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Details of Mackenzie's Murder and Inquest

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Details of Mackenzie's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 28 Feb 2010 - 22:45

Another Whitechapel Murder.

The body of a woman named Alice Mackenzie, known as Alice Kell, was found in Castle Alley, Whitechapel, on the night of July 16th, and the details of the murder leave no doubt that the unfortunate was the eighth victim of "Jack the Ripper." Almost before the dreadful work was completed, the police came from all directions, and with their bull's-eyes they threw patches of light in all directions; but there was no trace of the murderer. When the woman was placed in an ambulance, underneath her was found a broken clay pipe, stained with blood. Evidently taken unawares, as she was strongly built, weighed 140 lb, and could not have uttered a cry without being heard by the police, "Jack" adopted his old plan, except that in this case his right hand was placed over the woman's mouth, and the left hand drove the knife in her neck, instead of vice versa. The body was taken to the mortuary. The examination developed unusual features. "Jack" had done his work with a dull knife, therefore his slashes had not been clean. At 10 o'clock on the 17th the woman was identified as one who gained her living by charing work, and never resorted to the streets. The alley where she was killed is 100 yards long, dark, and encumbered by a mass of wagons and barrows, which formerly were stored in a yard. At the bottom is a network of streets, courts, and alleys. There are no residents of the place likely to go through it at night. The murder threw Whitechapel into a condition of fearful excitement. Several suspicious characters were arrested, but discharged for lack of evidence. The killing was done within a stone's throw from the scene of almost all the other murders.
Two parties have been placed under espionage in connection with the crime, a military-looking Englishman 6 feet tall, who insists that he is the veritable "Jack" and gives the names of his victims, and the dates on which he killed them, with all the ghastly and indecent details; the police believe him to be a lunatic. The other, who claims the same unenviable distinction, and who gave himself up, says his name is Brodie, and that he left London in September for Kimberley, South Africa. He is an ex-convict, and made the voyage back as a fire-man. He is pronounced insane from consumption and the excessive use of liquor.

Source: Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XVI, Issue 5551, 24 August 1889, Page 4


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Re: Details of Mackenzie's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Wed 12 Oct 2011 - 11:20

MYSTERY OF WHITECHAPEL.
Jack the Ripper Adds Another Victim to His List.

A NONPLUSSED POLICE FORCE.
The Murderer Seems to Vanish Into Thin Air - A Panic Stricken Populace - Speculation as to the Murderer.

He Counts Eight.
[Copyright 1889 by James Gordon Bennett.]

