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Inspector Charles Pinhorn

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Inspector Charles Pinhorn

Post by Karen on Fri 21 Jan 2011 - 1:46

MORTLAKE.

Sunday Gambling at Mort Lake.

At the Richmond Petty Sessions, on Wednesday, Thomas Sullivan, Patrick Corbett, and William Ryan, were charged with gambling by playing cards in a public place, and Ryan was further charged with assaulting a constable.
Police-constable Frederick Hatcher said that on Sunday afternoon he was on duty in plain clothes in Gloucester-place, at the back of the Wheatsheaf, Mortlake, in company with another constable. He saw the three persons and five other men playing a game called "Brag" with cards.
The Clerk asked whether it was a game of chance?
Witness said there was a certain amount of chance about it.
Mr. Whiteley: Have you played it? (Laughter.)
Witness said he had not. The men had a box to play on, and some of them were sitting round it on chairs. There was money on the box. Witness apprehended Ryan, who became very violent, kicking him on the leg. Several persons tried to rescue him from custody, some women joining in the attempt. A man named Corbett, brother of the prisoner of that name, came to the assistance of witness, and Ryan was secured. As much as 3 pounds or 4 pounds passed during the game.
Mr. Inspector Pinhorn said the other men would be summoned.
Police-constable Smith, 425 V, gave corroborative evidence, stating that he and the other constable, after watching the game, jumped over a wall and suddenly appeared amongst the men. Some ran away, while others fell over chairs. The other constable was attacked by about 30 women.
The defendant admitted being present, but denied that they were playing.
Mr. Inspector Pinhorn said this was going on continually on Sunday afternoons, and there had been many complaints about the abominable language used by these men while they were playing.
Ryan was fined 20s. and costs, and the others 10s each and costs. Ryan was sent to prison for seven days in default of payment. The others paid the fine.

Source: The Putney and Wandsworth Borough News, Saturday August 22, 1885, Page 3


Last edited by Karen on Fri 21 Jan 2011 - 9:41; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Inspector Charles Pinhorn

Post by Karen on Fri 21 Jan 2011 - 2:21

PUTNEY GOSPEL TEMPERANCE ASSOCIATION.

Police Experiences.

A meeting was called by the association, on Thursday evening, to hear the results of police experiences in respect of the taking of strong drink; and the assembly room was well filled. The Blue Ribbon Choir greatly assisted in the enjoyment of the meeting by excellent singing led by a harmonium. Mr. A.H. Head (of Richmond) presided.
After an opening hymn, prayer was offered by the Rev. Mr. Savory; and speeches by present and past members of the police force, varied by musical interludes, filled the evening until ten o'clock.
Bishop Meyers on the part of the ministers of Putney, bade the police welcome. They, he said, knew better than those outside what the effects of alcohol were. They got the poor drunkards into their cells and they made teetotallers of them for the time being, and many of them were the better for the enforced abstinence. (Applause.)
Inspector Pinhorn having been called on to speak, was cordially received. He said:

