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Inspector Nairn Commended

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Inspector Nairn Commended

Post by Karen on Tue 21 Dec 2010 - 18:58

A TICKET-OF-LEAVE MAN.

THREE YEARS' FOR THEFTS FROM WEST-END FLATS.

John Frederick Edwards, a clerk, pleaded guilty at the London Sessions today to five separate indictments charging him with having stolen watches, clocks, and a lot of miscellaneous articles from furnished lodgings. - Mr. W.H. Leycester, who prosecuted, said that the prisoner had been in the habit of strolling about the West-end and going into houses which were let out in flats, and slipping into any rooms he could, carried away valuable property. The prisoner, who was on his second ticket of leave, was wanted for not having notified his change of address, and he was arrested on a warrant. On his lodgings being searched property to the value of 300 pounds was found. - Warder Cook proved several previous convictions, and Sir P.H. Edlin sentenced him to seven years' penal servitude, and three years' police supervision. He commended the conduct of Inspector Nairn and Sergeant Powell.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday February 20, 1894

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Large Case Of Fraud

Post by Karen on Tue 21 Dec 2010 - 21:08

GOUDIE AND THE DETECTIVE.
AN "UNSOLICITED CONVERSATION."

The Bank Clerk Tells His Story.
EXTENT OF THE FRAUDS.

The large court at Bow-street, was again reserved this morning for the hearing of the case against Thomas Peterson Goudie, a former clerk in the Liverpool Bank; Thomas Francis Kelly, a commission agent; and "Dick" Burge, known better as a professional pugilist.
The first-named, who is represented by Mr. E. Smith, is charged with uttering forged cheques on the Bank of Liverpool. Kelly, represented by Mr. Mellor, and Burge by Mr. Avory, K.C., charged similarly.
Mr. Gill and Mr. Charles Mathews prosecuted on behalf of the Bank of Liverpool.
A large percentage of those in court were friends of the prisoners, and Burge on coming into court looked round anxiously to see if his associates were present. Goudie did not look so well; he, however, refused a seat in the dock.
Two or three applications to Mr. Fenwick, the magistrate, were made at the commencement of the business. Mr. Mellor and Mr. Smith both asked for copies of the statements asserted to have been made by prisoner.

Important Statement In The Train.

Inspector Nairn, however, provided this information in his evidence which followed. The inspector said when he brought Goudie up to London the prisoner was very talkative. Knowing that the conversation was of importance he made a note of it in a book. Goudie said to him: -
"I first met Stiles, with another man, whilst travelling to London on the concluding day of the Cambridgeshire races. We joined in a game of solo whist, and I told them I had been backing horses. Stiles first spoke to me. That evening I stopped at the Bedford Hotel, in London, and went to Hurst Park Races with them. I had two or three bets with Stiles and Kelly, and then went back to Liverpool."


Won 2,000 Pounds

"I won once to the amount of 2,000 pounds, but when I went to Kelly for the money he said that Stiles had borrowed it, and I told him that he had no authority to lend my money. The largest sum I think I have ever won from Stiles was 250 pounds in all."
"I have dined with Stiles, Kelly, and a lady at the Trocadero; and Kelly introduced me to his wife at Earl's-Court. Stiles told me that he had frequently put 8,000 pounds on a horse each way, and I thought he was a substantial man. He used to have a footman named Wicks."
On one occasion a cheque for 9,000 pounds came into the bank, and I was asked whether the signature of "Hudson" was a genuine one. I said "Certainly," and it was passed by the bank.

Without Challenge.

I have never written a cheque twice; it always went through without challenge. The bank has been defrauded to the amount of 163,594 pounds 10s.
I was approached on one occasion at 15, North John-street, Liverpool, by a man who said "You are a bank clerk, and a man who knows a lot about racing." He forced a conversation on me, and told me that I ought to be able to get a lot of money. I granted him an interview. His name was Mances. I was introduced to Marks by telegraph. I do not know Dick Burge.
Other statements - which were fragments of an "unsolicited conversation" with the detective - were to the effect that two men named Haggerty and Ellsworthy had taken 4,000 pounds of his (Goudie's).

Bank Notes' Wanderings.

The wanderings of four 500 pound Bank of England notes were described by a clerk from the bank. The first one, which was dated January 29th, 1898, bore the stamp of the Credit Lyonnaise, West-end Branch, "Stiles" (written in pencil), and the ink signature of "T.F. Kelly." This was paid into the Bank of England by the Earl's-court Branch of the London and South-Western Bank. The other notes, bearing the date of June 10th, 1898, had the Bradford stamp on it.
Note "No. 81,276" had a nice round. First it was issued by the Credit Lyonnaise to Burge on November 8th; then it was passed to Kelly, who paid it to Anthony Kelly, and later on Stiles got it and passed it to the Earl's Court Bank, who transferred it to the Bank of England.

Kelly's Banking Account.