LONDON, July 17. - [New York Herald Cable - Special to THE BEE.] - Thousands in this great city are quaking with fear of the murderer's knife. "Jack the Ripper" is back again. A horrible murder this morning enables him to cut another notch in the handle of the terrible knife. The details of this morning's crime leave no doubt that the murderer of Alice Mackenzie, known to some as Kelly, was also guilty of the following crimes: Christmas week 1887, an unknown woman was found murdered near Osborne and Wentworth Streets, Whitechapel; August 7, 1888, Martha Turner was stabbed in thirty-nine places on the landing of the George Yard building, Commercial-street, Spitalfields; August 31, Mrs. Nicholls was murdered and mutilated in Hanbury Street, Whitechapel; September 30, Elizabeth Stride's throat was cut in Berner Street, Whitechapel; September 30, Catherine Eddowes was murdered and mutilated in Mitre Square, Aldgate; November 9, Mary Jane Kelly was hacked to pieces at No. 26 Dorset Street, Spitalfields. All these murders were audacious, the last extraordinarily so. There were police in front, behind and all around the assassin when he killed the eighth victim. Before his dreadful work was completed the tramp of constable 272 drove the ghoul away. The constable left the spot ten minutes before, and on his return found the mutilated body in front of the house. He raced down Castle Alley to Castle Street. The only person in sight was Isaac Lewis Jacobs, who, with plate in hand, had been sent for cheese and pickles by his brother. He was arrested, but was evidently innocent. At the sound of the police whistle, from all directions bull's eyes threw patches of light everywhere. No trace of the murderer of the woman. The ambulance came, and under her was found a broken farthing pipe, which may have belonged to the woman or to the murderer. The body was taken to the morgue for examination, which developed an unusual feature. Jack had done the work with a dull knife. Heretofore the slashes had been clean. Alice Mackenzie's body bore the marks of Jack's terrible methods. The clothes were drawn over the head after the knife was driven into her neck. A cut four inches long running towards the groin had not severed the abdominal wall. On both sides of this cut and along the lateral line below the breast bone were twenty scratches. The woman was evidently taken unawares, as she was strongly built and weighed 140 pounds. She could not have uttered a cry without being heard by the police. Jack adopted his old plan except in this case. His right hand was held over her mouth while his left hand drove the knife into her neck, instead of vice versa. The murder threw Whitechapel into a condition of fearful excitement. Castle Alley was crowded all day with people from all quarters who had flocked to the scene. Stories of the crime are on every tongue.
John McCormack said he had lived with the woman for six years; she was forty years old; born in Peterborough; there was a family of three until a month ago; they then lived in a furnished room in Whitechapel; she did charring work; never got a living on the streets; some times drank too much; left the house at 4 yesterday afternoon; they had a tiff; gave her a shilling, and told her not to spend it in drink; was told she had returned to the house at 10 last night and had taken a blind boy, George Dixon, for a walk; the woman and boy went to a Cambridge music hall, there met a man and asked him to treat; she then went home to the lodging house and left after saying she was to meet a man at the Cambridge hall. Whether or not she met him is not known, for the boy has no means of identifying him except by his voice.
Nothing could more clearly indicate the cunning of the murderer than the selection of the locality. The alley is 100 yards long, dark and encumbered by a mass of wagons and barrows, which formerly were stored in a yard in which excavations were going on. A few feet above is a network of streets, courts and alleys. Castle Alley has no residents likely to go through it at night, baths being the only tenement house in the upper part of it while the others on the left side are small factories and work shops. On the right side is a high board fence shutting off the back yards of rows of small houses facing on New Castle Street. New Castle Street runs parallel with Castle Alley and just below the scene of the murder they are connected by a narrow court. If approached, therefore, from Whitechapel Road the murderer could escape down Castle Alley into Old Castle Street, through this to Wentworth Street, and thence to Commercial Street, or the lane. If approached from Old Castle Street, he could escape through Castle Alley court into Whitechapel Road. This way he did escape. If hemmed on both sides he could escape through the connecting court to New Castle Street, and thence to Whitechapel Road or Wentworth Street, as he chose. There was further cunning and evidence of intimate knowledge of the locality in the fact that he was just on the boundary line of two police districts. Whitechapel Road is patrolled by constables from the Leman Street station, and no constable comes from the road down the alley, because that is in the district belonging to another division. He must have known that an officer could come toward him only from the bottom of the alley, and his intimate knowledge of the locality and police rules made his escape as easy as ever. When it is remembered that in all the eight murders committed he has never once been seen by any body the fear of him in Whitechapel will be understood, and the superstition in some of the slums that he is invisible does not seem surprising. The police have absolutely no clue. Inspector Reid stated this evening that Jacobs was the only person in the vicinity of Old Castle Street, and he was simply on an errand, and was released directly. Three other men were arrested on suspicion during the early morning and forenoon, but were almost immediately released upon establishing their identity, and their whereabout at the hour of the murder. The search of the lodging house which followed close upon the discovery revealed nothing. Nobody had come in or gone out within the hour who could in any way be connected with the tragedy.
The only hope was the examination of the barmen and barmaids along Whitechapel Road, with reference to the presence in their places of the woman Mackenzie, prior to the murder. There is a possibility, judging from previous cases, that the murderer took her into one of these and got her stupidly drunk before attempting her death. This investigation appears to be the only chance of finding a clue, but it does not appear to have been made.
The attempt to surround the scene with a cordon of constables amounted to nothing, as the murderer had passed out into Whitechapel Road, and it would be quite as easy to hear wayfarers on that populous avenue as to encircle the population of London. Consequently the police stand as before, not knowing which way to turn. No doubt they have done and are doing all in their power. Chief Commissioner Monro and Colonel Munsall were on the spot as soon after the murder as telegraph and horses could bring them. All the detective strength of the metropolitan force has been centered on Whitechapel and the best brains of Scotland Yard not only are but have been at work on the murders up to a month ago. Two constables were nightly on watch at the alley, it being a likely spot for a murderer to select. Up to two weeks ago there was also a night watchman stationed in the alley by a man who owned a number of barrows stored there. The withdrawal of all those left the place free and nothing more for the police to work on at present than there was at the last murder, on August 9. The murderer is clearly a maniac, but cool, and he makes no mistakes, and leaves no traces, and, furthermore, is evidently without that sense of fear which leads to identification. "Jack the Ripper" has sent several letters to the police lately, after a long cessation of these epistles. They were in the usual braggadocio form and bear the old signature.
A letter was also received by Albert Backert, leader of the vigilance committee movement, three weeks ago. All the letter stated was that another would begin work again in July.
Many theories regarding the Whitechapel murderer have been advanced by detectives, criminal philosophers, court experts, newspaper men, and experts of insanity. The theory most prevails that the murderer is a religious crank, who imagines that he has a mission to perform, and, like the fanatic of Mahomet's time, the more atrocious butcheries he performs, the greater saint he thinks himself; that all the Whitechapel murders have occurred about the 8th of the month, or on the very last days of each month - and it is claimed that every new outbreak has occurred with the change of the moon. This, it is thought, indicates that the murderer studying its geography, would not venture to lose himself in the intricacies of the many and dangerous labyrinths of the district, especially when on a mission of murder.
Robert Buchanan, while engaged at rehearsal at the Haymarket theater, said: "I do not think "Jack the Ripper" seems to lack atrociousness. The skill displayed there is none of the really distinctive handiwork of an original fiend. He is probably an imitator of some weak-brained creature rendered crazy by gloating over the details of the horrible affairs of last year. Of course that is a very loose guess, but the evidence at present is so slight."
Buchanan had not heard the latest details, but George Moore, engaged in correcting the manuscript of a forthcoming novel, said he thought he could imagine the motive.
"I very early made up a theory almost from the first, and still believe in it. The absence of motives which generally lie in the road of a murder is very remarkable. These crimes are not committed for gain; that at least is certain. They are not, I am equally certain committed for revenge. My theory is that they are the work of some weak brained zealot of the purity class. Perhaps this unspeakable wretch thinks he is creating a panic among the poor women class. He thinks he may frighten them from their profession. It is an insane idea, of course, but a conceivable one. He is a loathsome outcome of the Puritanism of the day. That is my idea."
The novelist, James Payne, had no theory; to have a theory on such a case was a policeman's duty.
"It is obvious," said Mr. Walter Besant, "that the criminal is of the low class; that I think is proved by the status of the victims. It is also obvious that he has at least a rough and ready knowledge of anatomy. He would seem to be a bird of passage. It is hardly conceivable that with such a horrible lust of blood constantly torturing him and spurring him on to commit fresh outrages that he would have remained in London so long without it mastering him. Here then we have three considerations - his lowness of class, his knowledge of anatomy, and his nomadic life. Those traits would be united in a ship's butcher. Not many ships carry live cattle for slaughter nowadays. The great lines are all provided with ice rooms, but there are still to be found ships without those conveniences. I have made a voyage around the cape on a ship on which we slaughtered our cattle for the table. The doctor, a friend of mine, made the suggestion at the time when Jack was busy in Whitechapel last year, that in a certain class of disorders, which sometimes turn to a homicidal mania, and which is especially directed against women, it might be worth while to make enquiries at the hospitals as to whether any man with the symptoms of such a disorder was discharged at or about that date."
Mr. Henry Labouchere said: "It does not seem possible to form a theory which will hold water. I have seen and heard a score, but never one without a hole in it. In fact, most of them were all holes. As to whether Jack the Ripper is one person or more; well, even that is doubtful. I shall say that he or they live at a distance from Whitechapel. The man must have some hiding place in which to conceal his clothes, which can hardly escape blood stains, and in that district everybody was so much on the qui vive that he could not have found such secrecy as was needful. Mad? Well, no; I should say he was conspicuously sane. I have seen many mad people, and they all talk. They can't keep a secret. Of course this man has very particular reasons for keeping his tongue between his teeth. If he were caught a Whitechapel mob would make short work of him, but still his silence speaks for a sanity clever enough to laugh at the police, though that doesn't take any great amount of genius. The police have bungled the affair terribly but I don't see why even such a murderer should be mad. It is a taste. The fellow committed the first murder, perhaps, if he only knew it, from some perfectly understandable motive. He was not caught; the taste developed, and he went on to the end."