"I am pleased to be present tonight, and pleased to see ministers of the Gospel on the platform to give us a kindly welcome to Putney. The time was when the police were not so nearly associated with ministers. Notwithstanding what has been said about us we are not all capable of being bribed by drink or any other temptation that may be placed in our way. Bishop Meyers says we see a great deal of the drink curse in our countrymen and countrywomen, we do; and if it were advisable we might tell you some harrowing details of what the drink has done, and is doing, and will do, so long as it has a place in the social customs of this country. To my mind, it occupies a different position from all other articles offered for sale. Everything else is regulated in its production by the law of supply and demand. The demand regulates the supply. But I am afraid, in so far as drink is concerned, the demand is created by the supply; and the more readily it is obtained the more it is partaken of. Hence we find, on any special occasion, a supper or what not, when the wine flows freely, people drink the most. People cannot really know the effects of this drink. As a country, we have been advancing very slowly on this subject. We have not learnt it all yet. It is but recenty, within the last few years, that medical men have tried to shew us that the off-spring of the drunkard has a predisposition not only to partake of drink, but a predisposition to corresponding diseases, bodily and mental. There are men, I believe, and women too, whom we should treat very differently from the manner our friend referred to just now, when we find them in the street. Respectable people, on such occasions, pass by on the other side; but I never see a respectable person laugh at a drunken man or woman without feeling pained. I feel that if they had been placed in the same circumstances, and had been tried as those poor drunkards had been, the chances are that they would have fallen into the same habit and the same error. The drink is no respecter of persons. I care not whether they wear the garb of a clergyman, the uniform of the policeman, or the soldier, or the sailor. Whether they be learned in medicine or the law, whether they be rich or poor, prince or peasant, if they take suffcient quantities, the like results will follow. They will become insensible to law, to honesty, and to personal pride, and to everything that is right and true and holy. We are told by men who ought to know, because they occupy prominent positions in the country, that this drink is a food. All I know is that if it is a food it acts very differently to other foods. Ordinarily, food taken into the mouth passes into the stomach, where the particles that are necessary to building up the human frame, to creating blood and tissue and muscle and bone are extracted from it, and the rest is thrown off. But of this drink, no particle - mark the difference - enters into the human system. The blood will not have it; the body will not have it. If you go to one of our police-stations and see a man or woman who is thoroughly drunk and helpless on the cell floor, if you examine closely, you will see from the crown of the head to the toes, that there is a kind of perspiration working from every pore; and if it were possible to apply a light, you would see that perspiration burn with a blue flame. (Cheers.) So that the spirit that has been taken into the body is being thrown out of the body. The drink is often taken under mistaken notions. Some men fancy that with it they can think better and work better, and they take it into their study sometimes to prepare sermons and articles for the papers. I am afraid some of the newspaper articles are written under that influence. But instead of increasing the brain power it lessens it, and there is no author, no writer in any country who has so indulged in this drinking, who will not tell you that afterwards there comes a depression, there comes a desire for the stimulant again, before they can enter upon their work. You know there are men - you have seen them - who in the morning are all of a tremble; they can do nothing until they have taken something to steady the nerves, until they have taken the drink which is ruining them so fast. Have we seen nothing of this in the Police? Oh, yes! We have seen some of the best of our men, some of those who have risen to the chief places, ruined body and soul, in their families, in their social position. After having been officers among us, they are wanderers over the face of the earth. Men who come from respectable parents, men who bid fair to do well in this or any other service, have fallen by this drink. Things are not so bad as they were. There has been a great alteration in this district. A little while ago we were divided into classes - first, second, and third class. When a man first dons the uniform he is put in the third class; and he rises step by step, as his character enables him to rise. Two or three years ago we were remarkable for the number of third class men in the various ranks, caused by the number who went out on account of some fault; and there is no policeman on this platform, or in the whole of London, who will not tell you that the prime factor in their dismissal was intoxicating drink. Not that they became drunkards; we do not allow a constable to drink so much as respectable people. So long as a respectable man can talk rationally he is not allowed to be called drunk. But a policeman is considered incapable of looking after you when he is far short of being on the line. Very few third class men remain in this division. Almost every man - 99 out of every 100 - who have joined during the last five years are passing steadily up and obtaining their classes. (Cheers.) That is a proof that we are improving in moderation at all events, if not in total absinence. The speaker proceeded to appeal to his audience on behalf of abstinence, and ended by hoping that that Gospel Temperance cause would prevent and rid our country of a curse." (Cheers.)

Source: The Putney and Wandsworth Borough News, Saturday September 12, 1885, Page 5

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Re: Inspector Charles Pinhorn

Post by Karen on Fri 21 Jan 2011 - 9:13

Serious Assault on the Police.

