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Police Constable Endacott

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Police Constable Endacott

Post by Karen on Wed 5 Jan 2011 - 1:11

THE ARREST OF MISS CASS.
NO REPLY FROM THE HOME OFFICE.

Up to a late hour last evening neither Mrs. Bowman nor Miss Cass had received any communication from the Home Office or the Chief Commissioner of Police with reference to the promised inquiry into the case. Whatever motion is being taken is kept secret. Constable Endacott has been suspended from duty pending the investigations.

THE NATIONAL REFORM UNION.

At the Conference of the National Reform Union, held in Manchester yesterday, Mr. M'Laren, M.P., moved, and Mrs. Scatcherd seconded, "That the hearty thanks of this Conference be given to Mr. Atherley-Jones, M.P., and the other one hundred and fifty-three Members of Parliament who voted with him on Tuesday night on the motion for adjournment regarding the illegal arrest of Miss Cass, for the protest which they made in defence of female honour and public liberty, and also for the well-deserved censure they passed on the Home Secretary and the Government." A delegate suggested the omission of the words "and the Government" at the end of the resolution. - Mr. M'Laren accepted the amendment, but another delegate rose and objected to the omission, and said he would take every opportunity of censuring the Government. (Laughter.) He would rather move "that the meeting condemned in the strongest manner that Member for Birmingham who, after condemning the conduct of the Government in the strongest manner, had not the courage to vote against them." (Hear hear.) - After some discussion, the original motion, with the omission of the words "and the Government," was carried with only six dissentients.

CONDEMNATION IN BERMONDSEY.

At the annual meeting of the St. George's Ward of the Bermondsey Liberal and Radical Association, held last night at the Pilgrim Hall, New Kent-road, Mr. John Eastty presiding, Mr. R.V. Barrow, the candidate for the Bermondsey Division, referred to the defeat of the Government on Tuesday night through the conduct of the Home Secretary. Having detailed the arrest of Miss Cass, the conduct of the magistrate, and the steps taken in Parliament to demand a thorough investigation, he said Mr. Matthews had behaved so badly that even Lord R. Churchill had to denounce his own protege and throw him over (cheers) - and many of the Liberal Unionists had to join with the Liberals in passing a vote of censure on the Home Secretary. He believed the majority was too small to represent the feeling of the country on this question. On the motion of Mr. P. Hennessy, seconded by Mr. G. Oliver, it was unanimously resolved: "That in the opinion of this meeting the recent action of the Government in backing up the conduct of the police and Magistrate in their tyrannical interference with public liberty in the Regent-street case shows their unfitness to be entrusted with the destinies of any portion of the Empire, especially poor Ireland."

THE ACTION OF MADAME BOWMAN.

In view of the proceedings in the House of Commons yesterday afternoon, when Mr. Smith promised that a complete and impartial inquiry should take place with reference to the arrest of Miss Cass, in Regent-street, that young lady and her employer, Madame Bowman, have, says the Daily Telegraph, determined to await the result of the official investigation, reserving the right of instituting an action for perjury against Police-constable Endacott, or the exercise of such other legal remedy as they may be advised. They do not intend making any further communication to the Commissioner of Police unless at his request, and similarly they will put no information before the Public Prosecutor unless it should be asked of them. In their opinion they have already fully stated the facts in the letter of complaint, the receipt of which was acknowledged by the clerk to the Chief Commissioner on the 2nd inst., and they consider that the prosecution of the policeman merely would not meet the case in all its bearings, nor furnish that complete vindication which they desire. For the moment Miss Cass and Madame Bowman are not appealing to the public for funds for that purpose.

THE TRADESMEN OF REGENT-STREET.

A meeting of occupiers of business premises in Regent-street and the vicinity has been summoned to take into consideration "the presence of disorderly characters in Regent-street," and to decide what action shall be taken. The meeting will be held at St. James's Hall this afternoon at three o'clock.

THE POLICE IN REGENT-STREET.
PUBLIC MEETING THIS AFTERNOON.

This afternoon, a meeting of occupiers of business premises in Regent-street and the vicinity, was held in the banqueting room, St. James's Hall. The meeting was specially convened to take into consideration the annoyance caused by disorderly characters in Regent-street, and to decide what action should be taken. There was a large attendance, most of the prominent tradesmen in the neighbourhood, being present.
Mr. Wenkham was voted to the chair, and Mr. E.C. Keevil undertook the duties of secretary. Letters from Mr. Jay and other well-known inhabitants of the locality were read, expressing sympathy with the objects of the gathering. One gentleman wrote that it was intolerable for a Magistrate to rule that the finest thoroughfare in the West-end were to be closed to the virtuous after nine o'clock. (Cheers.)
Mr. E.C. Keevil moved the following resolution: "That a deputation from this this meeting wait upon Sir Charles Warren, the Chief Commissioner of Police, with the object of calling his attention to the large number of well-known disorderly women, principally foreigners, who frequent the streets at the West-end at all hours of the day. soliciting prostitution, and the deputation requesting the police authorities to exercise stringent and permanent regulations so far as the law will allow, to put an end to the present disgraceful state of affairs, which is generally injurious in trade to the value of property, and in every respect demoralising, as well as a public scandal. Mr. Keevil said they viewed this matter, not from a sentimental, but from a business point of view, and wished the evil, which was a serious injury to their business, to be at once permanently remedied.
Mr. NORMAN, solicitor, who spoke next, was frequently called to order, and on his proceeding to eulogise Mr. Newton, considerable uproar ensued, cries of "Question" and "Change the Magistrate" being raised. Unable to secure a hearing, Mr. Norman retired.
Mr. MYERS said it would be highly improper to discuss the case of Miss Cass. It was for them only to consider how to cleanse the streets from the pestilential characters who infest them.
M. WILLEY announced his intention to vote against the resolution, and to move the adjournment of the meeting. He felt strongly on this question. Mr. Newton had hoisted the black flag over their locality, and it was forbidden to the respectable to frequent it. He thought they should call, not a meeting of shopkeepers, but a meeting at which their Members of Parliament should be present, and the inhabitants of Pall-mall, St. James's-square, and Piccadilly should be represented. They should have a great meeting in the great hall at St. James's, and then they might secure redress. Much of the prevalent vice was due to the well-dressed skulkers who molested virtuous women in the streets, in the absence of their male relatives and friends.
Mr. DAVIES also condemned the resolution on similar grounds.
Mr. THROWER said that it was a remarkable thing that, whenever the police made an arrest, they pounced upon those only whom they suspected, and against whom they had no conclusive evidence. Yet he was ready any day to point out to the police a score of women who had walked the streets in the vicinity for years. In Soho there were hundreds of bullies banded together who constituted a real danger to those who would singlehanded interfere with them. In the absence of a definite amendment he would support the resolution.
Mr. THOS. JAY supported Mr. Willey's amendment. He drew a comparison between the streets of New York and of this city, much in favour of the former in this respect. Mr. Jay was loudly cheered.
The resolution was rejected, and the amendment adjourning the meeting until Thursday next was carried by nearly two to one.

Source: The Echo, Thursday July 7, 1887, Page 3

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Re: Police Constable Endacott

Post by Karen on Wed 5 Jan 2011 - 1:16

The proceedings taken by Miss Cass against Police-constable Endacott resulted on Friday in the constable being committed by the magistrate at Bow-street, Mr. Vaughan, for trial at the next sessions of the Central Criminal Court. Two sureties were given in 20 pounds each. In the course of the inquiry the magistrate refused to admit as evidence any of the statements made at the inquiry before Sir Charles Warren, because they were not made upon oath.

Source: The Guardian, August 24, 1887, Page 1250

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Police-constable Endacott Interviewed

Post by Karen on Wed 5 Jan 2011 - 3:49

THE REGENT-STREET POLICE SCANDAL.
SUSPENSION OF THE CONSTABLE.

The majority of 155, including tellers, who voted against the Government on the Regent-street case on Tuesday night was composed of 87 Gladstonian Liberals (including Mr. John Morley, Mr. Shaw-Lefevre, Mr. Stansfield, Mr. Henry Fowler, Mr. Osborne Morgan, Sir Lyon Playfair, and Mr. Arnold Morley), 13 Unionist Liberals (Sir Henry Havelock-Allan, Sir Thomas Grove, Lord Lymington, and Messrs. Barclay, W.B. Smith, Caine, Collings, Heneage, Hingley, Mackintosh, T.W. Russell, Sinclair and Verdin), four Conservatives (Messrs. Joseph Howard, Johnson, and H.B. Reed and Sir H. Tyler), and 51 Nationalists. The minority of 150 in favour of the Government, also including tellers, was made up of 136 Conservatives, 11 Unionist Liberals (Sir John Lubbock and Messrs. Barnes, A.H. Brown, Caldwell, Coghill, A.C. Corbett, More, Morrison, Richardson, T. Sutherland, and Wodehouse), and three Gladstonian Liberals (Mr. Childers, C.S. Kenny, and Sir Hussey Vivian). It is said that at the time of the division there were within call of the whips nearly 20 supporters of the Government who neglected to vote in consequence of having misunderstood the question before the House to be a defence of the conduct of Mr. Newton, of which they disapproved. Among those who walked out without voting were Lord R. Churchill, Mr. Chamberlain, Mr. Craig Sellar, Mr. R. Chamberlain, Mr. Kenrick, Mr. F. Taylor, Mr. F.W. Maclean, and Mr. Hanbury.
A brother-in-law of Miss Cass, writing to Mdme. Bowman from Stockton-on-Tees, adds the following testimony to her good character: - "I have known Miss Cass since she was a girl at school, and she has always been a hardworking, respectable young lady. I thank you for your kindness in saving her from the disgrace she might have had to bear from the policeman's mistake. I am quite sure that Miss Cass is innocent of the charge made against her. She lived at my house a great part of the time she worked for Mr. Tompkins."
A contemporary understands that Mr. Matthews tendered his resignation after the defeat of the Government on Tuesday, but that Lord Salisbury declined to accept it for the present, at all events. The Leeds Mercury London correspondent adds that a number of influential Tories have addressed a private communication to Lord Salisbury, asking the Prime Minister to make a speedy change in the office of Home Secretary.
Constable Endacott has been suspended from duty pending the investigations.
The Queen has desired Mr. Matthews to furnish her with all details of the incident, and the form the inquiry is to take.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OFFICIAL INQUIRY.

On Friday afternoon, at the chief offices of the police authorities in Scotland-yard, an inquiry was arranged to have been held respecting the circumstances of the arrest of Miss Cass in Regent-street on Tuesday night, June 28, by Police-constable Endacott. Upon inquiry it was stated that the legal representative of Mrs. Bowman and Miss Cass had called at Scotland-yard in the course of the morning, and requested that the inquiry should be postponed in order that the case of his client may be presented in a complete form, and with that object he took away some of the documents in connection with the case which had been left at Scotland-yard. So far as Sir Charles Warren is concerned, the inquiry, when held, will be open to the representatives of the Press; for, as he expressed himself, he was not only desirous of publicity to the case, but that the inquiry should be proceeded with at once. Whether the other parties to the investigation may have any objection, he could not say. There will be, it is stated, counsel to represent both sides; and Sir Charles Warren will himself be represented by a barrister, a friend; and the inquiry will be conducted somewhat on the lines of that which was made into the conduct of the police in the Belfast riots.
The Lord Chancellor, has commenced an inquiry into the conduct of Mr. Newton, magistrate at Marlborough-street police-court, during the hearing of the charge against Miss Cass. His lordship, having received Mr. Newton's explanation, sent a special messenger on Friday to Mrs. Bowman, requesting her to call upon him at the House of Lords and bring Miss Cass with her. The two ladies, accompanied by their legal advisor, Mr. Bartram, accordingly waited upon his lordship at half-past two in the afternoon. The interview, which was private, lasted about half-an-hour.
It is understood that Sir Charles Warren, the Chief Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, has issued instructions to the officers of the force, directing that the course to be adopted in future in thoroughfares such as Regent-street, Oxford-street, and Piccadilly, where women constantly parade for the purpose of solicitation, is to keep these persons on the move, and when a complaint is made the constable is to request the complainant to accompany him to the station, and prefer the charge against the accused. Unless this request is complied with, the constable is not to interfere in the matter.

CONSTABLE ENDACOTT INTERVIEWED.

A Press representative has had an interview with Police-constable Endacott. He is a find-looking man, tall, and clean shaven, with the exception of a dark moustache. He has been married 11 years, and has three children. In reply to questions as to his antecedents, he made the following statement: -

"I have been in the Metropolitan force for 12 years, and was previously in the Devonshire police, where I was stationed at Newton Abbott and Staverton, near Totnes, for three years. This is the first time I have been in any bother, although I have been engaged in a large number of cases. I have had a large number of charges before Mr. Newton against loose women, and this is the first time that my evidence has ever been questioned. On the day in question I was on special duty from four to 11 p.m., owing to complaints made by the inhabitants against the prostitutes, and I have been on and off this duty for several years. The majority of the women who are about Regent-street I know by sight well. I have been offered money by these women scores of times not to interfere with them, but have never taken a single penny. If I had taken all that was offered me I should be a rich man now. As regards my character, on coming to London in 1875 I was well recommended for good conduct, as you will see by these letters, given me by Commander Brooman, of the Royal Navy; the Rev. J.B. Hughes, vicar of Staverton, the Rev. H.G. Haines, a magistrate of Chagford, near Exeter; Mr. Thomas Hewetson, of Ware Staverton, and others. As to my career in the Metropolitan police, I have been commended by the judge and grand jury at the Middlesex sessions, and the Central Criminal court on several occasions for the tact and ability I have displayed while in charge of cases. I have also been rewarded by the Commissioners of Police for saving life in Newman-street, Oxford-street, at an explosion which occurred in the connection with the making of oxygen gas. I went into a room there and rescued a man who had been injured by the explosion. The room was full of fumes from the gas at the time, and I was very unwell for some days after. I have also been rewarded for arrests in connection with burglaries, highway robberies, &c. I have been caretaker of these premises for the past eight years, and the lessee has every confidence in me. I am well known by all the inhabitants round about, and I don't think there's one to say a word against me. I was suspended on Wednesday."

Endacott was found to be much liked by his comrades, who thought him a steady, reliable man, one of them remarking that he was "never in a hurry to run anyone in; he always gave them a chance."

MEETING OF TRADESMEN.

A meeting of occupiers of business premises in Regent-street and the vicinity was held on Thursday afternoon at St. James's hall, to take into consideration the annoyance caused by disorderly characters in Regent-street, and to decide what action should be taken. There was a large attendance, most of the prominent tradesmen in the neighbourhood being present. Mr. Wenkheim was voted to the chair, and Mr. E.C. Keevil undertook the duties of secretary. Letters from Mr. Jay and other well-known inhabitants of the locality were read, expressing sympathy with the objects of the meeting. One gentleman wrote that it was intolerable for a magistrate to rule that the finest thoroughfares of the West-end were to be closed to the virtuous after nine o'clock (cheers). Mr. E.C. Keevil moved the following resolution: - "That a deputation from this meeting wait upon Sir Charles Warren, the Chief Commissioner of Police, with the object of calling his attention to the large number of well-known disorderly women, chiefly foreign, who walk many of the principal streets at the West-end at all hours of the day soliciting prostitution; and that the deputation request the police authorities to exercise stringent and permanent regulations so far as the law will allow to put an end to the present disgraceful state of affairs, which is greatly injurious to trade, to the value of property, and in every respect demoralising, as well as a public scandal." Mr. Keevil said that they viewed this matter not from a sentimental but from a business point of view; they wished the evil, which was a serious injury to their business, to be at once and permanently remedied. Some uproar was occasioned by a defence of Mr. Newton by Mr. Norman, a solicitor. Mr. Willey announced his intention to vote against the resolution and to move the adjournment of the meeting. He felt strongly on this question. Mr. Newton had hoisted the black flag over their locality, and it was forbidden to the respectable to frequent it. He thought they should call, not a meeting of the shopkeepers, but a meeting at which their members of Parliament should be present, and the inhabitants of Pall-mall, St. James's-square, and Piccadilly should be represented. They should have a great meeting in the great hall, St. James's, and then they might secure redress. The amendment, adjourning the meeting until Thursday next, was finally carried by nearly two to one.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, July 10, 1887, Page 7

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Re: Police Constable Endacott

Post by Karen on Thu 6 Jan 2011 - 1:39

Weekly Notes.
POLITICAL AND SOCIAL.

HER MAJESTY'S Ministers sustained a virtual and damaging defeat in the House of Commons on Tuesday night; a motion for adjournment being carried against them by a majority of five (153 to 148). Its significance lies in the peculiar circumstances of the case, with which most of our readers must be acquainted. A modest young woman was walking in Regent-street one night last week, when Constable ENDACOTT arrested her on a charge of annoying more than one gentlemen, and, to her horror, she was placed in a police cell for the night. Being brought up at the Marlborough-street Police Court next day, Mr. NEWTON at once accepted the unsupported statement of the constable, ignored the simple explanations and protests of Miss CASS, rudely treated Madame BOWMAN, her employer, and dismissed the prisoner with an insolent caution, which implied a shameful stigma on her character. Next - that is, on the following night in the House of Commons - appears the HOME SECRETARY on the scene, and, with cool effrontery, Mr. MATTHEWS flatly refused an inquiry into the outrage, till Mr. CHAMBERLAIN opportunely insisted upon its necessity. But, although overwhelming proofs of the perfect innocence of Miss CASS accumulate, and of the utter falsity of an accusation so revolting to a woman, the HOME SECRETARY - the guardian of Justice - moves not, and the CHIEF COMMISSIONER OF POLICE makes no sign. The newspaper Press - The Times, as always, when victims are weak, excepted - was up in arms at this abominable denial of justice to a young woman. Indeed, there has rarely been a more genuine and wholesome outburst of public indignation and disgust.

Such were, in brief, the circumstances which, on Tuesday, amply justified Mr. ATHERLEY-JONES - who had previously endeavoured to extract a satisfactory statement from the HOME SECRETARY - in moving the adjournment of the House. The debate that ensued is briefly described elsewhere, but words almost fail to indicate the curious mixture of obstinacy and weakness, of theatrical pedantry and unconsciousness of the real situation, which marked the bearing of Mr. MATTHEWS, and at length brought down upon him the sarcastic rebuke of his patron, Lord RANDOLPH CHURCHILL. The honest indignation and demand for justice expressed by leaders of the Unionist Liberals, was met by evasive answers from foremost members of the Government, and a feeble promise that the whole matter should be considered by the PUBLIC PROSECUTOR.

It seems probable that the HOME SECRETARY, and possible that the implicated magistrate, will resign. But a still more important question was raised on the courageous initiative of Mr. CAINE. That hon. member expressed his firm belief that the police very extensively levy blackmail upon unfortunate street-walkers all over the metropolis to enable them to pursue their disreputable calling unmolested, and gave corroborative evidence of this startling charge; and The Times, now at last alive to the importance of the issues involved, pertinently asks: "If the police are really zealous in the cause of public morality, how does it come about that the notorious and unmistakable professors of solicitation enjoy impunity, while young girls fresh from the country are seized?" It is imperative - especially as the legality of police action in such cases is doubtful - that the whole subject should be thoroughly investigated either by the Home Office or the Scotland-yard authorities, or by both. This is the least that is demanded by outraged public sentiment.

Source: The Nonconformist and Independent, July 7, 1887, Page 641

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Re: Police Constable Endacott

Post by Karen on Thu 6 Jan 2011 - 2:17

THE CASS CASE.
THE POLICE AND THE PEOPLE.

The police force of this country is a mighty and many-sided organisation. It has its traditions, its records, its accumulated experiences, and above all its esprit de corps. The force contains some of the ablest, some of the astutest, and some of the most unscrupulous men in the country. This force, for the moment, is, in a certain degree, on its trial. It is not merely Police-constable Endacott whose conduct has been impugned, but the integrity of a large number of policemen has been challenged. As a police-sergeant said to us a day or two ago, "The credit of the force is at stake, and we shall do our best to vindicate ourselves." Should the testimony of Miss Cass be in any way invalidated, joy and gladness will run like an electric current through the whole force in this realm. Then those who have been assailed will laugh and point the finger of scorn at their accusers and say: "The corner-stone on which you have built up a series of charges against us crumbled beneath investigation; we are in the right, and you in the wrong; and all the accusations which have been brought against us, in and out of Parliament, are shameful fabrications." What, therefore, are the police doing at the present time? They are putting in motion all the secret machinery at their command - first, to find flaws in the character of Miss Cass, if they can, and then crush her. They are tracing her life, year by year, and week by week. They are putting her, in fact, under a national microscope, to ascertain specks and to magnify specks into faults if they can. We consequently see, on the one hand, a poor girl - a daughter of the people - alone and almost defenceless; we see, on the other hand, a powerful, a far-reaching, and a remorseless organisation, bent on defending itself, at all hazards, if it can.
There is much more in the investigation now going on than meets the superficial eye. Mr. Wontner did not get the investigation adjourned ten days for nothing. These ten days are being used to scrape together whatever evidence that can by hook or crook be obtained, and Mr. Wontner is just the one to turn such evidence to the best account in the interests of Endacott in particular, and the Police Force in general. We don't complain of this, but we ask for an impartial and not a one-sided investigation. We know nothing of Miss Cass or her antecedents; but if every action of her past life is to be traced, if the whole machinery of the Secret Inquiry Office is to be used to her prejudice, let Police-constable Endacott be subject to a similar investigation. If the woman - poor, defenceless, and almost friendless - is to be put under the microscope, let the man, who has the police force of the realm and the subtlest intellects of the Government on his side, be subject to similar treatment. Mr. Wontner says he wants "peace." We want something else - we ask for fair play and justice. But who is to inquire into Endacott's antecedents? Not the police certainly, as they are prejudiced up to the lips in his favour. As the matter is assuming public importance, as it may become an issue between the police and the people, it may be necessary to form an independent committee, as a counterpoise to the National Committee - the police force - which is daily sitting in Endacott's behalf. If it were simply a matter of credibility of testimony between Miss Cass on the one side, and Endacott on the other, but little public importance would be attached to it. But, fortunately or unfortunately, a vastly larger consideration has been imported into the inquiry. "The credit of the force" is involved. Hence the ten days' postponement; hence the subterranean inquiries now being made; hence the anxious conference now being held; hence the expedients that are being suggested in the interests of "peace."
There is one important feature of the case which should be strictly borne in mind. No evidence is taken on oath. Miss Cass having given her evidence without equivocation, again and again has been, and is, prepared to give it under the sanction of an oath. Anything that may be testified against her will not be under such sanction of an oath, and therefore no one can be subsequently prosecuted for perjury. This was a convenient provision, to say the least of it, for those who were under an obligation to institute the inquiry. It must be borne in mind that the inquiry is not a voluntary one. It was the result of a Parliamentary majority, and a Government defeat. Though the inquiry only directly concerns Miss Cass and Police-constable Endacott, it also involves the magisterial conduct of Mr. Newton, and the Parliamentary conduct of Mr. Secretary Matthews. Blood is thicker than water. Mr. Wontner, Mr. Newton, and Mr. Matthews are lawyers. There is, in the first place, Miss Cass versus the police force of the realm; there is, in the second place, the ablest legal ability waiting to turn evidence to account, and two out of the three named are personally and deeply interested in the issue. The odds, as far as the process of inquiry is concerned, are overwhelmingly against Miss Cass. But there is something stronger than the police, and stronger even than Mr. Wontner, Mr. Newton, and Mr. Matthews combined - and that is the people; and we venture to say that Miss Cass must not be crushed by unfair means or the unscrupulous use of any means to save the credit of the Force.

Source: The Echo, Monday July 18, 1887, Page 2

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Prosecution of Endacott

Post by Karen on Thu 6 Jan 2011 - 2:23

THE PROSECUTION OF ENDACOTT.
THE PUBLIC PROSECUTOR'S OFFER.

It is stated that the Director of Public Prosecutions has, in accordance with the instructions given by the Home Secretary, offered either to take up the prosecution against Police-constable Endacott already instituted by Miss Cass's solicitor, or that the prosecution should be left in the latter's hands, in which case the Government would defray the expenses properly incurred in relation thereto. Miss Cass has decided that the prosecution should be left in the hands of the solicitor who has acted for her.