Source: The Omaha Daily Bee, Thursday Morning, July 18, 1889

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Re: Details of Mackenzie's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Mon 31 Oct 2011 - 6:09

THE WHITECHAPEL MURDER.

On Saturday, before Mr. Lushington, at the Thames Police-court, William Wallace Brodie, 33, having no occupation, and no settled abode, was charged with being a wandering lunatic. He was further charged, on his own confession, with having murdered Alice M'Kenzie in Castle-alley, Whitechapel, on the 17th July. Detective-inspectors Moore (Scotland-yard) and E. Reid (H. Division) watched the case on behalf of the Criminal Investigation Department. On the evening of the day following that of the murder the prisoner, who is a tall, powerfully-built man, went to the Leman-street Police-station, and stated to Inspector Pinhorn that he wished to give himself up for the murder of the woman, but he declined to say anything about "the other eight or nine." The prisoner afterwards repeated his confession to Detective-Inspector Moore, to whom he also made a long statement of a rambling and singular character. In it Brodie stated he walked to Land's End and back in half an hour or three-quarters of an hour, and on his return went into Whitechapel through an avenue of trees. It was "1691 or 1721 o'clock" when he spoke to the woman, who was attired in a bright red dress. Having got her down he whipped a knife out of his pocket and cut her throat. He described the knife as a white-handled one, and added it was specially made for the purpose at Sheffield. Brodie also added he could feel a worm crawling about in his head. Inspector Moore said he had made inquiries into the case. Prisoner was discharged in August 1888, and was only here ten days when he started for the Cape. On Aug. 31 Mary Ann Nicholls was murdered in Buck's-row. When at the Cape the prisoner gave himself up as the Whitechapel murderer. He worked his passage home from the Cape on the 15th inst., and there was no doubt he was in bed at Harvey's-buildings on the night of the murder. On the 17th he was charged at the Mansion House with annoying his brother, and was bound over to keep the peace. Mr. Lushington said he had a letter from the doctor of the prison stating that when he was admitted he was not responsible for his actions. He was now sane. The prisoner, who deserved to be punished for what he had done, would now be discharged. The prisoner was immediately rearrested by Inspector Moore on a charge of fraud, and conveyed to Clerkenwell, in which district the alleged fraud took place.

BRODIE COMMITTED FOR FRAUD.

At the Clerkenwell Police-court on Monday, William Wallace Brodie was charged on a warrant with obtaining by false pretences a gold watch, value 9 pounds, from Peter Rigby Pratt, at 28, Clerkenwell-road. The prisoner is the man who made the extraordinary "confession" respecting the Whitechapel murders, and who, on being discharged from the Thames Police-court, was rearrested on the present charge. In the Clerkenwell Police-court on Monday the prisoner protested that he had given himself up on a higher charge than the one now made against him, and that the Court had no right to go into this fresh charge until the charge for which he had given himself up had been gone into, which charge, the prisoner said, was perfectly true, and he could prove it. They knew it to be true, but they chose to exhibit him about the country in this manner. The officer who arrested the prisoner on Saturday stated that when rearrested the prisoner said he had no recollection of obtaining the watch. It was the outcome of the "cursed drink." Mr. Haden Corser committed the prisoner for trial, it being understood that the question of the prisoner's sanity would be again gone into.

AN ARREST AT LOWESTOFT.

On Monday a man was taken into custody at Lowestoft on suspicion of being concerned in the last Whitechapel murder. The police at Lowestoft were requested by the detective department of London to keep a sharp look-out at the post-office for a man who would inquire for a letter addressed to Wilson Bland. Accordingly two officers were set to keep watch, and in due course the letter arrived, and on Monday morning it was inquired by for a man who was at once taken into custody. At the police-station he was asked to give an account of his movements on the night that the murder was committed. He readily did so, and his statement was wired to London. The Metropolitan Police inquired at the places mentioned by the man, including Ilford police-station, and it was found that his story was correct. Accordingly instructions were telegraphed to release him, and he left the police-station shortly before five o'clock on Monday evening.

Source: Hornsey and Middlesex Messenger, Friday August 2, 1889

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Re: Details of Mackenzie's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Wed 28 Mar 2012 - 20:25

WHITECHAPEL'S FIEND.
Is Jack the Ripper Responsible for Alice McKenzie's Killing?

LITERALLY CARVED TO DEATH.
Scenes and Incidents Attending the Seven Other Murders.

DID A WOMAN DO IT?
[SUBJECT OF ILLUSTRATION.]

