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Mary Davies, Lawrence Kellie and Mrs. Kellie

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Mary Davies, Lawrence Kellie and Mrs. Kellie

Post by Karen on Mon 22 Nov 2010 - 21:37

Not long after Mary Jane Kelly's death, Mrs. Hewitt of 25 Dorset Street stated that a man named Lawrence came to see her to make enquiries about Mary Jane Davies. Could this be her relative on the London Stage? Or was he just a friend? Also, note a few other pertinent names.

MR. LAWRENCE KELLIE'S FIRST VOCAL RECITAL.

Mr. Lawrence Kellie's first vocal recital which took place on Monday afternoon at Steinway Hall, Lower Seymour Street, was a distinct success. The hall was well filled in every part, and though the audience was not of a kind from which demonstrative enthusiasm might be expected, there was no lack of spontaneous and hearty appreciation. Of Mr. Kellie's own compositions, "For this would I be thine" was sung by Miss Mary Davies, who was not in as good voice as we have heard her, and "We kissed again with tears," and "Weeping in Dreamland," two perfect little musical gems, were given by Miss Hope Glenn. The composer rendered four of his own compositions most effectively. "This heart of mine," "An Autumn Story," and "Loyal Love," were taken in one group, for which he received a hearty encore. The first of the three is especially charming, both in words and music, and showed the peculiarly sympathetic quality of Mr. Kellie's fine tenor voice to the best advantage. His last song "The Golden Chain" was also well received, in spite of signs of fatigue in the singer after his prolonged exertions. Mrs. Kellie also gave Beethoven's "Adelaide," and Blumenthal's "Requital" in capital style, though the latter is too long to be very popular. Two duets "It is na Jean thy bonnie face," by M.V. White, in which Mr. Kellie sang with Miss Hope Glenn, and "Sons les Etoiles," by A.G. Thomas, in which he sang with Miss Mary Davies, were both very effectively rendered. Miss Davies also gave Cowen's "Thy Remembrance," and "The years at the Spring" by Hartog, with great delicacy and sweetness, and Miss Hope Glenn charmed the audience with two little German songs "Mir Wer Du Schusucht Kennt," and "Madchenlied." Lady Monckton recited "The Faithful Lovers," by Barnand, and "The Bagpipes" in her usual bright, dramatic style, and was much applauded, and M. Theo Werner gave two violin solos with much delicacy and precision, for which he was recalled. A most successful concert was brought to a close by a charming trio "A Wish" by Myles Foster, sung by Miss Mary Davies, Miss Hope Glenn, and Mrs. Lawrence Kellie.

Source: The Courier, May 26th, 1887, Page 10



Last edited by Karen on Fri 9 Nov 2012 - 19:44; edited 6 times in total

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Artist Of No Mean Degree

Post by Karen on Mon 22 Nov 2010 - 21:50

[img][/img]

Source: The Courier, May 26, 1887, Page 8

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Lawrence Kellie

Post by Karen on Mon 22 Nov 2010 - 22:23

MR. LAWRENCE KELLY'S CONCERT AT KILBURN.

- An excellent concert was given at the Kilburn Town Hall on Wednesday evening last under the direction of Mr. Lawrence Kellie for the benefit of "The Inebriate home for women." To this worthy object assistance was kindly rendered by some excellent artistes, and the hall was consequently fairly well filled with a fashionable audience. The front of the stage was embellished with a beautiful display of shrubs and plants. It is to be hoped that a substantial sum was realised for the charity. Mr. Algernon Lindo, who accompanied most of the pieces, played two solos on the piano, "Valse Caprice" by Caryll and "Ballade in A Flat," Chopin, with power and brilliancy. The lady artistes were Madame Osborne Williams, Miss Fanny Joyce, Madame Agnes Larkcom and little Miss Dorothy Hanbury, aged 8. The first-named lady sang with much feeling "Douglas Gordon." This charming song was sung by Mr. Kellie, its composer, recently on the same stage, with that pleasantly quaint style so peculiar to himself, consequently Madame Osborne William's singing, though faultless, lost somewhat of the charm inseparable from the comparison. Miss Fanny Joyce gave Meyerbeer's "Robert toi que J'amie," displaying fair voice and good intonation, Madame Agnes Larkcom sang Tosti's "Beauty's Eyes" in French with her accustomed sweetness. Her notes were very pure and bell like, and it would be difficult to find her superior among English artistes. She in part second sang "Within a mile of Edinboro's town" and as an encore "Comin' thro' the Rye." Dorothy Hanbury, the youthful songstress, rendered De Lara's "Garden of sleep" with almost womanly voice and style, and with much sweetness, and was encored, but we question very much if it would not be more beneficial to her future career as well as the pleasure of the public, that a few years more should pass over her head before she taxes those powers she is evidently endowed with. Mr. Ernest Birch with his fine baritone voice gave the "Bedouin Love Song" and an "Old Scotch song," and Mr. Frederic Upton recited "a sensational novel" and other such humorous pieces as one would not easily tire listening to. Mr. Stephano Khardys played a violin solo (a) "Elegie" by Ernst, (b) "Aragonaise" Massinet, the latter elegant work with masterly intelligence and finish. Mr. Lawrence Kellie, whose popularity is ever increasing, sang "An Autumn Story," perhaps his best known composition, and Hope Temple's "In sweet September," with his usual excellence of voice and feeling.

