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Inspector Joseph Helson

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Inspector Joseph Helson

Post by Karen on Thu 30 Dec 2010 - 2:03

SEQUEL TO A HORNSEY BURGLARY.
CHARGE OF RECEIVING.

John Pinnick, a licensed victualler, of the Earl of Essex, Bethnal Green, was charged on remand with stealing and receiving a portmanteau, and other articles of the value of 6 pounds, the proceeds of a burglary at 47, Raleigh Road, Hornsey. - Mr. Forbes defended. - Evidence having been given of the burglary at Raleigh Road, Harriett Rimmell, late manageress to the prisoner, said on the 28th ult., two men entered her master's house and asked to see him. The prisoner was sent for, and after engaging in a friendly conversation they all went upstairs together. When they came down one of the men gave her a quantity of cigarettes and a case and the other some collars. When they entered the house one of the men was carrying something but she could not say what. She saw the prisoner give one of the men some money, and tell them they must divide as best they could. On the following day she met one of the men who took her into a public-house and paid for a drink for her. He afterwards told her he had committed a burglary and had nearly paid for it with his life, and how he escaped he did not know. She did not believe it and told him so, and he then added that he had only just come out of prison, and expected soon to go back again. She asked him what he gave the "guv'nor" (meaning the prisoner) and he said a portmanteau. On going back to the Earl of Essex she saw the other man in the bar. On the next day she spoke to the prisoner about it, and he said he only had the portmanteau to mind, and she told him the men had given her some collars, and he advised her to burn them, telling her he should get rid of the portmanteau and gave a letter to give to the police if it was asked for. She having been told that the collars and cigarettes had been stolen, told a policeman. Prisoner told her if any complaint was made she had better go away for a little time and he would give her 5 pounds, and if she wanted more she could send for it. Late on Sunday night two men came to her house and told her if she gave evidence they would shoot her. She had never seen them before.
In cross-examination she said she told the police all she knew before she was dismissed from the prisoner's service. It was untrue to say she told the prisoner's wife when he discharged her, "If I cannot have your husband you shall not have him."
The witness added that her own husband was a builder and a far better man than the prisoner. (Laughter.)
P.C. Robinson, H Division, the constable who arrested Charles Pearce, deposed that in consequence of the statement Mrs. Rimmell made to him he went to the Earl of Essex, and Mrs. Pinnick gave him the portmanteau, which the prosecutor identified as his property.
Inspector Helson said the prisoner called upon him at Bethnal Green police-station and made a statement to the effect that the men were strangers to him and that he only had the portmanteau to mind.
Sergt. Alexander, Y Division proved prisoner's arrest.
Mr. Forbes said his client only minded the bag for these men who were utter strangers to him. This charge was founded upon the witness Rimmell's statement which was only made out of spite. He applied for bail.
Mr. Hughes-Hughes said the prisoner was unable to find bail on the first occasion, but they would allow him out on bail, himself in 100 pounds and two sureties in 50 pounds each with notice to the police until Monday next.

Source: The Courier and London & Middlesex Counties Gazette, February 14, 1890, Page 5


Last edited by Karen on Sat 26 May 2012 - 20:09; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Inspector Joseph Helson

Post by Karen on Thu 30 Dec 2010 - 2:23

POLICE RAID IN HACKNEY-ROAD
Fifty-seven Men in Custody.

Fifty-seven men, arrested during the early hours of Sunday morning, under a warrant of the Chief Commissioner, on premises known as the Loyal United Working Men's Club, 352, Hackney-road, were charged at the Worship-street Police-court today. Fifty-three of the prisoners were placed in the public part of the Court, only four, charged as principles, occupying the dock. These latter were Godfrey Stargett, aged 31, described as secretary of the Club; Joseph Simmonds, 26, a vice-president; Hyman Ernstein, 27; and Henry Parish, 30, club porter. Mr. Wontner, for the prosecution, said the police "raid" was made shortly before one o'clock on Sunday morning, and in the cellar on the premises forty-two persons were found playing with cards and dice, for money, a game which it would be proved was "hazard." That was a game prohibited by Act of Parliament, and, therefore, whatever question might arise as to whether this place was a bona fide club or not was immaterial. - Superintendent Meering, describing the raid, said that in the room there was a table covered with green-baize, and on it a box of dice, cards, and money. Directly the police entered there was a scramble, but Inspector Helson secured the dice, the cloth, and some money. Other officers obtained some of the cards, which were flung about. The forty-two persons were searched in the room and a list made. Some of the "members" had not a coin on them, other 1d. and very small sums. The upper part of the premises had a refreshment room, where there was a bar with two casks of beer, bottles of spirits, and cigars. In a billiard-room were nine men and the prisoner Ernstein. In one part of the premises were sticks and ropes, such as were used for prize-fighting or boxing competitions. - The accused were remanded.