[img][/img]

The London police appear to have as much difficulty in locating "Jack the Ripper," the Whitechapel fiend, as the Chicago police have in apprehending Tascott or the Cronin murderers. Had it not been for the murder of Alice McKenzie on July 17, the case would probably have lapsed into the category of unsolvable mysteries. This latest murder, however, has had the effect of putting the new regime of the department on its mettle, and no stone will be left unturned to apprehend the perpetrator, who is supposed to be the same as the one who committed the seven other crimes, as the surroundings, mode of perpetration, etc., showed the same dastardly plans and handiwork.
The latest murder was one of the most dastardly and barefaced ever committed even in London, the scene of many brutal and historic crimes. The POLICE

[img][/img]

GAZETTE herewith gives the history of the crime, with details, sketches and illustrations of it and its predecessors.
On the early morning of July 17 the body of a woman was found lying diagonally across the narrow four-foot sidewalk on the left-hand side of Castle alley as you go in from Whitechapel road, this great thoroughfare being only thirty yards away. She was dead, and the work of mutilation, interfered with by a singular circumstance, had begun when the murderer was warned by the approaching steps of Constable 272 H, and slipped up the alley, and thence into Whitechapel road through the dark, narrow court. He must have gone this way, because there was no other outlet without passing 272 H. And yet to go through this court and out into the street he must have passed only a few yards - ten at most - from a constable stationed in front of the very buildings between which the court runs.
The police were in front of him, behind him and all around him. There were three constables at least on watch within hearing of his victim's shriek, had his

[img][/img]

first blow failed. There was a lighted bedroom just above him, in which two people were going to bed. They were not fifteen feet from him when he struck the murderous blow.
At a quarter-past twelve Constable 423 H stopped under the very lamp post by which the woman was found and ate his luncheon. He was there perhaps ten minutes. Between twenty and twenty-five minutes past Constable 272 H came up from Wentworth street on his regular patrol, going up the right side of the alley and coming back on the left. He passed out and the alley was tenantless at half-past twelve. And yet at ten minutes to one, when he returned, the body lay there covered with blood, the victim dead and partially mutilated, with no trace whatever of the assassin. He had kept the same close watch on the patrol as he did in Mitre square. He took the same incredible chances and succeeded in the same incredible way. The death was as absolutely silent as has been all the rest. There was no sound even of conversation, because the words, unless voiced in a low tone, would have been heard by the people overhead. In all the annals of assassination as a fine art, there has been nothing to surpass this case.
When the constable found the body, the woman lay

[img][/img]

on her back with her clothes drawn up about her head and partially tucked away under her left arm. Her left leg was straight and her right bent.
As the woman lay there it became evident that "Jack the Ripper" had departed slightly from his previous methods. She had been struck from behind, like all the previous ones. But his method hitherto had been to stop the victim's mouth with his right hand, and with one heavy sweep draw the razor-like knife across the throat, severing the neck half through.
It was clearly evident, however, both from the appearance of the skin and the character of the cut, that the knife had been plunged into the left side of the neck and then drawn backwards toward the back of the neck and the operator. The blow was a heavy one, and the blade severed both the jugular vein and the carotid artery, but the knife did not break the skin on the other side. It had been pressed toward the hand as it was drawn out, the gash running toward the left ear. This shows clearly two things - the first being that the man stood behind her. The second is a bit of evidence that may turn out to be very important. It is that the murderer is left-handed; no right-handed man could, by any possibility, have made the wound that appeared.
When she was taken to the mortuary and closely examined the discovery was made that only the bluntness of the knife had prevented her from being as horribly dismembered as all the other victims. There was one cut about four inches long running from a spot two inches to the right of the navel diagonally toward the left groin. It was not deep, and had not severed the abdominal wall. The strange fact appeared, however, that this cut was but one of at least twenty attempts. On both sides of it and all along the lateral line below the breast bone were scratches made with the point of a knife. Each one had been an attempt to make the one ripping cut which is familiar to the mortuary surgeon, through all the other cases. The yielding skin or the bluntness of the knife had

[img][/img]

prevented the murderer from "getting a grip with the knife," this being the phrase which Whitechapel uses to describe the fact. A blunt knife in "Jack the Ripper's" hands is a strange discovery. All the other deaths and the subsequent mutilation have been done with a blade with the edge of a razor, and this clearly established dullness of his weapon in this case may account for his having stabbed instead of gashing the neck of his victim as before.
After having discovered the body the constable gave the alarm, and soon the scene of the murder was surrounded by "bobbies." But the acute murderer had escaped. The only person in the neighborhood who might have had any connection with the case was immediately placed under arrest as a suspicious character. His name is Jacobs, and he lives at No. 12 Castle Place, near the scene. There is no proof, however, that he had any connection with the crime, and he was released.

[img][/img]

In the meantime there had been no little excitement at Tenpenny's lodging house at 54 Gun street, off Brushfield street. Tenpenny's is a fourpenny lodging house of the lowest class, but is registered. It appeared that two women had left the lodging house the evening before, and neither of them had turned up. They were known as "Alice" and "Moggie." As they usually came home before morning it was conceived that one of them might be the victim. About ten o'clock Moggie turned up, but no Alice appeared, and John McCormack, the man with whom Alice lived, began to fear for her, but went to work as usual. He

[img][/img]

was placed under arrest and said that the woman's name was Alice McKenzie and that he had been living with her for about six years; that he had seen her on the previous day, when they had had a little quarrel and that she had gone out, he knew not whither.
At the inquest nothing pointing to the real perpetrator of the crime was elicited, and the police are still working on the case with very little chance of success.
All of the murders claimed to have been done by "Jack the Ripper" have been perpetrated within a radius of a quarter mile of St. Mary's Church, which is located on Whitechapel road near its junction with Commercial road (East). Nos. 1, 2, 6, 7 and 8 were committed within the boundaries of four squares. Here is a resume of the several crimes, of which the total number, attributed to the same fiend, is eight:

1 - An unknown woman, Christmas week, 1887.
2 - Martha Turner, found stabbed in 39 places, on landing at George-yard buildings, Commercial street, Spitalfields, Aug. 7, 1888.

[img][/img]

3 - Mrs. Mary Ann Nicholls, in Buck's row, August 31, 1888.
4 - Mrs. Annie Chapman, Hanbury street, September 7, 1888.
5 - Elizabeth Stride, Berner street, September 30, 1888.
6 - Catherine Eddowes, Mitre square, September 30, 1888.
7 - Mary Jane Kelley, 26 Dorset street, Spitalfields.
8 - Alice Mackenzie, July 17, 1889.

There is an impression prevailing that the murderer of all is a woman, but the police will give no information regarding the alleged suspicions.

