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Albert Bachert/Backert

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Albert Bachert/Backert

Post by Karen on Thu 18 Nov 2010 - 2:10

SINGULAR DISAPPEARANCE OF A FATHER.

A respectably-dressed young man, who gave the name of Albert Bachert, of 13, Newnham-street, Tenter-ground, Whitechapel, and who appeared to be in great distress, applied at the Thames Police-court, today, for publicity respecting the disappearance of his father, John Bachert, who had been missing since Saturday week. On that day he left home for the purpose of going to the City, but had not since been seen or heard of. As he had a large sum of money, and a quantity of jewellery on him, applicant was afraid something had happened to him. His description was as follows: Age 54, but looks ten years younger; height 5ft. 7in., complexion fair, light hair, blue eyes, and heavy sandy moustache. Was dressed in black diagonal frock-coat, dark tweed trousers, side-spring boots, and soft felt hat. On him was about 400 pounds and several rings, including one large diamond one. - Mr. Saunders referred applicant to the representatives of the Press.

Source: The Echo, Monday September 19, 1887, Page 4

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Fined For Drunkenness

Post by Karen on Sat 20 Nov 2010 - 14:18

MR. BACHERT COMPLAINS OF BEING LIBELLED.

At the Thames Police-court, Mr. Albert Bachert, the chairman of the so-called Whitechapel Murder Vigilance Committee, made an application to Mr. Dickinson, under the Libel Act. He stated that yesterday a meeting of the unemployed was held on Tower-hill, during which a man got up and made a speech. In the course of his remarks he mentioned having received a post-card, on which it was stated that applicant was a drunkard, and a person of bad character. Applicant asked for the name of the writer, and the speaker replied that it had been sent anonymously. He (Mr. Bachert) wanted to summon the speaker for libel.
Mr. Dickinson - Haven't you got something better to do than take an interest in these meetings? Are you one of the unemployed?
Mr. Bachert - I am.
Mr. Dickinson - Then go and look for employment, and take no notice of such stupid things.
Mr. Bachert - I have never been fined for drunkenness, although I must admit Mr. Montagu Williams fined me for being excited. (Laughter.)
Mr. Dickinson - Take my advice, and leave such matters alone for the future.
Mr. Bachert - Yes. They are only Socialists. I shall drop them for the future.
Applicant then withdrew.

Source: The Echo, Saturday April 9, 1892, Page 3

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Bachert Seeks Advice

Post by Karen on Sat 20 Nov 2010 - 14:28

THIS DAY'S POLICE.

THE KINGSLAND TRAGEDY.

At the Thames Police-court this morning, Mr. Albert E. Bachert, who took a prominent part in forming a Vigilance Committee during the excitement caused by the Whitechapel murders, asked Mr. Mead's advice under the following circumstances: - He had been writing to the newspapers respecting the Kingsland murders, and a few days since some of the friends of the murdered men came round to his house with the intention of "paying" him. He wished to know whether, if the men again came to his house, he could give them into custody before they assaulted him?
Mr. Mead said if the men threatened applicant he could obtain a summons against them, but the best thing he could do would be to complain to the police.

Source: The Echo, Monday September 29, 1890, Page 3

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Demolishing Millbank Prison

Post by Karen on Sat 20 Nov 2010 - 14:38

THE UNEMPLOYED.

Mr. A. Backert mounted the parapet on Tower-hill, at 11:30, this morning, and blamed the Social Democratic Party for throwing up the sponge. However, he and his comrades want to keep up the movement, and would do their best for them. It was their intention to march the unemployed to Millbank Prison and ask the buyer of the first lot to employ them in demolishing the prison.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday December 13, 1892, Page 3

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On The Jury

Post by Karen on Sat 20 Nov 2010 - 15:14

SCENE IN A CORONER'S COURT.

THE JURY LOCKED UP.

This morning Mr. Coroner Baxter resumed an inquest at the London Hospital respecting the death of James Evans, aged 65, a labourer, lately living at a common-lodging house, 6, George-street, Spitalfields. From the evidence at the opening it appeared that on the 5th inst. deceased was suddenly taken ill at the lodging-house, and that he was conveyed to the hospital, where he died early next morning. A nurse said that deceased had a bruise on his temple when admitted. Dr. Pembridge, however, deposing that death was due to apoplexy, the jury asked for an adjournment and a fresh doctor. - Dr. Earnest James Reynolds, medical officer of Poplar Hospital, now deposed that, acting on the coroner's instructions, he had made a post-mortem examination. There were no bruises.
The Coroner - The nurse said when she saw him alive there was a bruise on the left temple.
Witness - I examined him most carefully, and there was no bruise.
Mr. Backert - (the chairman of the Whitechapel Vigilance Committee, who was a jury-man.): Would a blow on his forehead cause his death?
The Doctor - I say that his death was due to cerebral hemorrhage.
Mr. Backert - You say there was no blow on the temple?
The Doctor - I don't say so. I say there was no bruise.
The jury here expressed their intention of having all the witnesses recalled. - During the examination of Sergeant Cook the coroner told Mr. Backert that he must behave himself, and speak in a proper manner.
Mr. Backert - You were very nasty with me on Saturday, and I have got a nasty name through it.
The Coroner - I don't know you. I never heard your name till Saturday.
Mr. Backert - Why would you not let me serve on Saturday?
The Coroner - Simply because you were not summoned. I did not know you were the same man. I have no feeling against you.
Mr. Backert - Thank you. I am much obliged for your remarks.
All the witnesses were recalled, but nothing fresh was elicited. While the jury were considering their verdict, Mr. Backert was writing on a piece of paper, and the coroner said, "I don't know what you are doing.
Mr. Backert - I do. We are just getting the verdict ready.
The Coroner - I cannot imagine you have any difficulty. If you cannot agree I shall adjourn the case to the Central Criminal Court, and take the judge's opinion on it.
A show of hands was taken, and out of fourteen jurymen eight were for a verdict of "Natural death," Mr. Backert remarking that he wanted an open verdict.
The Coroner - There are only two alternatives - to adjourn you again to come to a verdict, or to the Central Criminal Court, where you may be kicking your heels about for a week.
Backert - I like "fairations." I shall not alter my opinion.
The Foreman - He can order me to the Central Criminal Court if he likes.
Another Juryman - I speak for eight or nine jurymen, and I think that any sensible man must come to the conclusion that the death is quite natural.
Backert - The jury empanelled here are working men, and the reason why they give way is they don't want to lose time.
The Foreman - The Coroner seems to threaten us with the Central Criminal Court. (To the coroner.) This is only a repetition of last Monday about your 10 pound fine.
The Coroner - There is no threat whatever.
The foreman was about to speak, when the Coroner sternly ordered him to sit down. The Coroner then said that unless he could get twelve of the jurymen to agree he must adjourn the inquiry. "I must," said the Coroner, "ask you to remain here till the end of my Inquests today, to try and come to a decision."
Mr. Backert - We can go out?
The Coroner - Certainly not.
A juryman said that he thought they all ought not to be punished for the sake of one or two.
The Coroner said that he was sorry, but had no option in the matter. Eventually the jury were locked up, the coroner informing them that he would return about four o'clock to see if they had agreed. In the meantime, they would have nothing to eat or drink. Two constables were left in charge of the jury.