Inspector Alcock and Police-constable Spratley are sufferers from a savage assault which they sustained on Sunday evening.
At Richmond on Monday, before Mr. G.F. Whiteley and Mr. Thomas Cave, John O'Brien, aged 20, of 9, Suffolk-terrace, Queen's-road, Mortlake, was charged with being drunk and disorderly in High-street, Mortlake, and with violently assaulting Mr. Inspector Alcock and Police-constable Spratley in the execution of their duty, on Sunday evening. Mr. Inspector Alcock said that on Sunday evening, about half-past seven, he saw the prisoner in High-street, Mortlake. He was very drunk, challenging everyone that he saw to fight, and using very filthy and obscene language. Witness and Police-constable Spratley had previously had to speak to him during the evening, as there had been much disorder with him. As he was now continuing his bad behaviour, witness and the constable took him into custody. He immediately became "like a wild beast," kicking and biting and striking in all directions. In the course of the struggle witness received a kick on the forehead, the force of which was somewhat broken by the peak of his cap. He also received a kick behind the left ear. Prisoner was on the ground at the time, kicking up over his head. Witness had a slight wound on his forehead, and a bruise at the back of his ear. His thumb was also sprained. Police-constable Spratley received several blows, and his ribs were broken by a kick from the prisoner. Some gentlemen came along, and with their assistance prisoner was removed to the police-station.
Police-constable Spratley, 377 V, said that on Sunday afternoon, about 3 o'clock, he removed prisoner from the Bull's Run, Waterside, Mortlake, as he wanted to fight with a bargeman. Witness saw him again at half-past 7. He was with Inspector Alcock, and there was a crowd around them. Prisoner was then drunk. As soon as we was taken into custody, he threw himself down, and kicked, bit, and fought in all directions. They lifted him to his feet, and tried to make him walk, when he put his legs round those of witness, who fell to the ground. He then received a kick from the prisoner in the right ribs, and had kicks and knocks all over him. He was very stiff and sore that morning. With the assistance of some gentlemen, prisoner was taken to Barnes police-station. As witness was in great pain, he spoke to the inspector, who took him before the doctor, who said that his ribs were broken. The doctor was not present in court, but witness knew himself that his fourth rib was broken.
Prisoner made no answer to the charge.
Mr. Inspector Pinhorn said in January, 1881, prisoner was sentenced to a month's hard labour for stealing coals. In July he was summoned for using threatening language in the Park, and in consequence of not appearing, he was apprehended on a warrant and sentenced to seven days' imprisonment.
Mr. Inspector Alcock said that during the last few weeks prisoner had behaved fairly well. He had lately been employed by a baker at Isleworth.
The Clerk (Mr. Cartledge) said the prisoner was liable, if the bench committed him for trial, to seven years' penal servitude.
Mr. Whiteley said this was a most serious offence, and the bench must inflict a heavy punishment as a warning to others. Prisoner must be sent to the house of correction for four calendar months, with hard labour.

Source: The Putney and Wandsworth Borough News, Saturday August 29, 1885, Page 3

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Re: Inspector Charles Pinhorn

Post by Karen on Fri 21 Jan 2011 - 9:40

STRUGGLE WITH A BURGLAR.