Source: The Echo, Friday August 12, 1887, Page 3

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Re: Police Constable Endacott

Post by Karen on Thu 6 Jan 2011 - 2:27

Home News.

An application was made at Bow-street on Monday on behalf of Miss Cass, the dressmaker's assistant, for a summons against Constable Endacott for perjury, alleged to have been committed by him before the magistrate, when he recently preferred a charge against her after arresting her near Regent-street. The summons was granted.

Source: The Guardian, August 10, 1887, Page 1185

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Re: Police Constable Endacott

Post by Karen on Fri 7 Jan 2011 - 1:09

TRIAL OF ENDACOTT.

Mr. Justice Stephen commenced on Monday, at the Central Criminal court, the trial of Police-constable Bowden Endacott on the charge of perjury in connection with the arrest of Miss Elizabeth Cass in Regent-street, on June 28.
The prosecution was conducted by the Solicitor-general, Sir E. Clarke, Q.C.,M.P., Mr. J.P. Grain, and Mr. F.M. Abrahams. Endacott was defended by Mr. Besley and Mr. Gill.
The Solicitor-general, in opening the case, said the charge against the defendant was a very serious one, namely, that he did wilfully and falsely state that the prosecutrix, a young woman of 24 years of age, had been seen by him to accost gentlemen in a public street and solicit prostitution. Miss Cass, since the occurrence, had been married, but it would be convenient to speak of her by her maiden name. She came to London on the 27th April last, and after some time entered the employment of Mrs. Bowman, in Southampton-row, as a dressmaker. On the 28th June she received permission to go out in the evening, and when walking in Regent-circus she was arrested by the defendant, who said he knew her, on the charge stated. She was taken to Tottenham-court-road station, and there entered in the charge-sheet as a "common prostitute," and locked up until bailed, being produced the next day at Marlborough-street police-court and then discharged. The case had excited a great deal of public attention, and out of the circumstances attending it this charge arose.
Walter Crowe, second clerk at Great Marlborough-street police-court, said that on the 29th June he was present when Miss Cass was charged before Mr. Newton, and he took notes of the evidence given on oath by Police-constable Endacott. He knew Endacott had been specially put upon patrol duty, and also knew he had given evidence in many special cases, his truthfulness being never challenged.
Mr. Marshall Inman, an architect and surveyor, produced a plan of Regent-circus and the adjacent streets.

MISS CASS'S EVIDENCE.

Mrs. Langley (Miss Elizabeth Cass), examined by the Solicitor-general, said: I have been married since the beginning of these proceedings. I am 24 years of age. Until the 27th of April last I had lived mostly at Stockton-on-Tees, my occupation being that of a dressmaker. I resided with my father and mother. Before the 27th of April last I had never been to London. When I came I went to stay with Mrs. Tompkins, at Manor-park, Forest-gate. While staying with Mrs. Tompkins I on two occasions came into town with her to look for a situation. Once we went to several wholesale houses in the City, and on one occasion we went to the West-end. We were in Regent-street about three in the afternoon. Except on that occasion I had never been in Regent-street. About the end of May (the 31st) I saw an advertisement of Mrs. Bowman's. At the time I applied for the situation I was staying at Mrs. Robertson's. I went to Southampton-row to answer the advertisement, and arranged to go into Mrs. Bowman's service on the 7th June. I was to be forewoman, and to live in the house. I occupied the same bed as Jane Scott. We left off work in the evening at eight o'clock. On the evening of the 28th June I left off work as usual, and asked leave to go out. I went out alone at about a quarter to nine. I was dressed exactly as I am now. I went towards Bloomsbury-square, and then into Tottenham-court-road again. I knew that I was in Tottenham-court-road. When I got to the bottom of Tottenham-court-road I turned to the right. I observed a jeweller's shop. I turned round to the right, and then knew that I was in Oxford-street. I walked along as far as Peter Robinson's. When I got to the corner of Regent-circus I turned to the right and walked along as far as the church. I turned back to Regent-circus. I then turned to the left, which would take me along the same side of Oxford-street as I had come by.
Had you during all that time been alone? - Yes.
Had you spoken to anybody, or had anybody spoken to you? - No.
Just tell me in your way what you did. - There was a little crowd at the corner, and when I got to the corner a policeman came and took hold of my arm. The policeman was Endacott. He said, "I want you." I said, "What for?" He said, "I have been watching you for some time." I said, "You have made a mistake." He said, "Oh, no, I have not. Who is that girl you were with?" I said, "I was not with any girl." He said, "Oh, yes, you were; don't tell lies." I said he had made a mistake. He replied, "No; I have not." I asked him where he was taking me to. He replied, "To the Tottenham-court-road police station." I asked him if he would go to Mrs. Bowman's with me. He replied that he would not do so. It was in Oxford-street that he arrested me, and on the way to the station Endacott said he had known me some time. I said that could not be, for I had only been in London six weeks. I asked him to go to Madame Bowman's with me, and he said he could not. He did not ask anything about Madame Bowman. He took hold of my arm, and I asked him not to do that. He said he must take hold of my arm, as I would tell them at the police-station that he let me walk there alone. On the way to the police-station he asked me if Madame Bowman would bail me out. I said, "Bail me out?"
Did you know what that meant? - I knew what bail meant, but I did not know that I should need it.
Before you went to the police-station did you hear anything said about gentlemen being stopped several times? - No.
At any time during that evening had you spoken to or accosted any gentleman? - No. When I got to the police-station in Tottenham-court-road I saw a policeman in plain clothes. I do not know how I felt at the police-station.
Well, was some water brought to you? - Yes. I did not hear the conversation that passed between Endacott and a constable at the station. Endacott said, "Do you know me?" I said, "No." He said, "I know you." He was very near me at the time, and he was looking at me. He was staring me in the face.
What did you say to that? - I said, "You could not have done that. I have only been in London three weeks." He said, "You said six weeks just now." I said, "Yes, I have been in London three weeks; but I have also been down staying at Manor-park." I remember then feeling giddy, and I fell. A policeman then said, "Don't put yourself about. It will be all right." Presently Serjeant Comber came in, and took down what Endacott said. Serjeant Comber asked me my name. I told him Elizabeth Cass. He asked me if I could read and write, and I said "Yes." No other question was asked. A policeman led me to a cell. I asked Serjeant Comber if he would send for Madame Bowman, and he said he would. I was locked in the cell, and remained there about an hour. Then Madame Bowman came and bailed me out, and I went home with her. On the following morning I went to the police-court with Madame Bowman. I was allowed to leave.

IMPORTANT CROSS-EXAMINATION.

Cross-examined by Mr. Besley: I arrived at King's-cross on Wednesday, the 27th April. It was at about eight o'clock in the evening, and I went direct with Mrs. Tompkins to her house at Manor-park. On two occasions I visited Mrs. Robertson, who keeps a lodging-house in Trinity-square, in order that I might be nearer to places that I would be likely to get a situation. The first time I went there would be about the 10th May. I then stayed three days. The second visit was about a fortnight afterwards. The last time I went to Mrs. Robertson's I was there from Saturday till the following Saturday. I went out on the Tuesday after my arrival. It was Whit Tuesday. I left after dinner, about half-past two o'clock, and took an omnibus to the Bank, whence I walked to Southampton-row. I got there between four and five o'clock, and remained there about half an hour. I then walked back to Trinity-square, via Westminster-bridge. I got there between eight and nine, having been nowhere except in a shop to buy ribbon. That was the only occasion on which I went out while I was at Mrs. Robertson's, except one evening when I was out for about 10 minutes.
Do you know a young man of the name of Arthur Settle? - Yes; he is an assistant at Shoolbred's, and it was there that I went to buy the ribbon. It was a little after five. I was served by another young man, and asked for Mr. Settle.
Was Mr. Settle called to you? - Yes; I told him I was at Trinity-square for a few days, and said I was looking for a situation.
Did he tell you he could not leave business till eight o'clock? - Half-past seven. I said I would come back.
Did you go back at half-past seven? - Yes; he was to walk back to Trinity-square with me.
Did you go back at half-past seven punctually? - No.
Had you to wait until nearly eight before you went back? - Yes.
You walked up and down Tottenham-court-road? - Yes.
Now, will you tell me what you were doing between making the appointment at five o'clock and half-past seven? - I was looking about at the shops, but did not enter any.
I believe that when Mr. Settle did come outside it was half-past eight? - No; I don't think it was eight o'clock. Then I walked with him over Westminster-bridge to Trinity-square, Southwark.
When did you go out for ten minutes? - That was after Mr. Settle had seen me home.
How many nights did you sleep at Romford in the course of the whole three visits? - About seven.
At Romford did you walk to the station? - Once there and back.
When you were at Madame Bowman's you went on Sundays to Manor-park? - Yes.
You went to Madame Bowman's on June 7, and Endacott took you into custody on the 28th. There are three Sundays - the 12th, 19th, and 26th - between those dates. You have said you went to Manor-park on three Sundays, and yet that you spent a Sunday at Madame Bowman's. How do you explain that? - I was certainly one Sunday at Madame Bowman's. On that Sunday I went to church in the morning. I was at home in the afternoon, and went with Mrs. Tennel to the City in the evening.
Now with regard to June 28. Did you go out a few nights before to see the illuminations in honor of the Queen's Jubilee? - Yes. On Jubilee night we also walked. I did not notice any particular design in Regent-street that attracted my attention. We went out about nine, and returned about 11. Madame Bowman, Mrs. Tennel, and Miss Scott were with us. I did not tell Madame Bowman that I was going to meet the young man Settle, at Shoolbred's. The object of my getting leave to go out was to purchase a pair of gloves and to see the illuminations. I went out between half-past eight and a quarter to nine. When I got to Shoolbred's they were closed, and I passed on. When I turned the corner towards the church I did not notice any shops of Peter Robinson's. I had just got round the corner when Endacott said he "wanted" me. It was just by Peter Robinson's door, facing Oxford-street. There was a crowd at the corner, and I had just got through it when I was stopped.
Before Serjeant Comber came in to the police station did you say to one of the constables, "He has made a mistake this time. I have only been up that way twice?" - I did not say so.
As the gaoler was about to close the door of the cell did you speak to Comber? - Yes; I said, "Don't put me in there." I did not say, "Can't I have bail?" There was no conversation about bail.
Did you at first tell Endacott you had only been in London three weeks? - I said six weeks first.
Did you not say three weeks first, meaning Southampton-row? - No; it was six weeks first.
Witness afterwards corrected herself and admitted she said six weeks first and three weeks afterwards.
The first time you made a statement in public was on July 12 at Scotland-yard? - Yes.
Before that had you seen a solicitor? - Yes. Mrs. Bowman spoke to a solicitor. I cannot say how many days before that I saw the solicitor. I should say about a week.
On July 12, 21, 22, and 25, the days of the inquiry, did you say a word about your two visits to Trinity-square? - No.
Was it not until Mr. St. John Wontner, Endacott's solicitor, had asked you about your visits to Mr. Settle that you mentioned about the visits to Trinity-square? - Not until then.
And you mention for the first time today about your walk with Mr. Settle? - Yes.
Is it not only within the last two or three hours that you have spoken about walking to Trinity-square with Settle? - No; I had spoken of it before.
Do you know Jane Elizabeth Whitehead? - Yes. She lived at Stockton, and was in a situation with me. I have known her about six years. I saw her on April 25 (Tuesday) before I came to London.
After a conversation did she say she would come to the train and see you off next morning? - No; and I did not say that Bryan was going to see me off.
Do you know Bridget Costello? - Yes; I have known her about five years. She was a barmaid at two public-houses. I went to see her on the Wednesday morning I left. I went from Stockton to York and changed trains, remaining there about an hour and a half. A friend was with me - Mr. Bryan.
By his Lordship: I met Mr. Bryan at Eagle's Cliff, the junction for Durham.
Mr. Besley: Did Mr. Bryan live at Mandale-road, Stockton?
Witness: Yes; that is about a mile away from the Tompkins's shop. Mr. Bryan was living at Mandale-road up to the time of my coming away from Stockton.
I understand that he joined the train in which you were travelling to London at the junction where the people join it for Durham? - Yes.
Can you tell me the time that you got to York? - About one o'clock in the day.
Did you have lunch together? - Yes. I don't remember where, but it was a shop.
Had he a portmanteau with him? - No, I think not.
This is rather a matter that I should like you to recollect. Did he not have a portmanteau with him and leave it at the cloak-room at the railway station? - No, not that I know of.
How long did you remain in the shop? - I don't know; I should think about 20 minutes.
Then what became of you and Bryan after that? - We walked about the streets. We did not go into any other place.
Did he travel south with you? - No. I parted with him at York station. We left York about three o'clock in the afternoon.
Do you say that you came to London the same day that you took luncheon with Bryan in this house at York? - Yes.
Did you know at that time that Bryan was a married man? - Yes; and I had known him nearly a year. This was not an accidental meeting with him. It was an appointment made with him verbally two or three days before.
Where were you when you made the appointment? - I don't remember.
Was it before or after you had parted with your friends, Whitehead and Costello? - It was after.
Perhaps you can tell me the time when you made the appointment? - It was in the evening.
Now, where was it you made the appointment? - It might have been in the High-street.
Did you tell him the station you were going from? - Yes.
What station did you go from as a fact? - North Stockton.
Did he arrange to go in another carriage? - No.
What was the appointment then? - He did not say that he would go, but that he might go.
Did he agree to meet you at North Stockton station? - No.
Did you look out for him at the junction? - Yes; both at North Stockton and at the junction.
Did you tell him for the purposes of the appointment what train you were going by? - Yes.
Did any of your friends see you off from the station? - Yes; my father and my brother.
Did they know Bryan? - No. I reached London the same day that I started from Stockton. I won't say that it was not on a Tuesday that I left Stockton, but at any rate it was the same day that I arrived in London. I did not tell Whitehead that Bryan had given me a satchel and some gloves, and that he was going to meet me. I have known Bryan about a year, and used to see him about twice a week at this time.
By the Judge: Bryan never gave me a satchel, or anything like a satchel, but he did give me one pair of gloves. He gave me a glove-box.
Are those the only things he gave you? - I don't remember.
Can you say there was nothing else? - There might have been.
What was it? - I don't know.
It is not likely that you would receive presents without knowing what they were. Now, what else did he give you? - He gave me a ring.
What sort of a ring? - A ring with a stone in it.
What kind of a stone? - A diamond.
When did he give you that? - Just before I came away.
Have you got that now? - No.
What did you do with it? - My husband has got it.
Have you given us now the correct list of the presents? - Yes.
Did you ever visit the wife of this Mr. Bryan? - No.
Did Bryan ever tell you he had been forbidden his brother's house on account of his acquaintance with you? - No, never.
On Christmas Day last did you know that Mrs. Bryan was in London? - Yes.
Did Mr. Bryan tell you that he had won a goose at a raffle? - Yes.
Did you cook that goose? - No.
Did you spend that Christmas Day with him? - No.
Did you see him on that day? - No.
The Judge: How soon after did you see him?
Witness: The Sunday after.
The Judge: Christmas Day was on a Saturday in 1886; therefore you saw him on the following day.
Cross-examination continued: Did you cook the goose on that day? - No; I was not at his house.
Where did you meet him? - I met him at Norton, and was with him for two hours; but I was not at any house with him.
I will now call your attention to Good Friday of this year. How did you spend your day? - I went out for a drive in a dog cart. I joined it at Norton, which is between one and two miles out of Stockton.
Where did you go to? - To Castle Eden, which is about 14 miles out.
What time did you join the dog cart? - I think it was just before 12.
William Bryan was the person who took you? - Yes. I drove during part of the journey. We first drove to a place called Hart, and then turned to Castle Eden.
Before you got there, while you were driving, did you pass people who recognised Mr. Bryan? - I don't remember more than one recognising Mr. Bryan. I have not seen that person since.
You and Mr. Bryan occupied a private room at the Castle Eden hotel? - Yes.
Did you know that Mrs. Bryan was away with her children? - Yes; I knew she was away.
How long did you remain in this private room? - About an hour. We had tea. After tea we went walking about, and again returned to the hotel, where the horse was put in.
On your arrival did Bryan lift you out of the dog-cart, and on your departure did he lift you in? - He might have helped me.
When you got out of the dogcart didn't you jump into his arms? - No.
What time did you leave Castle Eden? - I don't remember. It was not dark. We got back to Stockton after dark. Bryan put me down at the bottom of Cardigan-street, and I got into my house by the back entrance. Cardigan-street was where I lived. Bryan did not put me down at the door, but at the end of the street. He then drove on to the livery stable.
Did he make an appointment to drive you out again on Easter Sunday if it was fine? - He did not. I don't think I saw him on Easter Sunday. I don't know where Mrs. Bryan was at the time. I saw him on Easter Monday.
Do I understand you to say that the meeting was accidental? - No; I had made a verbal appointment with him on the Friday before I parted with him. We arranged to meet at two o'clock on the Monday. I met him, and he went and got a trap, and we drove again to Castle Eden. I took the reins part of the way. I do not know what time we got to Castle Eden; I should think it was about half-past five or six. Bryan helped me out of the vehicle as before. After a walk, we had tea in a private-room in the hotel. It was not dark when we left; I suppose it would be about seven o'clock. We got back to Stockton between nine and half-past.
Mr. Besley: Did he put you down at the same place as before? - Yes.
Have you been driven by him to Seaton Carew? - Yes. It is about 12 miles from Stockton, I believe. I do not remember what month it was, but it was before we went to Castle Eden. We went twice to Seaton Carew. We put up at the Seaton hotel each time, and had a private room. On either occasion we were together about an hour and a half. I do not remember a room marked "Wellington." I remember that we went a third time, by train.
Did you know his wife was with his family at Redcar? - No. I knew she was away.
Did you ever know he was coming from the place where his family were to meet you at Stockton? - No.
Have you ever been to his house when his wife was away? - No.
Have you walked with him often in the Heartburn and other lanes in the neighbourhood of Stockton? - Yes.
At what time? - Between eight and nine o'clock at night.
His Lordship: Was it in winter time - was it dark? - Yes.
Mr. Besley: Do you know Mr. Bevan, of the Alma, where your friend Bridget Costello acted as barmaid? - Yes.
Was she at the Garrick in Stockton before? - Yes.
Do you remember one evening being seen by Mr. Bevan at Darlington station at 11 o'clock? - Yes.
With any one? - A friend.
Male or female? - Male. It was Mr. Turner. He did not kiss me. I had been over to do some work at the house of the parents of Bridget Costello.
Mary Costello came to the station, did she not? - Yes.
Did you say as you passed an hotel door where a young man was standing, "See how I'll take him on"? - No. (Laughter.)
The Judge: I wish to give notice that if I hear any levity in this case I shall immediately have that part of the court cleared in which it occurs. Unless you are quiet, you will be turned out.

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Re: Police Constable Endacott

Post by Karen on Fri 7 Jan 2011 - 2:22

Mr. Besley repeated the question, and witness replied in the negative.
Did you make no signal at all? - No.
Is it a fact that a young man said, "Good evening"? - No.
Is it a fact that Mary bade you good night, and you went off with the young man Turner?
Witness: Yes.
You intended to have taken the nine o'clock train, and took the 11:20 instead? - Yes.
You did not miss the train by design? - No, by accident. I had met Turner before in business twice or three times. He is a traveller.
Was not this gentleman whom you speak of as a commercial traveller a gentleman staying at the Hotel d'Or just before Costello left you? - No. He said, "Good evening." She left Turner to go with me to the station. I saw Mr. Bevan, but I did not know him then. I did not go back to Mr. Thompkins's house that night. I went home that night to where I was living in Cardigan-street.
Has Bryan sent you letters? - Yes. A lad named Teddie Anderson may have brought me three notes. I have seen him pass Tompkins's shop, but he did not signal to me.
Was the walking past a signal to mean that you were to go out and meet him? - No. I could not go out during business.
Didn't you generally meet him at night, when he passed the shop? - Yes; occasionally.
His Lordship: Did you always meet him at night on those occasions when he passed the shop? - Not always, but sometimes.
Mr. Besley: Mr. Bevan at that time was carrying on business in Stockton? - Yes.
Are you quite sure that you have answered correctly that you have only known Mr. Bryan since Christmas last?
The Judge: She did not say that.
Mr. Besley: Did you know him before he was married?
Witness: No. I knew him nearly a year before I came to London. He is a man of about 30 years of age. The more frequent walking out with him has been since Christmas. The walks I have had with him might have been a dozen.
Were you remonstrated with for your acquaintance with a married man? - By whom?
I will ask you, by anyone. Were you remonstrated with, and did you say, "I will have him; and I have broken it off with Langley, your present husband"? - I think I said to Miss Costello that I had broken it off, but not that I would have him.
How long before you came to London was it that you broke it off with Langley? - About a fortnight. He was not in a situation in Glasgow. He has been working at Burton.
Would you oblige me with the date of your marriage? - It was in August, about the middle of that month.
Did your husband go away after the marriage to Burton, and you remain in London? - Yes.
The Judge: What, after your marriage? - Yes; we were married on the Friday, and he went away on the Sunday night.
By the Judge: I have not seen him since then - the 19th August - until last Saturday. I have not been living with my husband during that time. I have been living with him since Saturday last. I have written to him frequently.
Mr. Besley: You are not a member of a family belonging to Stockton at all, are you? Don't you belong to Grantham? - I was born at Grantham, and was at Birmingham until I was seven and then went to Stockton.
I believe there is a family named Cass - a baker - in High-street, Stockton, who has two daughters, about 20 and 22? - Yes.
But they are no relation of yours, and you were not on speaking terms with them? - No.
Do you know a person named George Simmonds, a watch dealer and musical instrument maker, formerly of Bridge-street, South Stockton? - No.
[Simmonds was here ordered into court, and being confronted with the witness, Miss Cass said she recollected being introduced to him, but had not seen him since.]
Cross-examination continued: I was introduced to him by Bridget Costello. I accompanied Miss Costello to Mr. Simmonds' shop for the purpose of fetching a watch she left to be repaired. She introduced me to him as a friend of hers.
Did you meet him two or three weeks afterwards and again from time to time until about five weeks after the introduction - on a Sunday afternoon; and did he ask you to come into his house in Bridge-street? - No. I don't remember having ever seen him since I was introduced to him.
Did you proceed to his house on a Sunday afternoon, and was it arranged between you that he should go into the house first, and that he should leave the street door ajar, so that you might follow him in without being seen? - No; that is not true.
Did you go? - No; I did not.
On several Sundays did you go there at all? - No. I do not remember in what year I was introduced.
At how many different public-houses did you know Bridget Costello as barmaid? - Three.
The Judge: You say you were married on the 17th, and your husband left you on the 19th, and did not come back to live with you till last Saturday. Where were you living in the meantime? - With Mrs. Bowman.
Working for her? - Yes.
Cross-examination continued: When did you renew your engagement with Langley? Was it after the 28th June? - Yes.
All the time you were at Mrs. Bowman's you were not writing to him? - Yes; since my marriage.
Did you know the solicitor was bringing him to London to go to Scotland-yard on the 21st July? - Yes.
Re-examined by the Solicitor-general: Have you been living in Stockton ever since you were seven years old under the name of Cass? - Yes. When I first went to Stockton I went to the British school, and did not go to any employment till I was 14. I went to Mrs. Charlton to be taught dressmaking, and I was with her 12 months. After that I was employed by Messrs. Carter at Stockton, where I first went as an improver and then as dressmaker. Altogether I was there about three years. Afterwards I got a situation at Messrs. Robertson's, Middlesbrough, as dressmaker, and I was there for 18 months. In May, 1884, I went into the employ of Mr. Tompkins, and stopped until he gave up business and came to London. That was in either June or July, and I had then been in his employ for about two years. His successor was a Mr. Davis, and in about two months I went there, and was employed from September, 1886, to the 23rd April, 1887, four days after which I came to London. I gave these particulars to my solicitor. It was with my knowledge that information of that was given to Endacott's solicitor, in order that inquiries might be made.
Do I understand that you never spoke to Mr. Simmonds until you were introduced? - Yes. I first knew Bridget Costello as a machinist in one of the houses in which I was employed. I do not remember where I first saw Mr. Turner. I did not know anything of him besides seeing him in business. He was a traveller. I never walked out with him except on the occasion I have mentioned, when he walked with me to the station.
How did you come to be acquainted with Bryan? - I was introduced to him by Bridget Costello.
Where and under what circumstances? - We were walking down the High-street when we met him.
Did you know him before? - No, but Miss Costello did. She did not know his name.
The Judge: Then how did she introduce you? - She introduced him simply as a friend.
Mr. Besley: When you first made his acquaintance did you know that he was married? - No?
How long before you knew it? - About three months.
Re-examined: You have mentioned Good Friday and Easter Monday as the days on which you went to Castle Eden. Were there many people going there on those days? - I do not remember that there were many.
What sort of room was it you went into at the hotel? - It was rather a large room.
Were you ever in a bedroom with him, there or anywhere else? - No.
Did you ever have your meal in the private room? - Yes. The landlady waited upon us.
Has there ever been any immoral relation of any kind between you and Mr. Bryan? - No.
You have mentioned a ring he gave you, and the fact of your husband having it now; did you acquaint your husband with these matters? - Yes.
Was your husband, prior to the 28th June, and is he still, in a situation at Burton? - Yes. I have continued in my employment as dressmaker at Mrs. Bowman's. I had to attend several times about this inquiry.
You understand the suggestion that you started from Stockton one day, and arrived in London the next, having spent the night somewhere else. Is there any foundation for that? - None whatever.
What was the time you arrived in York? - One o'clock.
With the exception of the shop where you went for refreshments, did you go into any place at York? - No.
How long have you known Arthur Settle? - About five years. He was draper, but he did not live at Stockton. His parents lived there.
Mr. Besley asked permission to question the witness as to whether she had not said at Scotland-yard that there was no pretence for saying that she had ever gone out with Settle.
The Judge: You hear the question? - I was not asked such a question.
The Judge: What was asked: -
Witness: The question was as to whether there had been anything improper between us, and I said there had not.
Mr. Besley: But Mr. Grain put the other question also. - I have no recollection.