Source: The National Police Gazette: New York, August 17, 1889, Page 3

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Re: Details of Mackenzie's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Thu 29 Mar 2012 - 19:43

Bumping

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Re: Details of Mackenzie's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 8 Apr 2012 - 8:39

JACK THE RIPPER AGAIN.
HAS HE BEGUN A FRESH SERIES OF CRIMES?

All London Excited by the Fiend's Latest Work in the Whitechapel District - Tremendous Blunders Made by Sir Charles Warren and his Subordinates - Monro Doing Little Better.

All terror-stricken London again bows before "Jack the Ripper."
That dread name, the only one unfortunately by which the mysterious fiend is brought within the scope of mere human comprehension, is on the tongue of every man, woman and child in every district of that vast metropolis.
When that cry so familiar to Londoners for several months last year, "Another Whitechapel murder!" again rang out a few days ago, men refused to believe that another terrible crime, had been added to the mysteries of London. On the faces of the merchants and the clerks hurrying to business by the morning trains one could see incredulity pictured; but this look gave way to blank amazement when they saw Ludgate Hill ablaze with the announcements, "Jack the Ripper Again at Work!" "Another Woman Horribly Mutilated!"

[img][/img]

Even the most abandoned women live in a state of terror, however they may try to hide their feeling under a mask of drunken gayety.
The police are absolutely no safeguard. The murderer may prowl as he wishes about these alleys and lanes, even with his hands red with the blood of his victims.
There was no one more astonished than the constable who discovered the body of Alice Mackenzie.
"Why," said he to a reporter, "I could scarcely believe my bloomin' h'eyes."
The entire force are completely dumb-founded, they are as helpless as children.
After the murder they make a big show, which results in nothing except the arrest and subsequent discharge of some drunken loafers who drop mysterious hints in public houses.
It must undoubtedly be admitted the police here are terribly handicapped in dealing with the "Ripper." Whitechapel and its immediate neighborhood are simply networks of narrow streets on either side of Commercial road, which is a rather fine thoroughfare. Once a man who is acquainted with the locality turns any one corner the chances are that the best detective skill will not discover him. He becomes lost in the labyrinth.
Furthermore, the quarter is a large city in itself, a city of tumble-down, rickety houses and filthy courts and gateways, with a population for the most part criminal.
The lowest of the low, the most abandoned wretches, both male and female, reside here in filthy dens. They are steeped in poverty and vice, and this within a stone's throw almost of the royal mint of England.
The women are poor wretches who, as a rule, have a sort of partnership with men viler than themselves. They do a little charring by day, and supplement their earnings on the streets at night. If they have not regular partners they sleep in the low lodging-houses that abound here, and pay fourpence for the "doss." Should they happen to have companions an "eightpenny doss" is engaged. Sometimes there is not enough of money left from the gin palace to pay for a bed, and in that case a cart in some gateway or alley serves the purpose.
These are the women who become the victims of "Jack the Ripper." They know the quietest nooks and corners in this abandoned portion of the great city and have no fear for the policeman, whose heavy, measured tread always gives warning of his approach, and even should he flash his lantern on a dark corner the chances are that to save himself trouble he would pass on.
The fiend appears to be wonderfully dexterous at his work. He never gives the victim a chance of raising an alarm. The throat he first cuts in a single instant and then he begins the work of mutilation. The theory is that he cuts from behind, thus avoiding the blood. The abdomen he carves up with evident skill and the entrails he cuts out cleanly, as a rule taking care to place them in some position by the body which renders his terrible work more hideous. Then, his work completed, he glides away.

[img][/img]

There is nothing left behind that can lead to his discovery, and the police and the public must content themselves with the customary coroner's inquiry and the old-time verdict of the jury that the woman was "murdered by some person or persons unknown."
It is now almost two years since the first outcast was found dead and mutilated in the Whitechapel district. A murder in mystery was, however, nothing to marvel at in London and very little effort was made to discover even the customary police clew. The newspapers devoted a mere penny-a-liner's paragraph to the affair.
The following April another woman was found murdered in the same district, but Sir Charles Warren, the chief commissioner of police, was too busily engaged in endeavoring to crush the spirit out of the workingmen of London to trouble about the affair. The papers had the usual paragraph, and the case attracted no public attention.
On August 7 there was a slight commotion over the murder of a woman named Margaret Turner. She was found on the doorsteps of a house. Her body had been pierced in several places with a bayonet. On August 31, the metropolis was genuinely alarmed over the discovery of the body of Polly Nichols and in rapid succession the other crimes followed after and London awoke in terror, at last realizing the capacity of the fiend for his bloody work.
Sir Charles Warren was repeatedly attacked in the newspapers, and to make a struggle against his downfall he supplemented the bluecoats with a force of English bloodhounds. Sir Charles, to the amusement of the comic papers, exercised in Hyde Park with the dogs and had them set on his own track. The warrior in less than an hour was up the tallest tree he could find, with the brutes on guard beneath him. After this the hounds sickened of the business and took the first opportunity that offered to escape.
The crowded streets of London were, however, not the ground for bloodhounds.
Failure dogged at him at every step and while he was actually quarreling with his assistants in Scotland Yard murder flourished. Human remains were discovered October 2 in a cellar at the foundation of the new police building on the embankment and within the precincts of Scotland Yard. The mutilated body only was found here, but afterward legs and arms were found in other parts of the city.
Mr. Monro, chief of the detective department, could not agree with Sir Charles, who wished to "boss" the whole concern after his own fashion, and consequently, he handed in his resignation at the home office and left the yard.
Warren's day of doom was now rapidly approaching.
Mary Jane Kelly, or Lawrence, was cut up in pieces almost, on November 9. Her nose and ears and breasts were cut off and placed beside her. Her heart and liver were taken out and tied together round her gashed neck. The portion of her body carried off in all the preceding cases was not to be found. The murderer had excelled all previous efforts at diabolical butchery, and people wondered if this terrible work was never to come to an end.
The police were as powerless as ever, and as the weeks went on Londoners only waited patiently for the finding of the next unfortunate victim of Jack, the Ripper.
Things in the meantime went from bad to worse with Sir Charles Warren.
He fell foul of his master and old defender, Home Secretary Matthews, and prepared a magazine article in his own defence.
This article was sprung upon the public by the "Star" long before its time, and the result was that Warren went back to his soldiering and Monro was picked up again and appointed chief commissioner.
Since Monro's appointment London was not treated to further murders by the Ripper. There was little space given to the November 9 murder, the Parnell commission occupying all the attention of the newspapers.
The body of a woman was found early in June last, but it was not ascertained to a certainty that the old fiend had had anything to do with her murder.
The murder of Alice Mackenzie, a few days ago, gives Mr. Monro a chance of displaying his powers, but unfortunately there are indications that the metropolitan force has improved either in

[img][/img]

smartness or manners since the deposition of the military chief.
It is generally believed that the late crime is only the beginning of a fresh series, and Whitechapel is being and will be closely watched by the newspapers.

