paper, I am sorry we were so silly. I told Canham that if we were found out it would be very serious for us, but I thought that as Sievier had got 5,000 pounds from Joel we should be able to get 500 pounds from his wife without any difficulty.

Inspector Lawrence said on Sept. 22 he went to the house in Grosvenor-square with Chief Inspector Collins, and was present when Canham's statement was taken. He heard him admit that he had seen Charles Winborn write the first two letters.
Both prisoners were then committed for trial.

JOEL-SIEVIER CASE.
Mr. Markham, M.P., Repeats Grave Charges in Astonishing Speech.

Interest in the Joel-Sievier case has received a fresh stimulus owing to a remarkable statement made on Tuesday by Mr. A.B. Markham, M.P., at Kirkby, Notts.
It will be remembered that Mr. Markham's name was mentioned, and that he was subpoenaed as a witness in the recent prosecution of Mr. Sievier by Mr. J.B. Joel at the Old Bailey.
He said that, holding strong views as to the part played by the South African capitalists in bringing about the war, he devoted the greater part of 1901 to going through the files of the South African papers in the British Museum, and in doing so he came across the history of Mr. Joel. On March 7, 1902, he gave notice of his intention to ask in the House of Commons a question, the object of which was to get information as to whether Mr. Joel or his brother, Mr. Solomon Joel, was accepted by his Majesty's Government as a guarantor for the new meat contract in South Africa.
About two hours before the House met on March 11, he received a letter from Sir George Lewis, saying that

Mr. Jack Joel has no connection whatever with the contract with the Consolidated Johannesburg Investment Company, which guarantees partially the contract with the Imperial Storage Company I strongly urge you to postpone the question until you have ascertained what the real facts are.

"I saw Mr. Joel, who cried and whined, and appealed to me to spare him for the sake of his wife and little children.
"I told him his company had, through their influence, passed the Illicit Diamond Buying Law through the Cape Parliament, and that hundreds of men had served twenty years' penal servitude for this offence of buying a single diamond, and that I could not understand how, when others had been sent back from England to Africa, he had managed to escape, and I told him I hoped the Government would lay hold and send him back to his trial.
"Mr. Joel then became a pitiable object; he kept crying and saying, "Spare me, spare me!" and offered to give 10,000 pounds to any good cause I liked.

Referring to the Sievier trial Mr. Markham said: -

"Joel was on his oath. Sievier's life was at stake; yet Joel committed wilful and deliberate perjury, as badly as ever was committed in a court of law."
"When I served with a subpoena," Mr. Markham said, "I decided to tell what had transpired in 1902, for it was clear to my mind that Joel had set a trap to catch Sievier, who was admittedly hard up, and it was repugnant to my mind that any man should be trapped by one who was himself a refugee from justice."
Mr. Markham, therefore, supplied Sievier with the information that he could get the facts he required in Hansard, and that the woodcut portrait could be found in the "Police Gazette" in the British Museum.
In conclusion, Mr. Markham said: -
"If Joel had his desserts he would have been in prison."

Source: Lloyd's Weekly News, October 4, 1908, Page 10

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Re: Chief Detective-Inspector Henry Collins

Post by Karen on Sun 25 Mar 2012 - 5:01

New Chief at Scotland Yard.

London, March 29. - There has been much approval over the appointment of Inspector Fowler of Scotland Yard to the rank of chief inspector to fill the vacancy caused by the retirement of Chief Inspector Collins.
During the past six or seven years Mr. Fowler has been concerned in some of the most sensational cases of the day. He arrested Richard Brinkley, the Croyden poisoner, who was hanged for killing a married couple with prussic acid.
He successfully investigated the theft of Queen Alexandra's miniatures in 1908. The Queen had sent a number of miniatures of the Princesses to a farm at Tulse Hill to be touched up. The premises were broken into and the miniatures stolen. Mr. Fowler succeeded in arresting the thieves, who were given long terms of penal servitude.
In February, 1907, Mr. Fowler traced the burglars who broke into the Park lane residence of Mr. Wertheimer, the art dealer, stealing oil paintings, snuff boxes and treasures to the value of 800,000 pounds. Three men were captured and property worth 300,000 pounds recovered.

Source: Utica Herald-Dispatch, Saturday Evening, March 29, 1913

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