To be continued with the testimony of Mrs. Bowman....

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Karen Trenouth
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Re: Police Constable Endacott

Post by Karen on Fri 7 Jan 2011 - 5:18

Mary Ann Bowman deposed: I have lived for seven years at 19, Southampton-row, and have been in business as a dressmaker for over 20 years. On Whit-Tuesday I remember engaging Miss Cass as forewoman, to take her meals in the house, and to sleep with my niece, Jane Scott, which she did.
His Lordship: It seems to me that the only thing material is whether the witness ever saw her in Regent-street. (To witness.): Did you ever see her in Regent-street between June 7 and 28? - No.
Had she an opportunity of going out without your knowledge? - Not the slightest.
Mr. Grain: Between June 7 and 28 was she ever out without your knowledge and permission? - Never.
On the 28th she obtained your permission to go out? - Yes; to make some small purchases.
On Jubilee night were you with her the whole of the time she was out? - Yes. On the night of the 28th Endacott came and I bailed her out, and went to Marlborough-street police-court next morning.
Cross-examined: Jane Scott is my niece. Mrs. Banks is my adopted daughter.
Was she ever divorced in the name of Hill?
Witness: What has that to do with it?
Did not Mrs. Banks live under the same roof as yourself, and bring home men there?
Witness (indignantly): No; never, never.
And with regard to yourself, in the workroom have you not used filthy and foul language? - No, never.
His Lordship: I say that the suggestion that has been made, unless there was strong foundation for it, ought not to have been made.
The observation drew an exclamation of "Hear, hear," from a juror, upon which the judge sternly rebuked the offender.
By permission of the court Mr. Besley put some further questions to Mrs. Bowman, and in reply she said that if at the inquiry at Scotland-yard and Bow-street she had said that Miss Cass never went out except on the Sundays when she went to Manor-park, she meant that she did not go out alone.

Jane Scott deposed: I am a niece of Madame Bowman, and have been with her for 10 months. Miss Cass slept with me in the same room and in the same bed, and we had supper together. After going to church on the Sunday evening before the Jubilee day we went to the City to see the preparations. With the exception of going out on the night of the Jubilee and the days Miss Cass was away, from Saturday to Monday, she was always at home to supper.
Cross-examined: I do not know Regent-street.
How was it you have not mentioned before about being out on Jubilee night? - I did not think of it.

Mrs. Emma Tompkins, wife of Mr. John Tompkins, of Aveley hall, about a mile from Purfleet, stated that on the different occasions when Miss Cass came to her house to work she was driven to and from the station, with the exception of one occasion, when she walked. Miss Cass was under her observation the whole time she was at her house. The groom drove her to the station.

Mrs. Susannah Robertson: I am a widow, and reside at 42 and 43, Trinity-square, Borough. I have lived there for about 30 years. I have known Mrs. Tompkins, jun., since she was a child. About the end of April she called with Miss Cass, and arranged that she (Miss Cass) should come and work for me as a dressmaker. She entered on the work about the beginning of May. On the first occasion when she came Mrs. Tompkins, jun., accompanied her. She stayed a few days, and had her meals with me and slept in the same room as I did. When she left me on the first occasion she was fetched away by Mrs. Tompkins. During the time Miss Cass was out she went once to see Madame Bowman about the advertisement. On that occasion she returned between eight and nine o'clock in the evening. We have supper at half-past nine, or about that hour. She was back before that. It was not dark when she returned. Nobody went with her, and she returned alone.
Cross-examined: When did you first know it was important to prove that Miss Cass was not in Regent-street? - Mrs. Tompkins mentioned it after the inquiry. When she was with me she never wanted to go out, and I more than once remarked that she must be tired of staying indoors so long. When she went to Madame Bowman's she said she lost her way and took the wrong turning at Tottenham-court-road. She also said she knew a young gentleman at Shoolbred's, and waited to see him.

SECOND DAY.

On Tuesday Mrs. Elizabeth Ann Tompkins said: I am the wife of John Godfrey Tompkins, and live at Manor-park. My husband was formerly in business at Stockton, and employed Miss Cass for about two years. In April last she came to our house on my invitation. She arrived on the day arranged, on Wednesday, and I met her at King's-cross at eight o'clock. On the 30th of April I went with her to the West-end, and afterwards to Mrs. Robertson's. When Miss Cass went to visit Mrs. Robertson, she left my house in the morning. I did not go with her on either occasion.
Cross-examined: Miss Cass got to my house on Wednesday evening. I am certain of that. I took her to the City next day, and to the West-end on the Saturday. We got out at Oxford-circus and walked down Regent-street. We looked at the shops, but we did not go into any of them. I took her to show her Regent-street. On another occasion we went to see the Queen open the People's palace. When before the Commissioner I was alive to the importance of the fact of proving that Miss Cass had never been in Regent-street. I attended the inquiry for that purpose, and that only. I knew that Miss Cass had been away from me on many occasions and many nights.
Mr. Gill: Did you not think it right to say that she had been away from you and out of your sight for 15 nights? - I said, Miss Cass "remained with me until she went to Mrs. Bowman's," and that she was never out of an evening - not once. The reason why I did not mention before the Commissioner that she was 15 nights out of my house was that I did not wish to bring my friends unnecessarily into the matter.
Mr. Gill: Did you not think it a serious matter to keep back the fact? - I could account for where Miss Cass was.
Because someone told you where she was, you thought you could account for her? - I knew where she was.
The Judge: Was this inquiry held under any authority?
Mr. Gill: It was an inquiry held as the result of a letter written by Mrs. Bowman to the Home Secretary.
The Judge: What authority has the Home Secretary to order an inquiry?
Mr. Gill: I am sure I don't know, my lord.
The Judge: Certainly he has no legal authority, and I must say it is a very inconvenient way of administering justice. It is very inconvenient, if there is to be a criminal inquiry afterwards, that the preliminary investigation should be conducted otherwise than in the manner provided by law. This inquiry which has taken place is hard upon the person who is charged, and it places the witnesses in a false position. This witness was not upon her oath, and she might naturally think that she was justified in trying to avoid bringing in the names of her friends. That prejudiced the case of the person to whom the inquiry related.

Edgar Walford, a draper's assistant engaged by Messrs. Norman, Redding, and Co., Old Compton-street, Soho, said that he was in Regent-street on June 28, and saw a constable come hurriedly along and arrest Miss Cass. He saw her walk along for about 40 yards before she was arrested. He did not see any other woman accompanying her. He did not see her speak to anybody at the moment of the arrest, nor did he see anybody slip away from her.
By the Judge: She was arrested opposite the second window at Peter Robinson's establishment.
Cross-examined: I did not hear a word spoken to Miss Cass, although I was quite close. I did not hear a word from beginning to end. There was no great crowd at the corner.

Detective-serjeant Benjamin Morgan said: I was at Tottenham-court-road police-station when Miss Cass was brought in. I was sitting reading. The first thing I heard was a commotion, and, on looking round, I saw Miss Cass sink down as in a faint. Endacott was near her. She was assisted up, and I told a constable to bring her some water, which he did. When Serjeant Comber came in, he said to Endacott, "What is this?" Endacott replied, "Disorderly prostitute, annoying male passengers in Regent-street," or words to that effect. Comber asked, "Do you know her?" Endacott said, "'Yes; I have seen her there before." I think he said he had seen her there accosting before. He said that on that night she had taken hold of two or three gentlemen and accosted them. Something was said about another girl, but I did not hear what it was. Comber said to her, "You hear what the constable has said?" She made no reply. He asked her name and address, and she gave them. Just at that moment I left the police-station.

Serjeant William Comber said: I was acting inspector on duty at the Tottenham-court-road police-station when Miss Cass was brought in. Endacott was there. I asked him what it was. He said, "Soliciting; I saw her stop three gentlemen in Regent-street, and I arrested her when she stopped the third." I said to Miss Cass, "You hear what the constable says; what have you got to say?" She made no reply. She gave me her name and address. She was then taken into a cell. On the way she said, "Can I have bail, sir?" I said certainly. She then burst into tears, and said, "I am not the sort of girl the constable represents me to be, and if you send to Madame Bowman she will tell you that what I say is true." I asked her who Madame Bowman was, and she said "My employer, where I live." I sent Endacott to Madame Bowman, who came and bailed out Miss Cass.
By a Juryman: I thought she was sullen as she stood in the dock and did not answer me. She did not appear to be under the influence of liquor. I did not know that she had fainted.

Police-constable Hindmarsh, gaoler at Tottenham-court-road police-station, called in order that Mr. Besley might put a question, said that when water was brought to Miss Cass she said, "Thank you, I don't want water. If I do I will ask for it." I also heard her say, "That policeman has made a mistake. I have only been up that way twice."

Superintendent Draper was then called but he could not be found. He was sent for in all directions, and the judge had ordered his recognisances to be estreated, when the superintendent came in with breathless haste. It seems he had been in a coffee-shop close by. His lordship rescinded the estreaty but said he would disallow expenses. He could not understand how a man should want coffee at that hour. The evidence of Superintendent Draper was to the effect that on June 28 Endacott was patrolling Regent-street from Langham-place to the circus and the adjacent side streets.
Cross-examined by Mr. Gill: I found Endacott a diligent and trustworthy constable.
This concluded the case for the prosecution.
Mr. Besley intimated that he did not intend to call any witnesses for the defence except as to Endacott's character.

THE JUDGE'S INTERVENTION.

The Judge: If there are no more witnesses I must ask you, Mr. Solicitor-general, where your corroboration is. I cannot see that there is any. The only assignment of perjury is that wherein it is said he swore he saw her three times before in Regent-street.
The Solicitor-general submitted that there was corroboration of the evidence, for instance that given by the witness Walford. Endacott said he saw Miss Cass catch hold of two gentlemen, and one said, in her hearing, according to his evidence, "It is very hard I should be stopped." He (the Solicitor-general) submitted that there was evidence to go to the jury.
The Judge: Walford only speaks as to one period of time that he saw Miss Cass and says he continued to watch her for about 40 yards. That does not much matter. He says he did not see her speak to anyone at that time; but that does not disprove the assertion that she might have spoken to anybody previously in Regent-street. The only allegation of perjury that the jury look into is the question of whether Endacott committed perjury in saying that "he had seen Miss Cass in Regent-street three times within the last three weeks."
The Solicitor-general: Is it your lordship's ruling that there is no corroboration of the evidence given by Walford?
The Judge: Yes. None whatever. And I very much doubt whether that is material.
The Solicitor-general: You see, my lord, the statement goes on - "I have seen her there three times within the last six weeks, and, from her manner, I believe her to be a prostitute.
The Judge: That was the impression in the policeman's mind at the time, that he had seen her there. That was his impression, but in that he may have been mistaken. I think you must confine yourself to the fact as to whether Endacott committed perjury by saying that he had seen her three times previously in Regent-street. She was there once. What I mean is that the suggestion is so very obvious that I think you had better consider the matter.
The Solicitor-general, after conferring with his learned friends, said: I think, having regard to what your lordship has stated, I have come to the conclusion not to address the jury upon the residue of the charge. If the whole matter had been in your lordship's judgment sufficiently supported to justify its being put before the jury, I should have gone into the question which remains; but as the point is limited to that of Endacott seeing, or believing that he had seen Miss Cass three times in Regent-street, I quite feel the force of your lordship's observations that it might be a mistake on his part. While I regret, for some reasons, that I am obliged to take this course, yet I do not think it would be consistent with my duty to ask the jury to find a verdict upon the point which your lordship would leave to them.

Mr. Justice Stephen: You have taken the course which I should have expected from you under the circumstances, and nothing therefore remains for me to tell the jury, but that the man must be acquitted upon the whole charge; but in doing so I will make a few observations in explanation of the position in which the jury are placed. I may observe, by way of introduction, that in general there is no rule at all as to the number of witnesses required to prove a particular case. There are one or two, and only one or two, exceptions to the general rule. The case of high treason, for instance, is one in which, by Act of Parliament, it is enacted that an overt act of treason may be proved by one witness or by two witnesses. In the case of perjury there is no such statute, but although there is no statute, there is a rule which has all the effect of a statute. That rule, I believe, may be briefly expressed in these words, "If, upon a trial for perjury, the only evidence against the defendant is the statement of one witness contradicting the oath on which the perjury is assigned, and if no circumstances are proven which corroborate such witness, the defendant is entitled to be acquitted. There have been many cases in which a man has been convicted of perjury corroborated by circumstances not directly connected with it, but leading up to it. Suppose, for instance, it had been said that Endacott had admitted that he had told a lie, that would do. Or suppose you had proof that he had given evidence one way on one occasion and another way on another. Substantially, what Endacott is charged with is that he for some reason or other arrested Elizabeth Cass in an arbitrary and tyrannical when she was doing no harm whatever. He says, in substance, on oath, that he saw her accosting men on three occasions, and that he arrested her on account of what he saw. Now, what is the evidence that what he said was not true? Simply the contradiction by the witness Cass. I will not say one word on the subject of the contradiction. I will merely say that in almost every case which one has to try in a court of justice, whether civil or criminal, when any person's interests are strongly involved, we almost always get contradictions. If you were to allow the oath of a person taken before a magistrate to convict of perjury, the effect would be that in a very little time you would have all the police in London committed for perjury. In this particular case it is not my duty to give any opinion, and I shall not give any opinion, or even hint at any opinion; but I will just make one or two remarks in justice to the constable which ought to be borne in mind. In the first place, there is considerable room for mistake on the part of the constable; and what would have to be proved in order to convict of perjury is not merely mistaken apprehension but wilful perjury. It occurs to me as a possible thing that a man walking along the street, where there were many people might very well see what is alleged, and take the wrong woman, especially as she passed through a small crowd of people at the time. If there was a mistake of that kind, it would be a cruel injustice to convict the man of perjury. If mistakes were to be counted as perjury, Miss Cass had made mistakes in her evidence. But she seemed, and I am bound to say so, to give her evidence with extreme frankness, and there was no perjury, as far as I can see. She, however, showed great want of candour in not admitting the receipt of the diamond ring; but it would have been a cruel thing to snatch a verdict of perjury against her in consequence, and it would be hard to convict this man because he said something which might have been a mistake. It will be your duty to acquit the prisoner. But I will just say this: that I think the course of holding a private inquiry or an inquiry by a public authority, into the conduct of a man who is afterwards to be accused of crime such inquiry not being authorised by any statute, is a course which ought to be avoided. However, the investigation has been held, and the matter is at an end, and I must direct you under the circumstances to acquit the prisoner.

The jury then returned a formal verdict of "Not guilty," at which there was a slight attempt at applause in the gallery. Endacott, unable to control his emotion, was crying. "Let him be discharged," said the judge, and Endacott, wiping his copious tears with a pocket-handkerchief, was liberated from the dock.

The Scotland-yard authorities the same day (Tuesday) decided to reinstate Endacott at once.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, November 6, 1887, Page 4

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Opening of the Inquiry

Post by Karen on Sat 8 Jan 2011 - 5:52

Now, I will present the evidence given at the official inquiry, which was ordered by the Home Secretary, Mr. Matthews.

THE ARREST OF MISS CASS.

OFFICIAL INQUIRY THIS DAY.

This afternoon, the official inquiry into the allegations against Police-constable Endacott, in connection with the arrest of Miss Cass, was opened at Scotland-yard, in the Chief Commissioner's office. Sir Charles Warren presided, and Mr. Horace Smith, Recorder of Lincoln, gave his legal assistance in the capacity of assessor. Mr. Wontner appeared for Police-constable Endacott, and Mr. Grain, barrister, with whom was Mr. F. Abrahams, appeared for Miss Cass, Mr. J.A. Bartrum instructing Miss Cass's legal advisers. The inquiry was timed for two o'clock, but it was a quarter past, however, before Sir Charles Warren read the letter from the Home Office directing the inquiry to be held.
Sir Charles Warren then asked Miss Cass's counsel if he desired the representatives of the Press to be present.
Mr. Grain said certainly he did, if Sir Charles would permit it. He apprehended it was within the Commissioner's discretion. He certainly wished it.
The Chief Commissioner then read Madame Bowman's letter of complaint, which has already been given.
On the application of Mr. Wontner, it was stated that copies of all documents put in should be handed to him.
Sir Charles Warren said a copy of Madame Bowman's letter had already been sent to the constable.
Sir Charles Warren asked if there were any precedents as to such an inquiry to guide him.
Mr. Staples (Chief Clerk) said the only case was that of Greenfield, who was dismissed. The rule was that in the case of complaint the person complaining should go to a Magistrate
The Chief Commissioner - Has the rule always been acted on?
Mr. Staples: Yes, except in that one particular case. There had been many cases in which people complaining had been referred to the magistrates. This case has already been decided by a magistrate. There is no precedent whatever that is on all fours with this.
Mr. Grain said that where an inquiry had been made before a magistrate, then it was not proper to go before a magistrate again, but some other tribunal.
Sir Charles Warren - The first question is to explain whether the Magistrate endorsed the charge-sheet in any way signifying his disapproval of the constable's conduct. (The charge-sheet itself was before the Lord Chancellor today; but a copy was produced, and the column for any such endorsement was found to be blank.)
Inspector Wiley, who was in Court when Miss Cass was charged, was then called in. In answer to the Commissioner, he said the Magistrate made no observations to the constable, either censuring or approving his conduct.
Inspector Cuthbert, in answer to Mr. Grain, said a constable, in giving the particulars for a charge-sheet, had no right to describe a prisoner as a "common prostitute" unless he knew her of his own knowledge to be such. Supposing a constable to see a fairly respectable woman, who gave an address such as 19, Southampton-row, Bloomsbury (address Miss Cass gave), it would not be his duty to go there to inquire before incarcerating her. It was the usual course to inquire where there was any amount of doubt at all.
Sir Charles Warren - Will you ask if that was done?
Inspector Cuthbert said he did not know. That would be a question for the sergeant to answer.
Mr. Grain said from his instructions it was not done.
By Mr. Wontner - The charge-sheet form produced was one supplied to the police. Whoever was in charge at the station would fill in the sheet, and the constable laying the information would have nothing to do with the sheet except to sign it when it was filled in.
Inspector Wiley, recalled, said the caution administered to Miss Cass was, as nearly as possible, similar to that reported in the newspapers. In the newspapers the words "Don't stop gentlemen" were used, whereas the Magistrate said, "Don't accost gentlemen."
The Commissioner said the next thing he wished to know was in what case a woman could be convicted on the evidence of a constable alone.
Inspector Cuthbert said the custom in Metropolitan Courts was for women to be so convicted, and many hundreds had been convicted on the evidence of a constable.
The Commissioner (to Mr. Staples) - Do you know of any letter addressed to the Magistrates on this point?
Mr. Staples - There was one in 1883, which is referred to in subsequent letters. It has gone off to the Lord Chancellor.
Other correspondence was then read, in the course of which was the following letter from Sir Charles Warren to Sir James Ingham, dated October 22, 1886:

"Sir, - I shall be much obliged if you will bring the question as to evidence against prostitutes for soliciting before the quarterly meeting of the Metropolitan Magistrates on 25th inst. On the 31st of March, 1883, you informed the Commissioners of Police that the Magistrates were almost unanimous that the evidence of the constable alone would be sufficient when the person solicited shows by his conduct in the presence of the constable that he is annoyed by the solicitation. Since then there have been seven cases, which lead me to suppose that there is no such unanimity of opinion amongst the Magistrates at the present time; and as it appears that some think that, according to 2 and 3 Vict., cap. 47, the annoyance should be proved by the person annoyed, the constable was quite uncertain how to act, and placed in a most unfair and untenable position. Whilst I am quite aware that persons will not, as a general rule, come forward to give evidence in such matters, and that if the constables were to refrain from bringing cases forward on their own unsupported testimony, great disorder would be likely to arise, especially in the D Division; still I feel that it is a question between the prospect of local disorder, and the general efficiency of the police force. The present system, and the uncertainties connected with it, not only pave the way to the gravest charges being made against the police for blackmailing prostitutes, but also subject many to very grave injustice, disheartened them for their work, and injure the efficiency of the police generally. I shall be glad if the Magistrates can assist the Commissioner of Police by arranging for some common action in this matter, in order to obviate present difficulties; and if in uncertain cases they will refrain from calling public attention to police-constables, and if in cases where they consider the constable has acted wrongly they will endorse the charge-sheet, so that the Commissioner may know where the error lies."

Sir James Ingham, in reply, said -

"The suggestion made by the writer in the Whitehall Review (referring to an extract in which the necessity of corroborative evidence was suggested) obtained no support. There could be no valid reason why more cogent evidence should be required against a prostitute than against a murderer or other criminal. The value of evidence must be tested by common sense and experience. No general rule applicable to all cases can be laid down. The Magistrates suggest that the Inspector who attends the Court should make a report to the Commissioner upon cases touching the conduct of the police. Thereupon the Commissioner may, if he think the matter of sufficient importance apply to the Magistrate for permission to inspect the notes. If any serious mistake appears to have occurred, application may be made through me for an explanation."

Serjeant Comber said that on the charge being made against Miss Cass he sent Endacott to get bail from the address she gave. He described Miss Cass's conduct when being charged as "sullen," and on the charge-sheet he described her as of imperfect education.
Mr. Wontner said he preferred his questions to stand over for the present, as he was not yet thoroughly instructed, and he did not care to ask questions in the dark.
The Court accordingly adjourned till tomorrow morning.

Source: The Echo, Monday July 11, 1887, Page 3


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Re: Police Constable Endacott

Post by Karen on Sat 8 Jan 2011 - 14:19

THE REGENT-STREET ARREST.
TODAY'S PROCEEDINGS.