Source: The New Era-Gleaner, Thursday July 25, 1889

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Re: Details of Mackenzie's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Thu 21 Mar 2013 - 16:30

ANOTHER ATROCITY IN EAST LONDON.

Another of the series of diabolical crimes which so startled London some months ago was committed late on Tuesday night or at an early hour on Wednesday morning. The scene of the crime is also within the same restricted area as before, and the murderer would appear (at the time of the preparation of the first report of the horrible occurrence) to have been able to shield himself from discovery so effectually as to leave, as hitherto, no trace behind him.
Shortly before one o'clock on Wednesday morning the constable on the beat, while passing through Castle-alley, Whitechapel noticed a woman lying in the shadow of a doorway. He was about to rouse the woman, when he was horrified to discover that she was dead, blood flowing from a wound in the throat. The body was in a pool of blood which had flowed from a gash in the stomach, evidently inflicted with a sharp knife or razor. The officer at once gave the alarm
and within a few minutes several other constables were on the spot. The officials at the Commercial-road Station were informed of the discovery, and the superintendent at once despatched a messenger for the divisional surgeon. From what could be ascertained in the neighbourhood the murdered woman seemed to be about 40 years of age, and seemed to have belonged to the unfortunate class. The neighbourhood was closely watched by police, but no one had been arrested
up to the publication of the London morning papers on Wednesday.
Up to later on on Wednesday only

ONE ARREST

had taken place in connection with the latest of the East-end murders. At about five o'clock in the morning a man was seen lurking about the scene of the murder, and his movements attracting the suspicion of the police he was arrested and brought to Commercial-street Police Station, where he was searched. In his possession was a common butcher's knife and other small things. He, however, referred the police to the keeper of the Victoria Lodging House, who came and identified him
as a man he had known for years. Owing to this and other accounts received by the police he was

ULTIMATELY DISCHARGED.

The only clue which the police had to identify the murderer was a very slight one, being an old clay pipe which was found saturated with blood close beside the gas lamp under which the body was found. From later accounts it would appear almost a marvel how the murderer could have escaped, as no less than four policemen were on beat at the different exits to Castle-alley. The sergeant on duty in Wentworth-street and the vicinity passed the very spot only 10 minutes before the murder,
and when the alarm whistle blew every constable who was about closed in and blocked all the openings, arresting and examining every person who sought to pass by. The murderer must have been

WATCHING HIS CHANCE,

and escaped immediately after committing the deed. The cut on the left side of the throat was sharp and deep, and the victim would have bled to death from it alone. The knife was inserted with the same precision which characterised the other work of the Whitechapel murderer. On the other hand, the injuries inflicted in the abdomen were not so sharp and vital; neither was any attempt made to carry away any part of the body, but, of course, this may be accounted for by the fact that the murderer
was anxious to escape. No blood was found on the waggon which lay alongside the gaslamp, thus proving that the murder must have been committed on the pavement, which was covered with blood.
The victim is 5ft. 4in. in height. She is of fair complexion, with dark brown hair. One of her teeth had evidently been knocked out lately, and she was

VERY SHABBILY DRESSED.

No bonnet was on her head, and her upper dress consists of a red stuff bodice patched under the armpits and sleeves. She has on a kilted skirt and a brown linsey petticoat, while one of her stockings is maroon coloured and the other black. A white chemise and buttoned boots, which are very much worn, completed her attire. Her left thumb is cut off at the first joint. All the lodging-houses in the vicinity, as well as the dwelling-houses, have been thoroughly searched, but nothing of a suspicious character
has been found. Several women who were

LOITERING ABOUT AT THE TIME

of the murder were questioned as to having seen any person with the deceased, but they were unable to give any satisfactory answers. As it was raining at the time, the majority of the women who were about had gone indoors.
The excitement in Whitechapel reached a tremendous pitch. Early on Wednesday morning crowds gathered round about the place. The old terror of last year went abroad in as great intensity as ever. It was just at this period last year that the last series of murders began, and Old Castle-street is quite in the midst of the murder district. It runs from Whitechapel-road to Wentworth-street, parallel to and at a short distance from Osborne-street, where No. 1 murder was committed, while at scarcely a stone's throw,
and running in the same direction, is George-yard, where Martha Turner's mutilated body was found. Old Castle-street begins at the Whitechapel-road end with a very narrow, low, dark court, and after about 20 yards of this it widens out for about a similar distance, and narrows again at the further end. There are

THREE LAMPS

in this wider part, and it was under the middle one of these three that Constable 272 H found the body. On the opposite side of the street is a low hoarding, and over this the windows of a row of dwelling-houses look right down upon the place; but the miscreant was slightly shielded from the light by a small hand cart which stood between the body and the lamp. This morning most of the traces of the murderer's work has been removed, and the spot covered with a thick layer of dust, but there were still splashes of blood
on the foot of the lamp-post.

THE SCENE OF THE CRIME.

