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Coroner Ingleby Oddie

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Coroner Ingleby Oddie

Post by Karen on Wed 12 Jan 2011 - 1:44

Mr. Samuel Ingleby Oddie, Coroner for the County of London, and who was representing Crown counsel at the trial of Dr. Crippen, wrote an autobiography in which can be found a chapter dedicated to the Whitechapel murders of 1888. Here is a brief synopsis of his appointments:

- IN A NUTSHELL.

HOME.

Mr. Luxmore Drew has appointed Mr. S. Ingleby Oddie to be deputy-coroner for West London, vice Mr. H.R. Oswald.

Source: The Echo, Monday February 2, 1903

- CORONER FOR SOUTH-WEST LONDON.

Upon the recommendation of the Public Control Committee it was agreed unanimously to appoint Mr. Samuel Ingleby Oddie to fill the office of Coroner of the South-Western District at a salary of 780 pounds a year upon the understanding that, if also appointed Coroner of the City and Liberty of Westminster and the Duchy of Lancaster (Savoy portion), he will be paid a joint salary of 1,150 pounds a year.

Source: The Shoreditch Observer, Hackney Express, Bethnal Green Chronicle and Finsbury Gazette, May 18 1912, Page 6

- COUNTY HALL.

Mr. Samuel Ingleby Oddie was appointed a coroner of the county of London, and the South-Western coroner's district was assigned to him.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly News, May 19, 1912, Page 6

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Inquest On a Suicide

Post by Karen on Wed 12 Jan 2011 - 1:55

LOVER'S SUICIDE.

THUNDERSTORM A POSSIBLE CAUSE.

When an inquest was held at Battersea yesterday on Horace Sidney Hill, twenty-six, a boot-shop assistant, his sweetheart said he was much concerned last Wednesday about her being unwell. There was a thunderstorm when he left her that day, and he was always affected by thunder. He was in no kind of trouble.
Hill was found drowned on Thursday in a lake on Wandsworth Common, it was stated, with a scarf tied tightly round his neck. The coroner (Mr. Ingleby Oddie) said it was most unfortunate that a respectable, cheerful young man should have been driven off his head by the slight illness of his sweetheart, and it was possible the thunderstorm contributed to it.
The jury returned a verdict of Suicide during Temporary Insanity.

Source: The Daily Mail, Saturday August 10, 1912, Page 3

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Oddie On Vehicular Safety

Post by Karen on Wed 12 Jan 2011 - 2:17

LONDON STREET ACCIDENTS.

A CORONER'S VIEWS.

Mr. S. Ingleby Oddie, the Coroner for Westminster, has expressed his views on various aspects of the traffic question in a letter to the Times. He writes: -

"Sir, - It may well be that the explanation of the statistics which seem to show the more deadly effect in London of the motor-bus, when compared with the electric tramcar, is to be found in the fact that no tramcars traverse that part of London where pedestrian and swift vehicular traffic is most congested. I refer to the City of Westminster, which may be regarded as the real hub and centre of London traffic.
"This district extends roughly from the Thames on the south to Oxford-street in the north, and from Kensington Palace in the west to Chancery-lane in the east. Here are to be found most of the taxi-cabs, the large motor-cars, and the motor-buses. Here also are the crowds of shoppers, the theatre-goers, and the country and foreign visitors, but there are practically no tramcars.
"As Coroner for Westminster my experience of fatal accidents in this area has led me to the conclusion that a considerable saving of life might be effected in a very simple manner. A common cause of fatal accidents is to be found in the overtaking of one swift vehicle by another at crossings provided at dangerous points for the safety of foot passengers. Take the case of a pedestrian who leaves the pavement at such a place to cross to a refuge in front of an advancing omnibus. He would be perfectly safe from the omnibus, but he finds, when he has crossed in front of it, that a taxi-cab or motor-car is overtaking the bus on its offside. He is now in a perilous position. He has no time to go forward and reach the refuge, and perforce he steps back to avoid the taxi-cab and is knocked down by the unoffending omnibus.
"Now, Sir, if a certain number of the principal crossings and refuges were marked by a distinctive sign or colour, and if no overtaking of one vehicle by another were allowed at such crossings, I feel confident that many lives would thereby be saved. Another suggestion that occurs to me is that at certain bewildering crossings such as Trafalgar-square, there should be refuge between all adjacent lines of traffic proceeding in opposite directions. The effect of this would be that the pedestrian, as he passes between the pavement and refuge, or refuge and refuge, would only have to look out for and to deal with one line of traffic at a time.
"I am well aware of the argument that the multiplication of refuges means a hindrance to traffic, and that the prohibition of overtaking by vehicles at certain points would produce the same effect. The objection is, to my mind, an insignificant one.
"What really matters is the safety of human life, and not a momentary check to the rapid flight of motor vehicles."