Source: The Echo, Monday February 16, 1891, Page 4

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Backert Recieves JTR Letter

Post by Karen on Sat 20 Nov 2010 - 15:57

ANOTHER WOMAN MURDERED IN WHITECHAPEL.

Whitechapel was on Wednesday morning again the scene of another dreadful murder, similar in some respects to those which have been peculiar to that neighbourhood. It would appear that at about 1 o'clock on Wednesday morning a constable belonging to the Commercial Road division was going his "beat" through Castle Alley when he discovered a woman lying on the pavement near to a lamp-post. At first he thought it was simply a drunken person or one of the homeless wanderers of the neighbourhood who was making the pavement a sleeping-place, but upon examination he discovered that she was lying in a pool of blood, and that her throat was cut. He at once summoned other constables to his assistance, and the divisional surgeon was sent for. It was then found that the woman was dead, and the body was removed to the mortuary. Further examination showed that there was a severe wound in the abdomen, from which blood had flowed copiously. The wounds appeared to have been inflicted with a sharp instrument. So far as can be ascertained there was no attempt at further mutilation, and if the murderer was the same as the one who perpetrated the previous outrages in Whitechapel, he must either have been disturbed in his fearful work, or have been content to satisfy his thirst for blood in a less sensational way than before. The crime was perpetrated within the quarter of a mile radius common to the previous murders and within a stone's throw and between the scene of the death-place of Catherine Eddowes in Mitre Square and that of the Miller's Court murder. The buildings near to where the present murder was committed are mostly workshops, and the body was found almost in front of some public wash-houses. The tragedy has created much sensation in the neighbourhood, and the alley has been visited by hundreds of persons. The audacity of the murderer may be imagined when it is stated that the scene is overlooked by a row of houses the inhabitants of which would have been aroused by the slightest cry for help from the victim, and, further, this vicinity, owing to the opportunity it afforded for such an object as that which the murderer had in view, has been subject to special patrol by reserve men of the police from other divisions. On the same side of the road on which the discovery was made there is a continuous row of large warehouses and buildings, while the houses on the opposite side are partly hidden except the upper story by a high hoarding.
A theory held by some experienced detectives is that the murderer is a foreigner working in the capacity of cook or butcher on board a foreign vessel trading regularly to London, and it has been ascertained that some cattle boats arrived on Tuesday at the docks and sailed again on Wednesday. This, taken in conjunction with the dreadful tragedy, has led the authorities to issue orders to the East End and Thames police to watch all vessels about to leave the Thames, specially cattle boats which trade between London, Oporto, and other Spanish ports, and American ports, and also to request the cattle-men to give an account of themselves on the night of the 16th or the morning of the 17th inst. Detective-inspector Regan, Thames Division, with a large staff of detective officers under him, are, in consequence, busily engaged in carrying into effect the order, and all passenger vessels are boarded by the officers, and the passengers carefully scrutinised.
As a corroboration of the above theory, and justifying the action of the Thames police, a letter was received a few days ago by Mr. Albert Backert, 13, Newnham-street, Whitechapel, as chairman of the vigilance committee, commencing: - "Eastern Hotel, Pop---," and then thickly penning the words out. Mr. Backert states that he was urged to treat the matter as a practical joke; but in view of the writer "Jack the Ripper," threatening to recommence operations about the middle of July, and Wednesday morning's murder, enquiries have been made, with the result that it has been discovered that there is an Eastern Hotel in the East India Dock Road, Poplar, which is within a stone's throw of the docks, and where a number of sailors put up. It is thought probable that the murderer may have been on a voyage during the intervals between the Miller's Court murder and the one which on Wednesday renewed the horrors which have shocked the world.
At an inquest held in the afternoon the body was identified as that of Alice Mackenzie, a middle-aged woman of doubtful character, and who was last seen leaving a lodging-house about nine o'clock on the previous evening. Notwithstanding all the exertions of a strong staff of detectives no trace of the perpetrator of the terrible deed has yet been discovered.

Source: Local Government Gazette, Thursday July 18, 1889, Page 7

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Prepared To Fight Police

Post by Karen on Sat 20 Nov 2010 - 16:21

THE UNEMPLOYED.

