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Inspector Spratling

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Inspector Spratling

Post by Karen on Wed 29 Dec 2010 - 14:21

MR. SPROW AND THE POLICE.
CHARGED WITH DISORDERLY CONDUCT.

At the Thames Police-court, today, William Sprow, 34, described as a Trades Union leader, living at the Albion Hotel, Drury-lane, was charged with disorderly conduct, and causing a crowd to assemble, at Lower East Smithfield; and John Mars, 20, a labourer, was charged with attempting to rescue Sprow from the lawful custody of Inspector Goodall, H Division.
This officer stated that at about a quarter-past two yesterday afternoon he was on duty in High-street, Wapping, when he noticed a procession, in which were about 100 strikers. It was headed by a piper. The men hooted and groaned at the workmen at the Hermitage and Carron Wharves, and he stopped them, and told Sprow, who was the leader, and the piper, that that conduct could not be allowed. The men went away, but returned about half-an-hour afterwards, without the piper. They again shouted, and Sprow said, "Keep together, men. The taxpayers of London have no right to send the police here to interfere between us and these men" (pointing towards the men who were at work). Witness then took Sprow into custody, and Mars tried to rescue him. Witness said, in reply to Sprow, that when he stopped the men he said the taxpayers had no right to send the men there. He did not hear him tell the men not to interfere with the police, who were only doing their duty. The previous night Sprow spoke to him, and said that on the following day witness or some other officer would have the opportunity of taking him into custody.
Inspector Spratling, J Division, said that yesterday afternoon he was in front of Carron Wharf, when he heard Inspector Goodall caution Sprow. The latter afterwards returned, and he was taken into custody. The men's conduct was such that it tended to a breach of the peace. The procession menaced the men at work.
At this stage Mr. George Hay Young entered the Court, and said he appeared for the prisoners.
Inspector Spratling said the men were led by Sprow, and were under his control. It appeared to be an organised procession. - Inspector Goodall, recalled and examined by Mr. Young, said that he objected to the piper and the manner in which the men in the procession acted. Sprow asked him not to let the police push the people about. He did not hear Sprow tell the men to keep on moving, and the prisoner did all he could to keep the procession together. Sprow shook his fist in a menacing manner towards the men at work at the loopholes. Sprow's disorderly conduct consisted in calling out to the men to keep together, and leading them up and down. They passed the wharves four times. When he arrested Sprow the latter said he would go quietly, and did so. - Inspector Spratling, recalled, said he did not think Sprow did his best to keep the crowd in order. - Constable Chapple, 344 J, proved seeing Mars catch hold of Inspector Goodall's arm, and try to rescue Sprow.
For the defence, Mr. Young submitted that there was no evidence of disorderly conduct against Sprow. When that prisoner found the inspector objected to the piper the latter was removed. The procession was simply organised with the object of placing pickets along the road. There was no evidence whatever of disorderly conduct. Neither was there any evidence to show that Mars made any attempt to rescue the other man. All he did was to tell Sprow to go quietly. - Henry Yates, a labourer, was called, and he stated that he saw the procession. Sprow told the men they had a perfect right to walk along the highway, provided they behaved in an orderly manner. The police then closed round Sprow, and took him into custody. Mars went and advised Sprow to go away, and he did not attempt to rescue Sprow.
Mr. Dickinson said that Sprow, if he were the leader of the men, should recognise that greater responsibility attached to his action. These turbulent assemblies could not be allowed, and he would be bound over in the sum of 25 pounds to keep the peace. Mars had also been guilty of disorderly conduct, and he would be bound over to keep the peace for six months in the sum of 15 pounds.

Source: The Echo, Friday October 16, 1891, Page 3


Last edited by Karen on Thu 30 Dec 2010 - 0:10; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Inspector Spratling

Post by Karen on Thu 30 Dec 2010 - 0:08

SPROW BEFORE THE MAGISTRATES.

At the Thames police-court, on Friday, William Sprow, 34, described as a trade union leader, of the Albion hotel, Drury-lane, was charged with disorderly conduct, and causing a crowd to assemble at Lower East Smithfield; and John Mars, 20, a labourer, was charged with attempting to rescue Sprow from the lawful custody of Inspector Goodall, H division. This officer stated that about a quarter-past two on Thursday afternoon he was on duty in High-street, Wapping. He saw a procession of about 100 men who were out on strike, marching along headed by a piper. They hooted and groaned at the workmen at the Hermitage and Carron wharves. Witness stopped them, and told Sprow, who was the leader, and the piper that such conduct could not be allowed. They went away, but returned about half an hour afterwards without the piper. They again shouted, and Sprow said, "Keep together, men. The taxpayers of London have no right to send the police here to interfere between us and these men" (pointing towards the men who were at work). Witness then took Sprow into custody, and Mars tried to rescue him. - Inspector Spratling said the men were led by Sprow, and were under his control. It appeared to be an organised procession. There was hooting. He did not think Sprow did his best to keep the crowd in order. - Mr. Dickinson said these turbulent assemblies could not be allowed, and Sprow would be bound over in the sum of 25 pounds to keep the peace. Mars would be bound over to keep the peace for six months in the sum of 15 pounds.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, October 25, 1891, Page 2

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Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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