Source: The Shoreditch Observer, Hackney Express, Bethnal Green Chronicle and Finsbury Gazette, September 6, 1913, Page 2

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Two Hot Rums

Post by Karen on Wed 12 Jan 2011 - 2:29

TWO RUMS HOT.

CORONER ON AN "HISTORICAL" DRINK.

Two "goes of hot rum," a phrase reminiscent of the "two rums hot" of Driver Knox, the central figure of the recent North-Eastern railway strike, figured in the evidence at a Westminster inquest yesterday. "Hot rum is becoming historical," commented the coroner, Mr. Ingleby Oddie.

William Thomas Lilley, forty-two, a commissionaire, of Old Cavendish-street, Marylebone, was fatally injured by a taxi-cab while crossing Piccadilly-circus. The widow said he told her he had had two "goes of hot rum" that evening. She added that since he had been to Africa her husband was easily affected by alcoholic liquor.
The Coroner: If he had had two goes of rum it might have affected him? - It might have made him a little careless.
The Coroner: It is very frank of you to say so.
The jury returned a verdict of Accidental Death, and exonerated the driver from blame.

Source: The Daily Mail, Saturday December 21, 1912, Page 5

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His First Inquest

Post by Karen on Wed 12 Jan 2011 - 2:35

Mr. Ingleby Oddie, the new deputy-coroner for West London, held his first inquest yesterday, and one of the first things he did was to fine a doctor 2 pounds for non-attendance.

Source: Daily Mail, Wednesday February 4, 1903, Page 3

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Quote

Post by Karen on Thu 13 Jan 2011 - 0:02

"If you do not keep your eyes open while crossing the streets of London," said Mr. Ingleby Oddie, the Westminster coroner, yesterday, "you will find yourself on a mortuary table."

Source: The Daily Mail, Wednesday December 3, 1913, Page 5

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Re: Coroner Ingleby Oddie

Post by Karen on Thu 13 Jan 2011 - 0:08

THE FULHAM STREET CRIME.

Mr. Ingleby Oddie, the deputy coroner for West London, opened the inquest yesterday on Robert Tomlin, the labourer who died from injuries inflicted on him by a man in Greyhound-road, Fulham, on Saturday night.
James Rice, a labourer, of Garvan-road, who is charged with the wilful murder of Tomlin, was present in court in custody of two warders.
Ivy Kirby, a general servant, who was engaged to Tomlin, described the assault, and identified the prisoner, who she said knocked the deceased down and kicked him.
After several other witnesses had given evidence as to the assault, the inquest was adjourned.

Source: Daily Mail, Thursday April 6, 1905, Page 6

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Re: Coroner Ingleby Oddie

Post by Karen on Thu 13 Jan 2011 - 0:38

DEAD ON HIS ENGINE.

RAILWAY FIREMAN FINDS DRIVER STRICKEN DOWN.

Sitting without a jury, Mr. Ingleby Oddie held an inquest at Westminster on John Leal, aged fifty-eight, locomotive engine-driver on the London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway, lately living in Wandsworth-road, who died suddenly on Tuesday.
Henry Parntt, railway fireman, said that Leal worked from 6:30 a.m. till 8:45 p.m. on Monday. He and Leal had to get the engine ready on Tuesday, and they started just before 5 a.m., when Leal seemed as usual. They left Battersea locomotive yard at 5:27 to run "light" to Victoria. On Grosvenor-road bridge they were stopped by signal, and Leal started oiling his engine. When the signal was lowered witness called out, "All right, Jack," and as Leal did not reply witness went to him, and found him lying dead on the gangway by the side of the smoke-box. Assistance arrived and he was taken to St. George's Hospital.
Dr. Douglas Dyer, who made a post-mortem examination, said there was aortic valvular disease of the heart and signs of diabetes. Death was due to syncope.
The coroner found that Leal died from natural causes.