The man BACKERT announced today, at the usual meeting of the unemployed at Tower-hill, that an unemployed meeting, not under the auspices of the Social Democratic Federation, would be held on Saturday next. - The official organiser JUCHAN protested against the conduct of the police during the demonstration at the offices of an evening paper yesterday. He exhibited his leg, showing a wound, and stated that this was done by the police. The police were ordered to break up any procession that should attempt to start from Tower-hill today.
The next speaker, a man named KING, in alluding to what took place yesterday, stated that if he had had a stick in his hand yesterday afternoon, he would have retaliated. He cautioned the police not to continue their practices of yesterday, because if they did he thought the people would then have the right to use dynamite.

"PREPARED TO FIGHT THE POLICE."

Later on the assistant organiser, Mr. H. Waite, appeared on the scene. He had improvised a large red pocket handkerchief, which was attached to a staff, in the place of the banner which was yesterday captured by the police. In mounting the parapet he called for "Three cheers for the social revolution," and continued to say that the police had behaved cowardly and basely, and if they continued to do so they should all of them provide themselves with such toothpicks (a big stick) as he carried. He cautioned the police that they would not stand any further nonsense, and, if they fought them, they were prepared to fight the police.

Source: The Echo, Wednesday November 09, 1892, Page 3

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Violent Speeches On Tower Hill

Post by Karen on Sat 20 Nov 2010 - 19:13

There is something comical about the conduct of newspapers. Let a well-known man give an instructive address at the Toynbee Hall, or the People's Palace to hundreds of people, and in nine cases out of ten he is taken no notice of. But let some unknown and, it may be, broken-winded orator address a hundred or two of the "unemployed," and he gets a paragraph of publicity in a dozen papers. This encourages him to spout again, and he again gets noticed.

Listen to what the Times, in its well-prepared summary, today, says: -

THE UNEMPLOYED. - The gathering on Tower-hill yesterday was very small at first, but by midday two and three hundred persons had assembled. Among the speakers were Backert and the newly-appointed paid organiser Oldland, who declared that, if something were not immediately done, the unemployed would seize the 16,000 rifles in the Tower, and use them. Nothing but a bloody revolution would benefit the working-man. Some other violent speeches were delivered, but the proceedings ended quietly.

It is bad enough for such pernicious balderdash to be spouted on Tower-hill, or anywhere else; but worse when the insignificant spouters get the honour of notice in leader type in the leading journal. Speakers of the type referred to can no more advance the true interests of the unemployed or the employed than gesticulating buffoons can interpret Plato or produce a satisfactory Home Rule bill.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday December 13, 1892, Page 1

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Foreigners Unable To Vote

Post by Karen on Sat 20 Nov 2010 - 21:45

TORY TACTICS IN WHITECHAPEL.

On Monday night, another indignation meeting was held in Christ Church Schoolroom, Brick-lane, Spitalfields for the purpose of "Protesting against the action of the Conservative Party of this Borough in their scandalous attempt to deprive you of your vote at the next general election, by issuing nearly three thousand mostly unjust, vexatious, and frivolous objections, signed by Joseph Kaufman on behalf of the Conservative Party."
The chair was taken by Mr. C. Barham, and amongst his supporters on the platform were Messrs. Hamilton, Rycroft, W. Willis, Q.C., M.P., Samuel, Davis, Reynolds, and J. Hall, hon. secretary of the Whitechapel Liberal Association. There was a large audience which at intervals heartily applauded the numerous "hits" made by the various speakers. Several free fights took place, and a few persons who had the temerity to utter ejaculations, were speedily put out of the room.
The chairman said they had met that night for the purpose of discussing a very important matter, affecting as it did, the interest of a large body of the electors. Before the last election it was arranged that neither party would object to aliens being retained on the register, and the present Liberal Party in the Borough had promised not to take objection to any man who claimed to be on the register, and that promise had been kept. Many of the Conservatives' objections were made on the ground that the claimants were aliens. That was frivolous, because every Jew was bound to serve on juries, pay taxes, and to fulfill the duties of citizenship. Therefore they should be permitted to fulfill the rights of citizenship. There was scarcely an honest objection that could be taken in the case of those who were objected to by the Conservatives, and therefore he hoped that it was not too late to withdraw those objections. (Hear, hear.) He trusted that the next Parliament would get rid of the miserable technicality by which persons who had for years performed the duties of citizenship were objected to when they claimed the franchise on the ground that they were aliens. (Hear, hear.) Indignation was shown all over the country at the improper conduct in the East-end of London of depriving a legitimate citizen of his rights. He had been working in their midst, and had served in various parochial offices for about 25 years, and he never remembered a more dirty or miserable party trick than the one recently played upon them. (Applause.) On the evening of the 20th of August last, it being the last day for claiming and objecting to votes, he and the Vestry Clerk congratulated themselves that the objections would be very few indeed. Judge of his astonishment the next morning to hear that the letter box of the Vestry Clerk's office had broken down with the weight of the objections made, there being about 475 altogether in Spitalfields. (Shame.) He hoped, ere it was too late, that the Conservative Party would withdraw the paltry objections they had made against the aliens. (Applause.)
Mr. G. Hamilton, whose rising to speak was greeted with loud cheering, proposed a resolution protesting against the action of the Conservatives in Whitechapel, "in trying to deprive electors who would not promise their votes to the Conservative Party, of their right to vote at the next election by issuing nearly 3000 objections, mostly unjust, vexatious, and frivolous, to well-known and qualified supporters of the Liberal Party." Mr. Hamilton in speaking to it said the action of Mr. Kaufman, supported as it had been by the Conservative Party, had been mean and despicable. Honourable men like Mr. Bryce and Mr. Ritchie would never have sanctioned so under-handed a proceeding. (Applause.) He would like to know if Mr. Cowan was a more honourable man than Mr. Ritchie (cries of "no, no"), but yet he had objected to nearly 2000 voters in Whitechapel. (Hisses.) He was of opinion that if the Government only charged 25s. as the price of the stamp for Letters of Naturalization, they would obtain a far larger revenue than they at present received. (Applause.)
Mr. S.M. Samuel seconded the resolution.
Mr. Willis, Q.C., in supporting it said, that he did not attend in any political character, but to ask the meaning of the indiscriminate objections to voters in that district. Indiscriminate objection where persons had a perfect title meant the chance that the person objected to might not have the means to be represented or attend to support his claim. Broadcast objections without inquiry was a contemptible offence, inflicted a great wrong, and those who did it were careless of the interests of others, and did not desire to multiply the number of honourable citizens to support the Legislature. He believed that if the matter were made known to many Conservative members of Parliament and agents they would express their honest indignation and disapproval. (Hear, hear.) What could be the reason that such a contemptible course was taken in that district, except that those objected to were Liberals, and that there was an opportunity of exclusion from the register of voters? (Hear, hear.) Alluding in detail to the form of the objections, he said that many were made because the name appeared to be a foreign one. The conduct of the agent was contemptible, and the man who approved of it was not fit to represent any constituency. Such conduct should deepen their attachment to the party which had ever sought to confer in the widest sense the franchise on the people, leaving to their consciences its true exercise and discharge. (Hear, hear, and applause).
Mr. A.E. Bachert attempted to move an amendment to the effect that the action of the Conservatives was legal and should not be censured, and stated that the Liberals had made false statements about the Conservatives. Despite the earnest entreaties of the chairman, there was such a continuous uproar that Mr. Bachert could not be heard even at the reporters' table within a yard of him, and he was ultimately compelled to desist from his attempt to address the meeting.
The amendment having been seconded, the chairman put it to the meeting, but there were not more than a dozen hands held up in its favour.
The resolution was then carried by an overwhelming majority.
On the motion of Mr. J. Hall, seconded by Mr. Davis, a resolution in support of the candidature of Mr. S. Montague, the Liberal candidate, was carried amidst much enthusiasm.
A vote of thanks to the chairman concluded the proceedings.