The inquiry at Scotland-yard into the circumstances of the arrest in Regent-street of Miss Cass, and into the conduct of Police-constable Endacott in connection therewith, was resumed this morning at Scotland-yard, in the Chief Commissioner's office. Sir Charles Warren was again assisted by Mr. Horace Smith, the Recorder of Lincoln, in the capacity of legal assessor, and the same counsel and solicitors as yesterday were engaged.
Sir Charles Warren said he thought it advisable in the first place to see what were the instructions of constables with regard to apprehensions.
Mr. Staples, the Chief Clerk, read an extract from an order issued in August, 1886, in which constables were authorised to arrest women on witnessing acts of solicitation.
The Commissioner then said he should like the police order about bail read, as the matter of bail was mentioned yesterday.
Mr. Staples read this order, which laid it down that except in cases of felony or grave misdemeanour, or where a breach of the peace was anticipated, bail should as a rule be taken; but when the address of the arrested person was known, and the offence was not of a serious character, personal recognisances only should be required; confining in cells should be avoided as much as possible.
Sir Charles Warren then desired to know what course the legal gentlemen thought of taking.
Mr. Wontner said the first point was to ascertain what they were there for, and he confessed he did not quite understand. He did not quite see what was to be the result of this inquiry. Representing the constable, he must say that P.C. Endacott had made a statement on oath, and what he had said, if it was untrue, he was responsible for, criminally responsible. He could not see how they could mend matters by examining persons who were not under the obligation of oath, and therefore it was that he did not see what they were to do. If the constable was called upon to give evidence, he should have to exercise his discretion as to what advice he should give him; but this inquiry taking the form of an investigation into the conduct of the constable by his superior officer, he should feel inclined to throw any responsibility which might accrue on the Commissioner rather than on the constable. At the same time, this was not an inquiry into the character of Miss Cass and her employer. He did not know how far, if he had the materials, he should be allowed to examine Miss Cass respecting her past character. At the present moment Miss Cass figured before the public as a young lady who was seriously injured. That might be a very proper character for her to be presented in, and he, instructed as he was only yesterday afternoon, was not in a position to say anything to the contrary. But, before he hazarded any action on the part of the constable, he should, in order that he might not involve the constable in any false step, desire opportunity for making further inquiries. He should like to know if the constable was on his trial to meet any particular charge, or whether this was a roving Commission to satisfy an angry public, to see whether anything could be brought out to put an end to the feelings which might, or might not, be well founded.
Mr. Grain said he took it that they were there practically on an inquiry ordered by the Government, and they desired that the whole matter should be brought out to the best of their ability. He proposed to tender the statements of Miss Cass and Madame Bowman, and then to call Endacott and other witnesses, in order that the Court might put such questions as was thought fit, and that then he might be permitted to ask such questions as he thought fit.
Sir Charles Warren said the inquiry was ordered by the Home Secretary into the whole matter. With regard to Endacott, he might say at once that he would get no orders from him (Sir Charles), as his superior officer, and that, so far as he was concerned, Endacott was an entirely free agent in this matter.
Mr. Wontner suggested that after the adjournment today, the inquiry should be deferred for a week in order that he might institute inquiries, and prepare his questions.
Mr. Horace Smith said he thought this was a very proper request.
Sergeant Combar, who took the charge when Miss Cass was brought into the station by Endacott, was then recalled. Examined by Mr. Grain, he said he did not hear several of the statements which Miss Cass alleged she made when charged, and he did not hear Endacott say in reply to those statements, "Don't tell lies." He was positive that Miss Cass said, "Can I have bail?" Then it was that she burst into tears. When Mrs. Bowman came she said the policeman had made a mistake, but he did not hear her add, "And a very cruel mistake, too!" He could not say she did not say that, only that he did not hear it.
By Mr. Wontner - Witness had known Endacott for the last five years, and knew that for some time past he had been specially on duty to prevent solicitation. He had made a great number of charges against women, all of which had been sent before the Magistrates. The garb of some prostitutes did not differ from that of respectable persons. Some dressed gaudily and others dressed neatly, some dressed like respectable women and some were "mere butterflies." There was nothing in the garb of Miss Cass which could lead him to believe the constable's charge. When the constable made the charge Miss Cass could hear it, but she made no reply. When entered, the charge was read over to her, and witness asked her what she had to say, but she never answered at all. She was some five minutes in the dock. Witness was quite clear that the suggestion as to bail emanated from Miss Cass and not from witness. It was unusual to send the same constable who had brought in a prisoner to go and get bail, but, having a young and inexperienced constable on reserve at the time, witness adopted the unusual practice of sending Endacott to get Miss Cass's bail. It was not an unusual thing for the friends of people who were locked up to declare the innocence of the accused, and if the police discharged all people about whom such disclaimers were made, the cells would probably always be empty. Witness was not convinced when Madame Bowman declared the girl's innocence; any one might happen to make a mistake. Miss Cass's case did not, so far as he could see, differ from the hundreds of other similar cases he had to deal with.

MISS CASS CALLED.

Miss Cass was then called by Mr. Grain, and accommodated with a seat. She is a young lady with her hair cut short behind, and was dressed in black, her hat being relieved with a bit of white ribbon. In answer to counsel she said: "I have been in several employments as a dressmaker, with persons mostly near Scotland. I answered an advertisement of Madame Bowman's about Whit-Tuesday, and went to see her at 19, Southampton-row. I gave her full particulars in answer to her inquiries, and I went into her service as forewoman on 7th June. In addition to my weekly salary of 10s. I had my board and lodging. Mrs. Bowman has a niece, and I slept with her. My business duties ended at about eight, but I was often in the workroom after that. I was the only hand who lived in the house. Prior to going to Mrs. Bowman's I had been staying with Mr. and Mrs. Tompkins, at Manor-park, Forest-gate, having previously been in the employ of Mr. Tompkins, who had a millinery business at Stockton. I have no female acquaintances in London at all, except Mrs. Tomkins and her friend, Mrs. Bowman, her niece, and the shop hands. I had never been to London before, and was not in the least acquainted with London streets. I used to spend my time from Saturday to Monday at Manor Park, and that was with the full knowledge and permission of Madame Bowman. Prior to the 28th June, I had never been alone on any single occasion anywhere near Regent-street, but I was once one afternoon in Regent-street with Mrs. Tomkins. Mr. and Mrs. Tompkins are persons of high respectability. I have never spoken to any gentleman in Regent-street or any other street, for I did not know one; nor had I on the 28th June, or prior to it, walked in Regent-street with another young woman. On the night of the 28th June I finished work at about half-past eight, and Madame then gave me leave to go out. I wanted to go and get some gloves, but was not going to any particular shop. Leaving Southampton-row, I passed the British Museum, and came out into Tottenham-court-road, subsequently coming to where four roads met, Jay's being on the opposite corner to where I stood. In Regent-street, near Mr. Peter Robinson's establishment, a policeman said to me, "I want you." I said "What?" He said, "I want you." I said, "I think you have made a mistake." He said, "Oh no! I have been watching you some time - you and the other girl." He then took me along to Tottenham-court-road Police Station. I think he said (saying on the way), "You have been stopping gentlemen, and one complained to me just now." I said, "I have not spoken to one gentleman," and the policeman said, "Oh, yes, you have, and the other girl has slipped away, or I should have had her as well." I again said he had made a mistake, but he said, "Oh, no, I have not." I was dressed exactly the same then as I am now. I told him over and over again he had made a mistake. When I got to the police-station I was put into a kind of a dock, behind some iron rails. Endacott spoke to another policeman there, and I knew they were talking about me because they kept looking at me. I said to the other policeman, "He has made a mistake"; and I was told by him to wait till the inspector came, and not to put myself about, because it would be all right. Endacott stared at me and said, "You don't know me, do you?" and I replied, "No; that I don't", to which he answered; "But I know you, though, and have done for some time." I told the other policeman that I had never been out in London at night before, and Endacott said, "Don't tell lies." When the sergeant came I asked them to send for Madame Bowman. I was crying when I was put into the cell. I remained there about fifty minutes. At about eleven o'clock I was brought back into the charge-room, where I saw Madame, who complained of the way in which Endacott had spoken to her. All that had been said about my occupation was when the constable to whom Endacott spoke asked what Madame Bowman was. I replied, "A dressmaker," and he said "Do you live with her?" to which I replied, "Yes." The sergeant said to both me and Mrs. Bowman, "You will have to be at the police-court in the morning," and we then left. In the morning Endacott gave his evidence, and the Magistrate then asked if I had anything to say. I said the policeman had made a mistake, as he said he had seen me for weeks, and I had never been out before. Madame Bowman was called into the same box into which the policeman had been, but she was not sworn. She said I was respectable, and had not been out for the purpose which the constable had stated. The Magistrate said, "But she was last night," and Madame Bowman said, "But not for that purpose." Mr. Newton said, "But I say she was," and Madame said, "I beg your pardon." "Don't beg my pardon," Mr. Newton said; "stand down." Then, turning to me, the Magistrate said, "If you are a respectable girl, as you say you are, don't walk about Regent-street at night, stopping men, or if you do after this warning you will either have to pay a fine or go to prison. Now go away."
Mr. Wontner did not cross-examine Miss Cass, deferring his questions for the present.

MADAME BOWMAN'S EVIDENCE.

Madame Bowman was the next witness. She said Miss Cass was exceptionally quiet, but very diligent in her work, and trustworthy. Up to Coronation Day, the 28th of June, Miss Cass never went out after working hours, except to the Post-office, which was just around the corner. When the policeman came about her, witness thought she had been run over, or had suffered some other accident. The man told her that if she wanted Miss Cass she could find her in Tottenham-court-road Police-station, and she had better go and fetch her and bail her out. She accordingly went, and also accompanied Miss Cass to the Police-court the next morning. She corroborated Miss Cass's statement as to what then occurred. She added that she should certainly have been sworn if asked, and would have told the Magistrate what she had now told this Court.
Mr. Wontner also deferred cross-examining this witness.

After an adjournment,
Sergeant Morgan, in the Detective Force, said he was at the station when Miss Cass was brought in by Endacott, and he was in plain clothes then as now. He was reading at the time, but on looking up saw that the girl had, for some reason or other, fallen down on to the mat. She was picked up by two officers, and she was allowed to be seated. It was the work of an instant. At witness's suggestion some water was fetched for her, and she recovered immediately. In answer to the sergeant, Endacott said he saw the girl catch hold of two or three gentlemen, and heard her solicit prostitution. The sergeant said, "Do you know her?" and Endacott said, "Yes, I have seen her walking Regent-street for some time." Sergeant Comber then said, "You hear what the constable has said?" and although there could be no doubt she heard what was said, she made no reply.
By Mr. Wontner - Witness was often in the station, as he was understood to call in to see if he was wanted when he passed by. There was nothing unusual in women sinking down like Miss Cass when charged.
Mr. Grain asked for a suggestion from the Court as to who was to call Endacott, or what was to be done about him.
Mr. Horace Smith said [Sir Charles Warren had already stated that he was entirely free to do as he chose. Endacott might come if he liked, but was under no compulsion.]
Mr. Grain said he thought, then, he should take upon himself to call Endacott later on.
Police-constable Hindmarsh, the constable who was in the station when Miss Cass was brought in, and to whom Endacott spoke, said Miss Cass said when she was brought in, "That constable has made a mistake this time. I have only been that way twice." He was quite sure she said "this time." Witness was not in the charge-room when the charge was entered against Miss Cass.
Mr. Grain - Well, you can't tell us much about it then.
Police-constable Bareham said he came into the station while Miss Cass was being charged. She answered the questions as to her name and address, but when asked what her occupation was, she made no answer. He heard her while in the cell-passage say the policeman had made a mistake. He was present when Madame Bowman came, and he heard her say nothing except that she had come to bail Miss Cass out.
By Mr. Wontner - This case did not strike witness as anything beyond the ordinary cases, of which there were sometimes dozens in the course of a night.
Inspector Wyborne, recalled, said he could not offhand say what constables were assisting Endacott in the neighbourhood of his beat; but it could be ascertained. Endacott had been on this particular beat about six weeks prior to the 28th June.
By Mr. Wontner - Solicitation in Regent-street was a very common thing, and was a nuisance of which loud complaints were made by residents in the vicinity and by pedestrians. People would complain, but would not come to Court, and if they had to trust to the evidence of private individuals there would practically be no charges at all. Endacott had been in the force twelve years, and bore the character of a reliable and trustworthy man. He was married, and had three or four children. He was a zealous officer, and many of the charges he brought were of this description. Endacott would know most of the habitual walkers, who generally cleared out when he went on duty. A woman who knew her business would thus avoid arrest by turning off into a side street, but a woman new to this part, not knowing the constable, would be more likely to be less careful about soliciting in his sight. Witness would thoroughly rely on Endacott's truthfulness and accuracy.
Miss Cass, recalled at Mr. Grain's request, denied seriatim the statements made by Endacott in evidence before Mr. Newton.
Mr. Wontner said if the adjournment was made for ten days, instead of a week, he did not imagine any harm or wrong could be done to anybody by the extra two or three days. There were reasons why it should be a little longer than the week. He did not want to make any insinuations he could not fully support.
Mr. Grain did not oppose the application, and the inquiry was accordingly adjourned till the 21st instant.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday July 12, 1887, Page 3

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Re: Police Constable Endacott

Post by Karen on Sat 8 Jan 2011 - 14:35

THE ARREST OF MISS CASS.

OFFICIAL INQUIRY.

At Scotland-yard, on Monday, Sir Charles Warren, Commissioner of Police for the metropolis, commenced the inquiry promised by the Government into the conduct of Police-constable Endacott in arresting Miss Elizabeth Cass, milliner, 19, Southampton-row, Bloomsbury, in Regent-street, about 10 o'clock on June 28, taking her to a police-station, describing her as a "common prostitute," bringing her up before Mr. Newton, at the Marlborough-street police-court next morning, swearing that he had known her as a Regent-street "walker" for six weeks, and had seen her that night accost three gentlemen, one of whom complained to him about it.
Sir Charles Warren was assisted by Mr. Horace Smith, recorder of Lincoln, as legal assessor; Mr. Staples, chief clerk, and Superintendent Cutbush were also in attendance. Mr. Grain and Mr. F.M. Abrahams, instructed by Mr. Bartrum, represented Miss Cass and Madame Bowman; and Mr. St. John Wontner appeared for Police-constable Endacott. The witnesses were not examined on oath.
Inspector Wylie, in reply to Sir C. Warren, said he was in court when the case was heard, and the magistrate found no fault with the constable.
Mr. Cutbush, in reply to Mr. Grain, said that a constable had no right to search a person taken up on such a charge as that on which Endacott arrested Miss Cass. If a woman under such circumstances protested that she was respectable, and gave her address, it was no part of the duty of the constable to go and make inquiries at the address before he incarcerated her. If there was any doubt at all it would be the duty of those who took the charge to make inquiries. He believed that was not done.
Mr. Superintendent Draper stated that no person was sent to 19, Southampton-row, to inquire whether Miss Cass's story that she lived there was true. His information, however, was only second-hand, as the serjeant in charge was before the Lord Chancellor.
Inspector Wylie said that the magistrate administered a caution to Miss Cass, and said, "Go away, and don't come here again," or words to that effect.
Mr. Grain said the words reported in the papers were: "Now, just take my advice. If you are a respectable girl, as you say you are, do not walk Regent-street and stop gentlemen at 10 o'clock at night. If you do, you will be fined or sent to prison after this caution I have given you."
Sir Charles Warren said the next point was the police action in bringing a charge against a woman on the testimony of one man.
Superintendent Cutbush: The custom is for the evidence of the constable to be accepted, and many hundreds are convicted on the testimony of the constable.
Serjeant William Comber, 32 D, who was acting-inspector on the 28th ult., and took the charge, was then examined by Mr. Grain.
Did you send anybody to inquire as whether Miss Cass gave a true address? - I sent for her bail at the address given, after the charge was taken.
Whom did you send? - Endacott.
Did Madame Bowman come immediately? - Yes.
What did she tell you, and who was there? - There was Miss Cass, myself, and Madame Bowman. She told me that Miss Cass was a respectable girl in her employment, and that she would attend the police-court in the morning and explain it.
Miss Cass was in a cell by herself when Madame Bowman came. Directly Miss Cass was let out of the cell Madame Bowman said, "What gentleman have you been speaking to?" The girl replied, "No one has spoken to me, and I have spoken to no one until the policeman took hold of my arm." Witness asked Madame Bowman if she was prepared to bail the girl out, and she replied that she was. Witness said, "I shall require a bail of 2 pounds," and Madame Bowman said, "Twenty, if you like." Miss Cass looked sullen in the dock, and was not weeping, nor did she seem agitated. Witness made no difference in his treatment of an old and well-known offender and a person against whom nothing was known before. The charged was framed entirely on the evidence of the constable who made the arrest. No inquiries were made as to the appearance of the gentlemen who, in this or any similar case, were alleged to be stopped. Miss Cass presented a respectable appearance, but not more so than in the case of many other unfortunates. When Endacott had given his evidence, witness turned to the girl and observed, "You have heard what he has said, what have you to say?" She made no reply. He understood Endacott to say that he had seen Miss Cass several times during the previous six weeks soliciting gentlemen. Witness did not ask the constable why, if this were the case, he had not brought her in before. It was his duty when in charge of a case to inform the magistrate if there were any witnesses in attendance on behalf of an accused party who was not professionally represented.
On Tuesday the Commissioner said it was desirable to show what instructions the constables had with regard to arrests in general. Mr. Staples, the chief clerk, read an order of August last in which it was laid down that a constable had the inherent right of apprehending any person who had committed any offence without a warrant, when it was probable that the offender might escape in the event of not being arrested.
The police order with regard to bail enjoined that in the case of a person whose address was known, and who was charged with only a small offence, the person arrested should not be placed in the cells, except in certain cases.
In the course of a discussion between Sir Charles Warren and the legal gentlemen, Mr. St. John Wontner said he should take time to consider whether he should call Constable Endacott. He did not wish to call him until he had an opportunity of considering all the circumstances.
The Chief Commissioner said the inquiry was by order of the Home Secretary. Endacott would get no orders from him (Sir C. Warren), as his superior officer, or any instructions from him. Endacott was an entirely free agent in the matter.
Serjeant Comber, 32 D, was then recalled, and said that Constable Endacott had been selected on account of his trustworthiness for the particular duty of dealing with loose women.
Miss Elizabeth Cass stated that she was 24 years of age, and had lived with her parents at Stockton. She had been employed by a number of persons as a dressmaker near Stockton. On Whit Tuesday she had answered an advertisement inserted by Mdme. Bowman. She was engaged by that lady, who paid her 10s. a week and her board and lodging. Before being employed by Mrs. Bowman she had stayed at Manor-park for three weeks with Mr. and Mrs. Tompkins, in whose employ she had been at Middlesbrough. She had not been in London before that time. Prior to June 28 she had been in Regent-street with Mrs. Tompkins upon one afternoon, but had never been alone. She had never spoken to any gentleman in the street, and "did not know anybody." She had never walked about the street with another young girl. On the night of June 28, she went out for the purpose of getting some gloves, but was not going to any particular shop. When in Regent-street, near Robinson's, the policeman touched her on the arm, and said he had been watching her for some time - "her and another girl," She said he had made a mistake, but he said he had been watching her for a few weeks. He afterwards took her to Tottenham-court-road police-station. Endacott told her that he wished he had got hold of the other girl, who, he said, was worse than she was. She repeated that there was no girl with her, and that he had made a mistake. He took hold of her arm, although she told him she would walk by herself. She was taken to the station, and charged. Endacott during these proceedings told her once or twice "not to tell lies." She asked the inspector not to put her in the cell, but he said, "You must go in." She pushed the door open, as the officer was closing it, and said, "You will send for Mrs. Bowman at once?" At 11 o'clock she was taken out of the cell into the charge room, where she saw Mrs. Bowman, who asked her, "What man she had been speaking to." The witness replied that she had spoken to no one. She attended the police-court on the following morning, and after the police-constable had given his evidence, Mr. Newton, the magistrate, did not ask her if she had questions to put to the constable. He asked, "What have you to say?" and she replied that the constable had made a mistake. Miss Cass continued: A policeman at the station had previously asked me what Madame Bowman was, and whether I lived with her, and I told him. Comber asked me whether I could read and write, but not how I got my living. The next morning I attended at the police-court and had to enter the dock. Endacott went into the box and gave his evidence to Mr. Newton, the magistrate. Mr. Newton asked me what I had to say.
Did you make any answer? - I said they had made a mistake; that it was untrue that I had been seen in the streets for weeks, and that I had never been out alone before. Mr. Newton asked me what I did for a living, and I said I was a dressmaker, and told him where.
And then? - Mr. Newton said, "Who is Madame Bowman? Let her come forward." She was not sworn. Mr. Newton asked what she knew of me, and Madame Bowman said I was her forewoman, and was a respectable young woman. Mr. Newton said I was out in Regent-street on the previous night, and Madame Bowman replied, "Yes, but for no bad purpose." Mr. Newton retorted, "I say she was." Madame Bowman said, "I beg your pardon," and he replied, "Don't beg my pardon; stand down." Addressing me then, Mr. Newton said, "If you are a respectable girl, as you say you are, don't walk Regent-street at night and stop gentlemen; or if you do, after the warning I have given you, you will be fined or sent to prison." I then stood down.
The cross-examination of the witness was reserved.
Mrs. Bowman, examined by Mr. Grain, said she was a dressmaker, living at 19, Southampton-row. She had been there about seven years. Before engaging Miss Cass she made every inquiry about her character, and was perfectly satisfied with the result. The young lady had her meals with the family, and slept with witness's niece. She was the only one of the employees who lived in the house. Miss Cass was exceptionally quiet, and very diligent and trustworthy. She was the quietest young lady she had ever had in the house. She went with witness's permission on two or three occasions to visit her friends the Tompkins, at Manor-park, from Saturday to Monday. From the time she entered the service up to June 28th Miss Cass never went out alone after working hours, except to go to the post-office round the corner.
On June 28 did she ask your permission to go out? - Yes; she said she wanted to make a few purchases. That was about a quarter to nine. She had no acquaintance with the London streets. I was downstairs reading when the servant came and told me that a policeman wanted to see me about Miss Cass. I said at once, "She must be run over." I went and saw the constable, and he said, "You know Miss Cass. She is your lodger?" I said, "I beg your pardon; I do not take in lodgers. Where is she?" He said she was at Tottenham-court road station, charged with soliciting gentlemen for prostitution. I replied, "You have made a great mistake; she is so different." He said, "No; I have watched her for weeks." I told him that Miss Cass had never been out alone before, and he said, "If you want her you had better go to the station," and he left. I went to the station and saw Serjeant Comber, who was very civil. Someone went and opened the cell door and brought Miss Cass. I said to her, "What are you doing here?" She said, "I don't know, Madame. I was taken by the arm and brought here." I asked her where the other girl was that the policeman spoke of, and she said she had been with no girl. Then I said, "Have you spoken to gentlemen? and she replied that she had not, nor had any gentleman spoken to her. The serjeant spoke to me about bail, and I gave my name. I had no money, but I said when told that the bail was 2 pounds, that I would give 20 pounds if necessary. I attended the court in the morning, and being rather excited at the policeman's statement, I said, "Oh, dear!" Mr. Newton said, "Who is that woman?" My son-in-law said, "It is Madame Bowman." I then went into the box, and Mr. Newton asked me what I knew of Miss Cass. I told him that she was quiet and respectable; and he said, "She was in Regent-street." I replied, "But not for any bad purpose." He said, "I say she was." I replied, "I beg your pardon." He said, "Don't beg my pardon. Stand down." I said, "Stand where, sir?" not knowing exactly what he meant. Then, turning to the girl, Mr. Newton made those observations which she has repeated. I was not then sworn, and to the best of my recollection the magistrate did not even ask my name or address. I went to the court to give evidence, and was quite ready to be sworn.
Police-serjeant Morgan said he was in the detective force. He was at the police-station on the night of the 28th June, when Miss Cass was brought in by Police-constable Endacott. When she was brought in she was put into the dock. Almost immediately, while he was reading, he heard somebody moan, and saw Miss Cass on the mat. She had fallen down, from some reason or other, and was picked up by two constables and allowed to sit. He said to one of them, "Fetch her some water," and it was brought and put on the table by her, and she recovered at once. Serjeant Comber came in a few minutes afterwards, and Miss Cass was put in the dock then. She asked him if he would let someone know, and he said he would.
Police-constable Hindmarsh, examined by Mr. Grain, said he was on duty on the 28th of June at Tottenham-court-road station, and was present when Miss Cass was brought in. She said to him, after being placed in the dock, "That policeman has made a mistake this time. I've only been up that road twice." That was all she said to me or in my hearing. He did not see her fall on the floor, but she leaned against the dock, and he offered her a chair, which she accepted.
Police-constable Bareham said he was on duty in the station when Miss Cass was brought in. Serjeant Comber asked her when she was in the dock what her occupation was. That he said most deliberately. Miss Cass made no answer. He did not hear her ask how long she would have to stay there.
Did you hear her say more than once, "Are you aware ----?" - No, I did not.
Mr. Grain: Listen. Did you hear her say that the constable had made a mistake? - No.
Did Endacott say he knew her? - Yes.
Inspector Wyborne said that on the 28th of June Endacott was on what was called patrol duty. There were other constables in Regent-street, and it would be their duty if they saw cases of solicitation to take the women into custody. Endacott's beat was from Regent-circus to the church in Langham-place. He did not hear Endacott say in court that there was a witness for the defence. Nothing was said about the matter. Endacott had been on this particular beat for about six weeks. He had been on it before, however, some time previously. There had been an interval of a month between the first and second time of his being on his beat.
By Mr. Wontner: People would complain of solicitation, but they would not attend the court. If they had to depend upon outside evidence there would be very few charges preferred at all, because people did not care to come forward. Endacott was a married man, with three or four children, and had always borne a good character during his 12 years' service in the force. He might bring in three or four charges a week of this description. Habitual frequenters of the street ran less risk of being arrested than new ones, as they would know the constable, and not solicit in his presence. Witness expected the vicinity to be clear half an hour after Endacott had gone on duty. The regular street-walker stood a less chance of being arrested than one unknown, because these women turned down side streets when they saw the officer. He was aware that Endacott had been commended on several occasions for his zeal. He had never known Endacott bring a charge of this character before without its being sustained. He was a man upon whose accuracy and truthfulness he could thoroughly rely.
Miss Cass was recalled by Mr. Grain, who read to her extracts of the policeman's evidence from the depositions as to her being in company with another woman in Regent-street on the night in question, and catching hold of gentlemen, one of whom said, "It is very hard I should be stopped; it is the third time I have been stopped in this street." To each of these statements she gave an emphatic denial, adding that no one complained or spoke to her or the constable when he took hold of her arm.
At this stage the inquiry was adjourned to Thursday, the 21st inst., at ten o'clock.

