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Inspector Nearn, CID

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Inspector Nearn, CID

Post by Karen on Thu 23 Dec 2010 - 19:42

FATAL FIGHT AT WALTHAMSTOW.
VERDICT OF MANSLAUGHTER.

Mr. C.E. Lewis opened an inquest at the Lorne Arms, Walthamstow, on Friday afternoon on the body of Edward John Rippin, aged 32, a cabinet-maker, of 7, Hazelwood-road, Walthamstow, who died on the 28th September. On Thursday, the day prior to the inquest, Thomas Punshon, 27, a stone mason, of Goldsmith-road, Leyton, and George Kendall, 27, a bricklayer, of Claremont-road, Higham-hill, Walthamstow, were remanded at Stratford Petty Sessions on a charge of causing the death of deceased. The only evidence given at the police court was the evidence of arrest by Detective Henbest and Detective-Inspector Nearn. Prisoners at the time both made the statement that what was done was in self-defence.
Detective-Inspector Nearn, C.I.D., and Sub Divisional Inspector Rowe represented the police.
Mr. Fred. George represented the accused men.
The Coroner stated that he only proposed to take sufficient evidence to enable an adjournment.
Then the jury could arrange to devote a whole day to the case, as he thought it unfair to the accused men that the case should be interrupted in the middle. He thought it much better that the jury should conclude it in one day, so that no discussion outside could be brought to bear upon their decision.
Ada Elizabeth Rippin, the widow, was first called. She stated that deceased was brought home at twenty minutes to two on the morning of the 7th September by two men, who were strangers to her. They brought him upstairs and put him to bed. She thought he was in drink; he seemed very dazed. His nose was bruised and bent, and was also bleeding; there was blood upon his clothes and in his right ear. He said, "Where's my old woman," and that was all for some time. He was retching all night, and she noticed that one eye was black and the other grazed. During the afternoon of the same day she called in Dr. Clark. About two days afterwards he told her that someone had knocked him about. About a week later he again referred to the subject, and said the man who had knocked him about was a "short fresh-coloured chap" - a painter, he thought, but he did not know his name. During his illness he often raved about the someone who had knocked him about. Dr. Clark attended him until his death, which took place on Tuesday evening, the 28th, at a quarter to eleven. - In answer to Mr. George, the witness said her husband never told her who the men were who brought him home. They told her they found him lying on the ground, but she was so upset at the time that she did not notice whether they said where it was.
In answer to a juryman, the Coroner said every effort was being made to find the two men who brought deceased home.
This was all the evidence taken, and the inquiry was adjourned.
The adjourned inquest was held at the Lorne Arms on Thursday. Mr. Fred. George was again present, representing the accused men, who were also present. - Detective-inspector Nearn, who had charge of the case, had brought up a great number of witnesses, and the inquiry was of the most protracted character. It was also most perplexing, for the various witnesses made contradictory statements.
William Simpson, 9, Courtenay-road, Walthamstow, a tailor, was first called. He stated that about 12:45 a.m. on the 7th September he got into a train at Hackney Downs station. In the same carriage were two men, one of them the deceased, and the other a man who he had since been told was named Armstrong. They all went to St. James's-street station. Armstrong fell out of the carriage, as did also deceased, but he was caught by the head porter. They were certainly not sober. Witness went down into the station yard, and was talking to a friend, when he noticed several men, including the two accused, whom he knew slightly, come down the platform steps in company with two females. They stood in a group talking, when deceased and Armstrong came down the steps from the platform. They pushed their way through the group, and at the same time used very obscene language towards the two women. The deceased man spoke to a man named Pryor, and offered to fight him. Pryor asked why he was picked out for the fight, when Armstrong came forward, and with bad language said he would fight the best man among them. Both Kendall and Punshon advised the two to go away, but they refused. Armstrong took off his coat, and put himself into a fighting attitude before Punshon, who accepted the challenge, and, taking off his coat, began to fight. At the same time Kendall and the deceased began to fight in the roadway. After the fights had been proceeding a little while, Punshon knocked Armstrong down, and, leaving him, walked across to where the other fight had been going on. When witness looked across he saw that deceased and Kendall were no longer fighting. The deceased was lying on the ground alone. Punshon