Source: East London Press, September 19, 1885, Page 3

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Given Up The Idea

Post by Karen on Sun 21 Nov 2010 - 13:44

Mr. A. Backert has written to the Chief Commissioner of Police intimating that he has given up the idea of holding a meeting of the unemployed in Trafalgar-square on Christmas Day, for which he had obtained permission a few days ago.

Source: The Echo, Friday December 23, 1892, Page 3

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No Lit Torches

Post by Karen on Sun 21 Nov 2010 - 13:59

THE UNEMPLOYED.

MIDNIGHT MARCH IN THE CITY.
PROCESSION DISPERSED BY THE POLICE.

Though the weather was bleak and cold, several hundreds of men and youths were attracted to Tower-hill last night to witness, as they thought, scenes in connection with the "midnight march," so much alluded to in the meetings of the unemployed. The sight was one of a most dismal character. The police, with their top-coats, protected with capes, paraded the wharf - from whose walls the speeches are usually made - and marched up and down the pavement, which is bordered by the iron railings of the Tower enclosure. Ample arrangements had been made to cope with any disturbance or with any attempt to light torches. In all the police-stations of the City constables were kept in reserve, and a strong contingent was also kept at the Seething-lane Police-station. O'Keefe, one of the leaders, opened the proceedings with a rambling speech, in which he told the people they never would be able to do any good until they made themselves a nuisance in the City; and he meant to do it if he got six months. He declared, "I will lead you through the City, follow me."

ORDERS FROM THE POLICE.

At this moment Backert arrived and mounted the wall. When he began to speak a detective touched him on the leg with his walking stick, and told him he wanted to speak to him. Backert jumped from the wall, and went aside. In a few moments he remounted the wall, and said that Colonel Smith had given orders that if torches were lighted the men were to be attacked and dispersed. Therefore he hoped the people would abstain from doing anything to excite the police or anger them. But if they behaved quietly and were seized by the police, they had better take their numbers. He had friends, however, who would meet them as soon as they had got out of the City boundary, and then, if the Metropolitan Police did not object, they could light the torches and continue their march through the West-end. As the Tower clock struck 12 a procession was formed, accompanied by the police, but at Ludgate-hill the number of enthusiasts had dwindled down to a very small number. Upon reaching Temple Bar - close to which the jurisdiction of the City Police ceases - the processionists were met by men of the Metropolitan Police. Passing in among them, they soon scattered the marchers, who made no effort to light torches, but quickly dispersed; and the midnight march thus ended quite peacefully.

Source: The Echo, Friday December 2, 1892, Page 3

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Falsely Accused Of Theft

Post by Karen on Sun 21 Nov 2010 - 14:09

BACKERT AND THE POLICE.

Albert Backert, who has identified himself with the unemployed and many other matters in the district, attended before Mr. Dickenson, at the Thames Police-court, today, with reference to a charge of stealing 300 pounds that was preferred against him some time since. Without being called on for any defence, Mr. Mead ordered him to be discharged, and the gentleman who lost the money had since admitted he was innocent. Last Monday the same person lost two coats, and he (Backert) went and gave information of the robbery to the police. Last night, said Backert, an inspector or detective went to the gentleman's house, 40, High-street, Whitechapel, and wanted him to say that it was applicant who had committed the theft. - Mr. Dickenson advised Backert not to take any notice of such statements. He appeared to trouble himself about matters which did not concern him. - Backert said he had also to complain about Constable 442 H, who had been saucy, and refused to give the name of the officer that called at the house. - Mr. Dickinson observed that the police were not obliged to do such a thing. Applicant had better leave the matter alone, as, in all probability, the gossip was unfounded. - Backert then withdrew.