The Bradford Old Bank is connected with the case in an important matter, for its secretary - Mr. A.C. Fox - told the Court that Kelly had a large account with his firm. A copy of his transactions was produced. The balance standing in Kelly's favour on June 13th, 1900, was 11 pounds 8s., and on October 31st, 1900, about 1 pound. The subsequent dealings were:

Date 1900--------------- Sums Deposited

Nov. 25.............. 150
Nov. 30.............. 800
Dec. 10.............. 1,007

1901

Jan. 24............... 500
Feb. 4................. 100
April 2................. 2,365
April 17................ 4.344
May 1.................. 3,815
May 8................... 2,000
May 25................ 250
June 3................. 18,000
June 20............... 1,206
August 17............ 5,000
Sept. 3................. 5,156
Sept. 17............. 16,000
Nov. 11................. 9,000

Date 1901--------------- Sums Withdrawn

March 7, A. Kelly........... 725
March 22, A. Kelly......... 150
March 25, A. Kelly.......... 68
April 6, Stiles.............. 1,000
April 12, Wilson........... 750
April 20, Stiles............. 2,150
April 4, Burge............. 60
Aprill 22, Hodgson........ 100
April 24, Wilson........... 1,560
May 3, Stiles............... 1,850
May 8, Wilson.............. 100
May 6, Fortune............ 600
May 10, Wilson............ 1,200
May 11, Stiles.............. 1,000
June 3, A. Kelly............ 280
June 7, A. Kelly............. 500
June 8, Stiles................ 8,650
June 11, Bruckshaw........... 50
June -, A. Kelly.............. 25
July 6, A. Kelly............... 2,000
July 13, J. Kelly............... 2,000
July 22, E. Stiles............. 225
July 27, A. Kelly.............. 1,000
August 4, A. Kelly............ 50
August 11, B.A. Kelly........... 268
August 22, Stiles............. 2,440
August 26, Cash............. 500
Sept. 3, A. Kelly.............. 250
Sept. 6, Stiles.................. 2,500
Sept. 13, A. Kelly............. 500
Sept. 15, A. Kelly............. 300
Sept. 17, A. Kelly............. 400
Sept.19, Cash.................. 1,500
Sept. 21, Stiles ................ 6,700
Sept. 21, Gillespie............ 1,050
Sept. -, Cash................... 1,500
Sept. 27, Cash............... 500
Oct. 7, Cash................... 500
Oct. 7, J. Kelly.................. 117
Oct, 9, A. Kelly.................. 1,000
Oct. 31, A. Kelly................ 50

Paid Over In Large Sums.

Many of these amounts were paid over in large sums, mainly by cheques signed "R.W. Hudson." Sometimes this was varied by a credit note, or Bank of England notes for 1000 pounds or 500 pounds.
In connection with the September 17th amount, which was paid in with two cheques - 9,000 pounds and 7,000 pounds - the Bank of Liverpool raised a question as to some little irregularity, but Kelly could not be communicated with from the bank at first. After a couple of days the Liverpool Bank wrote to say that the endorsements on the cheque -- purporting to have been signed "R.W. Hudson" - were in order, and the money was advanced.
Mr. Fox said he immediately wrote to Kelly telling him of the correspondence which had passed between the banks on the matter of the cheques.
After this, on November 14th, Kelly presented a credit note for 4,500 pounds over the counter, and had the value in cash.

Balance of 5,764 Pounds.

After these payments had been made there remained a balance of 5,764 pounds. Beside the names mentioned there were payments to Fortune, Hodgson, and "Cash."
Mr. Mellor (for Kelly): I suppose you knew, Mr. Fox, that your customer Kelly was a racing man? - Yes; there were transactions with other bookmakers.
Is the "Cooper" mentioned here a gentleman who settles people's accounts at Tattersall's? - I have heard so.
Now, said Mr. Mellor was your attention drawn to the great increase in Kelly's account? - No; the fact that the cheques were drawn by Hudson disarmed my suspicion.
Is Mr. Anthony Kelly a brother of defendant? - Yes; I seldom saw him or defendant.
How long had Kelly had an account with you? - Since August 8th, 1892, and his usual withdrawals were 10 pounds to 20 pounds.

Offer of a Supplementary Statement.

It was stated by Mr. Smith that Goudie was anxious to assist the police in every way, and was willing to make a supplementary statement to Inspector Nairn whenever he would like to take it.
Mr. Gill said the prosecution would consider the matter.
Further evidence as to Stiles's account with the City and Midland Bank was given by the manager at the Shaftesbury-avenue branch. Stiles commenced banking operations on November 27th, 1900, when he opened an account with 350 pounds, in two 100 pound and three 50 pound notes.
Mr. Blake, the branch manager, said that on December 31st, 1900, there was a credit balance of 452 pounds on Stiles's account. A detailed list was then given of the year's transactions with this customer.

Other Banking Arrangements.

Witness added that when the account closed there was nearly 400 pounds in favour of Mr. Stiles. He was introduced to the bank in the ordinary way, and he was not given to understand that Mr. Stiles lived at Brighton, or kept a large number of horses.
Other banking arrangements by Stiles at the Earl's-court branch of the London and South-Western Bank were gone into. On 22nd November last the account was operated on for the last time, and the balance then was 2,983 pounds.
Mr. Mellor wanted to know how, even supposing that Kelly and Stiles decided to divide amounts received, it could be shown that they uttered cheques knowing them to be forged.

To Trace the Accounts.

His worship said it was for the purpose of tracing the accounts, whilst Mr. Gill said it supported another charge against the prisoner of receiving money obtained by false pretences.
After this other accounts were opened at Clapham Junction L.S.W. Bank in the names of W.H. Stiles, junr., Esther H. Stiles, and Una H. Stiles, and at Clerkenwell where "J.H. Stiles," a tin-ware manufacturer, deposited sums.
For the benefit of the prisoner Goudie's evidence taken at the first hearing in London was read over to him.
Application was again made by Burge's solicitors for bail, but Mr. Fenwick shook his head and said he could not consider it until later.
The three men were then remanded until Monday next.

STILES'S DEFENCE.

Mr. Appleton, who has been instructed by the friends of Stiles, the man for whom a warrant is out in connection with these frauds, has retained Mr. Marshall Hail, K.C., for his defence. Stiles's surrender is hourly expected, and this course is being urged upon him both by his legal advisers and his friends.

Source: The Echo, Monday December 16, 1901

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Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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