went up to him, and with the remark, "You're not outed yet," or words to that effect, he raised deceased up into a sitting position, and dealt him a blow which caused him to fall back again. After that Kendall and Punshon went away with the women. When deceased was struck by Punshon he thought he heard his head strike against the ground. Pryor brought some water, and Armstrong's face was bathed. While this was going on, two men came up and assisted deceased. One of them said, "If you'll get up and walk we will take you home." Deceased got up, but he fell again. He was bleeding at the time, but witness did not think he had been so much knocked about as Armstrong. - By Inspector Nearn: When Punshon went up to deceased and raised up he might have said, "I'll out you, you b-----, I will." Witness could not be positive. - By Mr. George: The first blow was struck by Armstrong. Before deceased and Kendall began fighting deceased came over to the assistance of Armstrong, but he could not say that he struck Punshon. Kendall then came up, but he could not say whether deceased or Kendall struck the first blow. When Punshon went up to deceased and said, "Get up," deceased did not get up, nor did he attempt to strike Punshon. That he would swear. When deceased was assisted up he fell forward on to Tite's coal office box. - By Inspector Nearn: He could not be sure Punshon raised deceased at all; deceased might have been in the act of raising himself. - By the Coroner: He would not swear that the accused men were sober, but they were certainly not drunk.
Dr. A.S. Clark, of Blackhorse-road, Walthamstow, deposed to attending deceased from the 7th ult. until his death on the 28th. On the 1st of October he made a post-mortem examination which showed that death was due to meningitis, following fracture of the base of the skull. - The Coroner: Would that be likely to be caused by a blow or a fall? - In my opinion it was caused by a fall, but it might have been caused by a blow. - Mr. George: Why are you of opinion that the fracture was caused by a fall? - A blow under the angle of the jaw would have caused such a fracture, but I found an effusion at the back of the head, which showed where he was struck. Such a fracture could not have been caused by a blow from a fist; his head must have come in contact with the ground or something hard. - By the Foreman of the jury. Such an injury could not have been caused by a kick.
A number of other witnesses were called who saw the occurrence. All of them agreed that there were fights between Kendall and deceased and Punshon and Armstrong respectively, but they disagreed about the action of Punshon afterwards. Two agreed with the first witness that he raised him while on the ground and struck him down again, another swore that deceased was not on the ground, but was in a fighting attitude and was knocked down by Punshon, and then raised and knocked down again by him, and another said that he treated both Armstrong and Punshon in the same way, by lifting them up and striking them while they were on the ground. The two women who were with the accused both denied that they saw Punshon or Kendall do anything after their opponents were knocked down. One of them explained this by stating that she was so frightened she went away, a statement which amazed the court. The other admitted she was there all the while, but denied that Punshon struck anybody on the ground.
William Armstrong, or Strong, as he told the Coroner his name really was, also gave evidence. He is an upholsterer, now residing at Bow, but at the time he was living at 18, Warner-road, Walthamstow. He said he met the deceased that evening on London Fields station, and they came to St. James's station together. They were both drunk, and he had only a slight recollection of anything that occurred. He did not remember challenging anyone to fight, nor did he remember fighting. He found next morning he had two black eyes, three teeth were missing, he had a deep cut on the forehead, and many bruises.
Herbert Bishop was the last witness called. He saw very little of the occurrence, but saw deceased and Armstrong lying on the ground. Both were bleeding and groaning. Deceased said, "I want my pal," and witness lifted him over to where the other man was, and sat them side by side. (Laughter.)
The Coroner's summing up was very clear, and the jury, after a short consultation, unanimously returned a verdict of "Manslaughter" against both Punshon and Kendall, with a strong recommendation to mercy on account of the provocation they received. They commended the police for the way the evidence had been put before them, and recommended that in future a constable should be on point duty near the station.
Inspector Nearn stated that a constable was on point duty there up till 1 a.m. every night, but at the time of this occurrence he was taking two women to the station.
The Coroner admitted the accused men to bail themselves in 50 pounds each and one surety each in the same amount.
The inquiry lasted seven hours.

