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Constable James Harvey

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Constable James Harvey

Post by Karen on Wed 29 Dec 2010 - 19:20

A PLUCKY POLICE OFFICER.

At Marylebone, on Wednesday, George Piper, 40, of Bosworth Road, North Kensington, Charles Bloomfield, 32, of Carlton Road, Kilburn, Michael O'Flanagan, 32, of Caird Street, Queen's Park, and Robert Hobbs, a private of the Rifle Brigade, were charged with being drunk and disorderly and using bad language. O'Flanagan and Hobbs were further charged with assaulting the police. The evidence showed that the men had been ejected from the Robin Hood public-house, Kensal Road, with the aid of the police. When outside they created a disturbance, and P.C. Mayhead, 391 X, ordered them away, and, after showing great forbearance at last arrested. Piper and O'Flanagan, when the soldier struck him on the jaw and O'Flanagan on the nose. He let go of Piper and seized the soldier, who then dealt him a blow on the hand with the buckle of his belt. He drew his truncheon to protect himself, but did not use it. On the way to the station Constable Harvey, who had Bloomfield in charge, was struck by O'Flanagan. Piper made an attempt to kick Harvey, and that officer afterwards arrested him. - Mr. de Rutzen fined Piper 20s., or 10 days' imprisonment, Bloomfield 10s., or 5 days, and the other prisoners one month each. He also commended P.C. Mayhead for his forbearance and for his general behaviour under trying circumstances.

Source: The Courier, September 22, 1888, Page 3


Last edited by Karen on Sat 26 May 2012 - 20:09; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Constable James Harvey

Post by Karen on Wed 29 Dec 2010 - 19:35

A SEPTUAGENARIAN'S ADVENTURE.

At the Marylebone Police-court today Agnes Lee, an old woman of 74 years, presented a pitiable appearance as she stood in the dock before Mr. Cooke to answer a charge of drunkenness. - It was about the hour of midnight, while patrolling the Edgware-road, that Police-constable Harvey came across the prisoner, who was lying across the footway helplessly intoxicated. An ambulance had to be sent for in order to get her to the police-station. It was there ascertained that she was a widow, and had come to London from Chingford, Essex, in order to visit a niece. Mr. Cooke was informed that she was charged with a similar offence the night previous, but failed to surrender to her bail the following morning. - The prisoner expressed her great regret for what she had done, and said she suffered from pains in her head. - Mr. Cooke fined her 5s.

Source: The Echo, Saturday April 21, 1894, Page 3

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Re: Constable James Harvey

Post by Karen on Wed 29 Dec 2010 - 20:23

SAVAGE ASSAULTS BY WOMEN.

Lucy Brett and Amelia Watts were charged, the first with kicking David Martin, 121 K, William Asbourne, 561 K, and James Harvey, 184 K, and the second with kicking the constable Martin and attempting to rescue Brett from custody. The defendant Brett and another woman were fighting in Stepney on Saturday night, and the constable Martin parted them. The fight having been renewed, he took hold of Brett, when the other woman went away. Brett became very violent and kicked the officer twice. Watts seized hold of Brett and tried to pull her away, and also kicked Martin on the thigh. The constable Asbourne came to Martin's assistance, but was knocked down and kicked by some of the prisoner's companions. Two butchers who interfered on the part of the police were also knocked down and ill-used by some of the gang. Constable Harvey arrived with a stretcher, and, assisted by the other officers, tried to place Brett upon it and fasten her down. She resisted violently, and in the struggle she seized hold of Harvey's whiskers and kicked him in a such a way that he lost his senses for a short time. Two more constables coming up, the prisoners were taken to the station. - Mr. Lushington sentenced Brett to two months' hard labour for the assault upon Martin, and two months' hard labour for that on Harvey. Watts was sentenced to one months' hard labour.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, April 13 1873, Page 4

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Re: Constable James Harvey

Post by Karen on Wed 29 Dec 2010 - 21:21

POLICE MINSTRELS.

