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Detective Sergeant Stephen White

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Detective Sergeant Stephen White

Post by Karen on Thu 30 Dec 2010 - 18:26

THREATENING TO MURDER.
CALLING SPIRITS TO HIS AID.

This morning, at the Thames Police-court, Henry W. Brinsdan Hinder, 29, described as a coachbuilder, was brought up in the custody of Detective-sergeant Stephen White, H Division, charged with threatening to murder Miss Eva Ford, a young lady residing at Woolwich. - Detective-sergeant White informed the Magistrate that he arrested Hinder on Sunday afternoon, at Tetbury, Gloucestershire, and told him he should take him into custody for absconding from his bail from the Thames Police-court in August last, when charged with threatening to murder a young lady. Hinder said, "When I came to the Court I saw a female who said she was my wife, so I thought I had better step it." On August 4 last witness was present at that Court, when a young lady, Miss Ford, to whom the prisoner had been engaged, gave evidence. She stated that when she broke off her engagement with the prisoner, he wrote her a letter, in which it was stated unless she married him he would murder her. Prisoner had been in the habit of attending spiritualistic seances, and after a seance, he told Miss Ford he had been in communication with her father's spirit, who had expressed himself favourable to their engagement, and hoped they would get married. Witness, in Court, heard the prisoner admit he had written the letter referred to. Since Miss Ford had removed into the country the accused had found out her whereabouts, and had again sent her threatening letters.
Mr. Sayer, Chief Clerk, said on the last occasion the case was tried before Mr. Lushington, who was acquainted with all the facts of the case, therefore the accused had better be remanded until Friday, when Mr. Lushington would be sitting at that Court. That would also give Sergeant White an opportunity of bringing Miss Ford there, and also to produce the threatening letter.
Mr. Saunders thereupon ordered the prisoner to be remanded until Friday.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday April 2, 1889, Page 4

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Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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Re: Detective Sergeant Stephen White

Post by Karen on Thu 30 Dec 2010 - 19:00

FOOTMAN CHARGED WITH FRAUD.

Richard Clark, 20, a footman, was charged at Marylebone, today, on remand, with stealing two blank cheques belonging to the Hon. Norman Leslie Melville, his master, of 24, Elvaston-place, Queen's-gate, S.W. He was further charged with being concerned with Colin McRae, 23, a public-house manager, and Richard Couchman, 32, a farrier, with forging and uttering an order for the payment of 15 pounds 14s. 6d., and another for 10 pounds, with intent to defraud. Mr. Freke Palmer, solicitor, defended McRae, and Mr. Cowdell, solicitor, was for Clark and Couchman. - The Hon. Mr. Melville said the prisoner Clark had been in his employ as footman, and returned with him in the same train from Edinburgh to London on the 27th of October. On the following day the prisoner, who was under notice to leave, left the situation. After he had left the prosecutor discovered that he had lost an account from his hat-box. On the 4th of November he received information from his bankers, Messrs. Williams and Deacon, of Birchin-lane, that some forged cheques had been passed through certain banks. Prosecutor then examined his blank cheques, which had been secreted in his portmanteau, and found that some were missing. The two cheques produced, the body of which he believed to be in Clark's handwriting, bore the same number as his cheque-book. The writing was an attempt to imitate his (prosecutor's) handwriting. - The prisoner was cross-examined by Mr. Palmer and Mr. Cowdell, in the course of which it was elicited that the prosecutor was prepared to have assisted Clark to get a situation as steward in the P. and O. Steamship Company. - George Lander, the landlord of the Mason's Arms, Kensal-green, said McRae called on him and asked him to pass a cheque for 15 pounds odd, and brought the bond to him. He undertook to do so, and shortly afterwards he received a communication from Mr. Melville, in consequence of which he deferred the payment of the money to McRae until the 7th, when the prosecutor and Sergeant White were there. - In reply to Mr. Palmer, the witness said McRae was a highly respectable man, who had filled good situations. - Mr. V. Cox, clerk at Messrs. Williams and Deacon's, having given evidence as to the receipt of the cheques, which he said were unmistakably forgeries, Detective-sergeant White, Scotland-yard, said he had some conversation with McRae, who said he had received the 15 pound cheque in connection with a betting transaction on the racecourse at Brighton. He added that on returning from the races he met Couchman, who, in conversation, said he had been paid a cheque for 10 pounds on the racecourse, and which cheque was cashed at a public-house near the Edgware-road. At the suggestion of witness, McRae took him to Couchman, and they all three went to Scotland-yard, but the men were not then charged. Subsequently warrants were issued, and the prisoners were arrested. Chard being taken at Ipswich by Detective-sergeant Turrell. - Mr. De Rutzen remanded the case for a week.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday November 29, 1887, Page 6

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Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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I Trained Him

Post by Karen on Thu 20 Jan 2011 - 9:06

A SUCCESSOR TO SHERLOCK HOLMES.

Alfred Cooper, 34, well-dressed, who described himself as a detective, of 106, Elmore-street, Islington, was charged at the Thames Police Court on March 3rd with unlawfully assuming the character of a police-constable, supposed for an unlawful purpose. Mrs. Mary Finnigan, wife of the proprietor of the Sugar Loaf publichouse, Backchurch-lane, Whitechapel, stated that shortly before 12 o'clock on Tuesday night Cooper entered the house and called for a glass of ale. Witness served him. He then asked to see "the governor," and said you can tell him I am a police officer from Scotland Yard."
Defendant: "Quite right. Great Scotland Yard. Witness continuing, said when her husband came down defendant said he had come to warn him about the gambling that was being carried on in the house. He also said Detective-Sergeant White told him to come there.
Defendant: Detective Superintendent White, of Stone. That is the man I trained. Detective-Sergeant S. White, H division, said he found defendant being detained at Leman-street station, and on seeing witness he said, "That is the gentleman I mean." Witness knew nothing about him. Constable 96 H said he asked defendant what he was, and he replied, "To tell you the truth I am a steward, but out of a job now. The officer gave me 2d. to go there and see if I could detect any gambling." He afterwards said he was an officer from Old-street.
Defendant: Quite right. I have a roving commission. I am one of the greatest and cutest detective officers in the whole universe. I have been kidnapped and detained at the City of London Asylum at Stone for eleven months. On getting to London Bridge I saw, much to my surprise, the question "Where is Jack the Ripper?" That woman (pointing to Mrs. Finnigan) is the one who held Jack the Ripper's tools. The bag, which contains the tools of Theophilus Montgomery, alias John the Ripper, and with which he did the murders, is in her house. It is close to where the last murder was committed. I have also invented a machine, to do away with Anarchists.
Mr. Mead: You had better stand down for the present.
Defendant: Good morning. Later in the day, Dr. Grant, of Commercial road attended and said defendant was insane.
Defendant: You are a liar. I have been trapped and am not insane.
Mr. Mead ordered defendant to be discharged, and gave instructions for the overseers to be notified of his condition. Cooper had to be forcibly removed from the dock.

Source: Wanganui Herald, Volume XXVIII, Issue 8454, 20 April 1894, Page 3

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Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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