Source: The Echo, Thursday December 8, 1892,

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Requesting Warrants

Post by Karen on Sun 21 Nov 2010 - 14:13

MR. ALBERT BACKERT applied to Mr. Mead for warrants against two officers of the H division, who, he alleges, have committed perjury. He said he had seen an ex-Cabinet Minister on the subject, who advised him to see Mr. Mead again "before bringing the matter before Parliament." - Mr. Mead said he could only advise him, as he had done before, to see Mr. Montagu Williams, who was on the bench when the original case was heard.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, August 2, 1891, Page 11

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A Ridiculous Scare

Post by Karen on Sun 21 Nov 2010 - 15:05

"JACK THE RIPPER."

A RIDICULOUS SCARE.

Following close on the publication of certain threatening letters alleged to have been sent by "Jack the Ripper," came last week a circumstantial story of the most extraordinary character from the chairman of the so-called "Vigilance Committee" in Whitechapel. The statements contained in it pointed to a direct clue to the Whitechapel murderer, and were said to have been made by a woman. Further inquiry by reporters brought out apparent confirmations of a still more startling character. These were worked up in certain directions with an amount of gruesome detail and ghastly horror that left little to the imagination. On sending a representative of Lloyd's to make independent inquiries into the matter, Mr. Backert could not be found, and from the account of an interview which appeared in the Evening News, he was not aware of either the name or address of the woman who made the statement. Even the initial was unknown to him, for when the Pressman said, "Give me her name and I'll find her out," Mr. Backert replied,
"The name is Newcome or Newcomb, but I'm not sure. I think it began with an N."
"Nicholson, Nelson, Newman, Newton, Ner-----"
"She didn't want her name published."
Researches in another quarter, however, ultimately led our representative in the right direction, and on finding the woman, she told a very different story to that sent to the papers by Mr. Backert. It was given at length in a large portion of our Special Edition of last week; and went to show that a simple tale of feminine fright had been magnified into a sensational horror. Notwithstanding this Mr. Backert sought to defend his conduct in the following letter, which appeared in Monday's Chronicle: -

"Several newspaper have attempted to throw some doubt upon the statement which was sent to you on Friday concerning the woman who called at my place and made the statement. From the information I supplied to a Lloyd's News reporter he was able to trace the woman and get a statement from her. I swear positively that every word mentioned in my letter was said by her although I notice in the newspapers this morning that several passages have been contradicted - in fact, the woman appeared so upset that I firmly believe she does not now remember what she really did say. I may add that the report which appeared in the Star on Saturday is entirely untrue. The conversation I had with the reporter was not at all as reported. There were two gentlemen present (Mr. Long and Mr. Copleston) who will swear that what appeared in the Star concerning what I was supposed to have said is not true. I never stated that I wished notoriety - in fact I have always shunned it; and in reference to the murders I have all along endeavoured to trace the murderer and have been assisted by many others who elected me as their leader and chairman. The names of many of these men can be given if required. In justice to myself and others who have helped me, I trust you will insert this note in your next issue. -
I remain, yours faithfully, ALBERT BACKERT, - 13, Newnham-street, Whitechapel, Oct. 12.

We may tell the chairman of the Vigilance committee that he is altogether mistaken in supposing that he gave our representative the clue.

AN IMPORTANT LETTER.

On Friday the following communication, which throws an interesting light on the story of the latest scare, came to us from Ipswich: -

TO THE EDITOR OF "LLOYD'S NEWS." - DEAR SIR, - I have just had my attention drawn to the paragraph in your issue of the 12th inst., containing the account of the interview of your reporter with my ex-charwoman at _____________square, Mrs. ________; also to a copy of Mr. Backert's letter to the Daily Chronicle, giving his version of an interview with the same informant. I am the "Captain" referred to, and I wish to thank you for the sensible and able manner in which you have investigated the matter.
The information given by Mrs. __________ to your reporter is straightforward and correct in almost every detail. My memory, however, in one respect, does not serve me so well as hers; for I do not recall as clearly as she appears to my movements at the time of the murders, with the exception of the occasion of the last one, which occurred while I was spending a fortnight with friends in Kent.
I am quite aware that the various coincidences were so remarkable as to furnish Mrs. ______ with reasonable grounds for suspicion, especially as on one occasion to which she refers, I was suffering from an acute attack of cystitis, for which I was treated for about a fortnight as an in-patient at University College Hospital.
With regard to Mr. Backert's letter, I am certainly of opinion, after reading Mrs. _________'s straightforward and temperate statement to your reporter, that, as your paper remarks, "there was nothing to justify the heated and exaggerated letter he sat down to write."
I enclose copy of a letter which I am sending to Mr. Backert, and of which, as well as of this, you are at perfect liberty to make any use you please.
Enclosed you will find my card; but you will of course understand that I do not wish my name in full to be brought before the public. -
I remain, your obedient servant, M.P.

COPY OF LETTER TO MR. BACKERT.

