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Detective-Inspector Robert Sagar

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Detective-Inspector Robert Sagar

Post by Karen on Fri 15 Jul 2011 - 2:05

A FAMOUS DETECTIVE'S ADVENTURES.

Detective-Inspector Sagar, who has just retired from the City of London Police after 24 years' service, has had a somewhat unique career. He began life as a student of medicine, but drifted into the detection of crime out of pure love of the calling. "When quite a lad," said he to an interviewer, "I came to London with the intention of studying medicine. To that end I became attached to St. Bartholomew's Hospital. As it happened, I went to lodge at the house of a detective. Before long I found that the study of criminology had more fascinations for me than medicine or surgery, and as a consequence I was more often to be found in the well at the Old Bailey than in the laboratory at St. Bart's. Sir James Fraser, then Commissioner of Police, interested himself considerably in my work, and as the result of a special report, he suggested that I should join the force. That is how I came to be a detective, although I had not previously belonged to the police. In that way my position was unique, as it was also from the fact that I am the only City detective who has never been in uniform. I joined in January, 1880, on the usual terms of a month's probation. Fortune appeared to favour me during this period, for I was put in charge of a peculiarly intricate case of forgery which had baffled the ingenuity of my colleagues. In the end I succeeded and ran my man to earth. He was sentenced to 20 years' penal servitude. In June, 1889, I was promoted to be detective-sergeant, and the following year to be detective-inspector. There's the whole story; what more could you want?"

TRACKING A FORGER.

"Were you not instrumental in bringing the Barmashes and Schmidt to justice?" - "Ah, yes; they were the bank-note forgers. Schmidt was very clever, but the smartest man I ever knew at that game was an American named Johnson, who, together with a man named Phillips, was awarded seven years for forging letters of credit on a City firm. Johnson was most polished in his manners, and always dressed in the height of fashion. He spent most of his time in swell West-End restaurants, and was generally known as the "Captain." He would never let even his best friends know where he lived, and would dodge in and out of stations on the Underground if he found that he was being watched. One day we tracked him down at a house in Bethnal Green. Whilst examining the premises I came across the head of a wire nail which had been driven into the partition on the stair fonding. I had almost cut away the wood underneath the nail when I heard something drop on the other side. This I afterwards found was a bundle of the finest imitations of Bank of England notes I have ever seen."

WHO WAS "JACK THE RIPPER?"

"What was the most sensational case with which you were connected?" - "Well, I can hardly say. Possibly that series of tragedies which came to be known as the "Jack the Ripper" murders. As you know, the perpetrator of these outrages was never brought to justice, but I believe he came the nearest to being captured after the murder of the woman Kelly in Mitre Square. A police officer met a well-known man of Jewish appearance coming out of the court near the square, and a few moments after fell over the body. He blew his whistle, and, other officers running up, they set off in pursuit of the man who had just left. The officers were wearing indiarubber boots, and the retreating footsteps of a man could be clearly heard. The sounds were followed to King's Block in the model dwellings in Stoney-lane, but we did not see the man again that night. The apron which had been worn by the unfortunate woman was found under the stairs in a common lodging-house in Dorset-street, and on the wall over it were scrawled in chalk the words - "The Jews are not the people that will be blamed for nothing." I feel sure we knew the man, but we could prove nothing. Eventually we got him incarcerated in a lunatic asylum, and the series of murders came to an end."

Source: Examiner, Tuesday 28 February 1905, page 6


Last edited by Karen on Sat 26 May 2012 - 20:04; edited 2 times in total

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Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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Re: Detective-Inspector Robert Sagar

Post by Karen on Sat 26 May 2012 - 19:20

ESCAPE AND RECAPTURE OF A PRISONER.