Source: The Courier And London & Middlesex Counties Gazette, June 22, 1889, Page 3

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Michael Maybrick and Lawrence Kellie

Post by Karen on Mon 22 Nov 2010 - 23:10

In this article, please note the mention of Mr. Maybrick (Michael) as well:

A very agreeable meeting of the Salon took place on Tuesday at the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours. An excellent musical programme was carried out by the aid of Miss Nora Pitcairn, Miss Helen D'Alton, Mr. Maybrick, and Mr. Lawrence Kellie, concluding with a musical sketch by Mr. Herbert Harraden. Some singular dresses were worn on this occasion, the strangest being a white silk Court train with a huge Medici collar pulled up above the ears, and a tulle veil tied round the head. Miss Eva Harrison (who sang the harvest song in "Claudian") was very much remarked in a statue gown of bright sky-blue silk with a fillet of lily leaves round her head. Mrs. Edmeston wore a magnificent dress of white silk brocaded with gold; Lady Vavasour was in black; Mrs. Tremball also wore black, and beautiful diamond ear-rings, Miss Whitman had cast off the habiliments of an Indian squaw, and appeared in a very becoming dress of red-brown plush, with a necklace of curious blue stones. Miss Whitman looked none the worse for the Carnival, but all the other women had a decidedly limp appearance. Among the novelists were Mrs. Henry Reeves (Helen Mathers), in black and white; and Mrs. Cashel Hoey. Miss Marie Decca wore a lovely statue dress of pale pink gauze, fastened on the shoulder with a gold brooch made of a musical stave in gold, with her name done in musical notation in little notes, made of diamonds. Mrs. Radcliffe-Crocker looked well in green, and Mrs. Stack wore a beautiful costume in dark grenat. Among those present were Miss Minnie Bell, Mrs. Alfred Barker, Mrs. Glanvill, Miss Isa Duffus Hardy, and Mr. and Mrs. Milton Wellings.

Source: Local Government Gazette, Thursday March 28, 1889, Page 9

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Singing To HRH

Post by Karen on Mon 22 Nov 2010 - 23:28

Mr. Lawrence Kellie, who is rapidly gaining a prominent position in the musical world, has now permanently taken up his abode in Kilburn. Mr. Kellie had the honour, a few days ago, of singing two or three of his compositions to H.R.H., who expressed himself as highly delighted.

Those who appreciate the graceful expressiveness of Mr. Kellie's voice and compositions, will be glad to hear that he is just about to give three recitals, the full announcement of which appears in another column.

Source: The Courier, Thursday May 19, 1887, Page 9

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Kellie

Post by Karen on Tue 23 Nov 2010 - 18:28

[img][/img]

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, November 20, 1887, Page 6

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No Mean Order

Post by Karen on Tue 23 Nov 2010 - 18:50

WILLESDEN CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH.

SACRED CONCERT.