Castle-alley is a thoroughfare about 170 yards long, and for about 160 yards is about 35ft. wide; the other ten yards, which forms the entry from Whitechapel High-street, is about 3ft. wide, and runs under and between Nos. 124 and 125, Whitechapel High-street. Through this narrow, dark, covered entry the wider portion of the alley is entered. On either hand are fenced-in spaces where rookeries have lately been demolished, on the left for about 40ft. and on the right for something over 140ft. The remainder of the right side is

A DEAD WALL,

beside which stood on Tuesday night some dozen 4-wheel vans and 20 costermongers' barrows. On the riht side are the rather dilapidated factories of a firm of wheelwrights and van makers, a builder's yard, a fruiterer's place, and the Castle-alley Wash-houses and the Board School. Thus it will be seen that in this 170 yards of thoroughfare completely shut off from the public view by the narrow passage connecting it with the High-street at one end and the projection of the Board School, which narrows it to about 16ft. at the other, and crowded
as it was with large vans and barrows, there was lots of cover for the perpetration of the crime. Where the body was found was between two four-wheeled vans, which were chained together outside the wheelwright's premises. The chain was fastened to the rails of the vans, which were sufficiently apart for two persons to stand between, and standing immediately over the space between them was a gaslamp. This very alley was

KNOWN BY THE POLICE

as a resort of destitute women, who utilised the vans and barrows for shelter and sleeping purposes. Some time ago the police authorities put two men on the watch in this alley every night, and continued to do so until the excitement resultant upon former atrocities wore away. On the side of the road on which the murder occurred there is a brick wall, not a dead wall, but with a number of stable entrances. Over these stables and warehouses there are a few people sleeping, and one woman who was there the whole of the night remarked to a reporter,
"We can always hear a cat move almost in this street at night time." She heard not a sound which she can recall as in the slightest way connected with the atrocity. The crime was not committed at the foot of the wall, but on the roadside near the kerb, between two of the carts standing there for the night. Of course, the roadside was stained with blood, but this the police have had washed away and covered over. When the cordon was drawn round the spot by the police, several persons were seized for examination, and called upon to explain their business in the street at the time.
One of these named Larkin, a man who has seen better days, was thought to be hurrying away with undue haste. He was seized and taken to the Commercial-street Station, but the deputy of the Victoria Home was sent for, and he was able to clear the man of all suspicion. He was then released, and it is this incident which is probably giving rise to the rumour which is so exciting some of the people that an arrest of importance has been made.

FORMER HORRORS.

The following are the dates of the previous East London crimes and names of the victims, so far as known:

Christmas week, 1887. - An unknown woman found murdered near Osborne and Wentworth streets, Whitechapel.
7th Aug., 1888. - Martha Turner found stabbed in 39 places, on a landing in model dwellings, known as George-yard-buildings, Commercial-street, Spitalfields.
31st Aug. - Mrs. Nicholls, murdered and mutilated in Buck's-row, Whitechapel.
7th Sept. - Mrs. Chapman, murdered and mutilated in Hanbury-street, Whitechapel.
30th Sept. - Elizabeth Stride, found with her throat cut in Berner-street, Whitechapel.
30th Sept. - Catherine Eddowes, murdered and mutilated in Mitre-square, Aldgate.
9th Nov. - Mary Jane Kelly, hacked to pieces at No. 26, Dorset-street, Spitalfields.

"JACK THE RIPPER" LETTERS.

It is stated that the police have during the past few weeks received letters, signed "Jack the Ripper," intimating that he would recommence his horrible work in July; and Mr. Albert Backert, who took a leading part in the Vigilance proceedings of last year, received a similar letter about three weeks ago.

INQUEST AND IDENTIFICATION.


The inquest was opened on Wednesday afternoon before Dr. Wynne Baxter, at the Boys' Institute, Commercial-road. The jury having viewed the body at the mortuary, John M'Cormack said: I live at 54, Gun-street, Spitalfields, a common lodging-house. I am a porter. I have seen the body at the mortuary, and recognise it as that of Alice Mackenzie. She was about 40 years of age. She has been living with me for six or seven years as my wife. I recognise her by her right thumb, which had been crushed at the tip by a machine. I recognised her face also, and a scar on her forehead. She said she came from Peterborough.
I do not know whether she ever had a husband. She worked very hard for her living as a washerwoman and charwoman. I last saw her alive between three and four o'clock on Tuesday afternoon. I was then in bed, and she went downstairs to pay the deputy of the lodging house 8d. for the night's bed. I had given her the money for the purpose, and also 1s. She was to do what she liked with the shilling. I did not see her again until at the mortuary. She had not been to work on Tuesday. She told me she went to work on Monday, but I did not believe it. She was not accustomed to come home late at night, and was always at home
in the evening until Tuesday night. I had a few words with her on Tuesday, and that upset her. She did not say she would walk the streets, or that she would do anything because of the quarrel. I went down to the deputy between half-past ten and eleven o'clock at night, and asked if she had paid the night's lodging, and the deputy said she had not. I said, "What am I to do? Am I to walk the streets?" The deputy said, "No. Go upstairs," and I went upstairs to bed again, and got up at a quarter to six in the morning. I can't say what the deceased went out for. She used to smoke a clay pipe." Other witnesses were examined,
and the inquest was then adjourned till Thursday morning.

Source: Aberystwyth Observer, 20 July 1889, Page 7

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Re: Details of Mackenzie's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 15 Sep 2013 - 19:00

THE WHITECHAPEL MURDERS.
Resumed Inquest.

On Wednesday Mr. Wynne Baxter, coroner for North-East London, resumed the inquest on the body of Alice Mackenzie, who was found murdered in Castle Alley, Whitechapel, on the 17th ult. The first witness called was Dr. Phillips, who made the post-mortem examination. He stated that while he was examining the body a tobacco pipe fell out from the clothing. It was a clay pipe, and was broken by the fall. It had been used. He had it placed upon the post-mortem table, but part of it had disappeared, and although every search had been made the pieces could not be found. The probability was that the woman was lying on her back on the ground when she was murdered. The instrument with which the deed was done was probably a pointed knife, with a shortish blade.
The Coroner: Did you detect any skill in the injuries?
Witness: A knowledge of how effectually to deprive a person of life, and that speedily. The injuries to the abdomen were not similar to those he had seen in the other cases. Neither were the injuries to the throat similar. The knife used could not have been so large as an ordinary butcher's slaughter knife. The marks on the body were caused after the throat was cut.
The Coroner having summed up, the jury returned a verdict of "Murder against some person unknown."

