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Walter Dew's Retirement

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Walter Dew's Retirement

Post by Karen on Sun 28 Feb 2010 - 17:08

CHIEF INSPECTOR DEW.

RETIREMENT AFTER 29 YEARS' WAR AGAINST CRIME.


Chief Inspector Dew, the man who raced across the ocean to capture Crippen, the principal detective figure in the important criminal cases of the past twenty-five years, is to retire from Scotland Yard on December 5 (says the Daily Express of November 9th).
"I have had nearly twenty-nine years of it, and that's enough for a young man," he said yesterday. "But I feel far too young to give up work altogether, and after my retirement I shall start as a private enquiry agent. I am not resigning in consequence of any attacks that were made on me in certain quarters at the beginning of the Crippen case."
Chief Inspector Dew is only forty-seven years old. He was barely nineteen when he joined the Metropolitan Police Force, where he won early promotion.
He was one of the detectives investigating the series of Jack the Ripper crimes, and it was for his energy in this work that he was given the rank of detective sergeant. He rose rapidly, and became inspector at Bow street, which led to his gaining the post of chief inspector four years ago in succession to Mr. Froest.
His career has been one long, adventurous criminal hunt, and it is noteworthy that though he had to deal with many dangerous men, he never carried a revolver until the hunt after Crippen, and has only used handcuffs about three times.
Among the people he arrested recently are: --
Miss Robinson and Miss Hamilton, witnesses in the Druce case.
"Harry the Valet," the expert jewel thief who stole £20,000 worth of jewels from the Duchess of Sutherland.
Conrad Harms, the bank swindler.
Dr. Crippen.
These are the only more striking cases, but there have been hundreds of minor arrests, and latterly Mr. Dew, entrusted with some special enquiries for the War Office with regard to stolen cartridges, ran the thief to earth.
All the important investigations came his way; he frequently had to leave for the Continent at a moment's notice to secure the arrest of some international swindler.
He has often said that, while that it is imagined that detection of crime is now made easier by the use of telegrams and improved locomotion, the truth is that the work is far more difficult today.
Criminals are better educated than they used to be, the means of escape are much easier, and there are so many ways by which a wanted man may cover up his tracks.
Formerly it was only necessary to scour a country for a criminal - today the detective must search the world.

Source: Hawera And Normanby Star, Volume LX, 24 December 1910, Page 2
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Re: Walter Dew's Retirement

Post by Karen on Sun 17 Jul 2011 - 0:50

INSPECTOR DEW RETIRES.
DETECTIVE WHO ARRESTED CRIPPEN.

Chief-Inspector Dew, of Scotland Yard, whose name has been before the public so prominently in connection with the Crippen trial and many other important criminal cases, has (says the "Daily Chronicle" of November 7) tendered his resignation, and will retire in about a month's time, after over 28 years' service in the force.
Inspector Dew intended to retire some time ago, but as the Crippen case had been placed in his hands, he stayed at Scotland Yard to see its conclusion.
Inspector Dew first came into prominence at the time of the "Jack the Ripper" crimes. For his services in relation to those cases he was promoted to the rank of detective-sergeant. Since that time rapid progress had marked his career, until he came to one of the foremost positions in the service. After some years as inspector at Bow-street he was four years ago appointed a chief inspector in succession to Mr. Frank Froest.
Chief-Inspector Dew has cleared up several difficult murder cases and exposed many huge frauds. One of his triumphs was to secure the conviction of a clever swindler named Nicholson, who obtained thousands of pounds by a clever advertising method in connection with the solving of easy puzzles.
When the Druce case was in progress in 1908 Mr. Dew arrested at Sisters-avenue, Lavender Hill, Miss Robinson, the Australian witness, on a charge of perjury. Miss Robinson, the daughter of an ex-policeman, swore that she was an Australian, and that she was formerly a maid in the service of the fifth Duke of Portland at Welbeck, and that she knew, both from the duke and the late Charles Dickens, that Druce was an assumed name of the duke.
Before her arrest Miss Robinson had created some sensation by offering a hundred pounds reward for the recovery of a mythical diary which she said had been stolen from her to prevent her giving evidence in the case. Inspector Dew arrested her on the collapse of the Druce prosecution, and secured her conviction on the perjury charge at Old Bailey.
While he was at Hammersmith Inspector Dew broke into a flat in Fulham-road and arrested "Harry the Valet," one of the most expert jewel thieves in the country, who stole the Duchess of Sutherland's jewels, worth 20,000 pounds, from the saloon carriage at the Gare du Nord.
In June of last year he obtained a long term of penal servitude for Conrad Harms, alias Henry Clifford, the clever swindler, who drew 4,700 pounds from Parrs Bank at Notting Hill after a forged note of credit had been sent there from one of the London branches of a well-known foreign bank. This Harms had cleverly forged in America and sent on in advance. With one of the 100 pound notes, the proceeds of the fraud, a purchased a watch in the Strand, and, later, as the watch did not keep proper time, he took it back to the tradesman to have it adjusted. In the meantime the note had found its way to the Bank of England, and the inquiries which followed led to the watchmaker communicating with the police.
Inspector Dew's share in the Crippen case is too well known to need recapitulating.

