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Lizzie Williams

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Lizzie Williams

Post by Karen on Fri 20 May 2011 - 21:50

Elizabeth Phoenix stated to the newspapers that Mary Jane Kelly, when living with Mrs. Carthy, had a friend named Lizzie Williams. In the following news article, a Lizzie Williams was very seriously assaulted by her paramour, who was a tall, powerfully-built young man named Joseph Allen. It was stated that he had ill-treated her before. Could Mary Jane Kelly have once lived with this Joseph Allen, and was he the "Joe" whom she preferred over Barnett? He seemed to be a very violent and dangerous man, who even kicked a Police-constable when he was arrested.

SERIOUS ASSAULT ON A PARAMOUR.

A tall, powerfully-built young man, named Joseph Allen, was charged at Marlborough-street, today, with assaulting Lizzie Williams by kicking her on the forehead; also with assaulting Police-constable Booker. The evidence was that the woman had been living with the prisoner for about five months, and supporting him by her immorality. Shortly after midnight she was in a public-house in Old Compton-street, when the prisoner entered, and exclaimed, "You are here, are you?" Being alarmed at his appearance, she ran out, being pursued by Allen, who knocked her down and kicked her on the forehead. Some people then protected her from further violence. He had frequently ill-treated her before. The constable pursued and overtook Allen, who kicked him. He was subsequently overpowered and taken to the station. The prisoner was sentenced to three months' imprisonment with hard labour.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday March 22, 1887, Page 3

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Karen Trenouth
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Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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Charged With Being Drunk and Disorderly

Post by Karen on Fri 20 May 2011 - 22:29

ENFIELD.

At the Enfield Petty Sessions on Monday last, when there was present, M. Latham, Esq. (in the chair), and H.C. Bowles, Esq., there was only one case, which was that of ELIZABETH WILLIAMS who was charged with being drunk and disorderly at Upper Fore-street, Edmonton, on the 2nd inst., and fined 5s. and costs, or 7 days.

Source: Weekly Guardian, Friday March 7, 1884, Page 2


Last edited by Karen on Sat 21 May 2011 - 8:52; edited 1 time in total

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Karen Trenouth
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Stolen Knives and Forks

Post by Karen on Fri 20 May 2011 - 22:56

LEGAL AND MAGISTERIAL.
Southwark. - Capture of Burglars. -

George Henry, 42, and John Griffiths, 50, well known to the police, were brought before Mr. Bridge, on June 10, charged with breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Hart, china and glass dealer, 65, Newington-causeway, on the evening of May 3, and stealing therefrom several clocks, a large quantity of knives and forks, and other property worth about 100 pounds. Griffiths was also charged with having in his possession a large number of housebreaking implements. Matthew Fox, an inspector of the Criminal Investigation Department, M division, said that the prosecutor's premises were broken into and plundered early on the morning of May 3, and on the 24th a young woman named Elizabeth Williams offered two dozen knives and forks in pledge at a pawnbroker's in this district, where she was detained, and Mr. Hart identified them as a portion of the stolen goods. She was remanded for inquiries, and on June 1 was released on her brother's bail to appear on Thursday next. When she left the court witness and Inspector Phillips, R reserve, followed her and saw her join Henry, who was waiting for her. Witness followed them and saw them go to a house in Webber-row, Blackfriar's-road. Witness handed Henry over to Detectives Martin and Cox, who took him to the station-house. Witness, accompanied by Inspector Phillips, entered 21, Webber-row, and found Griffiths in bed in the first floor front room, when he told him he should take him into custody for being concerned in breaking and entering 65, Newington-causeway, and stealing property worth near 100 pounds. He denied all knowledge of it. After securing him witness and Inspector Phillips searched the room and found in a cupboard thirty-eight skeleton keys so artistically made as to unlock any door or drawer. Under the bed they found four housebreakers' jemmys, some of which screwed up so that they could be carried in the pocket, and several wedges used by burglars in forcing open safes. One of them appeared to have been recently chipped. He also found a portion of a rope ladder, and two black masks. On further searching the place he found a carving knife and fork, a table knife and steel, which Mr. Hart identified as his property. Witness took Griffiths into custody. The prisoners were remanded. Just at the close of the business David Hyams, 38, general dealer, College-place, Draper-street, Newington-butts, was charged by Inspector Fox, with receiving a great portion of the property, well knowing it to be stolen. Detective Cox said that about an hour ago he went to the prisoner's house with a search-warrant, and found one of the marble slabs stolen from Mr. Hart's mansion. He also discovered 30 dozen knives and forks stolen from the same place. Inspector Fox said he found on the prisoner accounts showing that he had dealings with nearly all the stolen property. He therefore asked for a remand. Mr. Hart having identified the property produced, the prisoner was remanded, and bail refused.

Source: The Pottery Gazette, July 1, 1882, Page 648

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Re: Lizzie Williams

Post by Karen on Sat 21 May 2011 - 9:21

I found this incident very interesting indeed!

SERVANTS AND THEIR FOLLOWERS.

Elizabeth Williams, 28, domestic servant; Percy Davis, alias Percival Gordon, 28, clerk; and Robert Everett, alias Keith Darenport, were indicted for stealing a large quantity of jewellery and wearing apparel, valued at 100 pounds, the property of Mary Anne Cosens; and Robert Everett, sen., 49, an ex-superintendent of the Somersetshire constabulary, was also charged with receiving a portion of the property, well-knowing the same to have been stolen. All the facts have been already published at some length, and it will be remembered that the prisoners, Davis and Everett, jun., who were soldiers in the Grenadier Guards, made the acquaintance of Williams, a confidential servant in the employment of the prosecutrix, residing at 3, Prior-villas, St. James's-road, Croydon. On the invitation of Elizabeth Williams and another girl named Hannah Smith, the soldiers deserted their regiment, and stayed for over three months in the house of the prosecutrix without her knowledge, and stole the old lady's jewel-case and various other articles, which they pledged. It was proved that the elder Everett, who resided at 47, Auckland-street, Vauxhall, had pawned a large portion of the stolen property. On behalf of Williams, Mr. Lyon urged that she was not privy to the robbery, and that she was in reality deceived in a double sense by the prisoner Davis. In their address to the jury the soldiers practically admitted their guilt; but the elder Everett denied any knowledge of the robbery, and said that he was deceived by his son, who told him that the property belonged to a friend, who inherited the things from his grandmother. The jury found all four prisoners "Guilty," and Mr. Hardman, in passing sentence, characterised the conduct of the soldiers as disgraceful in the extreme, and ordered them to be detained in prison for two years, with hard labour; and Everett, sen., and the female prisoner to six months each, with hard labour.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, June 11, 1882, Page 4

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Re: Lizzie Williams

Post by Karen on Thu 26 May 2011 - 14:23

On August 12, 1888, an advert appeared in "Lloyd's" pertaining to twin sisters, Annie and Elizabeth Williams, who had been missing and unheard of since 1882. He was wishing to hear from either of them. This was just 4 or 5 days after Tabram's death.

LONG-LOST RELATIVES.

ANNIE AND ELIZABETH WILLIAMS (twin sisters), who were last heard of in 1882, then living in Marylebone, are inquired for by their brother, who wishes to hear from both or either.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, August 12, 1888, Page 3

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Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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