Source: Cardiff Times, 17 August 1889, Page 5

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Re: Details of Mackenzie's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 15 Sep 2013 - 19:01

THE WHITECHAPEL MURDER.
The Freak of a Lunatic.

On Saturday morning, before Mr. Lushington, at the Thames Court, William Wallace Brodie, 33, having no occupation and no settled abode, was charged with being a wandering lunatic. He was further charged, on his own confession, with having murdered Alice Mackenzie, in Castle-alley, Whitechapel, on the 17th inst. Further evidence having been given, Mr. Lushington said he had a letter from the doctor of the prison, stating that when prisoner was admitted he was not responsible for his actions. He was now sane. The prisoner, who deserved to be punished for what he had done, would now be discharged. The prisoner was immediately re-arrested by Inspector Moore on a charge of fraud.

Source: Cardiff Times, 3 August 1889, Page 4

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Re: Details of Mackenzie's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 15 Sep 2013 - 19:04

The Whitechapel Murder.
LATEST PARTICULARS.

The person arrested on Wednesday night as the Whitechapel murderer, mainly on account of his having accosted several loose women, was discharged early on Thursday. He was given into custody by a respectably attired man named Spooner. It was soon ascertained that the accused was a young married man named Charles Henry Evison, living at Ballspond. A receipt found upon him proved that only the day before he had insured his life for 100 pounds.
The excitement in the district continues, Whitechapel and Commercial-roads being thronged. Throughout the night groups of females might be seen at almost every street corner scanning the face of each passerby. Spitalfields may be said to have literally swarmed with police. The absorbing interest in the topic of the hour was indicated in one case when a thick-set-sailor-looking man, accompanied by a woman, who appeared to belong to the class known as unfortunates, were refused refreshment at a coffee stall. The police complain with justice of the extraordinary number of absurd statements brought to them having no bearing whatever on the crime in question.
Everything points to the narrow escape which the murderer must have had of detection. Sergeant Herwin, who was first made aware of the murder at five minutes to one, found the body still warm, and instantly took steps to block both exits from the alley. He has no doubt that the murderer and his victim entered the alley from High-street, Whitechapel, and that the murderer escaped in the same way. Although the superintendent of the Castle-alley washhouses - an ex-policeman - and his wife were awake at the time of the murder they heard no sounds.
The Central News says: Large numbers of people continue to visit the scene of the murder in Castle-alley, but there is very little excitement in the district, and there is a decided falling off in the number of persons who call at the various district police-stations offering information and making suggestions. There are no persons in custody at present in connection with the murder.

In the House of Commons on Thursday,
Mr. Montague asked the Home Secretary whether he would offer a substantial reward, and a free pardon to any person not a member of the police force and not the actual perpetrator of the crime in Whitechapel, who would give information that would lead to the conviction of the murderer; also if he would have the detective force in Whitechapel strengthened.
Mr. Matthews said he had consulted the Commissioner of Police, and he informed him he had no reason to believe that the offer of a reward now would be productive of any good result. The detective force in Whitechapel had already been increased.

IMPORTANT ARREST.
Confession of the Crime.

The Central News says: - The police made an important arrest yesterday. The prisoner, who is believed to be a returned convict, is in custody at Commercial-street police-station. It is reported that he has made a voluntary confession bearing upon the recent murders in the East End.
In a later telegram the Central News says: - The man in custody at Commercial-street police-station was arrested at an early hour yesterday morning apparently the worse for drink, but his condition at present is most peculiar, and he has the appearance of insanity. Nothing further has transpired respecting the alleged confession, but it is known the prisoner has been closely questioned by the police.
The Central News says: - The man in custody at Commercial-street police-station has deliberately confessed that he murdered Alice Mackenzie in Castle-alley. He asserts that he committed the deed with an ordinary knife, but no weapon was found in his possession. The prisoner's demeanour is that of an insane man, and his behaviour is strange and eccentric. In answer to questions put to him he said he "lived nowhere," and that he had recently returned from abroad. The police are making diligent inquiries about the prisoner, who in the course of the day will probably be charged on his own confession. The prisoner, the Central News adds, is over six feet high, of fair complexion, and light, fair moustache. He is an Englishman, and of military build.

A Contradiction.

The Press Association is authorised to state that there is absolutely no foundation for the statement that the police have apprehended a discharged convict for the Whitechapel murders, and that he had made a voluntary confession bearing upon the recent murders. The local police support their denial by the assertion that they have not even received any statements today, and that the only man in custody is charged with drunkenness.

The Contradiction Withdrawn. --- A Full Confession of all the Crimes.

Since the official contradiction has been published on the authority of the officials at Commercial-street, the Press Association has received the following communication from a correspondent: A tall man of military appearance, with moustache, who last night gave himself up as being the Whitechapel murderer, is still detained in custody. The police at first disbelieved his statement, but today he repeats his story with emphasis. He gives dates and full details of all the murders and the manner in which he alleges he committed them. In reference to the Mitre-square murder, he says he watched the police for more than half an hour before he could accomplish his object. In some instances he was disturbed, and he had great trouble with some women before he could get them to accompany him. The police are testing his statements.

ANOTHER WOMAN ATTACKED IN WHITECHAPEL.

Early on Thursday morning a woman reported at a police-station in Walworth, South London, that she was accosted on Wednesday night in Bishopsgate by a man, who said he lived in Walworth, and persuaded her to accompany him there. As they passed along an unfrequented thoroughfare he attempted to force her down on the ground, and when she screamed, drew a long-bladed knife and threatened to "rip" her up. She, however, continued to call for help, and footsteps being heard approaching, her assailant decamped. He was pursued by a passer-by, but succeeded in escaping. The woman describes the man as of dark complexion, about 5ft. 9in. in height, and wearing black clothes. The description has been circulated.

Source: Cardiff Times, 20 July 1889, Page 4

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