"Ipswich, Oct. 16, 1890. - SIR, - I have just seen two reports of certain information supplied by my ex-charwoman, Mrs. ______ , formerly of _______square, E., in one case to yourself, in the other to a reporter from Lloyd's Paper with regard to the so-called "Jack the Ripper" murders. May I suggest that you might have shown more wisdom had you communicated the information unobtrusively to the police instead of rushing into print with a slipshod and highly-embellished version of what was evidently intended to be, and was in almost all particulars, a truthful statement by an honest though ignorant woman; for by the former method of procedure you would have put the matter into the hands of experts, and would have avoided not only the trouble and excitement caused by your letter, but the possibility of having to answer for your unjustifiable conduct. I enclose my card, but trust that you will have sufficient discretion to understand that my name is not for publication. - I remain, sir, yours faithfully, THE MAN REFERRED TO.

THE WOMAN'S STORY.

Last night we received a letter from the woman herself - too long for publication - in which she says of Mr. Backert, "I solemnly declare I was only two minutes in this man's company...but I was about half an hour in his sister's company...He describes me as a nervous woman - how, then, could I lodge such a man? I can assure you, sir, I was not so nervous as not to remember what I told him. In the first place I had only two rooms - one leading out of the other. I now declare I never let a furnished room, and never on oath did I tell this man such a story. He has injured me a great deal. Why did he not send his sister for a policeman? He says he had not time; but he found time to sit down and write to the paper. A more cruel attack against a defenceless woman was never read."
The poor woman is afraid she will be called "Jack the Ripper's landlady." This need not be if she will only keep her own counsel. We have refrained from printing her name or address, and so far as we are aware it is unknown to Mr. Backert to this hour. In the public interest, as well as that of all parties concerned, silence is best; but the "Vigilance" chairman - we do not hear of any committee - does not appear to be of this opinion. Not satisfied with the unwarrantable publication of the mass of hysterical nonsense of last week, he appeared at Lloyd's office last night, showing a letter bearing the post-mark, "Low-hill, Liverpool," which ran as follows:

Dear Boss, - I am sorry for troubling you, but, since my last epistle, I have altered my mind as regards Hackney, London, and intend to do a bit in Liverpool for a short time in the vicinity of Hanover-square. I am already billeted here as you will see by the postmark. I intend to give the Liverpool police the chance of their skill this time. -
JACK THE RIPPER.

In giving publicity to this letter we must state that we do not attach the smallest importance to it. The police authorities say that threatening letters have become so common that they are convinced they are designedly written for mere wantonness or to create a scare. A "vigilance committee," if it is to be of the slightest public good, should discountenance sensational excitement.
Let Mr. Backert, instead of rushing into print, quietly hand over any letters he may receive to the police, and he will be acting far more wisely than he has done in the past.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, October 19, 1890, Page 9

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G.W.B.

Post by Karen on Sun 21 Nov 2010 - 15:55

ALLEGED LETTER FROM "JACK THE RIPPER."

According to the St. James's Gazette Mr. Backert has received a letter from "Jack the Ripper." The letter is given as follows: -

"George-yard, Whitechapel. - I am going to commence operations again shortly in this neighbourhood, and if you or your infernal gang in the least attempt to trace my whereabouts, so help my God, I'll put a knife in your heart. So beware and take warning, and let me alone. Let the police catch me if they can; it's their duty. But I pity them, as I never intend to be taken alive. I have nearly been caught twice. - Yours truly, JACK THE RIPPER. G.W.B. - my initials." Mr. Backert has handed the letter to the police."

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, July 5, 1891, Page 16



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Interview With Lord Mayor

Post by Karen on Sun 21 Nov 2010 - 16:08

THE UNEMPLOYED.

INTERVIEW WITH THE LORD MAYOR.

Mr. A. Backert, the leader of one of the sections of the unemployed which has separated itself from the leadership of Messrs. Juchan and Waite, the Social Democratic Federation organisers, had an interview yesterday with the Lord Mayor at the Mansion House. The interview was strictly private, but Mr. Soulsby, the Lord Mayor's private secretary, afterwards furnished an account of what had taken place. After hearing Mr. Backert's statement, the Lord Mayor said that he did not believe the distress at the present time was exceptional. With regard to starting a relief fund, he thought that such a course was altogether inadvisable, as people would thereby be induced to come up from the country. Mr. Backert asked him to use his influence with the City companies with a view to them taking action, but his influence in that direction was not so great as Mr. Backert appeared to imagine. His (the Lord Mayor's) opinion was that trade had been greatly injured by strikes, the depression caused by which he, as an employer of labour, had himself experienced. He was willing, in his individual capacity, to do all that lay in his power to remedy any genuine distress that could be shown to exist, and if Mr. Backert would furnish him with the names and addresses of a few typical cases, he would cause such cases to be investigated. Before this had been done he could not take any action.

MEETING ON TOWER-HILL.

The usual daily meeting of the unemployed was held on Tower-hill yesterday. A speaker named Dennis denounced the paid organisers, Juchan and Waite, and defended the Shipping Federation in its attitude towards the dockers.

Source: The Echo, Thursday November 17, 1892

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The Unemployed

Post by Karen on Sun 21 Nov 2010 - 16:17

THE UNEMPLOYED.

A meeting of unemployed was held yesterday on Tower-hill. - Mr. W. Cartwright, of the Vestry Employees' Union, was the first speaker, and he explained that they were met together to obtain employment, and so put an end to the sufferings which they were enduring for want of work. They wished, first of all, to be heard quietly, because they only wanted to have work found for them, and they hoped that their reasonable requests would be granted, according to the promises made them by the Progressive members of the County Council. (Cheers.) - Mr. Henry Waite, who is a dock labourer, moved the following resolution: - "That this meeting of unemployed workmen condemns the action of the County Council in refusing to receive a deputation; and, further, calls upon the Council to open municipal workshops at once to provide work for the unemployed of London." - Mr. Moore, of the Navvies' Union, seconded the resolution, and among the subsequent speakers were Mr. A Backert and Mr. Lloyd, a commercial traveller. - The resolution adopted.