Source: Barrier Miner, Wednesday 14 December 1910, page 7

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Re: Walter Dew's Retirement

Post by Karen on Sun 26 May 2013 - 21:51

RETIREMENT OF INSPECTOR DEW.
DETECTIVE WHO TRACKED CRIPPEN.

IN MANY FAMOUS TRIALS.

It is authoritatively announced that Chief Inspector Dew, of Scotland Yard, has tendered his resignation to the Chief Commissioner of Police.
Chief Inspector Dew will not actually leave Scotland Yard for several weeks yet. When he does, it is stated, he will set up in business as a confidential inquiry agent.
Joining the Metropolitan Police Force nearly 29 years ago, Mr. Dew has been associated with the leading criminal cases of the past quarter of a century. He first came into prominence at the time of the "Jack the Ripper" crimes. For his services in relation to those cases he was promoted to the rank of detective-sergeant.
Since that time rapid progress has marked his career, until he came to one of the foremost positions in the service. After some years as inspector at Bow-street, he attained the aim of every detective of the C.I.D. - he was four years ago appointed a chief inspector in succession to Mr. Frank Froest.
Chief Inspector Dew has produced proofs in hundreds of forgery charges. Several difficult murders cases were cleared up by him, and many huge frauds were exposed. Mr. Dew, after months of inquiry, had the satisfaction of securing the conviction of a clever swindler named Nicholson, who as an "ornithologist" specialist, obtained thousands of pounds by a clever advertising method in connection with the solving of easy rebuses.
It was in 1907 and 1908, when the Druce case was in full swing, that Mr. Dew was given a watching brief by the Commissioner, as the result of which one Saturday night in January, 1908, he arrested at Sisters Avenue, Lavender Hill, Miss Robinson, the Australian witness, on a charge of perjury. It will be remembered that Miss Robinson, the daughter of an ex-policeman, swore that she was an Australian, and that she was formerly a maid in the service of the fifth Duke of Portland, at Welbeck, and that she knew, both from the duke and the late Charles Dickens, that Druce was an assumed name of the duke.
Prior to her arrest Miss Robinson had created some sensation by offering a hundred pounds reward for the recovery of a mythical diary which she said had been stolen from her to prevent her giving evidence in the case. Inspector Dew arrested her on the collapse of the Druce prosecution, and secured her conviction on the perjury charge at the Old Bailey.

THIS YEAR'S SENSATION.

It was whilst at Hammersmith that Mr. Dew broke into a flat in the Fulham Road and arrested "Harry the Valet," one of the most expert jewel thieves in the country, and the man who stole the Duchess of Sutherland's 20,000 pound jewels from the saloon carriage at the Gare du Nord. "Harry the Valet" was a very tough criminal, but he was taken by surprise, and gave no trouble.
In June of last year Mr. Dew obtained a long term of penal servitude for Conrad Harms, alias Henry Clifford, the clever swindler, who drew 1700 pounds from Parrs Bank at Notting Hill after a forged note of credit had been sent there from one of the London branches of a well-known foreign bank.
This Harms had cleverly forged in America and sent on in Advance. When he came over his arrest was brought about in a curious way. With one of the 100 pound notes, the proceeds of the fraud, he purchased a watch in the Strand, and, later, as the watch did not keep proper time, he took it back to the tradesmen to have it adjusted. In the meantime the note had found its way to the Bank of England, and the inquiries which followed led to the watchmaker communicating with the police.
Eighteen months ago Mr. Dew was sent to Salisbury to take up the case in which Mrs. Haskell was accused of the murder of her crippled son. It was only after a second trial that she was acquitted.
During the whole of the "Jack the Ripper" outrages Inspector Dew was stationed in Whitechapel, and took part in all the exciting searches, incidents, and inquiries which those crimes entailed.
He was entrusted with the difficult task of unravelling the mysterious disappearance of Belle Elmore, and after the flight of Dr. Crippen he directed the excavations at Hilldrop Crescent which resulted in the discovery of the remains of the missing woman.
During the time he has been at Scotland Yard Mr. Dew has been in charge of the leading investigations. His quiet, unassuming disposition secured him considerable respectability among his colleagues, and the announcement of his ensuing resignation has been received with universal regret.

Source: The New Zealand Herald, Saturday December 24, 1910, Page 2

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Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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Re: Walter Dew's Retirement

Post by Karen on Wed 17 Dec 2014 - 14:22

INSPECTOR DEW TO RETIRE.

It is announced that Chief Inspector Dew is retiring from Scotland Yard on December 4. He intends, it is stated, to set up in business as a confidential inquiry agent, thus following the example of other ex-members of the detective service.
Mr. Dew has had many exciting experiences. At the period of the "Jack the Ripper" crimes he was engaged in the East End of London and his work in connection with these mysteries earned him promotion to the rank of detective-sergeant.
Since then he has been largely concerned in forgery cases, many times taking long journeys across the Continent in pursuit of criminals.
Inspector Dew tracked down "Harry the Valet," played a prominent part in the Druce case, and was entrusted with the elucidation of the Salisbury murder case. He was promoted to be Chief Inspector at Scotland Yard about four years ago, succeeding
Mr. Froest on the latter's appointment as Superintendent.

Source: Abergavenny Chronicle, 11 November 1910, Page 3

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Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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