At Richmond on Monday Joseph Kennedy, age 42, no home, described as marble polisher, was charged with burglariously entering 4, Carrington-villas, Marsh-gate-road, Richmond, premises used as a "sleeping-house" in connection with St. John's Collegiate school, and stealing a gold watch and various articles of clothing, to the value of 25 pounds, the property of Carlos Urrutia and Emil Ghil, two of the students. He was further charged with assaulting Inspector Charles Pinhorn in the execution of his duty. Mr. Urrutia stated that he went to bed on Saturday night, slept soundly, and did not awake until near four o'clock in the morning, when the police aroused the household, and he then found that the clothes he had been wearing were missing, together with the watch and the money in the pocket. A shawl belonging to Mr. Ghil was also missing. Mr. Hatton, the master, had been downstairs at 12 o'clock, and left the back door unfastened, but nothing was heard until the police arrived.
Charles Pinhorn, an inspector of the V division of the metropolitan police, said that at three o'clock on Sunday morning he was in Marsh-gate-road, Richmond, and saw the prisoner about 200 yards in advance of him. He noticed that the prisoner looked back towards him, and then turned the corner and went up Church-road. Witness thereupon went after him and stopped him. He found that he was carrying a pair of trousers, vest, coat, and pair of boots under his own coat. The inspector took them from him, and said, "You will have to go with me to the police-station," and prisoner then, with an oath, struck witness on the right shoulder with his fist, and attempted to pass. Witness took hold of him with his left hand, but he struggled violently to get away, and he (Inspector Pinhorn) was obliged to throw the clothes down. After they had struggled some time, the prisoner said he would go quietly, and they walked along together about 300 yards, when the prisoner said he would not go any further, and said he would kill witness if he did not let him go. He took hold of the corner of the cape which witness was wearing and twisted it until the inspector's arms were almost pinioned to his side and attempted to throw him to the ground. They both fell, and witness knelt upon the prisoner's legs. Prisoner, however, got his legs free and kicked witness in the stomach and legs. He got upon his feet and rushed at witness with his open hand, as if to clutch at his throat. They again fell to the ground, when witness got the man upon his stomach and knelt upon his back, holding his face down to the ground. Witness sounded his whistle, and kept the prisoner in that position until Police-constable Willmott and Police-serjeant Cann arrived and took him to the station. On being searched the gold watch and chain produced were found in his pocket. An old envelope found upon the clothes in prisoner's possession induced witness to go to 4, Carrington-villas, where he found that the front garden gate had been opened, and also the side gate and back door. They were still standing open, as also was Mr. Urrutia's bedroom door. He aroused the household, and the property was identified, and the prisoner charged. Mr. Dermer remanded the prisoner.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, June 8, 1884, Page 2

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Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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Re: Inspector Charles Pinhorn

Post by Karen on Fri 21 Jan 2011 - 10:00

SERIOUS CHARGE OF STABBING.

William Burns, 19, was charged on remand, at the Thames police-court yesterday with unlawfully wounding Henry Heinberger, a fur dyer, of 92, Grove-street, St. George's, with intent to do him grievous bodily harm.
The prosecutor, who was now able to attend, said at 12 o'clock on the night of Friday week he was standing at his door, when he saw the prisoner having a row with his sweetheart's father. Witness spoke to the latter and told him not to fight, when prisoner said to him, "You mind your own business!" He then struck him in the face with his fist, and with his right hand stabbed him in the left side. The people called out, "He has got a knife," but witness did not see one in his hand. Witness ran towards his own door, but could not stand, and fell. He was taken to the London hospital, where he remained until Friday.
By the prisoner: He did not threaten to do for him and knock him down.
William Bohle, a seal dyer, said he heard screams, and on going down Grove-street saw prosecutor facing the prisoner outside a beerhouse. The people called out, "He has got a knife." Prisoner said to prosecutor, "Come on, 'Kack'," and went towards him and struck him a blow in the stomach. Prosecutor said, "I'm stabbed," and ran to his own door. Witness saw that he was bleeding from a wound in the stomach, and ran after the accused, whom he then saw in custody.
Charles Ryder said prisoner had been "keeping company" with his daughter. He had a few words with him on Friday week and struck him. Prosecutor came up, and witness saw him strike a blow, but did not see a knife.
Mrs. McCarthy, of Grove-street, said she saw Burns draw a knife, and heard him say, "Where is 'Kack' now?"
Another witness said after the prosecutor was wounded prisoner was seized by some people. Witness then saw him throw the pocket-knife (produced) away.
Constable 304 H said when he arrested prisoner he simply said, "All right, sir; I'll go with you."
Inspector Pinhorn said when he read the charge over to the accused, he said, "I didn't do it. They all rounded on me. I'll be one with them yet. It isn't my knife; I never had one."
Dr. O.H. Smith, house surgeon at the London hospital, said prosecutor, when admitted, was suffering from a stab in the chest, such as would be caused by the knife produced. It was two inches deep, but did not penetrate the abdominal wall, as it ran in a slanting direction under the skin. Prosecutor had now recovered. Mr. Dickinson committed the accused, who denied the charge, for trial.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, September 14, 1890, Page 1

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