Source: The Express, October 9, 1897, Page 5


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Re: Inspector Nearn, CID

Post by Karen on Thu 23 Dec 2010 - 20:29

MORE ALLEGED LONG FIRM FRAUDS.

At the North London Police Court, on Monday last, William Mathew Webster, 70, builder, of the Clock House, White Hart-lane, Tottenham; William Lawson, 31, a builder, of 228, Kingsland-road, Kingsland; and James Wilson, 54, merchant, of 40, Stonebridge-road, South Tottenham, were charged before Mr. Lane Q.C., on warrants, with having conspired to obtain, from Henry Arthur Kittle and other persons, goods and money with intent to defraud.
Detective-inspector Nearn applied that only sufficient evidence be taken to justify a remand. There were a large number of cases from Leeds, Burton-on-Trent, Norwich, and the city of London, in which goods to the value of hundreds of pounds had been obtained. The goods mostly consisted of cement, lime, timber, and plumbers' materials, and the alleged frauds extended over several years, some cheques bearing the date of 1878.
Detective-sergeant Murphy said that on Saturday he received a warrant from that court. At eight o'clock the same evening he arrested Webster at the Clock House, Tottenham - an old building in course of demolition. Witness read the warrant. He said in reply, "I know nobody. I never gave a reference to any of the others. What I have had I have paid for." Witness took possession of a large quantity of correspondence. At one a.m. on Sunday morning he saw Lawson at 228, Kingsland-road, a shop with two rooms above it. The warrant was read and he made no reply. On the premises witness found a large quantity of correspondence and some cement sacks, which bore the name of Casebourne and Co., Leeds. They would form the subject of a charge against the prisoners. At 8:30 the same morning witness saw Wilson at 40, Stonebridge-road, Tottenham. He was in bed. After the warrant had been read, the prisoner said, "I don't know much about any of the others, Mr. Murphy. I have nothing to do with Mann and the other lot." The "lot" referred to had already been committed for trial from Edmonton. He handed witness a quantity of correspondence and the keys of Waverley House, Tottenham another building in course of demolition, where witness found more cement sacks.
Webster asked no questions.
Lawson said - I should like to know what I am here for. The only thing I have done wrong is having a cheque from Andrew Manns.
Wilson did not ask any questions.
Inspector Nearn said he would not offer any more evidence at present.
The prisoners asked for bail
Inspector Nearn opposed the application.
The matter was already in the hands of the Treasury, and they would prosecute on the remand.
Mr. Lane told the prisoners that he should not grant bail. The information that had been laid against the prisoners were then remanded for eight days.

Source: Weekly Guardian, Friday January 27, 1893

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Re: Inspector Nearn, CID

Post by Karen on Thu 23 Dec 2010 - 20:38

NORTH LONDON.

ALLEGED CHEQUE FRAUDS. - Arthur Wells, 35, a well-dressed man, who described himself as a commission agent, with no fixed abode, was charged with forging and uttering bankers' cheques with intent to defraud tradesmen in various parts of London. - Detective-inspector Nearn said at present the prisoner was only charged in three different cases. His method appeared to be to fill up a cheque and make it payable to a well-known resident. This would be taken to a tradesman who knew the payee, with a letter asking that the cheque should be cashed, as the writer was short of cash. There were a very large number of cases against the prisoner. The prisoner was arrested while riding in a cab in the Strand on the previous afternoon. - Prisoner was remanded.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper, April 14, 1895, Page 18


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Re: Inspector Nearn, CID

Post by Karen on Thu 23 Dec 2010 - 21:47

NOTED POLICE RETIREMENTS.