On Thursday evening, March 8, a sacred concert was given in the above chapel before a very large and appreciative audience. The programmed performed was as follows: -

Chorus, "O Father, whose almighty power"; solo, "Be thou faithful unto death," Mr. J.E. Houghton; solo, "He was despised," Miss Minnie Laurie; chorus, "Surely He hath borne our griefs" solo, "There is a green hill far away," Miss Mary Davies; duet, "For so hath the Lord," Mr. J.E. Houghton and Mr. Sackville Evans; solo, "Light in darkness," Miss Minnie Laurie; solo, "Why do the nations," Mr. Sackville Evans; solo, "Pilgrim's path," Miss Mary Davies; chorus, "Behold the Lamb of God"; solo, "If with all your heart," (by desire) Mr. J.E. Houghton; solo, "Rejoice greatly," Miss Mary Davies; solo, "Nazareth," Mr. Sackville Evans; solo, "O rest in the Lord," Miss Minnie Laurie; chorus, "Hallelujah." A glance at the above programme will show that the concert and the artistes were of a superior character. We were, therefore, not surprised to find so large an audience assembled to listen to such a good and well-known singer as Miss Mary Davies, as well as the other well-known ladies and gentlemen who took part in the proceedings. Miss Davies sang with all her customary grace and power, and Miss Laurie and Messrs. Houghton and Sackville Evans did full justice to their pieces, the latter showing that they too, were artistes of no mean order. Each of the soloists received an encore - Miss Davies for her exquisite rendering of Handel's "Rejoice greatly"; Miss Minnie Laurie for the beautiful air, "O rest in the Lord," Mr. J.E. Houghton for his capital singing of Mendelssohn's "If with all your hearts," which was sang by special desire, and Mr. Sackville Evans for his careful exposition of Gounod's "Nazareth." It is scarcely necessary to say that the choir which numbers 40 voices, under the able conductorship of Mr. John Burr, sang their choruses in a highly creditable style, and gave great satisfaction to all present. Mr. Horace Holmes presided at the pianoforte. The promoters of the concert deserve to be congratulated upon the excellency of the entertainment.

Source: The Courier, March 17, 1888, Page 3

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Mother's Tea And Concert

Post by Karen on Fri 26 Nov 2010 - 0:41

ST. LUKE'S KILBURN.
ANNUAL MOTHER'S TEA AND CONCERT.

The annual tea and entertainment to the mothers and friends, attending the Mother's meeting in connection with St. Luke's Church, Canterbury Road, Kilburn, took place in the Schoolroom adjoining the Church on Thursday evening last. There was a good attendance, about one hundred and fifty partaking of an excellent meat-tea kindly supplied gratuitously by Mrs. Kellie, and presided over by a host of willing friends. After tea the leader of the meeting (Mrs. Kellie) presented each with a beautifully designed and appropriate card and a medal. Subsequently a most successful vocal and instrumental concert was given in the large room, which was tastefully decorated for the occasion with evergreens and flags, &c. The edifice was crowded to excess. The entertainment commenced with a pianoforte duet, entitled "Gigot," which was exceedingly well played by Mrs. Williams and Miss Taylor, and received a meritorious applause. The recitation of Miss Florence Grieves "The Pride of Battery B," was also well rendered. This was followed by a song entitled "Going to Market," which was sung in a tasteful manner by Miss Ethel Gordon. Miss Madeline Kellie then treated the company to a violin solo, which was very creditably performed. The piece chosen by that lady was Farmer's 2nd Sonatina, and so long as she remained on the first and second positions she had complete control over her instrument, but when she attempted the third position her fingering was hardly so accurate and the bowing became a little uncertain. Considering the nature of the piece, however, MIss Kellie played exceedingly well, and was amply rewarded by being heartily applauded. The vocal success of the evening, undoubtedly was due to the humorous songs of Mr. Lawrence Kellie and Mr. Kilmister, both of which were vociferously encored, the latter singing on his second appearance "Poor Thing." The mothers attended MIss Kellie's class then sung "Victoria we hail," the jubilee hymn, in a very creditable manner, the audience joining heartily in the chorus. A long and varied programme was gone through, and the happy gathering separated after singing "God Save the Queen."

Source: The Courier, January 5, 1888, Page 3

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Kellie's Mother's Meeting

Post by Karen on Sat 27 Nov 2010 - 14:06

Mrs. Kellie, whose mother's meeting at St. Luke's, Kilburn, is well-known to many of our readers, is to be congratulated on the success of the entertainment so kindly promoted by her for their benefit last week. We are pleased that the success of Mr. Lawrence Kellie in the musical world does not debar him from giving his kindly assistance to an entertainment of this kind.

Source: The Courier, January 5, 1888, Page 10

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Re: Mary Davies, Lawrence Kellie and Mrs. Kellie

Post by Guest on Fri 23 Dec 2011 - 20:05

This thread is quite interesting and needs bumping up.

Rootschat researchers dug Lawrence Kellie up in the census and his name is really KELLY.

http://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?action=printpage;topic=4941.0

http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/k/kellie.html (?)

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