A meeting will be held in Hyde-park, at 4 p.m. on Sunday, for the purpose of making public the unjust convictions of cabdrivers by London magistrates on the uncorroborated evidence of police-constables, with a view to assisting Sir C. Warren, the Chief Commissioner, in framing the new police regulations.

THE STATE OF REGENT-STREET.

The adjourned meeting of West-end tradesmen, to protest against the disorder prevalent in Regent-street and its vicinity, was held on Thursday afternoon in the Banqueting-room, St. James's hall, the Earl of Wemyss and March presiding. Among those present were Lord Dorchester, Mr. Tom Jay, and Mr. Bonthron (chairman of the St. James's vestry). A number of letters of regret at inability to attend were read. Lord Derby wrote wishing every success in the endeavours "to put an end to, or at least diminish, the great and apparently increasing evil."
Mr. Willey moved a resolution rejoicing that an inquiry was being held into the action and conduct of the police authorities in connection with the recent arrest of Miss Cass, and trusted that the result of the inquiry would be improved administration, and a more orderly state of things in the thoroughfares of the West-end than, unhappily, at present existed.
Mr. Bonthron seconded the motion, which was supported by Mr. Drew and carried.
Mr. Whiskard, manager of the Alliance bank, proposed the appointment of a committee to watch the inquiry which was now going on.
Mr. Westropp seconded.
Mr. Charles Mitchell said that with regard to blackmailing by the police - if it were true - it arose from the present law with regard to these women not being stringent enough. In fact, it did not give the police sufficient power (cheers and hisses).
Mr. Leslie thought that the root of the evil laid in the existence of houses which harboured these women.
Mrs. Burdett trusted that the police would not be allowed to hold the power they now possess with regard to these women, for, if they were, the remedy would be worse than the disease.
The resolution was carried. On the motion of Dr. Oxham, a vote of thanks to Lord Wemyss for presiding was passed.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, July 17, 1887, Page 8

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Re: Police Constable Endacott

Post by Karen on Sat 8 Jan 2011 - 16:52

THE REGENT-STREET ARREST.

OFFICIAL INQUIRY.
TODAY'S PROCEEDINGS.

The inquiry at Scotland-yard into the circumstances of the arrest in Regent-street of Miss Cass, and into the conduct of Police-constable Endacott in connection therewith, was resumed this morning at Scotland-yard, in the Chief Commissioner's office. Sir Charles Warren was again assisted by Mr. Horace Smith, the Recorder of Lincoln, in the capacity of legal assessor; Mr. Wontner appeared for Police-constable Endacott, and Mr. Grain, barrister, with whom was Mr. F. Abrahams, appeared for Miss Cass, Mr. J.A. Bartrum instructing Miss Cass's legal advisers.

THE CONDUCT OF THE CASE.

The inquiry commenced a little later than the time arranged (half-past ten), Mr. Grain and Mr. Wontner being engaged in consultation for five or six minutes.
Sir Charles Warren asked if any conclusion had been come to as regards the course to be pursued.
Mr. Wontner said he supposed there was no objection to his stating, as the Commissioner was aware, that certain correspondence had passed between him and the Commissioner as to the course to be pursued. The constable originally came to him with the authority of his superiors, and he (Mr. Wontner) therefore applied to the Commissioner for pecuniary and material assistance in order that the necessary inquiries should be made. His view was this. If it should turn out that Miss Cass was a perfectly respectable girl, he should then, in all probability, be in a position to say that, having regard to her character, the probabilities were that the constable was under some strange error. He should, in that way, have removed Miss Cass from all sort of imputation. Unfortunately, the Home Secretary, in directing this inquiry seemed to have given instructions to the Commissioner which had necessitated his replying to his request for assistance by an absolute refusal to give him any. That refusal had tied his hands in such a way that the constable being a person without any means for making inquiries himself without assistance, he (Mr. Wontner) was not today at all in a position to carry into effect the views he had all along entertained as to the proper way of dealing with this case; and, under those circumstances, inasmuch as he could not approach the inquiry into the matter in the full and complete way he should wish, he took his stand on the case as it was. The constable, in the course of his duty, had made a charge against Miss Cass. Under the Act of Parliament, he was a competent and sufficient witness against Miss Cass upon the charge made. That charge had been heard in the regular way before a Magistrate, who had expressed no disbelief in the evidence given by the constable; but, on the contrary, had stated that, in his belief, Miss Cass was acting as the constable swore she acted on the night in question. That evidence had been given on oath, and if it was not true it was competent for Miss Cass, or those acting with her, to impugn that evidence by a prosecution for perjury, and if they chose to impugn the evidence in that way, he should be prepared at the proper moment to take such action on behalf of the constable to justify his conduct as might be necessary under the circumstances. Until such action was taken he declined to put the constable forward, and he declined to take any strong course to justify his conduct, because it seemed to him that to do so, and, in fact, to continue this inquiry, was simply to continue a farce.
Mr. Grain suggested that his friend ought not to speak in that way of the inquiry.
Sir Charles Warren said he took it that that was only an expression of Mr. Wontner's.
Mr. Wontner said that what he objected to was that this inquiry could not lead to anything. If he called the constable, Endacott could only repeat what he had already sworn to.
Mr. Horace Smith pointed out that the inquiry might still go on if Mr, Wontner withdrew.
Mr. Wontner intimated that he quite understood that, but the constable had already given evidence on oath, and at present nothing had been brought to his knowledge which caused him to alter his belief of what occurred on the night in question. To call Endacott was merely to ask him to state without the obligation of an oath what he had already sworn to. However, Endacott was in attendance, and Mr. Grain might call him if he chose.
Mr, Grain said that inquiries had been made, and most searching inquiries, too, by the police at Stockton into Miss Cass's antecedents. Those inquiries had given Miss Cass and her friends a great deal of pain, though he did not for a minute suggest that they were not justified. He should recall Miss Cass to ask her upon one or two matters with which he was not acquainted at the last inquiry, and then leave the inquiry in the Commissioner's hands.
Sir Charles Warren, who had misunderstood Mr. Grain to say that the Scotland-yard police had been inquiring into Miss Cass's antecedents instead of the Stockton police, said the Scotland-yard police had made no inquiries whatever.
Mr. Wontner said he could go farther than that, and say that the application had been made to Scotland-yard for assistance; it had been positively refused, and the refusal had been carried to such length that, when inquiries were sought to be made of another constable, access to that constable was refused.

MISS CASS RECALLED.

Miss Cass, recalled, in answer to Mr. Grain, said: - Before coming up to London I was engaged to be married to William Thomas Langley, in the employment of a large firm of brass finishers. I am still engaged to him, and he is here today.

MISS CASS CROSS-EXAMINED.

Cross-examined by Mr. Wontner - I know a gentleman named Settle at Shoolbred's. I was not going to see him that night. I went out with the idea of seeing the illuminations, and also for a walk. I had not communicated with Mr. Atherley Jones or Mr. Dodd. I knew Mr. Dodd at Stockton. My father is a handmaster at a menagerie (late Wombwell's) that travels about the country. My father knows Mr. Dodd through the band - he has played at Mr. Dodd's house. I saw the report of the case at Marlborough-street first in an evening paper, and Madame Bowman then wrote to the Commissioner of the Police, the day after the charge. I read the letter before it went.
Re-examined by Mr. Grain - I know someone employed in the drapery department at Shoolbred's. There is no truth whatever that anything improper occurred between me and anyone there. I was going towards Shoolbred's that evening.
Mr. Horace Smith - Why did you go to Shoolbred's?
Witness - Because the other shops were not open up the Tottenham-court-road.

OTHER WITNESSES.

Mrs. Bowman recalled, and examined by Mr. Grain, said that her husband kept her books.
Mr. Tomkins, a draper at Stockton in 1886, said that Miss Cass was in his employ up to 1884. He had an excellent character with Miss Cass. Witness knew her as a highly respectable person. Her parents were highly respectable people. Witness left Stockton, and came to London, going to live at Manor-park. His wife heard from Miss Cass, and witness invited her to come and stay. She came about three months ago. She did some work for witness's wife, and remained for about six weeks. She left to go to Madame Bowman's.
Mr. Thomas William Langley said he was engaged at a firm of brass finishers at Burton, and was now engaged to be married to Miss Cass.

CROSS-EXAMINATION OF POLICE-CONSTABLE ENDACOTT.

Cross-examined by Mr. Grain - I was in Devonshire before I came up to London to better myself. I know Chagford, in Devon, which is my home. I had not to leave anywhere because I got a young woman in trouble.
Did you get a young woman in trouble? - I did.
Did it come to the knowledge of your superiors? - No, it did not. I will swear it. (Laughter).
Mr. Grain - You are not on oath.
Witness - But I can swear it. I paid money to the girl, and settled it in that way. There was no order taken out against me. A summons was taken out, but I settled it by paying the young woman. I did not leave Staverton (where I went as a constable from Chagford) without notice. I was not "inquired for" by the girl before I left Staverton. The girl was named Rogers. She was housekeeper to her brother, a miller.
How did you know her? - I lodged at her house with her brother.
And you took advantage of your position there to seduce her?
The President interposed, and Mr. Grain said he was sorry he had put his question in that form.
Cross-examination continued - I have never been to Witheridge, in Devon. I have a cousin, a policeman, of the same name as myself.
Have you had any other troubles with females since you have been in London? - No, never.
Are you a married man? - Yes.
Were you married when you got this poor girl in trouble in Devon? - No; that was thirteen or fourteen years ago.
On the night in question did you see any other females soliciting? - Yes; I saw one or two.
Did you take them into custody? - No.
Why? - Because I always let them stop two or three gentlemen before I take them into custody. I was on that beat from four to eleven. I only saw one woman soliciting, and she ran away. The other girl with Miss Cass, who "slipped away," was a taller girl. I saw Miss Cass accost three persons before I took her into custody.
When did you first catch sight of Miss Cass and her alleged accomplice? - Coming out of Oxford-street. Both the girls had hold of the arms of a man.
And would it not be your duty, when you saw two girls catch hold of the arms of a man, to apprehend these girls? - It is not the practice.
Never mind the practice. What is your duty?
Sir Charles Warren - The police act on their own discretion, according to the Act of Parliament.
What about the second time that Miss Cass and her "alleged accomplice" stopped a man? - That was at Langham-place. There was an "oldish man," walking towards the church, and they took hold of his arm.
Why did you not take them into custody? - He did not complain in any shape or form. I dare say I was thirty yards away.
What about the third time? - They stopped there a few minutes, and walked towards Oxford-circus. They got hold of a man, "pinned him" and the gentleman remarked, "It's a d---- hard thing" ----
Was that his expression? - Yes, something to that effect. He said, "It's a d----- hard thing that anyone can't walk without being stopped."
Did you know Miss Cass? - Well, I have seen her about.
Did you know her, yes or no? - I had seen her about two or three times within six weeks previous.
Give me any occasion prior to the 28th of June when you saw her in Regent-street? - Just along by Great Portland-street and Peter Robinson's. I have kept no record of the times.
Can you give me no times? - I could not. If I did I should be telling a story, and I am not going to do that. The days I do not know, but it would be between eight or ten, or eight or eleven in the evening.
On those occasions what was she doing? - I saw her, I think, once or twice with a female, and once by herself.
What was she doing? - She was doing nothing. I never saw her doing anything to commit herself until this night. I never saw her doing any harm.
By what authority, then, did you put her down on the charge-sheet as a common prostitute? - By my experience she acted that night as an ordinary prostitute.
Why did you say you had seen her two or three times before if she was doing no harm? - Having seen her commit herself that night I thought she was there before for the same purpose.
Did you not, when you said you had seen her two or three times before, intend to convey to the Magistrate that you had seen her soliciting? - If I had intended that impression I should have said so.
Have you made any inquiries as to the respectability of Madame Bowman, her employer?
Witness (to Mr. Wontner) - Shall I answer that?
Mr. Wontner - Have you made any personal inquiries?
Witness - Yes.
Mr. Grain - Well, what have you got to say about Mrs. Bowman? - I have nothing as yet.
As yet? Dare you say one word against her respectability?
Mr. Wontner - He hasn't yet.
Mr. Horace Smith said this was hardly cross-examination.
Mr. Wontner - It is extremely unfair. We are acting with some caution, and he is trying to force our hands.
Mr. Grain asked if he might put it to the constable whether he knew today, after making inquiries, anything against the character of Mrs. Bowman?
Sir Charles Warren decidedly thought the question ought not to be asked.
Have you seen Miss Cass here? - Yes, last Tuesday.
When she gave evidence here she was dressed in exactly the same way as on the night? - Very similar, I should think.
And on the previous occasions when you alleged you saw her? - Very similar each time I have seen her.
What was the other girl dressed like? - Not so quiet as Miss Cass. She was dressed very nicely.
Have you ever seen the other girl since? - I have not.
Have you ever seen her before? - Yes, several times.
Acting as a prostitute? - Well, not as a prudent woman.
Do you say she was acting as a prostitute? - Well, that would be my opinion.
At the very first moment you took Miss Cass into custody, did she not say you had made a mistake? - No, she did not.
Did she not say where she was employed? - She did not, Sir.
When did you first hear the name of Mrs. Bowman? - When the sergeant sent me.
Miss Cass's statement, then, is a lie from beginning to end? - It is.
Did she not nearly faint on being taken into the station? - I saw nothing of it. She was quite collected. I have had regular prostitutes many times make much more fuss than she did, ten hundred times. I have seen them cry bitterly.
She seemed to take it as an old hand? - She was so stubborn.
Have you ever seen the other girl since? - No.
Have you learnt anything about her? - I was given to understand she was a married woman.
Who told you so? - Someone at Marylebone Police-station, a joiner, I think he was.
Mr. Horace Smith - That person should be here if there is such a person.
Mr. Grain - I understand from you that he made a statement which was reduced to writing, and which is now in the hands of the police? - Yes, Sir.
Mr. Grain - Of course I shall ask leave to have that produced.
Mr. Wontner - You are raising this storm yourself now.
Did this man communicate with you before making the statement? - Yes; at the corner of Great Portland-street. He said he had seen Miss Cass in company with another woman who was supposed to be married.
Did you ask the man his name and address? - He gave me his card, and I gave it to the Superintendent.
Have you had any other statements made to you by alleged eye witnesses? - I believe there are a lot of statements. I really could not say.
Have you had any made to you? - Yes. James Reeves, the manager to a jeweller in Great Portland-street, Rolf, I think, the name is. As I was passing the shop on the day following, Reeves says, "Hallo, I see your name figures up well in the paper." I said, "Yes." Then he said, "I have known the girl for some time."
How did he know her? - By her name, and by her being with this married woman.
He said he knew her by her name? - Yes, seeing it in the paper. He knew her as a "wrong 'un," I think he called her.
Mr. Grain - Now, what did the man who made the statement say about this married woman? - He said he had been home with her.
That does not appear in the police report? - I said to the man, "What sort of girl is she?" He said, "Dark. She is always about with a married woman." The inspector took the man's statement down.
And then it was, when you spoke to him, that he said he had been home with this married woman? - Yes.
And going home with this married woman, did you ask him where she lived? - He said he thought she took him to a house somewhere at Notting-hill.
Where was that statement taken down? - In a shop, by Detective-inspector Robson.
Has any other person given you information about this matter? - I have had letters, telegrams, and such things.
Did you ask the third gentleman, whom you say was solicited, for his address? - I asked him to come to the station, but he refused.
And this joiner, or whoever he was, did he say he had seen any solicitation on the part of Miss Cass or her companion? - I believe he did.
You had charge of the case at the police-court. Did you inform the Magistrate that there was a witness for the defence? - No.
Did you know Mrs. Bowman was there? - No; I did not know her.
But you went to her house. Will you swear - (a laugh) - that you did not know she was in Court? - Yes.
Did Mrs. Bowman say when you saw her, "Policeman, how can you say such a thing; she is such a very different girl?" - She said, "This is the first time she has been out, but she went to meet her young man at Shoolbred's." I answered, "But it occurred in Regent-street." Mrs. Bowman added, "She went to see her young man at Shoolbred's."
In reply to further questions, the police-constable said he had casually asked an employe at Shoolbred's if he knew of any young man keeping company with Miss Cass, and he replied that he did not.
By Mr. Wontner - I left the constabulary at Devon to come to the Metropolitan police.
And did you bring a certificate from the Devon Constabulary? - Yes.
Sir Charles Warren then handed in a number of certificates referring to Endacott, one of which said, "Good conduct; ability as a constable moderate."
Re-questioned by Mr. Wontner - The constable said he did not think, in any case, he should get gentlemen who complained of solicitation to go to the police-court. As a rule, a Magistrate discharged with a caution a girl for a first offence of the kind. Witness had no personal feeling against Miss Cass. There was no private reason of his own why he apprehended her.
Did she say anything against you before the Magistrate? - No.
Mr. Grain intimated that he had exhausted all the evidence he had to produce; but the statements which had been made by various persons came to him as entirely fresh.
Mr. Horace Smith - All we can say is, that we are very glad to have any one to come and tell us what they can.
Mr. Grain (who was told that the Court might adjourn till tomorrow) said something may occur between this and tomorrow, and, if so, I will impart it to the Court at once.
Mr. Horace Smith - Any witness that comes here, and his evidence is relevant, will have his expenses paid.
Mr. Grain said he hardly understood the sense of the remarks.
Mr. Smith - If anyone comes here, and his evidence is not wilfully false, his expenses will be paid him out of a fund that it is not for me to mention now. With regard to expenses, it is only reasonable, if a bona fide witness comes here, that he should be paid.
Mr. Grain - Is that rule to date from the commencement?
Mr. Smith - I won't say that, but it applies now. I wish to say that, so that persons may not have the excuse of saying, "We cannot attend, because we shall lose our day's expenses."
Jane Scott said she was a niece of Mrs. Bowman, and lived with her. Witness occupied the same bedroom as Miss Cass, who, during the time she was there, only went out one Sunday night. Witness knew that of her own knowledge. The only time Miss Cass was out was on a Sunday night, when she went to "auntie's sister," a married lady. Witness was not with Miss Cass when she went out the day before Jubilee Day.
By Mr. Wontner - I saw Miss Cass go out that night. She said she was going to buy a pair of gloves.
Re-examined by Mr. Grain, witness said she positively and distinctly averred that Miss Cass slept with her every night she was in London, except the Monday night.
Mrs. Banks, the daughter of Mrs. Bowman, said she stayed with her mother for a week, and never knew Miss Cass to go out.
Cross-examined by Mr. Wontner - Witness was often out herself in the evening, and could not say what Miss Cass was doing while she was out.
The inquiry was then adjourned till tomorrow.

Source: The Echo, Thursday July 21, 1887, Page 4

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Re: Police Constable Endacott

Post by Karen on Sat 8 Jan 2011 - 19:36

THE REGENT-STREET ARREST.
OFFICIAL INQUIRY.

ENDACOTT CORROBORATED.
TODAY'S PROCEEDINGS.

The inquiry into the conduct of Police-constable Endacott, and into the circumstances of the arrest in Regent-street of Miss Cass on a charge of soliciting gentlemen for immoral purposes, was resumed at Scotland-yard, before Sir Charles Warren (the Chief Commissioner) this morning. Mr. Horace Smith (the Recorder of Lincoln) again assisted the Commissioner in the capacity of legal assessor; and Mr. Grain and Mr. Wontner appeared respectively for Miss Cass and the constable Endacott.

A NEW POLICE WITNESS.

Superintendent Draper, examined by Mr. Grain, said he took down the statements of Endacott and a man named Wheatley, a joiner, who was brought by Endacott to Marylebone Police-station in support of his allegations against Miss Cass.
Mr. Horace Smith said that statement had better not be produced yet at any rate, because Wheatley was not in attendance.
Mr. Grain asked, if it was decided that it could be produced subsequently, whether it would be handed in or not?
Witness answered in the affirmative.
Cross-examined by Mr. Wontner - Witness first spoke to Endacott about witnesses to support his statement before notice of the matter had been taken in the House of Commons, but two or three days after the hearing before the Magistrate. Endacott's statement was that while he was standing in Castle-street this man, Wheatley, came up and said, "What a fuss they are making about this girl! The case is all right. I have seen the girl about myself." Witness was not sure whether Endacott gave him Wheatley's card or merely his name. Witness sent Inspector Robson to fetch Wheatley, and his statement was taken.

ENDACOTT CORROBORATED.

James Wheatley, carpenter and joiner, of 4, William-street, Manchester-square, W., said he knew Endacott as a constable, but did not know his name till this case brought it into prominence. On the 28th June he (witness) was standing at the corner of Margaret-street on the night the girl was arrested. He did not see her arrested, but he saw the constable pass with a girl, who was walking along as coolly as if she was out with a young man. He thought he knew the girl, and, therefore, went and looked, and he believed, although he would not swear on his oath, that the girl the constable had was the girl he had seen about with a fair woman.
Mr. Grain - Ask Miss Cass to come in.
On Miss Cass entering, Mr. Grain asked witness: Is that the young lady you saw in the custody of the policeman?
Witness: It is the young lady.
Mr. Grain - I ask you to look carefully. You are an independent witness, and I am sure you desire to tell us the truth. Are you prepared to say that prior to that night you had ever seen her before? I want you to be careful.
Witness - I recognised this young lady in company with a fair girl a little taller than herself.
Have you ever seen her before that night? - I believe, to my best knowledge, I have seen her before.
Do you believe it now? - I believe I have. I will not swear to it. I saw the young lady with the constable, and passed right in front of her. I firmly believe I have seen her in company with a fair girl, but I won't swear.
Where? - In Regent-street, by Peter Robinson's.
Miss Cass then retired, not having in any way indicated her feelings on hearing this statement.
Mr. Grain (to witness) - You are very much in doubt whether you have ever seen her before?
Witness - I really believe, to my best knowledge, that it is the girl I have seen; but I would not take an oath, because I might be mistaken. I really believe her to be the girl.
You believed it at the time? - I did, and would have taken my oath at the time.
Do you believe it now? - Well, I have a little doubt, but I believe it is.
You have a great doubt, have you not? - No, I have not a very great doubt.
What sort of doubt? - Not a very great doubt because, passing in front of her, I believe she was the one I had seen on three different occasions in company with a fair girl.
You have read in the Press what has passed about this matter? - Yes, I saw what was stated, and I said, "That is the girl I saw with a fair girl." I am not going to swear it; but I said I saw this girl (Miss Cass) walking down near Peter Robinson's. I have seen her on three occasions, about three weeks before the night in question. I believe in my own mind that Miss Cass is the girl, but I might be mistaken.
The constable knew your name? - No, I don't think he did. He knew my employer's name. I gave him my card. I have made it my special duty to see if I could find this "fair girl" since, but I have not been able to do so. (Emphatically.) I believe the "fair girl" to be a married woman, and that she lives in the Edgware-road.
Why do you believe she lives in the Edgware-road? - Because I have seen her there, walking with a man with a basket.
Mr. Grain (smiling) - I don't fully appreciate that answer, as to judging she was a married woman because you saw her with a man with a basket.
By Mr. Wontner - I judged she was a married woman by her manner with the man in the Edgware-road. I knew the constable by seeing him on his beat. In consequence of seeing the report of the case in the paper, I spoke to the constable (Endacott), who was with his wife. I was under the impression that the constable was right, and that the report was uncalled for.
Mr. Wontner - And did you on the 14th of July make a statement to Inspector Robson? - Yes, I said I did not believe that the girl (Miss Cass) was a prostitute.
Mr. Grain - That Miss Cass was not a prostitute? - Yes, but I believe the married woman I had seen with her was a prostitute.
Mr. Grain - You did not call on Mrs. Bowman? - No.
Mr. Horace Smith - You have not been in the police force yourself, Wheatley, I suppose? - No, Sir, I have not.