One of our ablest detectives has just retired after upwards of 25 years' service in the person of Detective-sergeant Frederick Gray, long the terror of criminals in South London, and latterly at Bow-street. Mr. Gray was born at Lower Kirby, Essex, in 1859, and joined the Metropolitan Police in 1877, being at once attached to the L Division, and stopping with it for 23 years. He first became noted for his arrests of deserters, securing no fewer than 250 in five years. In February, 1882, after three months' patient watching, he was able to secure the arrest of a notorious gang of eight coiners in Wappaway-street, Wandsworth. The men were taken in the very act of coining by Gray and other officers, and after a stiff fight removed to Wandsworth police-station. To show the importance of this capture it may be stated that on one bench 12 batteries were working, while over 200 moulds, 600 finished coins, and a die for stamping sovereigns were seized. Mr. Gray also captured the "swell cash-box thieves," Simcox Pearson, and others, early in 1889, and soon afterwards Webb, the notorious burglar, better known as "Bandy," who received 20 years' penal servitude for shooting Sergeant Bonner. On May 6, 1889, the energetic detective captured single-handedly Henry Green, a notorious criminal, against whom were forty-four cases of burglary in the neighbourhood of Dulwich. For this he was rewarded by the court and promoted to detective-sergeant. Carter and Bailey, the West-square burglar, in 1890; Kemp and Gill, the Farringdon-street jewel thieves, in 1892; the notorious shoplifters, the Dickinsons, 1893; James and Williams, the Lambeth coiners; Finberg, Wright, and Harris for the Stamford-street outrage;

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"Scotch Jimmy," for the famous theft of postal orders from the Glasgow Post-office; Polly Carr, the notorious "Queen of the Forty Thieves"; the Cadogan-gardens jewel robbers, and hundreds of other criminals have passed through Mr. Gray's hands. Up to the date of his retirement he has received no fewer than 108 commendations from judges and magistrates for his smart captures.

After a quarter of a century's service in the Metropolitan Police Force, during which his skill and tact have won for him the unstinted appreciations of the powers that be and the sympathetic regard of his comrades, Inspector H.C. Nearn retires upon his laurels and a pension to enjoy a well-earned leisure time. Mr. Nearn's connection with the force dates from June 4, 1877, when he went to Bow-street. That he was marked for rapid promotion was proved by his early transfer as clerk at New Scotland-yard, where he soon reached the grade of sergeant. Thence he was sent as local inspector to Stoke Newington, and, after five years' service returned to headquarters, in 1899, as a first-class inspector. Some notion of the activity of Inspector Nearn's career and of the value of his services in the detection and suppression of crime may be gathered from the facts that, among other achievements, he played important parts in the Chipperfield murder case, in the prosecution of the Stoke Newington illicit still keepers, and in the bringing of Messrs. Goudie, Dick Burge, and Co. to justice. Among his most noteworthy captures were John Sharp, the notorious burglar and forger, and Pockett, the fraudulent money-lender.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper, September 28, 1902, Page 3

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Re: Inspector Nearn, CID

Post by Karen on Thu 23 Dec 2010 - 22:08

A HIGH BAILIFF IN TROUBLE.

At Bow-street Police-court today Herbert Jenour, of Hobury-street, Chelsea, was charged on a warrant with embezzlement. - Detective-inspector Nearn said that he and Detective-sergeant Buckle arrested the prisoner outside his house last night. The witness told him that he held a warrant for his arrest for embezzlement. The prisoner replied, "Oh, you mean my sister's affair." "No, I do not," said witness; "you are charged on the warrant with embezzling money during your employment as high bailiff at Edmonton County Court." The information in the case was read in Court, and from it it appeared it was the prisoner's duty, as high bailiff, to collect money from persons in the Edmonton district against whom a judgment had been given. Two sums, one of 5 pounds 2s. and the other of 4 pounds 11s. 6d., were mentioned which had been received by the prisoner and not accounted for. It was stated that other charges would be preferred against the prisoner, and he was remanded.