The annual visit of the Metropolitan Police Minstrels to Stratford took place on Wednesday evening, when the Town Hall was not large enough to accommodate the many persons who desired admittance. The arrangements were made under the superintendence of Sub-Divisional Inspector Pipe, of West Ham, who was ably assisted by the inspectors at West Ham-lane and Forest Gate police-stations, Sergt. Shayler and Constable Harvey being instrumental in selling a large number of tickets. Among the officers of the force who attended were: Supt. Wells (K Division), Chief Inspector Bridgen (K Division), Sub-divisional Inspector Pipe, and Inspectors Mearon, Taylor, Sheahan, and Budge (West Ham), Sub-divisional Inspector Quigley, and Inspector Tetcombe (Forest Gate), Sub-divisional Inspector Bantick (Plaistow), Sub-divisional Inspector Hancock (Limehouse), Sub-divisional Inspector Allum (Bow), Sub-divisional Inspector Cawley (Ilford), Mr. Powell (divisional clerk), and many others, Sergt. Cuddon efficiently acting as caterer for the guests. The minstrels are now in their 24th season, and carry out their programme with much vigor, the jokes of the funny men being much appreciated. The items in the first part were: Opening selection by the K Division Band, under the direction of Mr. W. Grant Jones; overture, the Company; comic song, "The Four Sarahs," Mr. A.G. Ellis; song, "Will the roses bloom again," Mr. G. Sporne; comic song, "The whistling coon," Mr. F.T. Masters; song, "Learn to love me, Annie darling," Mr. R. Hayes; comic song, "The rooster in the barn," Mr. J.S. Doyle; ballad, "I cannot say good-bye," Mr. J. Biggs; comic song, "The girl with the golden hair," Mr. W.J. Hopkins; song, "Beautiful isle of the sea," Mr. J. Holder; ballad, "Close to the threshold," Mr. D.M. Attack; song, "The cabin with the roses at the door," Mr. G. Knowles; comic song, "Josephus orange blossom," Mr. T. Haines; bass song, "The old cabin home," Mr. C. Norman; song, "Come back to Erin," Mr. H.R. Willson; comic song, "They're looking for a coon like me," Mr. H.J. Ham; song, "The fisherman and his child," Mr. W. Mew; comic sketch, "The great railway race to the north," by The Company.
Part II. consisted of a comic sketch, "Rival forces," by Messrs. T. Haines, A.G. Ellis, and J. Holder, and a farce, "Tarts," by Messrs. W.J. Hopkins, W. Baker, and A.G. Ellis. There was also a number of selections on the harmoniphone, mandoline, and sleigh bells, by Mr. A.G. Holmes, a song and dance by Messrs. T. Haines, and H. Ham, and Mr. J. Holden entertained the audience with a burlesque, "Thou art so near and yet so far." Messrs. H.R. Wilson, J. Holder, J. Biggs, and C. Norman sang a part song, "The meeting of the waters," and Mr. J.S. Doyle created much amusement with a stump speech. Mr. H.R. Wilson acted as interlocutor. As a result of the concert the Metropolitan and City Police Orphanage will benefit to a considerable extent.

Source: The Express, Saturday February 15, 1896, Page 5

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Re: Constable James Harvey

Post by Karen on Thu 30 Dec 2010 - 0:30

ARGUMENTATIVE BURGLARS.
WORSTED IN DEBATE WITH A MAGISTRATE.

The dramatic arrest of two burglars named George Pearce and John Jones at the Phoenix public-house, Harrow-road, was related at Marylebone Police Court yesterday.
Police-constable Harvey said that at four o'clock yesterday morning he saw a light flickering in the bar parlour. He called a comrade, and, having placed a man on the roof to watch, entered the premises in the rear. They encountered the prisoners on the staircase.
The prisoner Pearce exclaimed, "The game is up. I could have shot you both while you were on the roof." At the same time he took a fully-loaded revolver from his pocket, which witness now produced.
Mr. Curtis Bennett: Are the cartridges drawn?
The Witness: Yes, sir.
The Magistrate: I once had a case where the bullets had not been drawn.
The Clerk: There was a case of the sort at this court years ago. The weapon went off while the magistrate was looking at it, and the bullet went through a chair.
The landlord said that he missed a teapot and a button-hook from the bar-parlour.
Pearce: The articles were not moved out of the parlour.
The Magistrate: If you unlawfully move an article two inches, that is stealing.
Jones: I don't see that. You might as well charge me with stealing the ladder I moved, and the slates we moved off the roof.
The Magistrate: I am aware, Jones, that you know a good deal about this sort of thing, but that is the law.
As regards the revolver, Jones remarked, "There are heaps of them in the streets being played with by children."
The Magistrate: Yes; and some of those children are sometimes shot.
The prisoners were committed for trial.
Before leaving the dock Pearce said: "I did not carry the revolver for the purpose of injuring life or limb, but if I saw a means of escape I should frighten anybody. In this case I saw no means of escape, so I gave it up." He added that Jones did not know he carried the weapon.

Source: Daily Mail, Wednesday August 5, 1903, Page 3

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