ANOTHER POLICE INSPECTOR.

Detective Inspector Robson said he was sent by Superintendent Draper to call on the men who Endacott had mentioned as able to corroborate his statements as to Miss Cass's solicitation. He went to Rolph's, the jeweller, where he found Mr. Rees, one of the men, who made a statement to him, which witness took down. Mr. Rees had been asked by an officer last night to attend this morning, but he was not here yet. Witness had asked him whether he had seen Miss Cass in the custody of the constable, and he said no. Witness asked him how he knew Miss Cass to be a prostitute, and he replied, through a friend of his - Mrs. Frampton, who lived in Carlisle-street, and who he saw in Great Portland-street the previous night, when she informed him that her friend Eliza had been locked up, and he knew her friend Eliza was named Elizabeth Cass. Witness had not made any inquiries as to who Mrs. Frampton was. Rees was taken to Carlisle-street by witness and Sergeant Record, but he could not point out Mrs. Frampton's house.
Cross-examined by Mr. Wontner - Carlisle-street was a long street, and there were some brothels in it. It was difficult to distinguish one house from another.
By Mr. Horace Smith - Rees said that Elizabeth Cass had accosted him several times in Regent-street and Great Portland-street.
By Mr. Wontner - Rees gave witness a description of Miss Cass's companion, saying she was a fair woman.
Rees, on being called for, was found not to have arrived yet, an hour having elapsed since the inquiry opened.

MISS CASS AGAIN RECALLED.

Miss Cass, again called, was examined by Mr. Grain, as follows: - Have you ever heard the name of Frampton in your life? - No, Sir.
Do you know any person of the name of Frampton? - No.
Have you ever been in Carlisle-street in your life to your knowledge? - I do not know Carlisle-street.
Have you ever been in any house in London, except the houses of Mrs. Bowman and Mrs. Tomkins, or any shop? - Yes, I have been to Miss Tomkins's friend's house, but to no other.
Did you ever accost any person in the neighbourhood of Regent-street named Rees? - No, I never spoke to anybody at all.
To your knowledge, have you ever been walking in any of the streets of London with any young woman, or any woman, of fair hair, answering to that sort of description? - Only Mrs. Tomkins.
It was here intimated that Mrs. Tomkins was dark, and would be called.

MRS. TOMKINS.

Mrs. Tomkins, the wife of Mr. Tomkins, draper, who was called yesterday, said she had a high opinion of Miss Cass's moral and business character, and she had given satisfaction in every way. When Miss Cass came to witness's house at Manor-park she remained indoors, and was never out of an evening - not once. Miss Cass was at Stockton a little over two years with witness, and remained for some time with her successors, who carried on the drapery business.

AN ALLEGED POLICE CONSPIRACY.

Mrs. Bowman was recalled, and, questioned by Mr. Grain, said she was called upon by a person presenting a card of Zoebel and Co., 153, Euston-road (the employers of the witness Wheatley) stating that his employers had great sympathy with Mrs. Bowman and Miss Cass, and that the police were getting up a case against Miss Cass, and were going to call a joiner, who would state that he had seen Miss Cass.
Mr. Smith did not see what relevancy it bore upon the case, as the person who presented the card was not present, and could not therefore be identified.
Mrs. Bowman was not further questioned.

A LADY TENDERS EVIDENCE.

A French lady, who objected to make her name public on account of business prejudice, but who gave it to the Commissioner, tendered her evidence. She said that on the night of the 28th June she saw two girls accosting a gentleman, and on a constable coming up one ran away. The one who got away was a fair woman, and the other was dark, with her hair cut short like a boy. She thought she could recognise them both again. There were four ladies outside the Court, and she firmly believed one was the girl she saw soliciting.
Five ladies were then called in. As Miss Cass walked in behind Mrs. Bowman, the witness said that was the young lady she had seen. Within two months ago she saw Miss Cass with another lady.
Mr. Grain - About what time?
Witness - Six weeks ago.
Mr. Grain - And where?
Witness - Oxford-street.
What time? - In the afternoon, up to about seven or eight o'clock. I believe I saw her twice, but am not quite certain. Her face is not unknown to me. I saw her on the 28th of June, taking hold of a gentleman's arm.
You saw her take hold of a gentleman's arm? - Yes.
What were you doing out then? - I was coming from my place of business. It was just by the first turning round Oxford-circus.
What sort of a gentleman was it? - an old or young man? - He was a gentleman who "frequents the streets." I have seen him there very frequently - going with some of the gay women.
How long have you seen this man about Regent-street? - I have seen him several times for the last twelve months.
What does he look like - a young man, an oldish man, or what? - He is like an American, and dresses like one.
And have you seen him frequent Regent-street? - Yes.
And accost women? - Yes, gay women; and the girls have called him by a nick-name, and speak as if they knew him.
When did you make this statement to the police? - I saw a police-sergeant, and afterwards I went to Tottenham-court-road Police-station, and my statement was taken down.
Now, when the affair, you say, was discussed in the workroom at your place amongst the girls, what did they say? - They read it out from a Sunday newspaper report, and some of them were "very nasty" with me about it. They seemed inclined to take the part of the girl. I said, "If you knew what I know, you would be of a very different opinion."
Did you see Miss Cass arrested? - Yes.
And how did she go to the station? - Very quietly - (warmly) - like a regular prostitute.
Mr. Grain (laughing) - Now, get angry, and we shall get the truth. (Laughter.) You say Miss Cass went quietly to the station, like a regular prostitute.
Do they go quietly? - Like a lamb.
You seem to be well-acquainted with their manners and customs? - I have been twenty years in England. (Much laughter.)
Mr. Wontner - Are you quite sure that the girl arrested by the constable, Endacott, is the same that you saw accost gentlemen? - I am quite sure.
Mr. Horace Smith - At the moment when the police-constable arrested the girl, where was the gentleman? - The constable took hold of her, and she shook him away.
Mr. Smith (repeating the question) - Answer me, where was the gentleman when the girl was arrested?
Witness - (Pausing) - She was holding the gentleman's arm.
You are sure of that? - Yes.
Mr. Smith - Very well.
It subsequently transpired that the name of the French witness was Fernande Pietre.
After waiting for some minutes, the Court was informed that Rees, the manager of a shop, who had made a statement with reference to Miss Cass, was still not present to give his evidence.
Sir Charles Warren - I do not think it likely that he will come here now (it being a few minutes before the ordinary time for adjournment). Have the counsel any remarks to make?
Mr. Grain said at present he had no further evidence. In the meantime, before the Court sat again, he would cause inquiries to be made as to statements made by the French lady.
Sir Charles Warren thought it would be convenient to adjourn till Monday.
Mr. Grain - If there are no other witnesses, how long will the inquiry be kept open?
Mr. Horace Smith - We think it ought to end on Monday. People have had full notice, if they wished to attend and give information. We won't say it will close on Monday, but probably, so far as any evidence is concerned, it will close then.
The court then adjourned.

Source: The Echo, Friday July 22, 1887, Page 4


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Re: Police Constable Endacott

Post by Karen on Sat 8 Jan 2011 - 23:18

THE REGENT-STREET SCANDAL.
TODAY'S PROCEEDINGS.

EXTRAORDINARY EVIDENCE.

The inquiry into the circumstances attending the arrest of Miss Cass, on the 28th of June, by Police-constable Endacott, in Regent-street, was resumed this morning at Scotland-yard by Sir Charles Warren, the Chief Commissioner, assisted by Mr. Horace Smith, the Recorder of Lincoln.
Mr. J.P. Grain and Mr. F.M. Abrahams represented Miss Cass and Madame Bowman, and Mr. St. John Wontner appeared for Police-constable Endacott as before.
The inquiry, which was timed to commence at eleven o'clock, did not commence till twenty minutes later, Mr. Grain and Sir Charles Warren, and Mr. Horace Smith all being absent till 11:20.

A MISSING WITNESS.

Mr. Grain, on opening the proceedings, said he had made application on Saturday at the business place of the man Rees or Reeves, and communications were sent to him, but he had not at present been found. Communications were also sent to - they should find out what her name might be hereafter, but he meant the foreign lady. She was here, and he desired to put further questions to her by way of cross-examination in consequence of inquiries which had been made. The man Wheatley had also been asked to attend, and there were some other witnesses to be called, in consequence of important information which he had received since the last adjournment.

THE FRENCH WITNESS CROSS-EXAMINED.

The foreign woman who tendered evidence corroborative of Endacott on Saturday was then called and examined by Mr. Grain, as follows: - What is your real name? - My real name is Madame Pietra. I only have one name. Excuse me, but before I answer any questions, I should like to know, after the promise Sir Charles Warren made to me that neither my name nor place of business should be stated, why you took the liberty of sending six things in the shape of men to different places of business where I have lived, and to give defamation to my character?
Mr. Grain - Will you kindly answer my questions?
Madame Pietra - I think you have behaved in a most ungentlemanlike manner, and (turning to Mr. Horace Smith) I don't wish to speak to him. I wish to bring an action for defamation to my character.
Mr. Grain - Don't say that, or I shall ask you some very serious questions presently.
Madame Pietra - I can tell you things that would surprise you.
Mr. Grain - Very likely you can. Do you know Sergeant Scott, of the police? - No; I decline to know Sergeant Scott.
Do you know him? - I don't know what his name is, as I have had to deal with a good many sergeants in Vine-street, but don't particularly know their names.
I am asking you questions which I think you understand. Do you know Scott? - No, Sir, I don't.
Mr. Horace Smith asked Mr. Grain to put his questions in the least disquieting way possible, the witness being evidently very excitable.
Mr. Grain - My information is of such a serious character. When you took your rooms at the place you are still living did you say you were the wife of a police-officer - a detective? - There never was a man at my place.
Did you represent yourself as the wife of a detective officer? - Never. I never was married in my life, and never was seen out with a man.
Did you give a reference? - Yes, to 14, Little Titchfield-street; but the lady said she did not require any reference, she could see what I was.
Do you know the name of Picard? - No, I don't.
Do you mean to say that? - I know a lot of Picards in London, but my name is Pietra, and I can bring my papers to prove it.
Have you lived in Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square? - No, Sir, I never did.
You never carried on any business there? - Never.
Will you look at that brass plate (handing the plate to witness)? - I don't know that.
You have never seen one like that before? - No.
You know nothing about the name? - No.
You never heard of it? - Well, there are a lot of that name in the Strand.
Where have you heard the name of Picard? - I don't know anybody of that name.
Have you yourself ever been charged at Marlborough-street Police-court? - No, Sir.
Have you charged anybody else there? - No. I took a summons out some years ago, but that is all.
What is the name of your landlady at the place you live now? - Mrs. Beckworth; and she had a very good reference of me.
Mr. Horace Smith here begged the witness to do nothing except just answer the question, and not to supplement her answers with statements not called for.
Mr. Grain - Do you mean to say, after acknowledging that Mrs. Beckworth is your landlady, that you did not say you were the wife of a detective officer? - Yes.
Witness was proceeding to again supplement her answer with a rambling statement when
Mr. Horace Smith said - If you do not answer the questions and then stop you will have to leave the Court.
Witness - I wish to leave it.
Mr. Grain - Do you know 21, Market-place? - No.
Have you ever had any knowledge of a Belgian named Picard? - No; I don't know anybody of that name.
Do you know Bolsover-street? - No; I don't know anybody there, or in the neighbourhood.
Have you ever been in any house there or that neighbourhood? - No.

THE WITNESS REFUSES ANSWERS.

Do you know a woman named Glass? - I think that was the woman that I was robbed last year. (The witness speaking English with a French idiom, constructed her sentences in a manner which made them sometimes not easily understood.)
When did you first make the acquaintance of this woman Glass, and who and what was she? - I can't tell you anything about her, and if I could I don't wish to.
Who was Glass? - That is not your business, Sir.
Mr. Horace Smith - You either must decline to answer or -----
Witness - I decline to answer any questions.
Did you ever charge her with robbing you? - I don't wish to answer you. That is nothing to do with your case. I will answer to anybody except you, Mr. Grain.
Mr. Grain - Did you live in the same house with this woman Glass? - I refuse to answer you, and that is sufficient.
Mr. Grain - You must not refuse every answer, please. Was there a person in the same house with you at the same time by the name of Picard? - It is no good asking any more questions. (To Mr. Horace Smith.) I don't wish to have anything more to do with that man.
Mr. Horace Smith - What is the objection? Do you object to Mr. Grain? - Yes, I will answer any gentleman except him.
Mr. Smith - Well, will you tell me about this woman Glass? - I don't understand what about it. I made a written statement last night after the defamation of my character had been made, and I do not hide anything of my private life from my childhood; but I don't like the way that man ----
Mr. Grain - We have made inquiries ----
Madame Pietra - False inquiries.

THE WITNESS EXPELLED.

Mr. Horace Smith (to Madame Pietra) - Leave the room and wait. I cannot collect my mind at all while such a torrent of language is going on. (The witness here retired.) Mr. Grain, will you come and speak to me privately. This is not a matter to be made public.
After consultation with Mr. Grain, Mr. Smith said he should like to ask Madame Pietra one question; and she was therefore recalled.
Mr. Smith - You say that on this night you saw two women and a gentleman, and a policeman came up. He took hold of the dark girl ---
Witness - He made her move on first.
Mr. Smith - At that moment she had got hold of the gentleman's arm. Which arm? - I could not tell you. I did not take such particular notice.
Then you can't tell me which arm the girl (Miss Cass) had hold of? - No.
When did you first give any information as to what you had seen? - On the following Monday. I knew a sergeant of police by sight, and told him.
On the 8th of July you made a statement, which was taken down in writing. Had you made a statement before? - I do not recollect the day.
Mr. Smith (to Mr. Wontner) - It was on the 4th that she made her statement, and then it was taken down on the 5th.
Mr. Wontner - As long as we clearly know.
Mr. Grain - Have you ever gone by the name of Avanzizi? - No.
Or a similar name? - No.
Or Madame Richards? - I wish to leave the Court; I don't wish to answer anything further.
Mr. Smith - The question is, did you ever go by the name of Richards? - No; I never went by any other name than Pietra.
Mr. Smith (to Mr. Grain) - When she says she has never gone by any other name that is sufficient.
Mr. Grain protested, and said he could not go on if he was to confine himself to a particular method of cross-examination.
Mr. Grain - You mentioned in your evidence that you were looking for a sergeant that you know? - I don't know his name. I only know him by sight.
You don't know any of the Police Force by name? - No.
The one that you were going to look for where had you seen him before? - I went to the Police Station to see him.
You told me you went to see the sergeant to tell him what you had seen on the 28th. How did you know him? - Only because I had seen him in the street. I should have given the statement to Inspector Wyborn if I had seen him.
Who is that sergeant that you know by sight? - I don't know his name.
Mr. Grain (to the Court) - I want to know why she went to the station to find a particular sergeant if she did not know him before.
Sir Charles Warren - She says she did know him before, but not his name.
Madame Pietra - Is it about the references?
Mr. Grain - What references?
Madame Pietra appealed to the Court.
Objection was taken as to Mr. Grain's cross-examination.
Mr. Grain said he must really protest. He was not aware that there was anything irregular in his cross-examination.
Sir Charles Warren - If you want my opinion, I must say that I never saw anything more disgraceful in my life.
Mr. Smith - That is not my opinion; but I must ask you not to ask needless questions.
Mr. Grain questioned the witness as to whether she had been charged at the Marlborough-street Police-court? - No. (Excited.) I never ---
Mr. Smith - If she was charged at the police-court, there is a charge-sheet, and I should like to see it. Surely we can get that information by that means.
Mr. Grain said that as he had been told that his course of cross-examination was improper, he should decline to put any further questions to the witness.

A NEW WITNESS FOR MISS CASS.

Edgar Walford, of 51, Old Compton-street, deposed: I am a draper's assistant. I saw Miss Cass taken into custody. I was close to her when she was taken into custody, and was walking a few yards behind her. Up to the time that I saw her and she was taken into custody it is not true that she had taken hold of anyone's arm. There was no young woman with her who ran away. After she was taken into custody, I followed her and the constable. My age is 27. I know nothing whatever of Miss Cass, and am here with the knowledge of my employer.
By Mr. Wontner - I am shop-walker and assistant at 51, Old Compton-street. We close at half-past eight. I was going to Davis-street, Tottenham-court-road, to get some boots. I had no particular object in being at the right-hand side of Oxford-street, when Davis-street is on the left side. It was on my return from the shop in Davis-street that I saw Miss Cass and the constable.
You say that you followed the girl for about thirty yards. Where was she? - I passed Regent-circus into Oxford-street. I then walked on and went behind her until she got to Regent-street, and when she was walking quietly I saw her arrested. It was in Oxford-street that I saw her arrested.
Then it was not in Regent-street at all that she was arrested? - No, in Oxford-street.
But Miss Cass says she was arrested in Regent-street? - I don't know about that. It was about six or seven yards from Peter Robinson's.
Mr. Wontner - Miss Cass herself says that it was Regent-street, as she was going home.
Mr. Grain said it was hardly fair to make such a statement. (Reading the answers of Miss Cass in her evidence: - "Where the policeman came up was what is known as Peter Robinson's - at the corner of Oxford-circus.")
By Mr. Wontner - There was no reason for making any charge against Miss Cass - not a tittle of reason. There was no gentleman there whom she accosted.
When did you first make your statement? - Last Friday night was the first time.
Why then? - I saw a report of the case in The Echo, and then I called on Madame Bowman, and she afterwards called on me.
By Mr. Horace Smith - I had not known Madame Bowman before. Miss Cass was very quiet when she was arrested, but seemed much affected. The next day (the 29th ult.) I saw the placard and paper, and then I spoke of the case in business, after reading it in The Echo.
A discussion ensued as to the precise spot where the arrest occurred. A map was produced, and Miss Cass pointed out that it was in Oxford-street, opposite Peter Robinson's.

THE WITNESS WHEATLEY RECALLED.

Wheatley, the joiner, who saw Miss Cass in Endacott's custody, was then recalled and cross-examined by Mr. Grain. He said he did not know Edward Mountain. (The man Mountain was here called in, and witness expressed himself as quite sure that he did not know him.) On Mr. Grain asking some question about French polish, witness said he did recollect buying some polish from him. At that time witness had a conversation with him about this Cass case, but he did not say he was sorry he had had anything to do with it. This was after he had made the statement to the police. On the day following this conversation he saw Mountain again, and said, "A singular thing occurred last night. The very woman I said I believed was Miss Cass I saw only last night, and if I were to see them apart I would be prepared to say it was the same woman."
Sir Charles Warren - How do you know the woman you saw the second time was not Miss Cass? - I would not swear it was not.
By Mr. Grain - Witness was certain he had never been in the police force. He would swear he was not in the habit of using a public-house in Langham-place or the vicinity with Endacott, who was almost a perfect stranger to him. He had not told a man named Watson that he knew Endacott perfectly well.
Did you not tell Watson that Endacott told you he received so much a night for not taking prostitutes into custody? - I will take my solemn oath I did not say a word about it. Proceeding, witness said he often went to the "Cock" publichouse, in the neighbourhood of Great Portland-street, but he did not frequent that place with gay women. He had never told Watson that he had been in the police force at Leamington, and was not known as "Leamington Jim." He told Detective James that he had seen the person he thought was Miss Cass, and that he might have been mistaken in the first place. The reason he did not tell the Court this when he was first called was because he did not think anything about it, he being quite unaccustomed to police and magisterial proceedings.

REEVES STILL MISSING.

The witness Reeves was here called, and found to be still missing.
Mr. Grain then intimated that he should call no more witnesses.
The Court adjourned for luncheon.

On the resumption of proceedings after luncheon, Police-constable Endacott was called in to further explain the exact place at which he arrested Miss Cass. He said the spot was in Regent-street, between the Circus and Castle-street, in front of Peter Robinson's Regent-street shop, and not in front of Peter Robinson's Oxford-street shop, as stated by Walford. He took her past the Oxford-street shop when she was in his custody.
Mr. Horace Smith said he wished the Press would take notice that there was a difference in the evidence as to where the arrest took place, because doubtless some respectable people were passing at the time, and could assist the Court in ascertaining the spot where the arrest occurred.
Endacott, asked if he did not take Miss Cass the longer way to the station, if his assumption was correct that the arrest occurred in Regent-street, said it was the longer way, but he had at first intended taking her to the back of the station, till he remembered the back way was closed after six.

THE FAIR WOMAN.

Mr. Horace Smith - Have you inquired about this fair woman since?
Witness - I have not.
Could you make any inquiries which might lead to her being discovered? - I think not. I have been about there, and can see no trace of her.
Could not inquiries made through the police be of any use? - If she is in the streets she might be seen, but I have seen people and then not seen them again for five or six months.
Mr. Horace Smith - We cannot keep this inquiry open for five or six months, that's quite certain. (To Mr. Wontner) - Have you any information?
Mr. Wontner - No, Sir.
No anonymous information even? - Absolutely none.
Superintendent Draper, asked by Sir Charles Warren, said he did not think there was a possibility of finding the fair woman. He had exhausted the inquiry on that point. He had heard that there was a doubt as to where the arrest occurred, and with regard to that he might mention that he had two men on duty at Oxford-circus who must have seen the arrest if it had occurred in Oxford-street. He could find out who those constables were, and have them brought here tomorrow morning.
Mr. Grain expressed the hope that the two constables would not be told what it was they were coming to prove.
Inspector Draper said he trusted it was not thought anything would be said to them which could affect the evidence they would give.
Sir Charles Warren - We had better wait here till they are brought, after that request from Mr. Grain.
Superintendent Draper intimated that the constables could not be fetched without some time elapsing.
Sir Charles Warren - We will stop here all night, if that is all. When these insinuations are made they had better be stopped at once.
Mr. Grain assured the Court he did not intend to make any insinuations, and he was not aware that he had. He had known the police for many years, and his experience of them was not such as would lead him to make insinuations against them. Never before had his conduct in a Court of Justice been found fault with. He again assured the Court he did not desire to make any insinuation, and expressed himself as ready to apologise to Sir Charles Warren personally if desired.
Sir Charles Warren - It will be more satisfactory for the constables to come at once.
An adjournment for an hour was accordingly ordered, pending the arrival of the constables.

Source: The Echo, Monday July 23, 1887, Page 3

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Re: Police Constable Endacott

Post by Karen on Sun 9 Jan 2011 - 2:09

THE REGENT-STREET SCANDAL.
TODAY'S PROCEEDINGS.

CLOSE OF THE INQUIRY.

The Scotland-yard inquiry into the conduct of Police-constable Endacott, and into the circumstances of the arrest of Miss Cass on a charge of solicitation, was resumed this morning before Sir Charles Warren (the Chief Commissioner), and Mr. Horace Smith (the Legal Assessor). Mr. Grain, as before, represented Miss Cass and Madame Bowman, and Mr. St. John Wontner appeared for Endacott.

WHERE THE ARREST OCCURRED.