Source: The Echo, Friday July 10, 1896, Page 3

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Re: Inspector Nearn, CID

Post by Karen on Fri 24 Dec 2010 - 0:37

GOUDIE AND CO. COMMITTED.

DETECTIVE SIDELIGHTS ON THE TURF.

The chief interest in the Liverpool bank frauds case at Bow-street yesterday centred round the detective evidence, which threw a peculiar light on the racing associations of certain of the accused.
Detective-sergeant Butterworth, of the Bradford City Police, said he had known the prisoner Kelly for the past twenty years. Between 1898 and 1900 he did not appear to be a man of means, but in the beginning of 1901 there was a great change.
Cross-examined by Mr. Charles Mellor (for Kelly): All racing men have their ups and downs. Sometimes they are prosperous and sometimes the reverse? - Of course.
And when they win they throw their money about? - Yes. I remember that about two years ago Kelly owned a horse named Tonian.
Do you know that Kelly backed it for so much money that it started at five to one on? - I cannot say. I do not know whether the horse was ridden by Sam Loates. I may have heard that his horse won in a field of seventeen at Wolverhampton, Baron Rothschild being second, and Corkscrew third. I know what betting "on the nod" means, but I have only seen Kelly bet ready money.
Witness added that on November 25, two days after an account of the frauds appeared in the papers, Kelly's mother had a stall at a church bazaar at St. George's Hall, Bradford, and Kelly lent her active assistance. He did not know that Kelly was able to collect from jockeys and racing men about 90 pounds for the bazaar. He did not know that Kelly owned coursing dogs, and won with Colonel North's dogs. Rickaby, the jockey, was among the racing men he had seen Kelly with.
Detective-sergeant Gough, of Scotland Yard, said he had known Stiles for about six years. At one time he was a "runner" on racecourses in the employ of a bookmaker known as "Chippy" Norton or "John Bull." Since October 1900 his circumstances had changed in a remarkable way, and last year he appeared with horses and carriages.
Witness said he had also known Burge for about seven years as a pugilist and as frequenting racecourses. Prior to October last he did not appear to be a man of means, and during last year he borrowed money from several betting men.
Mr. Biron (for Burge): Would you be surprised to hear that during the last few years he has made 20,000 pounds by boxing alone? - I know he made a great deal of money, but I think 20,000 pounds would leave a large margin. He has not made any money by boxing during the last twelve months. He won the world's light-weight championship in America, and it was said the stakes were 49,000 dollars.
Mr. Biron mentioned two other fights won by Burge, in which it was said he won 1,200 pounds and 1,400 pounds.

BOOKMAKER'S DIAMONDS.

Mr. Moyses (for Stiles): I think "Chippy Norton" or "Mr. John Bull" was a considerable figure in the racing world? - Yes, a very considerable figure indeed.
I don't mean as to his bulk, but as to the business he did. He was in a large way? - He appeared to be in a large way. He wore big diamonds, and so on. It is possible that 39,000 pounds was owing to "Mr. John Bull" at the time of his death, but he had heard that he was not worth much money.
Detective-inspector Nearn, of Scotland-yard, recalled, said Goudie did not tell him that he deposited 1,000 pounds with a bookmaker named Hibbert.
Detective-inspector Froest, of Scotland-yard, said "Laurie" Marks, who had been mentioned in connection with the case, was a most remarkable-looking man, easily identified. After exhaustive inquiries he had come to the conclusion that he had committed suicide while travelling from Boulogne to Folkestone in November last.
Eventually all the prisoners were committed for trial. An application for bail on behalf of Burge and Kelly was refused.
In answer to the usual caution Burge said, "I had no idea that any of the cheques were forged, or that there was anything wrong."
Kelly replied, "I had no idea that any of these cheques were forged. Goudie gave me to understand that he was doing all this for a very rich man. He even wanted me to buy Sievier's horses for him. Mr. Sievier was offered 65,000 pounds for three of them by another gentleman, and refused it. He eventually sold one of them, the Duke of Westminster, for 21,000 guineas. Goudie was in Tattersall's at Newmarket backing horses for hundreds of pounds when I met him.
Goudie said he had nothing to say.
Stiles replied that he had not the remotest idea that the cheques were forged.
Mr. Fenwick said the greatest credit was due to Inspectors Nearn and Froest and Sergeant Gough, and all concerned in the case for the prosecution.