Source: The Echo, Friday April 1, 1892

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JTR A Woman?

Post by Karen on Sun 21 Nov 2010 - 20:17

THE WHITECHAPEL MURDERS. - The chairman of the Whitechapel Vigilance Committee, Mr. Albert Backert, informed the Press Association yesterday that the police at Leman Street station, having received a letter stating that a tall, strong woman has for some time been working at different slaughter-houses dressed as a man, and made searching enquiries during the morning at the slaughterhouses in Aldgate and Whitechapel. It is presumed that this has something to do with the recent Whitechapel murders, and it has given rise to a theory that the victims may have been murdered by a woman. It is remarked that in each case there is no evidence of a man having been seen in the vicinity at the time of the murder.

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At Westminster Abbey

Post by Karen on Sun 21 Nov 2010 - 20:48

THE UNEMPLOYED.

On Sunday morning a contingent of the unemployed, headed by Mr. O'Keefe, marched from Tower-hill to Westminster Abbey, where they occupied four rows of seats close to the north door. The Rev. Sir James Erasmus Philipps, Bart., M.A., was the preacher, but he made no reference to the unemployed question or the presence of the contingent. The offertory was for the poor of Westminster. At the conclusion of the service the men had an interview with Dean Bradley and Archdeacon Farrar in the Jerusalem chamber. After some conversation Archdeacon Farrar asked: Do you want relief or do you want work? O'Keefe: We want work. Archdeacon Farrar: The sympathies of every good man in England are with you. We have it on the authority of Mr. Keir Hardie that there are 1,250,000 men throughout the country out of work. That number of men represents a nation. Supposing, then, we could dispense relief to those in London, we should have a host of men flocking up from the country, and things would be as bad as ever. If extra work were provided it would dislocate those industries already in existence. The dean and myself cannot, of course, provide you with work; and, in the matter of relief, we have the district of Westminster, where our own parishes are situated, to look after. You may rest assured, however, that we will do all we can to alleviate the distress which is so rife at the present moment. Archdeacon Farrar, amid the cheers of the deputation, announced that the dean would be pleased to present each man with 1s. as an evidence of his sympathy, and that he (the archdeacon) would present each of them with a similar amount. On retiring the deputation thanked Dean Bradley and Archdeacon Farrar for the kind manner in which they had been received.
On Tuesday afternoon a body of unemployed, acting on the announcement made at the morning's meeting on Tower-hill, paid a visit to the offices of the St. James's Gazette, to protest against some remarks published by that journal on the previous evening. The editor explained that there was no intention to attack the genuine unemployed, and the deputation, expressing satisfaction, withdrew.
On Thursday Mr. Backert and two others waited as a deputation on the Dean of St. Paul's, who told them that it would do more harm than good to have a sermon and collection in St. Paul's on behalf of the unemployed. If the deputation would send to the secretary of the Diocesan Board of Education the names of any genuinely unemployed men, the dean promised to use his influence with that gentleman in order to get work for them.
On Friday Mr. Backert addressed a meeting of unemployed on Tower-hill, vigorously denouncing the Dean of St. Paul's reception of the previous day.

The man Daniel O'Keefe, was charged at the Thames Police-court on Wednesday with causing an obstruction on Lord Mayor's day in front of the Sailors' home, Dock-street, Whitechapel. - Mr. Mead bound defendant over to keep the peace.
A tailor giving the name of George Burnett, living in Clerkenwell, was charged, at Bow-street police-court, on Monday, with obstructing the police in Trafalgar-square on Saturday last and bound over to keep the peace.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, November 13, 1892, Page 2

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Cheating And Defrauding

Post by Karen on Sun 21 Nov 2010 - 21:02

ALBERT BACKERT IN COURT.

Albert Backert, 26, who described himself as an engraver, of 3, Harford-street, Bristol, was charged on a warrant, at the Thames police-court, on Friday, with obtaining a quantity of bread and flour from Mrs. Elizabeth Pascoe, with intent to cheat and defraud. The prisoner, it may be remembered, figured as the chairman of the self-styled Whitechapel Murder Vigilance committee, and he has also lately figured at the Tower-hill meetings of the unemployed.
The information of Mrs. Pascoe, baker, of Commercial-road, showed that on the 14th ult. Backert came to her shop and presented an order, which he stated was urgent, for six quarterns of bread and six quarterns of flour. Believing he came there with the authority of the Rev. Mr. Wilson she let him have the goods.
The Rev. Harry Wilson, vicar of St. Augustine's, Stepney, stated he was chairman of the Labour Bureau committee, of which Backert had acted as secretary at a salary of 25s. a week. It was the prisoner's duty to fill up order forms; but he had no authority to go to Mrs. Pascoe's.
Detective-serjeant A. Pearce, H division, said he arrested the prisoner at Bristol on Thursday. After the warrant had been read Backert said, "I am entirely innocent."
Mr. Dickinson remanded the prisoner until Tuesday, and agreed to accept bail in two sureties of 25 pounds each, with 48 hours' notice to the police.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, February 12, 1893, Page 2

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Money From Rothschild

Post by Karen on Sun 21 Nov 2010 - 21:31

SCENE ON TOWER-HILL.

A man of the name of King alleged, at a meeting of the unemployed on Tower Hill this morning, that he and Backert had received each 5 pounds from Lord Rothschild, for the purpose of speaking against the Social Democrats. He was met with a hostile reception and had to be protected by the police.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday January 24, 1893, Page 3

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Was Innocent

Post by Karen on Sun 21 Nov 2010 - 21:40

THAMES.

BACKERT AND THE POLICE.