Source: The Echo, Monday July 7, 1890, Page 3

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Re: Inspector Joseph Helson

Post by Karen on Thu 30 Dec 2010 - 2:46

BETHNAL GREEN BURGLARIES.

At the London Sessions on Wednesday before Sir P.H. Edlin, Q.C., Chairman, William Brown, 24, John Shaw, 19, James Thompson, 16, and Elizabeth Barney, 30, were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Streeter, 20, St. Peter's-street, Hackney, and stealing therein a watch and other articles. - Mr. Besley, instructed by the Treasury, prosecuted; Mr. Purcell defended Thompson and Barney, Brown pleaded guilty. - After hearing the evidence, the Chairman held there was no case against James Thompson. - The jury found Shaw guilty, and acquitted Elizabeth Barney and James Thompson. - Barney then, acting on the advice of her counsel, pleaded guilty to other indictments charging her with receiving certain goods knowing them to have been stolen. - Mr. Besley, with regard to other indictments against Shaw, remarked that as he had been convicted of a very serious offence he did not propose to proceed with them. On the charge against James Thompson he would offer no evidence. - A verdict of Not Guilty, was therefore recorded. - Inspector Helson, J Division, said Shaw was only liberated from prison in March last, and up to the time of his arrest there had been about 26 cases of house breaking in Bethnal-green. - Warder Turrell proved nine convictions against Brown. - The Chairman sentenced Brown, who had pleaded guilty to four other indictments for house-breaking, to 10, and Shaw to 7 years' penal servitude. Barney was sentenced to four months' hard labour, and James Thompson was discharged. - The learned Chairman said he cordially agreed with the Grand Jury's commendation of the conduct of inspector Helson and the other officers engaged in the case.

Source: The Mercury, Saturday May 24, 1890, Page 3

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Re: Inspector Joseph Helson

Post by Karen on Thu 30 Dec 2010 - 17:02

A CHILD KIDNAPPED AND MURDERED IN VICTORIA PARK.

An extraordinary death of a little girl named Mary Ellen Barnes, aged two and a half years, whose parents reside at 2, Tuscan-street, Bethnal Green, and who is supposed to have been kidnapped and murdered in Victoria Park, was inquired into by Mr. Alfred Hodgkinson on Wednesday afternoon. Thomas Barnes, the father, stated that his daughter was, on Tuesday week last, left in the passage of the house, when she suddenly disappeared. Inquiries were made, and the deceased was discovered in Bethnal Green Infirmary. She stated that an old man had taken her to the park and had given her some tea. He then took her earrings, her shoes, and cape. The deceased did not complain of having been ill-treated, but she was bruised. She was attended by a doctor, but became unconscious, and died on Saturday.
Charles Woodward, a labourer employed at Victoria Park, said he found the deceased in the plantation near the guinea-pig houses. She was unconscious. Witness called a park constable and conveyed her to the infirmary. He had not previously seen the deceased, or a man and child near the spot.
Dr. Styles, divisional surgeon, said there was a bruise over the left eye. In his opinion death was due to meningitis, accelerated by a blow.
Inspector Helson said every inquiry had been made, but no clue had been obtained as to who the man was that took the deceased away.
After a lengthy inquiry the jury returned a verdict of "Wilful murder against some person or persons unknown," leaving the matter in the hands of the police.

Source: The Mercury, Saturday May 13, 1893, Page 10

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Re: Inspector Joseph Helson

Post by Karen on Thu 30 Dec 2010 - 17:39

THE FATALITY IN HACKNEY ROAD.