Source: Daily Mail, Tuesday January 21, 1902, Page 3

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Re: Inspector Nearn, CID

Post by Karen on Fri 24 Dec 2010 - 1:15

NORTH LONDON.

THE ALLEGED LONG-FIRM FRAUDS.

William Mathew Webster, 70, builder, of Clock House, White Hart-lane, Tottenham; William Lawson, 31, builder, of 228, Kingsland-road; James Wilson, 54, merchant, of 40, Stonebridge-road, South Tottenham; Andrew Edward Mann, 47, builder, of 81, Trinity-road, Tottenham; and George Henry Richards, plumber, of 228, Kingsland-road, were charged on remand with having been concerned together in a series of alleged long-firm frauds. - Mr. Ward, the barrister for Wilson, complained that the police had stopped his client's correspondence. Two particular letters addressed to him since he had been under remand had been confiscated. - Detective-inspector Nearn said he had those letters. They were addressed to the prisoner at his residence and brought to the court last week. He took charge of them because they both related to frauds. Inspector Nearn said the police still intended to keep the letters.
One of the charges against the prisoners is that they conspired together to defraud Messrs. Young and Martin, building material merchants, Stratford, of goods to the value of about 60 pounds. - Among a number of charges which are brought separately and conjointly against the prisoners, Lawson was charged with obtaining possession of a house and shop, 228, Kingsland-road, under false pretences. - Mr. Humphreys proceeded to deal with another charge against Webster and Mann of obtaining 5,500 bricks from Messrs. Mark Gentry and Co., brickmakers, of Sible Headingham, Essex. These bricks were never paid for, but the original invoice was found at Webster's house when he was arrested. - A number of papers relating to the case could not be produced, and it was stated that on the settlement of the affairs of Mark Gentry the majority of the papers were sent to Messrs. Lloyd's paper mills at Sittingbourne, and there destroyed. - Mr. Lane remanded all the prisoners, and refused bail.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, February 12, 1893, Page 10

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Re: Inspector Nearn, CID

Post by Karen on Fri 24 Dec 2010 - 16:27

TOTTENHAM.

ALLEGED LONG FIRM FRAUDS.