Police-constable Dyer, one of the constables on duty at Oxford-circus on the night of the arrest, was called to assist the court in fixing the exact spot at which Miss Cass was taken into Endacott's custody, there being a conflict of evidence on this point. In answer to the Assessor, witness said he did not see Endacott at all between nine and ten. He might have passed without witness seeing him. Witness's duty was to regulate the 'bus traffic. There were a great many people going both up and down the pavement. There were times when witness's back might be turned to the people who were passing, as, for instance, if he had had to go and move on a 'bus which had been stopping too long. He did not see Endacott pass with Miss Cass, and he thought he should have done so had he passed with her.
The Assessor - But all the evidence showed, both Miss Cass and Endacott's, and the others, that at any rate Endacott passed there.
Sir Charles Warren said if the constable was regulating traffic, and had his back to the pavement at times, it was impossible he could see whether Endacott or any one else passed.
Mr. Grain said he did not know whether the Court would like him to call witness's to show that the witness Walford had spoken of the affair to his fellow employees shortly after the arrest, and had made statements to those employees which tallied with the evidence he had given to the Court.
The Commissioner said he did not think it was necessary.
The Assessor - I am very sorry that some persons seem to absent themselves from this Court. They may have good reasons for doing so, but I am surprised we have not had more information than we have. It may be an unwillingness to submit themselves to cross-examination.
Mr. Grain - All the persons who have communicated with us, giving their names and addresses, we have brought here, except one or two who have written this morning, and after the course the inquiry took yesterday I do not call them.
The Assessor asked if Mr. Grain desired to make any observations to the Court.
Mr. Grain said he did not think this was the proper place to make observations either one way or the other, and especially after what happened yesterday he should not address the Court.
Sir Charles Warren - The inquiry is now concluded; unless, in the meantime, before I make the report to the Secretary of State, which I am instructed to do, some important evidence is brought to my notice in one way or another, in which case I will give due notice.
The Court then rose.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday July 26, 1887, Page 4

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Re: Police Constable Endacott

Post by Karen on Sun 9 Jan 2011 - 8:04

Now here is an account of the inquiry which appeared in Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper:

THE MISS CASS INQUIRY.

The inquiry into the conduct of Police-constable Endacott, in connection with the arrest of Miss Cass in Regent-street, was resumed, at Scotland-yard, on Thursday. Sir C. Warren presided, assisted by Mr. Horace Smith, Recorder of Lincoln, as legal assessor. Mr. J.P. Grain again appeared on behalf of Miss Cass and Madame Bowman; and Mr. St. John Wontner appeared for Endacott. At the opening of the court Mr. St. John Wontner complained that to an application for pecuniary assistance to conduct the necessary inquiries on behalf of the constable, he had met with a refusal from the authorities. The Home Secretary had absolutely refused to give any assistance. He, therefore, took his stand on the following facts: - The constable had made his charge against Miss Cass on oath, and the magistrate had expressed his belief that the charge was correct. The statements of Miss Cass and Mdme. Bowman were not on oath, and he did not see what this inquiry could lead to. It was a farce.
Mr. Grain protested, and Mr. Smith pointed out that whatever course was adopted the inquiry would go on.
Mr. Wontner said that he would put some questions to Miss Cass and Mdme. Bowman; but not until action was set on foot to indict Endacott for perjury would he undertake to defend the case in a thorough manner.
Mr. Grain said searching inquiries had been made by the Stockton police as to the antecedents of Miss Cass; and although those inquiries were necessarily painful to her friends, they had revealed nothing but what redounded to her credit, and showed her to be a young woman of the highest respectability.
Sir Charles Warren said that the Scotland-yard police had been strictly forbidden to move in the matter.
Miss Cass was then recalled. She stated that she was engaged to be married before she left Stockton, and was still engaged. The gentleman's name was Thomas Edward Langley. He was employed in a large brass-finishing factory at Burton, and was present that day. In reply to Mr. Wontner, Miss Cass said she went out not only to purchase gloves, but for a walk and to see the illuminations. The gentleman she knew at Shoolbred's was a Mr. Settle. He was in the drapery department and came from Stockton. She did not go out to see him on this occasion.
Cross-examined at some length, Miss Cass said she did not know Mr. Dodds, M.P. Her father knew him, and had been with the band of which he was master to Mr. Dodds' house. She first saw Mr. Atherley Jones, M.P., on the Saturday after the 28th of June.
In reply to Mr. Grain, Miss Cass said there was not the slightest foundation for suggesting that there was anything improper between herself and Mr. Settle.
Mr. Wontner said he never said there was.
Mr. Grain: You suggested as much.
Madame Bowman, recalled, said her husband did the book-keeping of her establishment. He would appear if required.
Mr. F.G. Tompkins, a former employer of Miss Cass, gave her a very high character, and said she had spent most of her Sundays while in London with his wife at Manor-park.
Mr. Edward Langley said he was engaged to be married to Miss Cass. He was a brass finisher at Burton.
Police-constable Endacott said, in reply to Mr. Grain: I was formerly in the Devon police, at Staverton. I was removed from there on my own application.
Was it because you got a young woman into trouble? - No.
Did you ever get any young woman into trouble? - Yes; at Staverton.
Did that come to the knowledge of your superiors? - No; they never said anything to me. I settled the matter by the payment of money before the child was born, and I have never seen it. I did not leave Staverton suddenly. The girl's name was Rogers, and she lived with her brother, a miller, as housekeeper. I lodged there, and was intimate with the young woman, the result of which was a child.
Did you not leave Staverton without giving notice? - No; I gave a month's notice. That was after I had received the affiliation summons, which was served upon me five or six months after the child was born. I do not know a place called Witheridge, in Devon, but I have heard of it. I have a cousin of the same name who was a policeman in the North of Devon. I have never had any trouble with women in London, and am a married man with three children. The occurrence in Devonshire was 14 years ago, when I was 20 years of age. On the night I arrested Miss Cass I did not see any other person, except the girl with her, solicit. Witness went on to say he had seen Miss Cass twice or thrice before the 28th. She was not doing anything wrong on these occasions. He did not know how it was he noticed Miss Cass if she were doing nothing. He saw her and another woman molest two gentlemen. A gentleman complained of Miss Cass, and then he arrested her. She did not ask him to go to Mdme. Bowman's. She said nothing except to ask him not to walk so quick, as she was not one of the regular ones. It was a lie that Miss Cass had asked him to go to Mdme. Bowman's. She was very cool and stubborn, made no fuss, and behaved like an old hand.
Have you made any inquiry as to the respectability of Mrs. Bowman, her employer? - I have made some inquiries.
What have you got to say about Mrs. Bowman? - Nothing yet.
Nothing yet. Dare you say one word, sir, about Mrs. Bowman? - I have nothing to say against her.
Mr. Smith hardly thought that was a proper question to put to the witness.
Sir C. Warren agreed with the assessor that it was hardly fair to put a question of this character.
Examination continued: Miss Cass was dressed very much as she is now. I have seen the other girl before acting as a prostitute, but I have not seen her since the 28th. Miss Cass did not tell me I had made a mistake, nor did she say where she was employed. I learned that from the serjeant when he sent me to the house of Madame Bowman. It is untrue that I said, "I want you" to the girl, and that she replied, "I think you have made a mistake." I did not say, "No, I have not." All that is untrue. Miss Cass never mentioned the name of Madame Bowman to me, nor did she ask me to go to the house. I did not say, "No, you will have to go to the inspector." All that is fiction - a lie. She asked me not to show her up, and I said I did not want to do so. She said, "I am not like one of those regular girls." That I will swear. She did not nearly faint as she was crossing the threshold, or did I see water given to her in the dock. She took the charge like an old hand. I have not taken any steps to find the other girl whom I allege to have been with Miss Cass. I have been given to understand that she was a married woman.
Who told you? - Certain persons. I don't know their names.
Endacott, in reply to further questions, said he had been told about Miss Cass and her companion at the Marylebone police-station by some one who was there. I saw this person before seeing him at the station, and he made a complaint. I do not know his name, but he gave me his card, and I handed it to the superintendent. This person saw me with the woman in custody, and came up and gave me his card in consequence. He said to me that he had seen Miss Cass about with a married woman, and I replied, "If you know anything about it, you had better give me your card," and he did so. My informant gave the name of this married woman of whom he spoke, but I have forgotten it. I don't think he gave her address. I have had a statement made to me by Mr. J. Reeves, a jeweller's manager, in Great Portland-street. He said to me, "Your name figures up well in the paper this morning." I said, "Yes, it is funny, so much fuss about a small matter." He said, "It is quite right. I have known the girl for some time." Reeves further said that he knew her by name, and used words to the effect that she was a common prostitute. Reeves is manager at the shop of Mr. Rolfe. He told me he had been home with the married woman who it is alleged was Miss Cass's companion. The person who told me that he had seen Miss Cass soliciting is a joiner. I have never heard or seen anything of the person who I allege complained to me of Miss Cass before I arrested her. I did not tell the magistrate that there was a witness for the defence in court when the charge was heard, because I did not know Madame Bowman was there. When I went to her house and told her what Miss Cass was charged with, she did not say I must be mistaken, because the girl was so different. She said Miss Cass had gone to Shoolbred's, to meet a young man. Of that he was positive. He replied, "This was in Regent-street," and Madame Bowman said, "I can't account for her being in Regent-street."
In reply to Mr. Wontner, Endacott said he had been three years in the Devon police force before coming to London. Certificates of character were next handed in and read by counsel. Endacott said he had never been in trouble before, and had no spite against nor private reasons for arresting Miss Cass.
Mr. Grain asked if the superintendents could attend.
Sir Charles Warren said they could come or not, as they liked. He would arrange for these persons to be asked to attend. The statements referred to by Endacott would also be produced.
Miss Jane Scott, niece of Mdme. Bowman, said she occupied the same bedroom as Miss Cass. Miss Cass, before her arrest, was only out once after eight o'clock, and then they were all out together - herself, Miss Cass, and her aunt's sister. She was quite sure that Miss Cass had never been out but on that occasion. The business was over at eight; they had supper at nine all together, and at 10 she and Miss Cass went to bed.
Mrs. Banks, a married daughter of Mdme. Bowman, said she was staying at 19, Southampton-row, on the 28th. She had never been out with Miss Cass. She went out herself frequently, but always with her husband.
On Friday Superintendent Draper said: I took the statements, at the station, of Endacott and Mr. Wheatley, a joiner. I asked the constable if he could produce any witnesses in support of his statement, and he gave the name and address of Wheatley, who, he said, had seen him take the girl to the station.
Do you recollect whether the officer gave you Wheatley's card? - I do not, but he gave the address.
This is not the man who is manager of the jeweller's business? - No.
James Wheatley deposed: I am a carpenter and joiner, and live at William-street, Manchester-square. I was standing at the corner of Margaret-street on the night of June 28, between half-past nine and 10. I saw the constable Endacott pass me and go in the direction of the two young women. I walked along and passed the constable, and on getting up to the young women I looked them full in the face. I will not swear that Miss Cass was the young girl I saw with a fair woman.
Mr. Grain (to the inspector): Ask Miss Cass to come in, please. [Miss Cass here entered the room.]
Mr. Grain (to the witness): Is that the young lady you saw in the custody of the policeman? - Yes. To the best of my knowledge I have seen her before that evening, but I will not swear it. I thought I had seen this young lady in company with a fair woman. I have a little doubt. On the following night (the 29th) I saw Endacott, and told him that I saw him arrest Miss Cass, and that I thought I knew her. I had seen her in the neighbourhood of Regent-street. Once I had seen her in the company of a gentleman. That was about a fortnight before the arrest. I have seen her on three occasions. About three weeks before. I have made it my business to try and find the fair woman, but I have not succeeded. I believe her to be a married woman, and living near the Edgware-road.
By Mr. Wontner: I did not believe Miss Cass to be a prostitute then, and I don't now.
Mr. Grain: Oh!
By Mr. Wontner: I believe the fair woman who was with her was a prostitute. I made a statement, which was reduced to writing.
Re-examined by Mr. Grain: Is that the card of your employers? - Yes. It was one like that I gave to the constable. On one occasion I saw several women in Regent-street watching a constable, and I heard them say, "We are watching 42." "Oh," I said to myself, "42!" and I went on to where Endacott was standing, and said, "Are you 42?" and he said he was, whereupon I told him he was being watched.
Mr. Wontner: That will do. You were very anxious to have him here, Mr. Grain, but I think he has said too much for you.
Mr. Grain: Indeed he has not.
Inspector Robson said: About 11 o'clock on the 1st of July Superintendent Draper sent me to inquire into the truth of Endacott's statement. I went to see Mr. Reeves, at Rolph and Co.'s, jewellers, Great Portland-street. He was alone in the shop and unable to leave, but he made a statement to me, which I did not take down at the time. He told me that he had not seen Miss Cass arrested by the constable, but he knew her to be a prostitute through a Mrs. Frampton, living in Carlyle-street, whom he had seen on the previous night in Great Portland-street. Mrs. Frampton informed him that her friend Eliza had been locked up. Reeves added that he knew Eliza to be surnamed Cass. Reeves has since been taken by an officer with local knowledge to Carlyle-street, to try and identify the house where Mrs. Frampton lived, and has failed to do so. There is nothing to distinguish one house from another. I saw Wheatley subsequently, and he merely said that he believed he had seen the girl frequently. That is all I know beyond the statement made at the station.
By Mr. Smith: Reeves said that Miss Cass had accosted him frequently in Regent-street and Great Portland-street. He described Mrs. Frampton as a fair woman.
Miss Cass, recalled, said, in answer to Mr. Grain: I know nobody of the name of Frampton, and never heard of it. I have never been in Carlyle-street, and do not know where it is. Beyond the houses of Madame Bowman, Mrs. Tompkins, and Mrs. Tompkins's friend, I have never been in any house in London. I have never spoken to anyone called Reeves, nor have I walked with anyone who has fair hair except Mrs. Tompkins.
Mr. Smith: It is not suggested that Mrs. Tompkins is identical with Mrs. Frampton.
Mr. Wontner: Of course not.
Mrs. Tompkins said she knew Miss Cass, and had the highest opinion of her moral character. She was in the service of witness and her husband at Stockton, and came to stay with them for a time at Manor-park. She was there several weeks, and was never out alone once. Miss Cass was with them a little over two years in Stockton. Witness had never seen any levity of conduct on the part of the young lady. She was very quiet - absurdly so.
The next witness was a lady who tendered her evidence. She said she was named Madame Fernandre Pietre, and was employed in a large dressmaking house in Regent-street. Speaking with a foreign accent, she said: On the evening of June 28 I was walking home. I heard a commotion at the corner of Castle-street, Oxford-street, and saw a gentleman whom I should recognise if I could see him again. He was stopped in the street by a young woman. There were two young women, and I could certainly say that they were both together. This lasted about a few minutes. A constable came up and pushed her arm, but she would not go away, and then the constable took her into custody. It seemed to me that the woman was rather "saucy." When the constable came up and caught hold of her arm the other woman ran across the road where I was.
By Mr. Smith: Could you recognise that young woman if you saw her again? - I could recognise them both. The fair woman had red-coloured cheeks.
What was the other like? - The other woman was very dark, with her hair cut short like a boy.
Have you seen her since? - No; I have not seen her since. I think that I have met her two or three times within the last two months. I suppose that she went to her business. In our class of business - the dressmaking - the young ladies behave most respectably in the house, but we don't know what goes on when they are outside of it. I have seen the dark lady about near Gask and Company's premises in Oxford-street, between nine and ten at night.
Mr. Smith: Let Miss Cass come in, please.
The ladies, five in number, then entered the court, Madame Bowman leading the way, followed by Miss Cass, Mrs. Tompkins, Mrs. Banks, and Miss Jane Scott - Immediately Miss Cass entered Madame Fernande Pietre observed, "The second one is her."
Mr. Smith: Have you ever seen this lady (pointing to Madame Pietre) before?
Miss Cass: Never.
Mr. Grain (to Madame Pietre): Have you seen this young lady before? Yes. I firmly believe that I met her with another lady about six weeks ago on a Saturday, in New Oxford-street. She was walking along like any other person, and the same as I was doing. The last time I saw her it was the jubilee week. It was on the evening of the 28th of June that I saw her. What made me look at her most was when the policeman took her. She caught hold of a gentleman's arm. He was about 40 years of age, and looked like an American. I have often seen him about Regent-street.
At the suggestion of Sir C. Warren, the ladies here retired from the court.
Mr. Grain (to witness): Had you seen the report of the proceedings at Marlborough-street police-court? - No.
How, then, was your attention brought to the matter? - After meals some one would often read the paper, and one was saying how shameful it was, and the whole house was upset.
Mr. Grain: I want to know when you first heard about the case? - We read it on the following Monday in Lloyd's Newspaper. The people at my place of business said, "We will sign a paper in favour of Miss Cass." I said, "It would be silly to do that. You know nothing about her."
Who told you to come here? - The serjeant at the station, yesterday.
When did you first go to the station? - The night I read the account in Lloyd's. My statement was taken down in writing.
Are you quite sure that the girl who solicited the gentleman did not get away while the other was arrested by accident? - Quite sure; the other was a fair girl. The gentleman hastened away.
Mr. Smith: You may have the address of the witness, Mr. Grain, as you have asked, for the purpose of making inquiries about her.
Is Reeves now present? - The court was informed that Reeves had not arrived, although he had said he would be present, and the messenger sent to the shop where he was employed had found it shut.
Mr. Smith: We think the inquiry ought to come to an end on Monday; but we do not say that it must close, only that it will probably do so. It was then arranged that the inquiry should be adjourned till Monday.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, July 24, 1887, Page 8

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Re: Police Constable Endacott

Post by Karen on Sun 9 Jan 2011 - 16:21

THE ARREST OF MISS CASS.