Albert Backert attended the court with reference to a charge of stealing 300 pounds that was preferred against him some time since. Without being called on for any defence, Mr. Mead ordered him to be discharged, and the gentleman who lost the money had since admitted he was innocent.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, December 18, 1892, Page 4

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Writes To The Prime Minister

Post by Karen on Mon 22 Nov 2010 - 1:18

From the central office of the "Unemployed Investigation and Relief Committee," 85, Commercial-road, Mr. A. Backert, secretary of the committee, lately addressed a letter to the Prime Minister, in which he said: -

Thousands of workmen who voted for your party at the last election expected that when you were returned to office work would be found for them, but you adjourn Parliament and neglect the unemployed. The men, with their wives and families, are now starving, and we are doing our best to help them from a starvation grave. Now, sir, let me know at once whether you will, as soon as Parliament assembles, take the unemployed question in hand in preference to that of Home Rule for Ireland. If you do not attend to the unemployed we, the committee, shall feel it our duty to call upon the unemployed in general to elect men who will stand by them in their hour of need.

The letter was promptly followed by another from the Rev. Harry Wilson, vicar of St. Augustine's, Stepney, and chairman of the committee in question, in whose name he repudiated the language used by Mr. Backert, and informed Mr. Gladstone that that gentleman had, in consequence of his action, ceased to be their secretary. The committee claims to be entirely non-political.

Source: The Guardian, January 25, 1893, Page 131

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Letters For Backert

Post by Karen on Mon 22 Nov 2010 - 1:50

"JACK THE RIPPER'S" WARNINGS.

The Central News says the rumours current of a further expected visit of Jack the Ripper on Wednesday night caused a revival of the scare, especially in Whitechapel and the East-end. - It appears that the police have from time to time received numerous anonymous communications, and although none have been actually disregarded, yet one received early this week was deemed of sufficient importance to be circulated, which was done on Tuesday in a quiet manner throughout the entire police force of the metropolis. The following is the text of the letter: -

"261, Whitechapel-road, London, Sept. 28, 1890. Dear Mr. _______, please look out round your quarter. I am about to commit a murder in your neighbourhood. I am, yours faithfully, JACK THE RIPPER - I saw your name in Lloyd's. The neighbourhood is supposed to be Victoria-park-road, South Hackney." The Central News says that although the police have circulated the letter they attach little importance to it, but in consequence of it being the season of the year in which "Jack" committed his last atrocity, they have taken special precautions. The activity in the slums has been resumed, and the men on duty have been urged to renewed vigilance, and in certain districts extra men have been put on with the latest "improvements" in dress and noiseless boots. Secluded spots are especially to be watched. It is understood Sir Edward Bradford on his return to Scotland-yard on Wednesday, had a special report made to him on the precautions adopted with a view to the arrest of the notorious assassin should he recommence his atrocities.

TO THE EDITOR OF "LLOYD'S NEWS." -
SIR, - The reports which have appeared during the last few days concerning the supposed "Jack the Ripper" have caused great alarm in the East-end, and being chairman of the Murders Vigilance committee I have been asked by many persons for information concerning these threats. I may say that a few days ago I received a letter purporting to have been sent by "Jack the Ripper," stating to look out for some more murders during the coming winter. Having received so many threats, I took no notice of the matter, but in view of the fact that murders have been committed after I have received letters threatening to do so, and also that the dark nights are approaching, one cannot fail to take some notice of the matter. Should any more letters be sent, either to the police or myself, I shall at once call a meeting and reorganise the Vigilance committee, and appeal to the Home office and Scotland-yard to grant the same power to the committee men as is accorded to special constables, as something must be done to stop both these threatening letters and a repetition of those horrible murders which have so greatly injured the East-end. - Yours faithfully, ALBERT BACKERT, 13, Newnham-street, Whitechapel, Oct. 3, 1890

Last night Mr. Backert wrote again to say he had just received another card signed "Jack the Ripper." It was from Whitechapel-road, and ran thus: -

"Dear Boss, - Be prepared for another murder and mutilation - not in Whitechapel, but in the Hackney district, perhaps the Strand way. I never mean to quit my ripping. I love my work too much for that. Ha. Ha! Ten more murders I intend to do."

A correspondent directs our attention to a "prophecy" in "Old Moore's Almanack" for 1890, which runs as follows: -

"At the end of October an important clue will be discovered, which will ultimately lead to the detection of the villain who committed so many foul murders in the East of London."

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, October 5, 1890, Page 9


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Fraud

Post by Karen on Mon 22 Nov 2010 - 2:01

CHARGED WITH FRAUD.

At the Thames Police-court, this morning, Albert Backert, aged 26, who described himself as an engraver, of 3, Harford-street, Bristol, was charged on a warrant, with obtaining a quantity of bread and flour from Elizabeth Pascoe, with intent to cheat and defraud. -
The information of Mrs. Pascoe, baker, of Commercial-road, was to the effect that on the 14th inst. Backert came to her shop and presented an order, which he stated was "urgent," for six quarterns of bread and six quarterns of flour. Believing he came there with the authority of the Rev. Mr. Wilson, she let him have the goods. - The Rev. Harry Wilson, Vicar of St. Augustine's, Stepney, stated he was chairman of the new Labour Bureau Committee, of which Mr. Backert had acted as secretary, at a salary of 25s. a week. It was the prisoner's duty to fill up order forms; but he had no authority to go to Mrs. Pascoe's. - The Rev. R. Wilson, curate, and brother of the last deponent, stated Backert produced the form "A" to him, saying it was a very urgent case, and that the committee had ordered it to be at once relieved. Believing that statement was correct, he signed the order. - The Magistrate remanded the accused, but allowed bail.

Source: The Echo, Friday February 10, 1893

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Re: Albert Bachert/Backert

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