At the North London Police Court, on Saturday last, William Mathew Webster, 70, builder, of the Clock House, White Hart-lane, Tottenham; William Lawson, 31, a builder, of 228, Kingsland-road, Kingsland; James Wilson, 54, merchant, of 40 Stonebridge-road, South Tottenham; Andrew Edward Mann, 47, builder, of 81, Trinity-road, Tottenham, and George Henry Richards, plumber, of 228, Kingsland, were charged on remand, with having been concerned together in a series of alleged long firm frauds. - At the outset of the proceedings Mr. Ward, barrister, who appeared for Wilson, complained that the police had stopped his client's correspondence. Two particular letters addressed to him since he had been under remand had been confiscated. - Mr. Humphreys, barrister, who prosecuted for the Treasury, said no doubt the matter could be explained, probably the letters had been stopped by the governor of the gaol. - Mr. Ward mentioned two particulars - Detective-inspector Nearn, said he had those letters. They were addressed to the prisoner at his residence, and brought to the court last week. He took charge of them. - Mr. Ward: Why? - Inspector Nearn: Because they both related to frauds - one a very serious matter against your client. I will tell you more if you wish. - Mr. Humphreys: Not at present. - Mr. Lane said no doubt the police had good ground for interfering with the correspondence. - Inspector Nearn said the police still intended to keep the letters. - One of the charges against the prisoners is that they conspired together to defraud Messrs. Young and Martin, building material merchants, Stratford, of goods to the value of about 60 pounds. It now appeared from the cross-examination that the prisoner Richards introduced Mann, who was represented as a wealthy man engaged in building speculation at Holly Park, Enfield, to the firm, and demanded a commission for so doing. Goods were supplied, but in order to cover the commission the prices were marked at 20 per cent, above the net prices. Mann complained of this, and fresh invoices at net prices were supplied. As a consequence Richards was not paid his commission. On the first order of 30 pounds Mann paid a cheque of 24 pounds, which was met. Webster was also supplied with goods, but he paid for all he had. - Among a number of charges which are brought separately and conjointly against the prisoners, Lawson was charged with obtaining possession of a house and shop, 228, Kingsland-road, under false pretences. At the time he took possession there were a number of fittings in the shop, and these he told his next-door neighbour (a Mr. Tyley, a boot-maker) he had purchased for 5 pounds. He sold the majority of the things to Mr. Tilley for 13s. - Formal evidence was given to show that Webster was connected with Mann in building estates at Tottenham and Southgate. - Mr. Humphreys proceeded to deal with another charge against Webster and Mann of obtaining 5,500 bricks from Messrs. Mark Gentry and Co., brick-makers, of Sible Headingham, Essex. These bricks were never paid for, but the original invoice was found at Webster's house when he was arrested. The order was executed in November, 1891, and some time after that the affairs of Mr. Mark Gentry went into the hands of a firm of chartered accountants. Among the papers was found a bill for 2 pounds 12s. 6d. drawn in favour of Mark Gentry by Webster, and in Mann's handwriting. When the bill became due the clerk to the accountant called upon Webster at the Clock House Estate, and asked him to meet the bill. The prisoner Webster replied that he was not the Webster referred to in the bill. That Webster was a brother who had recently died in the south of France. As (the prisoner) had no interest in the estate he would not pay the bill. - Mr. Henry Brookes, stationmaster at White Hart-lane station, G.E.R., said that the bricks arrived at the station, and Webster carted them away to the Clock House estate. - A number of papers to this case could not be produced, and it was stated that on the settlement of the affairs of Mark Gentry the majority of the papers were sent to Lloyd's paper mills at Sittingbourne, and there destroyed. - Bail was asked for on behalf of the prisoners, but Inspector Nearn opposed, saying that the case was only in its infancy. Inquiries were being conducted in the country which showed that the case would develop into one of the most serious long firm prosecutions which had come under the notice of the police for many years. - Mr. Lane remanded all the prisoners until Saturday next, and refused bail.

Source: Weekly Guardian, Friday February 17, 1893

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Re: Inspector Nearn, CID

Post by Karen on Fri 24 Dec 2010 - 16:48

CHARGE AGAINST A HIGH BAILIFF.

Herbert Jenour, of Hobury-street, Chelsea, was charged at Bow-street with embezzlement. - Prisoner was until recently high bailiff of Edmonton County-court, and it is alleged that whilst acting in this capacity he embezzled between 300 pounds and 400 pounds. - Detective-inspector Nearn, of the N Division, stated that, accompanied by Detective-sergeant Buckle, he arrested prisoner near his residence at Chelsea. Prisoner said, "Oh, you mean my sister's affair." He (witness) said, "No; you are charged with embezzlement." Prisoner said, "Embezzlement! It is all Tommy Rot." Witness said he would read the warrant if prisoner would go indoors. Prisoner said, "Don't go there," and he was then taken to Bow-street. He there said, "They have been a long time over my affairs, but this is the result of having a basket maker at the Treasury." - The sworn information was read, and it alleged that prisoner received warrants from Westminster and Clerkenwell County-courts, to levy executions on the goods of persons living within Edmonton district; this was done, but that prisoner failed to account for the money, reporting in one case that there were no goods, although the man had goods to the value of 300 pounds, and in the other that the warrant had been withdrawn. It was alleged, further, that he had embezzled between 200 pounds and 400 pounds paid on behalf of persons in his own district. - Prisoner was remanded, it being stated that the Treasury would prosecute.