Source: Lloyd's Sunday News, September 8, 1918, Page 7

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Re: Coroner Ingleby Oddie

Post by Karen on Thu 13 Jan 2011 - 0:53

LIFE'S SAVINGS LOST.

Man's Sad Suicide at Chelsea.

At Chelsea this morning Mr. S. Ingleby Oddie held an inquest on the body of James William Lillywhite, who was for many years manager to Messrs. Weeks and Co., horticultural builders, and who lived in Perrymead-road, Chelsea.
The deceased had lately been depressed owing to financial worry. It appears that he had lost nearly all his savings, having advanced it without proper security. Recently he went away on a holiday, thinking that the change would prove beneficial, but he seemed no better on his return. On Saturday he did not return home at his usual time, and his son, a bank clerk, went in search of him. He subsequently found him hanging from a beam in his office, dead.
Mr. George John Cooper, secretary to Messrs. Weeks and Co., gave evidence that deceased had lost his money through advancing it without proper security. Other evidence showed that the deceased in order to accomplish his purpose had mounted a ladder, and fixed a rope to a beam, and then, kicking away the ladder, hanged himself.
The jury returned a verdict of "Suicide during temporary insanity."

Source: The Echo, Wednesday March 9, 1904, Page

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Re: Coroner Ingleby Oddie

Post by Karen on Thu 13 Jan 2011 - 1:01

WAR ITEMS.

No inquests will be held by the Westminster coroner (Mr. Ingleby Oddie) on soldiers who die from their wounds in Westminster, Battersea, and Wandsworth.

Source: The Daily Mail, Wednesday September 9, 1914, Page 5

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Re: Coroner Ingleby Oddie

Post by Karen on Thu 13 Jan 2011 - 1:12

TO DECEIVE THE CHILDREN.

CONSUMPTIVE'S PLUCKY PLAN BEFORE SUICIDE.

"He no doubt felt he was going to die, and to lessen the shock he acted in a very plucky manner in making arrangements to conceal his death from his children," said Mr. S. Ingleby Oddie, the coroner, yesterday, at a Westminster inquest on Charles Mason Swinnerton, aged thirty-five, an electrician and lately an inmate for consumption at the Lambeth Infirmary. "Weeks after he became ill he was found drowned in the river, and it would appear that when he mentioned taking a long journey he had this in his mind."
John Swinnerton, a brother, stated that in March Charles Swinnerton said to him: "Look here, Jack, I have fought hard all along, but now I have given up all hope. I estimate that I have about three weeks to live. I don't want Chick (his eldest boy) to write to the infirmary, because he will find out I am dead. I shall tell him I am going a long way for a few years to get better."
It was stated that his wife had disappeared, and this had worried him. Mr. Oddie said she must have been a bright specimen to leave him in his trouble. A verdict of Suicide while Temporarily Insane was returned.

Source: The Daily Mail, Wednesday April 8, 1914, Page 3

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Re: Coroner Ingleby Oddie

Post by Karen on Thu 13 Jan 2011 - 1:24

At Westminster on 19th inst. Mr. Ingleby Oddie held an inquest on Mario Guiliani (28), an Italian, who was found shot in Trafalgar-square. Guiliani had formerly been a leather merchant's manager at Hankow, and lately had lived in Upper Bedford-street, Bloomsbury. It was stated that he had had trouble with his family, and had also had financial worries. A verdict of suicide during temporary insanity was returned.

Source: The London and China Telegraph, May 26, 1913, Page 501

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Re: Coroner Ingleby Oddie

Post by Karen on Thu 13 Jan 2011 - 1:42

Apparently, Oddie replaced Coroner John Troutbeck after the latter's death.

LONDON'S NEW CORONER.

RECOMMENDATION TO COUNTY COUNCIL.