At Clerkenwell police-court on Wednesday, John Oxley, 32, of 4, Rutland-court, Aldersgate-street was charged with escaping from Holloway prison on April 8. - William Elvey, chief warder, said the prisoner was sentenced to 18 months' imprisonment at the Central Criminal court last September, and to serve the remainder of a term of penal servitude.
- On the 7th inst. he was in the prison hospital, having injured his ankles. He was missed from his cell there on the next morning, and the lock was found to have been removed from the cell-door. Examining the cell, a piece of iron was found concealed in the bed; it had been shaped into the form of a screwdriver, and had probably been used to remove the lock. From the cell Oxley had apparently passed into the prison yard. To do this he had to go by two other doors, which should have been locked; and this point was at present a subject of strict investigation by the prison authorities. Round the prison yard was a wall 24ft. high, and the yard was divided in two by a partition wall of the same height, the two parts communicating by a door, which would not be locked at the time. The prisoner, it appeared, must have scaled the partition wall by means of a rope, one end of which he attached to the handle of the door, throwing the other end into the yard beyond, then passing through the doorway and hauling himself up. From the top of the partition wall he could reach the top of the outer wall, and thence appeared to have descended into a piece of waste ground by means of another rope. The ropes were found. They were made of bits of string and rags, and of the counterpane of his bed. The prisoner was delivered into witness's custody again by the City police. Oxley, it was stated, was captured, after a most remarkable chase, in a house at Haggerston. The police surrounded the house, but, notwithstanding that his ankles were still unrecovered from their injuries, he jumped from the window, eluded the constables, and ran off to a neighbouring timber yard. There he scrambled "like a cat" to the top of a woodstack, about fifty feet high, and down the opposite side, and made off again, still pursued by the constables, jumped into the canal, and swimming across, was eventually captured, after a pursuit lasting nearly half-an-hour, by Detective Hunt, of the City police. Detective-serjeants Sage and Newby, of the G division, and City Constable Sagar were participators in the chase and capture. - Detective-inspector Peel, of the G division, said that Oxley was notorious for his escapes from custody. He had taken the hinges off an inner door of the cell, and used them to break down the outer panels. He could "run like a monkey up a pipe or a ladder." The prisoner, a small man, of very quiet demeanour, begged that he might not be given back to the prison authorities. What was done inside the prisons was never known outside. - He was remanded till Thursday and then committed for trial.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, April 26, 1885, Page 2

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Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
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Re: Detective-Inspector Robert Sagar

Post by Karen on Sat 26 May 2012 - 19:22

TWO MORE INFORMERS.
KING'S EVIDENCE IN THE FORGED NOTES CASE.

Schmidt, the informer in the forged notes case, has, since the case was last before the Mansion House Police Court, been joined as King's evidence by Solomon and William Barmash.
This was the statement made by the prosecuting counsel, Mr. Mathews, at the resumed hearing yesterday, and the announcement fell like a bomb among the remaining eight prisoners who stood in the dock. They were not long in discovering that the two Barmashes occupied positions in another part of the court.
Beyond the reading of the confessions of Solomon and William Barmash the sitting was occupied with the cross-examination of Schmidt.
The confessions of the Barmashes were practically a corroboration of the evidence already given and an elucidation of parts of Schmidt's story. Solomon Barmash alleged that he first met Schmidt at the house of Mrs. Samuels, when Schmidt suggested forging 5 pound notes and produced some paper - a difficult thing to procure - with which to do the work. Solomon Barmash, according to his own story, did not entertain the idea. When Devonport and others were arrested for uttering forged 100 pound notes Detective Sagar, according to Solomon Barmash's confession, induced him to tell all he knew on the strength of the 1,000 pound reward offered by the Bank. He offered to put the forger into the power of the police, having Schmidt in his eye at the time.
The confession of William Barmash placed the whole plot at the door of the Bernsteins, who, he said, instigated and financed it.
In cross-examination by the prisoners and their legal representatives, Schmidt admitted that in Germany, which he left fifteen years ago, he was known by the name of Johan Jacobs. He warmly denied that he had done no "honest work" in London, but could only account for seven months' work out of four years. He denied that the reward of 1000 pounds was contingent upon his securing a conviction. It was for giving evidence only. At the time he went to the Bank's solicitors he was dependent upon the police for money.
You endeavoured to entrap Salisbury in your wicked designs? - Yes.
You knew he was a poor shoemaker with nine children? - Yes.
What was your motive? - I was acting under the instructions of the police.
Speaking of his other forgeries, Schmidt said that he was engaged with the Barmashes in some cheque forgeries shortly after he came to London. His next work was a letter of credit for 1,000 pounds. Then he was engaged with the prisoner Salisbury in forging Russian postage stamps, and after that with another man in forging Russian rouble notes. The case was further adjourned.

Source: Daily Mail, Thursday November 20, 1902, Page 6

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