Source: Daily Mail, Saturday July 11, 1896, Page 2

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Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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Re: Inspector Nearn, CID

Post by Karen on Mon 27 Dec 2010 - 0:27

ALLEGED FORGERY ON LONDON BANKERS.

Frederick Francis Middleweek, aged 19, a clerk employed in the office of the Charity Commissioners, was charged at Bow-street, London, police-court, on Tuesday, with attempting to obtain a cheque book from Messrs. Coutts and Co. by means of a forged order. Mr. Mullens, solicitor to the London Bankers' Association, prosecuted, and said he only proposed to give evidence of arrest, as he had not yet had time to go into the details of the case. The cheque-book was obtained by a fictitious order purporting to come from the Royal Sea Bathing Infirmary. A letter accompanied the order, with a request that the cheque-book should be sent to the Bessborough Library, Roehampton-street, Vauxhall. Suspicions were aroused, and accordingly a "dummy" parcel was made up by Detective-sergeant White, of Scotland-yard. It was duly forwarded, and on Monday at half-past five Detective-sergeant Nearn, of Scotland-yard, saw the prisoner go to the address mentioned and receive the parcel. Witness followed him, and said, "Is your name Walker?" (the person to whom the letter was addressed). He said "No," and declined to say anything further. He was taken into custody. He made no reply to the charge. At Bow-street Station he took the letter from his pocket and opened it. Witness said, "Is that for you?" He replied "Yes." Mr. Bridge (to the prisoner): Do you wish to ask any questions? Prisoner: No; I was commissioned by a nobleman, and for my services I was to receive 1,000 pounds. Mr. Mullens said that on this evidence he would ask for a remand, as he would have several witnesses to call. He observed that a similar order was presented a few weeks ago. It was thought strange as the request for the cheque-book was not made direct from the office. The police then made inquiries. It was proposed to make further inquiries concerning the prisoner. The accused was then remanded.

Source: The Courier and London & Middlesex Counties Gazette, October 25, 1889, Page 2

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Re: Inspector Nearn, CID

Post by Karen on Sun 22 Jul 2012 - 11:17

"COMMISSIONED BY A NOBLEMAN."

Frederick Francis Middleweek, a clerk employed in the office of the Charity Commissioners, is alleged to have obtained a cheque-book from Messrs. Coutts and Co., by means of a forged order, which purported to come from the Royal Sea Bathing Infirmary. At Bow-street, today, Mr. Mullen, the prosecuting solicitor, said a letter accompanied the order with a request that the cheque-book should be sent to the Bessborough Library, Roehampton-street, Vauxhall. Suspicions were aroused, and accordingly "a dummy" parcel was made up by Detective-Sergeant White, of Scotland-yard. It was duly forwarded, and on Monday, at 3:30, Detective-Sergeant Nearn, of Scotland-yard, saw Middleweek go to the address and receive the parcel. The officer followed him, and said, "Is your name Walker" (the person to whom the letter was addressed). He said, "No," and declined to say anything further. He was taken into custody, making no reply to the charge. At Bow-street Station he took the letter from his pocket and opened it. The officer said, "Is that yours?"
"Have you any questions," asked the Magistrate, of Middleweek, when evidence bearing out this statement had been given. "No," said Middleweek, "I was commissioned by a nobleman, and for my services I was to receive 1,000 pounds." - Mr. Mullens said that on this evidence he would ask for a remand. It was proposed to make further inquiries concerning the prisoner. The remand was granted.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday October 22, 1889, Page 3

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