At Worship-street Police-court on Thursday, John Spiegalhalter, a weakly lad of seventeen, son of a German clock maker, carrying on business at 405, Hackney-road, was charged before Mr. Rose with causing the death of Alfred A. Sawyer, aged fifteen, by shooting him with a revolver. Detective-inspector Helson, J division, said that about eight o'clock on Monday evening he received information that the boy had been shot, and he proceeded to the house 403 Hackney-road, where he saw on the floor of the kitchen, the dead body of the boy Sawyer. He then went to the adjoining house, occupied by the prisoner's father. In the backyard there was a bonfire, and evidences of the celebration of Guy Fawkes Day. Statements were made that pistols had been used, and that one had been loaded with bullets, the latter having been used by John Spiegalhalter. The latter, when inquired for, was missing, and witness learned that he had been sent away to a relative at Harlesden. The lad was arrested there about midnight, and brought to town during the morning. Detective-sergeant Whitlock deposed to arresting the prisoner. When told the charge, he said, "The revolver went off before I could raise it in the air. I did not see the boy standing at the fence." He made a statement as to where he had put the revolver, and the weapon was found as stated. It was produced by the officer, and proved to be an Army weapon of large pattern, but old make, having ten chambers. One of the bullets had entered the boy's left breast near the heart, and he had died about a minute later. William Spiegalhalter, an elder brother of the prisoner, gave evidence of the lighting of the bonfire and the discharging of fireworks and pistols "into the air." The revolver in question, he said, was loaded with bullets, and after it had been fired off once his brother went into the kitchen to reload it. He had done so and returned into the yard, when the revolver went off "before he had time to raise it into the air." They did not know anything had happened till a few minutes later a message came in from next door, and then it seemed that the boy had been standing at the fence which parted the two yards. Mr. Rose ordered a remand, and accepted the father's bail in 40 pounds for the prisoner's appearance next week.

Source: The Hackney Express and Shoreditch Observer, November 11, 1893, Page 3

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Re: Inspector Joseph Helson

Post by Karen on Fri 31 Dec 2010 - 0:08

THE SEQUEL TO A HORNSEY BURGLARY.

John Pinnick, a licensed victualler, of the Earl of Essex, Bethnal Green, was again brought up and charged, on remand, with stealing and receiving a portmanteau and other articles of the value of 6 pounds, the proceeds of a burglary at 47, Raleigh Road, Hornsey.
Mr. Forbes defended.
The evidence of Inspector Helson, Sergeant Alexander and P.C. Robinson having been read over,
Mr. Forbes submitted that there was no case for him to answer, but the Bench thought it better Mr. Forbes should call any evidence he might have and then address the Bench and he then called, John McHugh of 4, Victoria Place, James Street, Bethnal Green, who said on the day in question (23 January) he was in prisoner's house and saw two men enter one of whom was carrying a black bag which he asked the "guv'nor" to mind. The prisoner took the bag and put it on the floor in the box when the man told him not to leave it there as it might get taken, and he did not want to lose it. The witness Rimmell was not there at the time and came in after.
Mr. Hughes-Hughes said the Bench did not want to hear Mr. Forbes and added: We dismiss the charge.

Source: The Courier and London & Middlesex Counties Gazette, February 21, 1890, Page 5

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Re: Inspector Joseph Helson

Post by Karen on Fri 31 Dec 2010 - 0:28

FATAL AFFRAY AT BETHNAL GREEN.

FREE FIGHT WITH KNIVES.

At the London Hospital, today, Mr. Wynne E. Baxter resumed his inquiry respecting the death of Charles Clapton, aged 17, a hawker, of 2, Sherwood-place, Turville-street, Bethnal-green, who was fatally stabbed in a faction fight, which took place on the night of the 27th ult., between a number of lads from Hoxton, known as "Father Jay's boys," and another gang of lads from Bethnal-green. The deceased, who appeared to be leader of his gang, was stabbed in four places, and died from the effects of his injuries on the 30th ult.
Peter Hawkes, of 25, Nottingham-street, Bethnal-green, an undertaker, deposed that on the evening of the 29th ult. he saw a gang of about 30 youths, between 17 and 18 years of age, turn from Hague-street into Sale-street. Several had sticks, and someone called out, "Here is one." Directly afterwards there were cries as of someone being injured, and the sticks were freely used. Witness noticed a lad on the ground, the others knocking him about. There was a cry of "Look out; here's a copper! Come on;" and the gang then decamped, leaving the deceased lying helpless on the ground. Witness and a friend went to his assistance, and on loosening his clothes found his back was covered in blood. They removed him to a doctor's, and then in a cab to the London Hospital. Witness did not think he would be able to identify any of the deceased's assailants. - George Collins, of 22, Tournier-street, Bethnal-green, said the dispute between the deceased and the other young men originated over a boxing competition, as "the lads" thought the awards were made unfairly. Several witnesses having been called, Inspector Helson said he had other evidence, but it could throw no further light on the matter. Those who could assist him refused to speak. - Detective Chandler deposed to the deceased, in a dying statement, remarking that he was surrounded by about 30 youths, some of whom stabbed him when on the ground.
The jury returned a verdict of "Manslaughter against some person or persons unknown."