The inquiry before Sir Charles Warren, with whom was the Recorder of Lincoln (Mr. Horace Smith) as assessor, respecting the arrest of Miss Cass, under circumstances well known to the public, was on Monday resumed at Whitehall. Applications for admission by the public were refused, as there was no room.
Mr. Grain and Mr. F.M. Abrahams, instructed by Mr. J.A. Bartrum, represented Miss Cass and Madame Bowman; and Mr. St. John Wontner represented the policeman Endacott, who arrested Miss Cass; Mr. Staples, the chief clerk, and Mr. Superintendent Cutbush were also present.
At the opening of the court, Mr. Grain said that since the meeting on Friday application had been made respecting the man Reeves (the assistant of a jeweller in Great Portland-street, who had told the police, who stated it in court, that Miss Cass was the friend of a married prostitute whom he knew). This man Reeves, though communications had been sent to him, had not yet been found. But the "foreign lady" who had come forward on Friday was in waiting, and he should have to ask her questions to find out what was her real name, and it would also be his duty to put questions to her on matters of an important character.
Madame Pietra was then recalled, and asked by Mr. Grain: What is your real name?
Witness (excitedly): My name is Madame Pietra. That is my real name, and I can prove it. I never had but one name.
Mr. Grain: Thank you.
Witness: And, excuse me, but I should like to know what authority you have, after promising me on Friday that my name should not be given in the paper, and my address also, to take the liberty to send round to where I have lodged and worked and defame my character. I do not say they were men you sent round, but things in the shape of men. I wish to bring an action for defamation of character against Mr. Grain.
Mr. Grain: By all means. Please answer my questions.
Witness: I do not wish to answer any questions you put to me.
Mr. Grain: But answer the questions I put to you, please.
Witness: I do not wish to answer you anything, Mr. Grain. You have behaved most ungentlemanly to me, and I wish to bring an action for defamation of character. Perhaps I could say something about you that would surprise you.
The witness was being pressed as to her knowledge of Serjeant Scott of the police, and as to who was the serjeant she said she waited to see before she gave her statement as to the arrest which she had seen from the opposite side of Regent-street, and in Regent-street, when
The Assessor interposed sharply, and told Mr. Grain to bring out what he wanted to bring out.
Mr. Grain said he had information of a serious character regarding the witness, who had made categorical statements, and he was asking her upon these. Addressing the witness, Mr. Grain asked if, when she took her present lodgings, she stated that she was the wife of a police detective officer.
The witness again volubly replied, denying the allegation conveyed in the question, and said that no reference was required of her as her landlady was satisfied with her appearance. Next questioned whether she knew the name of "Picard," she declared she did not. She had never lived in Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square, and she followed this with a torrent of passionate declamations against the counsel. She was then shown a small brass plate by Mr. Grain, such a plate as is seen under door bells in streets where several persons inhabit one house. This plate bore the words "Picard" in large capitals, and underneath, in smaller capitals, "Shirt Maker." She declared that she had never seen this before. Asked whether she had ever been charged herself with any offence at Marlborough-street police-court, she declared that she had not. She had taken out a summons there.
There then arose a passage of arms between the witness, the Assessor, and Mr. Grain. The Assessor had told the witness to simply answer a question or to refuse to answer it, and when she was proceeding to run on with assertions, protestations, and threats, instead of replying to a question, the Assessor sharply told her to be quiet after she had answered or had not answered her questioner. Mr. Grain then put again the question whether she had not told her landlady when she took her lodgings that she was the wife of a detective officer, and the witness again passionately inveighed against Mr. Grain for daring to ask such questions. The Assessor again intervened, and demanded that Mr. Grain should receive the answers and then pass to something else, and he again told the witness that she must answer simply, without adding a multitude of other words. In answer to questions then put the witness said she did not know 21, Margaret-street, Regent-street; that she had no knowledge of the name of Picard; that she did not know Bolsover-street; that she did know it by passing through it, but knew no one or any house in it; that she did not know a woman named Glass, unless that was the name of a woman whom she had charged with robbing her.
Mr. Grain asked her what her business was when she charged the woman Glass, and at once the witness burst out in what the Assessor called a "flood of language," declaring that she would not answer "that man," pointing to Mr. Grain, any more. She had lost her place of business where she was respected and the place where she lived. The Assessor strove to calm the witness, and then Mr. Grain asked her if her name was not Picard when she charged Mrs. Glass, and whether Picard was a Belgian. The witness rose from her seat, and continued to talk so much and so loudly that the Assessor declared it was "dreadful" to have this flood of speech; but the witness continued to ply Mr. Grain with angry reproaches, and at last the Assessor told her to leave the court, and she retired. In very sharp tones the Assessor, at the same time, demanded of Mr. Grain what he had to press the witness about, and Mr. Grain conferred privately with the Assessor.
The Assessor asked Mr. Wontner if he wanted to ask this Madame Pietra anything.
Mr. Wontner replied that he certainly did not; and he desired it to be noticed that he did not bring her there, nor had his side brought Wheatley there.
Mr. Grain also desired it to be understood that he had not brought Wheatley or Madame Pietra before the court. They had brought themselves.
The Assessor begged Mr. Grain to recollect that he had not stopped the cross-examination.
Mr. Grain said he was quite willing to leave the matter where it stood or to resume the cross-examination.
The Assessor rejoined that he desired to ask one or two questions.
The witness was then recalled, and the Assessor reminded her that she had stated she had seen the two girls, of whom Miss Cass was one, catch hold of a gentleman's arm; that the one ran away, and that Miss Cass had hold of the gentleman's arm when the policeman came up and pushed her before taking her into custody at the corner of Castle-street, Regent-street. The Assessor now asked which arm she had hold of. The witness did not answer the question directly, and the Assessor put it again still more plainly, and the woman first said the "left," then she said the "right," and then she said she did not know - that she could not remember; she could not tell whether she was facing the policeman and his prisoner or whether she was behind at the time. She was on the other side of the street.
When did you first give your information? - On the Monday following the arrest. I wished to do so before, but I could not find the serjeant I knew.
Mr. Wontner, at whose suggestion the last question was put, said the reason he desired that it should be asked was that he had received a copy of a Newcastle paper in which it was stated that this police evidence was got up for the purpose of assisting the constable, and that therefore he was responsible. He could only disclaim having heard anything about it except in court.
Mr. Smith: Did you, Madame Pietra, make a statement before the 5th July? - No.
Mr. Grain: I have a great deal to ask, but, as I take it, she refuses to answer.
Mr. Smith: Try other questions.
Mr. Grain (to witness): Will you say positively that you have never gone by the name of Avanzini?
Witness: I do not know the name of any such person. I will only answer questions with regard to the case.
Have you ever passed as Madame Richard? - I am ready to answer any straightforward questions, but these are not straightforward.
Mr. Smith: You were simply asked whether you have passed as Madame Richard; surely that admits of a plain answer? - I have never gone by any other name than Pietra.
Mr. Grain: Have you passed as Madame Richard?
Mr. Smith: She has answered you. She says she has never passed by any name but that of Pietra, and to ask her again seems to be a mere waste of time.
Mr. Grain: I am acting upon information, but I don't know whether it is correct or not.
Mr. Smith: Why don't you test your information?
Mr. Grain: I have tested it.
Mr. Smith: Directly a witness lets a word fall, the meaning of which is not quite clear - as in the case of Madame Pietra, who is a foreigner - you jump at it.
Mr. Grain: Allow me to say, with all due deference, that I have taken the course which I thought right with regard to the witness, in order to elucidate this inquiry. This witness, who was brought here or came here - I don't care which - gave a story which was very categorical, and it was my duty to have that story sifted.
Mr. Smith: Then why not ask for an adjournment? If a charge was made against this woman, there would be a record of it at the station, and I should like to see the charge-sheet; and if I do not see it I shall have my opinion.
Mr. Grain: So should I.
Mr. Wontner: Surely my friend ought not to ask questions of this kind unless he has some ground for it. I have also had a flood of information, but we have not acted upon it. We could put all sorts of irrelevant questions if we chose.
Mr. Smith: So have we all, and if we used it all we should be doing a very wrong thing. (To Mr. Grain): Go on and ask questions upon which you have information, and into which you have inquired.
Mr. Grain: I do not know what to do. You say this is wrong, and I certainly decline to put another question if you hold that I am taking an improper course.
Witness: I will not answer any more questions that Mr. Grain may ask me. Your information about me, is false, Mr. Grain.
Mr. Smith (to the witness): Go and wait outside a moment, madame. I cannot collect my mind together for a single moment while your torrent of speech is going on.
Madame Pietra then retired from the court and remained in attendance.
Mr. Grain: I will now call another witness.
Mr. Edgar Walford, a draper's assistant, of 51, Old Compton-street, Soho, was then called by Mr. Grain. He stated that on the night Miss Cass was taken into custody he was coming up Oxford-street on the north side. As soon as he had crossed the circus he saw Miss Cass, on the Peter Robinson block, about 30 yards in front, and he gained on her before she had got very far. She was by herself, and she spoke to no one. In his sight the policeman went up to her, and he saw her arrested. The policeman went to her and took her arm, and took her down Great Portland-street (the first turning eastwards from the circus). Witness was sure that at the time of the arrest she had not hold of any gentleman at all. No other woman was with her. No young woman ran across the street away from her. When she was taken into custody he followed down Great Portland-street to Goodge-street, and then turned back. He was there that day with the knowledge and approval of his employers.
In reply to Mr. Wontner, the witness said he was an assistant, and the shop where he was employed closed at half-past eight. He usually went out after the closing of the shop. He went out on this night to Davies-street, Berkeley-square, to get some boots. It was on his return from Davies-street that he saw the arrest. He could give no reason for walking on that side where he saw Miss Cass was arrested; he had no particular reason for doing so. He had just crossed Oxford-circus and saw the young woman just before him when he crossed the Circus. She was about six or seven yards from Robinson's when he first saw her arrested.
Mr. Wontner remarked that the young person said that she was arrested in Regent-street.
This was denied, and the notes showed that Miss Cass had said that she had "just turned the corner into Oxford-street" when the policeman first came up to her. The policeman had said he took her the Regent-street side of the circus, and Madame Pietra put the arrest at the corner of Castle-street, Regent-street - still further north.
The witness Walford, in continuation of his cross-examination, said that the policeman took her in that block between the circus and Portland-place. The policeman took her down Great Portland-street. Witness saw nothing that would justify her arrest. He saw the constable walk sharply after her. He certainly did not interfere and say that the woman was innocent, because he did not know what she was charged with. She might have done something of which he knew nothing. He did not conceive it to be his duty to interfere. He saw the case reported, and called upon Madame Bowman, but did not see her. No one asked him to come to this court. He attended voluntarily, and gave no "statement" until that morning. Madame Bowman called at his place of business on Saturday, but he was unable to speak to her, as he was busy, and he could only say that he would come to the court on Monday. He did mention having seen an arrest at the time, and he commented upon the case he had seen reported.
In answer to the Assessor he said he had not known Madame Bowman before. It was almost like daylight when the arrest was made. The young lady went very quietly with the policeman, but he could not hear anything that was said. He had spoken of the arrest to others, and he had been told it was his duty to come forward.
An important point then arose. The witness was asked the exact spot where the arrest had occurred. He stated that the young woman was going up Oxford-street, and was near to Peter Robinson's, just before reaching Great Portland-street, when the policeman Endacott laid his hand upon her. This he was certain of.
Miss Cass was then recalled, and a large map was placed before her. The different points were explained to her, and she pointed out on the map the exact spot indicated by the young man.
The Assessor remarked that the two accounts exactly tallied; but that Endacott and Madame Pietra had said that the arrest was in Regent-street, the latter putting it at the corner of Castle-street in Regent-street, "near the crossing."
The witness Wheatley was recalled and examined on this point. He said that he saw Endacott and the girl at a spot where they appeared to have come up Castle-street from Regent-street.
Sir Charles Warren said that this was a mistake, for they could have come up into Great Portland-street from both Oxford-street and Regent-street. This showed the necessity of new light being thrown upon the point.
The re-examination of the witness Wheatley was then proceeded with by Mr. Grain. Witness said he did not know a man named Mountain. (A man was called into the room.) That man was a stranger to him. The stranger withdrew, and Wheatley was asked if it was correct that a counter was being made in June at Zoebel's, and French polish was wanted. Witness then said he did not know "that gentleman" (the person who had been called). It was recalled to his attention now that he had spoken to this gentleman about the "Cass case" - that he had said he had been to the police. He acknowledged that he did say that he had his doubts about Miss Cass being the girl he thought. He had told Mr. Mountain that he had seen, since the hearing, the woman he thought was Miss Cass.
In reply to Sir Charles Warren, the witness said he had seen a woman since this case had been before the public whom he had taken to be Miss Cass, and he thought that he had mistaken Miss Cass to be the same woman.
Mr. Grain then stated that he had no more witnesses.
Endacott was recalled, and he declared that the spot where he arrested the young woman was in Regent-street, on the northeast side, and about 20 yards from the northeast end of the circus - about 30 yards from Castle-street. He said he took her round Oxford-circus, up Oxford-street, and then down Great Portland-street towards the Tottenham-court-road station.
In reply to Mr. Grain, the witness said it was not much further to bring the prisoner out of the upper part of Regent-street, to turn the circus, then up Oxford-street, and down Great Portland-street. It was the way the woman was going, though not the nearest.
The Assessor said it was to be wished that some respectable person who saw the arrest would come forward. The young man from Compton-street and Miss Cass had given identical evidence as to the place of arrest, while Endacott and Madame Pietra had said it was in Regent-street.
Endacott, in reply to further questions, said that he could not find the "fair woman," the companion of Miss Cass, and he intimated that he did not expect to find her.
Mr. Superintendent Draper was again recalled, and he said that every inquiry had been made about the fair woman alleged to have been with Miss Cass on the night in question, but without success or hope of success. He suggested that the constables on the beat should be called as to the question of arrest.
Sir Charles Warren at once accepted the view, and ordered that the constables should be called.
Police-constable John Tyeman, 339 D, was subsequently called, but he did not know anything about the occurrence, as he neither saw Miss Cass nor Police-constable Endacott that night. If Endacott had passed by him with a woman in his custody he should probably have seen him, but he did not. There were a lot of people about, going Citywards to see the illuminations.
On Tuesday there was only one witness - a police-constable who was stationed near the corner of Regent-street, and who, it was supposed, might possibly have seen the arrest. He, however, knew nothing about it.
Police-constable Dyer, 369 D, was called. Examined by the Assessor:
Where were you stationed on the night of June 28? - Outside Peter Robinson's.
Did you see Endacott that evening in the street? - Yes.
Where? - I saw him pass me about seven o'clock.
Did you see him after that? - Yes; in about half an hour.
And after that? - No; not at all.
Any time between nine and ten did you see him at all? - Not at all.
Can you account for not seeing him, because we are told by all the witnesses I may say, speaking generally, that he must have passed there between nine and ten o'clock? I do not say who else must have passed. I am not talking about Miss Cass; I am asking you about Endacott. - It is possible that he could have passed there and I might not have seen him.
Mr. Smith was sorry that persons seemed to absent themselves from the court. They might have good reasons for doing so, but Sir Charles and he had hoped to have more information from eye-witnesses, and it was much to be regretted that such had not come forward.
Mr. Grain said that all the persons who had communicated with him had been called, except one or two whom he declined to call, in consequence of the turn matters took yesterday.
In answer to Sir C. Warren, Dyer said that if the arrest took place near where he was standing, with his back to the people, he should in all probability have seen it.
Mr. Wontner: Do you think that if the arrest had taken place within 10 feet of where you were standing, you could have failed to see it? - No, unless I was engaged at the time.
Mr. Grain: You said the foot traffic was exceedingly large at the time? - Yes.
Mr. Smith: Do either of the counsel wish to make any observation?
Mr. Wontner said he did not.
Mr. Grain was of opinion that this was not the place for making observations or speeches, one way or the other. He certainly did not intend to make any observation after what happened the previous day.
Sir C. Warren: As no more evidence is offered, the inquiry is now concluded, unless, before I make the report to the Secretary of State for the Home department, as I am instructed to do, some important evidence is brought to my notice in one way or another, in which case I will give due intimation.
This concluded the proceedings.

The Pall Mall Gazette says: We are informed by those who have had the conduct of Miss Cass's case that they believe the evidence taken before Sir Charles Warren justifies them in laying an indictment against Police-constable Endacott for wilful and corrupt perjury.
It is stated that Sir Charles Warren's report to the Home Secretary, delivered on Wednesday, on the Cass inquiry, entirely exonerates Miss Cass of the charges brought against her by Police-constable Endacott, and leaves the whole question of the future proceedings in relation to the policeman to Mr. Matthews.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, July 31, 1887, Page 8

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Endacott Assaulted

Post by Karen on Sun 9 Jan 2011 - 17:28

THE CHARGE OF ASSAULTING.
POLICE-CONSTABLE ENDACOTT.

AN APPEAL AT THE MIDDLESEX SESSIONS.

At the Middlesex Sessions, today, Edward Pole appealed against a conviction by Mr. de Rutzen, sitting at the Marlylebone Police-court, for having assaulted Bowden Endacott, Police-Constable 42 D R in the execution of his duty. He was sentenced by the Magistrate to six months' imprisonment with hard labour. - Mr. Forrest Fulton, M.P., appeared in support of the conviction; and Mr. W. Thompson was for the appellant.
Police-constable Endacott stated that on the 10th April he was outside Hyde-park, where he saw the appellant walking backwards with a large stick, which he flourished in his hand. He was one of a lot of Socialists, some of whom surrounded him, the others following. When the appellant was ten yards out of Hyde-park-gate, he struck a gentleman on the hat. Witness caught hold of the stick, and seized the appellant by the collar. The appellant made an attempt to strike him with his stick, and, at the same time, kicked him on the instep. The appellant ran away, and the witness would have fallen had it not been for the crowd, by whom he was surrounded. He first identified Pole at Marylebone Police-court. At the time he saw the appellant he was on the sick list, and off duty.
In cross-examination the witness stated that the applicant was forced away from him, and that he did not know what became of him in the confusion. He had not taken the name and address of the gentleman who was assaulted. After the assault he was examined by the divisional surgeon and placed on the sick list, on which he remained until the 26th of the month. At the time of the occurrence he was not selling tickets for an excursion. - A large number of constables corroborated Endacott's evidence, and Mr. Lloyd, the D Divisional Surgeon, who had attended Endacott, stated that there could be no doubt that the constable had received a severe injury on the instep of his left foot. He suffered from lameness, and was by witness's directions on the sick list for thirteen days.
Mr. Thompson, in addressing the Court on behalf of the appellant, said that the defence was a denial that the appellant was there at all. He would thoroughly satisfy the Court that the appellant was not near the scene of the assault, but at the very hour in question he was a long distance off engaged at the residence of his solicitor. He would also place in the witness-box Detective-sergeant Record, of the D Division, an experienced and trustworthy officer, who had known the appellant for several years, and who would state that the man who was flourishing a stick, and who escaped on an omnibus, was not the appellant, but a person somewhat resembling him.
Evidence having been adduced to that effect, the Court retired to consider their decision.

Source: The Echo, Friday July 22, 1887, Page 3

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Re: Police Constable Endacott

Post by Karen on Mon 10 Jan 2011 - 0:12

Finally, here is another account of the inquiry which appeared in The Hackney Mercury and North London Herald.

THE CASE OF MISS CASS.

OFFICIAL INQUIRY.
EXTRAORDINARY EVIDENCE.

The inquiry into the circumstances attending the arrest of Miss Cass by Police-constable Endacott, in Regent-street recently for soliciting, came to an end on Tuesday, at Scotland Yard, before Sir C. Warren, the Chief Commissioner of Police, assisted by Mr. Horace Smith, the Recorder of Lincoln. Mr. J.P. Grain appeared on behalf of Miss Cass and Madame Bowman, her employer, and Mr. St. John Wontner for Endacott.
On Friday, the first witness was James Wheatley, a joiner, who said he knew Endacott as a constable, and saw him taking Miss Cass to the station. He believed he recognised her as a girl whom he had seen walking the streets with a fair young woman whom he knew as a prostitute. The reason that he knew Endacott was that he saw a lot of French women on one occasion watching him, and as he heard them mention Endacott's number he went and informed him that the women were watching him.
Detective-sergeant Robson said he had seen James Reeves, who had volunteered evidence. Reeves had told him that he knew the fair woman; she was a Mrs. Frampton, and on the day after the arrest she had told Reeves that her friend Eliza had got into trouble. Reeves said he knew Eliza to be Elizabeth Cass. She had frequently accosted him. Witness took down Reeves's statement and sent an officer with him to identify Frampton's house. This Reeves had failed to do. Mr. Grain suggested that Reeves should attend, and, with the permission of the court, an officer was sent to find him.
Miss Cass, recalled, said she knew no one named Frampton. She had never been out with anyone but Mrs. Tompkins.
Mrs. Tompkins corroborated the statement of Miss Cass, who had been in her employment in the country. She received an excellent character with Miss Cass, who behaved satisfactorily in every way. Her business abilities and her moral character were both good, and everything she did while in witness's employ substantiated the character she received. When she came to London she came and stayed with witness until she entered Madame Bowman's service. Miss Cass never went out in the evening at all, and only once or twice with witness.
A French lady, who at first refused her name and address, but afterwards said it was Ferdinande Pietre, was then brought into the room. She spoke very rapidly and ungrammatically, and with a strong French accent. Mdme. Pietre said that on the 28th June she was going down Regent-street in the evening between 9 and 10 and saw a commotion there. A gentleman, whom she should recognise if she saw him again, was seized hold of by two young women. In about two minutes a constable came up and made the young women go on. One of the women was rather saucy and he pushed her. Witness took no more notice, but soon afterwards she saw the girls again holding another gentleman's arm, and then the constable arrested one of them, but the other one ran away across the road. She could recognise both these girls. One was fair with light hair, and the other was dark.
Miss Cass was then called in, and Madame Pietre said Miss Cass was one of the girls, and she was certain she had seen Miss Cass in the streets several times during the last two months, but not recently. In the course of her statement, which was of a rambling character, Madame Pietre said she had been acquainted with the neighbourhood for the last 15 years. She had seen the man who complained of Miss Cass. She believed he was in the habit of soliciting women. He looked like an American and dressed like one. She would not swear she had seen Miss Cass before the 28th, but thought she had. The witness here became very excited, and said she had had an altercation with her fellow employees owing to this case. She said that Miss Cass must have been a prostitute or she would not have gone to the station so coolly. She (Madame Pietre) would have been torn to pieces first.
The hearing was then adjourned.

On the resumption of the inquiry on Monday, Mr. Grain stated that he would put the lady who called herself Madame Pietre again in the box, as important statements had been made to him in regard to her since the last sitting of the court. The man Reeves who had stated that he knew Miss Cass to be the companion of a woman of the town could not be found.
Madame Pietre was then put in the box. She was in a state of intense excitement, and denounced Mr. Grain in bitter terms for having sent "six things in the shape of men" to the different places she had worked at and lived, and defamed her character, causing her to lose her situation and apartments. She would bring an action against him, tell people what she knew of him, and finally she broke into a volley of abuse. When she calmed down, Mr. Grain asked whether she had ever represented herself to be the wife of a detective. She replied that she had never been married and had never lived at the addresses named by Mr. Grain. She was respectable. Mr. Grain was a despicable thing. She declined to say whether she had lived in the same house as a man named Glass. She refused to say whether she knew a Belgian called Picard. Madame Pietre here burst into an uncontrollable fit of temper and again denounced Mr. Grain. At the request of Mr. Smith, Madame Pietre left the room for the purpose of recovering her equanimity.
On her return, Madame Pietre was questioned by Mr. H. Smith. She said that on the night of the arrest she saw two women with a gentleman, and the women had hold of the gentleman. Shortly afterwards the policeman came up and made the girls move on. At that moment Miss Cass had got hold of the gentleman. She first communicated with the authorities on the following Monday. She wished to do so before, but had no chance to see anybody. As she knew a serjeant by sight she tried to see him, and when she saw him she told him what she knew.
Mr. Wontner said he had received a copy of a Newcastle paper, which stated that the evidence was got up for the purpose of defending the police-constable, and that it was got up by his side. Therefore he wished to disclaim it.
Mr. Grain then questioned the witness again. She said she had never gone by the name of Araucini, or by any other name than that of Pietre. She did not know any of the police force except publicly. She had never seen this sergeant of whom she spoke at any particular place. She should have made the same statement to any sergeant she saw. She protested against Mr. Grain's attempts to find out something against her character.
The Chief Commissioner (with warmth): I never heard anything so disgraceful in my life.
Mr. Smith, too, said he considered the method of examination adopted by Mr. Grain was improper, and the latter thereupon declined to ask any further questions.
Edgar Walford, in answer to Mr. Grain, said he was a draper's assistant. He was present when Miss Cass was taken into custody. He was close to her just before that event, and he saw her walking quietly along the street for about 30 yards. Up to that time he was quite sure she had not taken hold of any gentleman's arm. Witness did not see her speak to any one, nor was there any other woman with her. At the time she was taken into custody by Endacott there was no young woman who ran away across the road. The arrest drew his attention to Miss Cass, and he followed her and the police-constable for some distance.
In answer to Mr. Wontner, witness said that as far as he knew there was no possible reason for Miss Cass's arrest. She appeared to be an innocent person wrongly taken into custody, but he did not take it upon himself to interfere. He waited until he saw the account in the paper of the transaction, before he communicated with the solicitors who were acting for Madame Bowman. When Miss Cass was arrested she seemed very much affected, but she did not cry and went to the station very quietly. He did not hear anything that was said between Endacott and Miss Cass as he was out of earshot. He did not interfere between them when she was arrested, as he did not know what she might have done elsewhere.
Miss Cass recalled, pointed out that the actual arrest took place in Oxford-street in front of Peter Robinson's house.
Wheatley recalled, said he did not know a man named Mountain, but subsequently on seeing the man admitted he knew him. He had a conversation with him as to Miss Cass's arrest. He said to Mountain, "A singular thing happened last night; the very woman I thought was Miss Cass I saw only last night, and if I saw the two of them apart I would be prepared to say it was the same woman." Mountain did not say to him, "If that is so, you ought to go to the superintendent and say so." Witness never told any man that Endacott told him he got so much a night for not interfering with prostitutes. Witness denied that he was in the habit of going to a public-house and drinking with prostitutes.
Inspector Draper, recalled, said he did not believe there was any chance of obtaining information about the fair woman. There were two constables on duty near the Circus at the time, and one of them must have seen the arrest. The court then adjourned for the attendance of these two constables.
After a long interval one of the constables arrived. He gave his name as John Twyman, and stated that he was stationed at the north-east corner of Regent-circus. He could not say whether or not he had seen Endacott that night. If Endacott and Miss Cass had come round the circus he thought he would have seen them.
The inquiry was again adjourned.

On the resumption of the inquiry next day some discussion took place as to the exact spot on which the arrest took place, the witnesses having differed on this point.
Police-constable Dyer, who was on duty near Regent-circus, said he saw nothing of Endacott, but admitted that the latter might have passed without his noticing him.
Mr. Grain having stated that he had no intention of addressing the court, Sir C. Warren said the inquiry was concluded, unless before he made up his report to the Home Secretary fresh important elements in the case were brought under his notice.

Source: The Hackney Mercury and North London Herald, Saturday July 30, 1887, Page 6

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Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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Re: Police Constable Endacott

Post by Karen on Wed 19 Jan 2011 - 22:29

FOREIGN NEWS.
Dissatisfaction With the Acquittal of Policeman Endacott in the Cass Case.

England.
POLICEMAN ENDACOTT'S ACQUITTAL.

LONDON, NOV. 2. - The failure of the prosecution of policeman Endacott for traducing the character of Miss Cass, is a subject of regretful comment among citizens generally and in the press. The Pall Mall Gazette, which took a leading part in the crusade against the police methods illustrated by the Cass arrest, is especially bitter against Judge Stephen, who deemed the evidence against Endacott insufficient to hold him on. The Gazette says that it may now be accepted as English law that there is no redress for any person accused by a policeman. "According to Judge Stephen," remarks the editor, "if the vilest man on the force were to swear that the Princess of Wales were soliciting, he could not be held for perjury unless the Princess produced witnesses to sustain the denial. The ordinary rule of law that the burden of proof is on the accuser is set at naught, but the responsible officials of the police department are saved from danger of decapitation, and this boon, doubtless outweighs one woman's reputation. Endacott will, as the result of the decision, be restored to his position and receive his back pay in full. The outcome of the case has been unfortunate for Miss Cass in all respects. Though it was conceded that there was no proof of anything improper in her conduct on the evening of her arrest, when she was carrying a bundle for delivery for her employers, yet the great resources of the police department have been used in tracing during her whole life, and the result has been the discovery of some pecadillos which have been magnified as much as possible in order to discredit her before the public. It was shown that she was frivolous and indiscreet in her conduct before coming to London, though nothing worse than flirtation was proven. The police also, without any proof to that effect, insinuated that her sudden marriage after the proceedings began was arranged in order to offset medical evidence as to her chastity. It is argued, however, by those interested in criticizing the action of the police, that this line of attack was an evasion of the real issue, and could have no bearing on the right of an officer to make arbitrary arrests of women against whom no evidence could be proven of improper conduct at the time of the arrest. The police certainly have no cause to congratulate themselves on the result of the whole affair, however much as Miss Cass may have been damaged by it.

Source: The Quincy Daily Herald, November 3, 1887, Page 3

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What Became of Miss Cass

Post by Karen on Thu 20 Jan 2011 - 15:28

THE FORTUNES OF MISS CASS.
HER MARRIAGE.

The mistake which utterly ruined Constable Endacott, and may not improbably lead to his incarceration in gaol, has made the fair Miss Cass' fortune. Ever since the facts of the affair have been public property her employer, Mdme. Bowman, has been smothered in orders, in fact, the good lady would like nothing better than to take Miss Cass into partnership. I am told, however, that Miss Cass flies at higher game. She is already a regular contributor to a weekly paper and received handsome sums for her (signed) articles. The next thing we shall probably hear is that she is "going on the stage." Meanwhile Endacott's trial has been twice postponed, and rumours of "an arrangement" with the prosecutrix are current. One can quite imagine Miss Cass would now prefer to let the matter drop. A legal investigation cannot do her any good, and might do her harm. If, for instance, it transpired at the trial that Miss Cass' manner on the night of her arrest was flighty, public sympathy would be considerably mitigated. I confess I have suspected this might be so. Presuming Miss Cass' manner to have been strictly quiet and modest, Endacott's conduct in arresting her becomes inexplicable. A good girl would be no use to him for black-mailing purposes. She wouldn't know what he wanted. Miss Cass was married to the man of her choice last week. A wag remarks that if the constable's trial is postponed too often, by-and-by, instead of being a case of "Endacott" with the lady it will be a case of "Start-a-cot." But I must really apologise for inflicting this shocking pun upon you.

Source: Star, Issue 6081, 10 November 1887, Page 2

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