Among the reports which were adjourned on Tuesday at the meeting of the London County Council was that of the Public Control Committee with reference to the appointment of a coroner for South-West London in the place of the late Mr. John Troutbeck. The Committee stated that in response to the advertisement issued, thirty-eight candidates had offered themselves for the appointment, and five of these had been seen. They submitted the names and qualifications of three candidates - Mr. R.L. Guthrie, Mr. S. Ingleby Oddie, and Mr. R. Henslow Wellington - with a view to the appointment of one of them by the Council. After careful consideration the Committee has formed the opinion that Mr. S. Ingleby Oddie was the candidate best qualified for the appointment. Mr. Oddie has had considerable experience both as a barrister and as a medical practitioner, while, as Deputy Coroner for the Western District of London since 1903, he has acquired considerable experience and knowledge of the duties of a coroner. The Dean and Chapter of Westminster and the Duchy of Lancaster, who have the right of appointment of the Coroner for Westminster and Liberty, have been informed of the steps taken in the matter, and of the proposal for the appointment of Mr. Oddie.

Source: The Shoreditch Observer, Hackney Express, Bethnal Green Chronicle and Finsbury Gazette, May 11, 1912, Page 6

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Re: Coroner Ingleby Oddie

Post by Karen on Thu 13 Jan 2011 - 6:28

ENGINE DRIVER'S FALL.

STRANGE DISAPPEARANCE FROM TRAIN WHILE ON A JOURNEY.

What the coroner (Mr. Ingleby Oddie) described as a puzzling and difficult case was investigated at Westminster yesterday. The inquest concerned the death of a London and South-Western engine driver named William Digweed, of Ludlow-road, Guildford, who, while driving a train from Guildford to Waterloo, disappeared from the engine.
He was a very stout man, weighing 18st., and it was stated that the entrance to the gangway of the engine was only 13in. at the top and 15in. at the bottom. The coroner's officer declared that he himself had great difficulty in getting on and off the engine.
Digweed was found standing in the four-foot way in a very dazed condition, and could give no account of what had happened. He died in Charing Cross Hospital without being able to clear the matter up.
The fireman, Arthur Wm. Nurse, who also lives at Guildford, described how, about three-quarters of a mile from Oxshott, he was attending to his duties, and "after a matter of three seconds," turned round and discovered that the driver had disappeared. He took the train on to the next station.
Witness told the coroner that Digweed never left the footplate while the train was in motion, and he could suggest no reason for the accident.
Detective-inspector Scott, of the Railway Police, said that within a yard or two of the spot where Digweed was found some money was scattered about. There was also a slight depression in the six-foot way showing where the man fell. His little finger was torn off, and was lying close by. There was no oilcan or anything of the sort lying about.
Medical evidence showed that Digweed was liable to fainting fits owing to heart disease, and the jury returned a verdict of "Accidental death."

Source: Lloyd's Weekly News, April 11, 1915, Page 4

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Re: Coroner Ingleby Oddie

Post by Karen on Thu 13 Jan 2011 - 11:21

STABBING TRAGEDY.

JURY'S SYMPATHY FOR ACCUSED GIRL.

A narrative of a girl's love for a man who, according to her account, had deserted her was told at the inquest yesterday on the young German, Herman Carl Weinberg, who was fatally stabbed in Lisle-street, Leicester-square, early on Sunday morning. As the result of the jury's verdict the coroner committed for trial on the charge of murder Eva Davis, a young and pretty girl, with whom both coroner and jury expressed sympathy.
The first witness was Mary Symons, who described herself as a milliner and said that she had been very friendly with the deceased for the last four months. In Bond-street about three weeks ago Davis came up to her and said: "I believe I know you. You are the girl who has taken my German away." Witness replied: "If you want to get him back that's not the way." They went to a public-house at the corner of Sackville-street, where Davis said: "I love that man. I have got nothing to live for. If I love, I love." Later, showing a knife in her bag, she said: "I will have his life. My life is nothing to me without him."
In reply to Mr. Barrington Matthews, who appeared for Davis, the witness said that Weinberg was supposed to be a man of independent means. Money was sent him from Germany. He was a gambler.
Dr. Montagu Farr, of Charing Cross Hospital, said that Weinberg soon after being brought into the hospital partly recovered consciousness, and murmured: "Marie, Marie, I want to come to you." The post-mortem examination revealed severe heart disease. Death was due to syncope following hemorrhage caused by a knife wound in the arm and accelerated by serious organic disease of the heart.
Mr. Barrington Matthews: Do you think the loss of blood would have been sufficient to cause death if he had not been so suffering? - No.