Source: The Echo, Tuesday August 9, 1892

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Re: Inspector Joseph Helson

Post by Karen on Fri 31 Dec 2010 - 3:28

DECOYED AND MURDERED IN VICTORIA PARK.

Mr. Hodgkinson held an inquiry at the vestry hall, Bethnal-green, on Wednesday, respecting the death of Mary Ellen Barnes, aged 2 and a half years, the daughter of a wood machinist, residing at 2, Tuscan-street, Bethnal-green. - George T. Barnes stated that the deceased was his daughter. On May 2 the deceased was left in the passage of the house, when she suddenly disappeared. Every inquiry was made, with the result that the deceased was discovered in the Bethnal-green infirmary, having been taken there by one of the Victoria-park constables. Witness went there and was told by Dr. Knox, the medical superintendent, to keep her quiet and to call in a medical man. Witness then took her home, and she made a statement to the effect that an old man had taken her away to Victoria-park and had given her some tea. He then took her earrings, her shoes, and cape. The deceased did not complain of having been ill-treated, but she was bruised. The deceased was attended by a doctor, but became unconscious and died on the following Saturday morning.
Mary Barnes, of 12, Edward-road, Grove-road, said the deceased was her granddaughter. Witness heard that the deceased had been missing from her home and had been found in Victoria-park. Dr. Davis attended the deceased after the father brought her home from the workhouse. She (witness) heard the deceased say that an old man took her away and robbed her.
Charles Woodward stated that he was a labourer employed at Victoria-park. On the 2nd inst., about 7:15 p.m., he found the deceased in the plantation near the guinea-pig houses. She was unconscious. Witness called a park constable and by his advice conveyed her to the infirmary, and then informed the police. Witness had not previously seen the deceased, neither had he seen a man and child near the spot.
Dr. Holland, of 190, Green-street, deposed to being called on the Friday morning and finding the deceased in convulsions. There was a bruise over the left temple. Witness was informed that the deceased had been kidnapped. The deceased was suffering from inflammation of the membranes of the brain, brought about by the injury and fright. Death took place on the following morning.
Dr. Styles, divisional surgeon of police, deposed to having made a post-mortem examination of the body by the coroner's orders. He found a bruise over the left eye. In his opinion death was due to meningitis, accelerated by a blow, and the congestion was most apparent on the spot corresponding with the bruise.
Inspector Helson said that every inquiry had been made, but up to the present nothing had been ascertained to lead to any clue as to who the man was that took the deceased away.
After a lengthy inquiry the jury returned a verdict of "Wilful murder against some person or persons unknown," leaving the matter in the hands of the police to make further investigations.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, Sunday May 14, 1893

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Re: Inspector Joseph Helson

Post by Karen on Fri 31 Dec 2010 - 3:44

DALSTON POLICE COURT.

MONDAY.
ALLEGATIONS AGAINST THE POLICE.

Walter Turner, 22, wood turner, of Danby Street, Bethnal Green, was charged with having been concerned with John Reed and James Millard, already under remand, with stealing a gold Albert from the person of Mrs. Lucy Ann Turner, a widow lady residing at 174, Amherst Road, Hackney. On Wednesday last, at five o'clock p.m., Mrs. Turner was walking near her house when Reed ran up to her and snatched her gold Albert, value 5 pounds, and a pair of eye glasses. He made off with Millard, and the couple were captured. - Two witnesses, Edward Moore, saddler, of Bridge Street, Homerton, and David Davis, dairyman, of Junction Place, Amherst Road, now swore that they saw Taylor in the neighbourhood when the robbery was committed, but neither was able to say that the prisoner took part in the robbery, although it was suggested that he was the person who ran off with the chain. - Detective Murphy said the prisoner was identified among some 10 or 12 others. - Prisoner said he distinctly heard Murphy tell the witnesses, Moore and Davis, that they could identify him by his white necktie, and he also alleged that the officer was the worse for drink, but both these allegations were denied. - Mr. Bros said he was unwilling to remand the prisoner on such slender evidence, but on Inspector Helson stating that there might be a number of other cases prisoner was remanded till Thursday.

Source: The Courier and London & Middlesex Counties Gazette, September 20, 1889, Page 5

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Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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