GIRL'S STATEMENT.

Police-constable Brindle said that after her arrest Davis said of the dead man, "I told him if he did not keep away from me I would kill him. He lived with me for six months, and left me three months ago; but he is always after me when he sees me." The witness added that Weinberg was one of the very worst of his class in the West End.
Other evidence showed that when the police arrived after the stabbing, and asked who had caused the wound, Davis said: "I did." Deceased at once said: "No, it was not her."
The coroner (Mr. Ingleby Oddie) said that Davis had been in the clutches of the deceased. No doubt great sympathy was felt for her. The fact that he was suffering from heart disease did not help her so far as the jury's verdict was concerned.
After consideration by the jury the foreman said: "We had better say we return a verdict of Wilful Murder because we have to do so, but we say with a very strong recommendation to mercy."
The Coroner: That is not a province of ours. We are simply committing her for trial. Is your verdict Wilful Murder? - Yes.

Source: The Daily Mail, Wednesday July 10, 1912, Page 5

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Re: Coroner Ingleby Oddie

Post by Karen on Thu 13 Jan 2011 - 12:46

PATHETIC STORY OF REFUGEE'S DEATH.

FAMILY STRANDED AT CHARING CROSS STATION AFTER WEARY PILGRIMAGE.

A pathetic story was told to the Westminster coroner yesterday, when Mr. S. Ingleby Oddie held an inquiry concerning the death of Marie Marzona, aged nine months, born in Italy, and son of a stonemason, who, with his wife and family, came to this country from Eastern Rumania. The child died in a waiting-room at Charing Cross (South-Eastern and Chatham) Station.

Eoffemia Marzona, who bore traces of hardship, and who was unable to speak a word of English, stated through an interpreter that she was the mother of the child. She had five other children, the eldest being a girl aged ten.
They all left Rumania three months ago en route for Italy, where her husband was going to join the Army. They travelled through Petrograd, Finland, Norway, and Sweden, and arrived in England on Thursday. She did not know which station they came to.
The coroner said he expected they were glad to arrive in England, and he supposed they were bewildered.
Witness added that they experienced many hardships through cold and exposure, and they were travelling the whole time. They obtained money to do so from the different Consuls.
The Coroner: Have you had sufficient food?
Witness shrugged her shoulders expressively, and said she had no doctor for the deceased baby, which had been ill. They arrived at six o'clock on Thursday morning, and the child had had no nourishment all night.
Thomas Galloway, timekeeper at Charing Cross Station, said that the Marzonas and other refugees arrived at the station at 7:15 a.m. on Thursday, and he understood that they were going to Folkestone. As there was no train till 9:10 he put the whole party in front of the fire in a waiting room. At about 7:30 he was informed that one of the children was ill, and saw the deceased on a seat, with the mother bending over her. The woman was very distressed. Witness sent for a policeman, who took the baby to the Charing Cross Hospital.
Dr. Scott stated that the baby was dead on admission, the cause of death being pneumonia. The infant, which was fairly clean, must have been ill for some time.
On behalf of the Italian Consul, Mr. E.F. Paventa informed the coroner that everything was being done for these refugees, who were coming here in large numbers from Roumania and Serbia. This family, no doubt, strayed away from the rest of the party, and found themselves stranded, and somebody must have directed them to Charing Cross, which was the wrong station.
The Consul's idea was that the best thing to do would be to put the family into the infirmary at his (the Consul's) expense, and when they were well enough they would be able to resume their journey through France to Italy. They would be supplied with money by the various Consuls, and would get passes for the journey.
They had already been through twenty or thirty control stations, and had had some exciting experiences, especially in Russia, where they underwent many hardships. Two of the other children were at present in Charing Cross Hospital, suffering from pneumonia.
The coroner said he thought the Consul's suggestion was a very reasonable one, and in summing up he remarked that the case had disclosed a very pathetic pilgrimage of a man and his family coming from Eastern Roumania, through Russia and other countries, to Charing Cross, on their way to Italy.
It was extraordinary how this poor mother had managed to nurse so young an infant during their three months' travelling. It was not to be wondered at that the child eventually succumbed to pneumonia.
The jury returned a verdict of "Death from pneumonia."

Source: Lloyd's Weekly News, January 21, 1917, Page 5

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