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Miss Clark Murdered In Early 1888

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Miss Clark Murdered In Early 1888

Post by Karen on Sat 13 Nov 2010 - 11:18

THIS DAY'S NEWS.
TERRIBLE TRAGEDY AT MARYLEBONE.

HOW THE YOUNG WOMAN WAS MURDERED.
THE POLICE ON THE TRACK.

The circumstances connected with the shocking discovery at No. 86, George-street, Marylebone, where Miss L. Clark was found with her throat cut, and otherwise terribly injured, are at present surrounded with mystery. The police are naturally reticent with regard to the evidence to be adduced at the forthcoming Coroner's inquiry, but it would appear from independent sources of information that there is now no doubt as to the nature of the poor young dressmaker's death. Inspector Robson, an experienced officer in the detection of crime, is today busy making investigations, together with some detectives of the Criminal Investigation Department. Whatever may be the character of the evidence in their possession (and which they decline to disclose), there is reason to believe that they are on the track of the perpetrator of the crime. The two young men detained last evening have been released, but the officers trust that their inquiries today may enable them to get some definite particulars which will enable them to make an arrest.

EVIDENCE OF A STRUGGLE.

It now appears that an application was made to inspect the house (which was to let, with the exception of the second floor, occupied by Miss Clark), and that it was this which led to the shocking discovery. The deceased was found near the passage, where a stream of blood for some distance along the floor indicated that a severe struggle had ensued between the victim and her murderers, for it is generally thought now that more than one man was engaged in the perpetration of the crime. Immediately the police were called in they came to the conclusion that a horrible crime had been committed; for, while no weapon could be found - which at once dispelled the idea of suicide - a medical examination of the body led to the discovery of an extensive injury at the back of the head. This circumstance leads the authorities to think that Miss Clark received a sudden blow from her assailants, and that then, while partially insensible, her struggles were arrested by the cutting of her throat. Her watch and chain, money (there is a rumour in the district that Miss Clark had saved a considerable sum, as her dressmaking business was of a high-class description), and other articles of value were then, it is presumed, stolen, and the rooms she occupied thoroughly ransacked.

NOT SUICIDE.

The difficulty that the police have to contend with is the fact that no definite idea can be fixed as to what day the tragedy occurred. It is however, believed that the last time Miss Clark was seen to leave the house was on Friday evening. Mrs. Grover, residing at 17, Blandford-street saw Miss Clark in Baker-street a few days ago. She then appeared quite cheerful. Apart from the existence of extensive injuries to the head and the absence of any weapon, Mrs. Grover says the deceased was not at all a likely person to commit suicide. Mrs. Grover was on very intimate terms with the deceased woman, She, indeed, formerly lived with Miss Clark, at 86, George-street, but left some months ago and went to reside at 17, Blandford-street. Her opinion, therefore, as to Miss Clark's disposition and character are not founded upon a mere casual acquaintance. To our reporter this morning Mrs. Grover said, emphatically - "Miss Clark was not the person to commit suicide. Oh dear! no." Mrs. Mees, a widow, and sister of the deceased young woman, arrived this morning, in almost a heart-broken state, and is now staying at No. 27, King-street, which is a coffee-shop, at a corner of a turning near George-street, occupied by Mr. Brigstock, who, too, has known the deceased for some considerable time, and who, moreover, confirms the statement at to Miss Clark's cheerful demeanour at all times. Miss Swift, an assistant at this coffee-shop, saw Miss Clark last Sunday week, when she called there and had a long conversation with her. She, too, speaks highly of Miss Clark as a genial young woman of a bright and happy disposition. "There was no suicide in her," remarked Miss Swift, who inclines to the belief, generally expressed in the district, that the deceased was entrapped by some man, under the guise of a friend, and then murdered.

THE MEDICAL MAN'S OPINION.

The medical man who was first called in, and who has since made a minute examination of the body, confirms the impression, as given above, that Miss Clark was foully murdered. The injuries on the head, the traces of blood, and the terrible and unusual character of the throat wound, all indicate, in his opinion, a horrible death at the hands of at least one miscreant. The doctor adds that the head is evidently extensively fractured. It is not possible to ascertain, from the nature of the injuries, whether the deceased was held by one man while another cut her throat; but it is considered not improbable, from the fact of her dress being much disarranged, that Miss Clark was resisting an assault upon her at the time she received the blow rendering her partly unconscious. The blood, spattered about on all sides, showed (in the doctor's opinion) that the poor woman was not rendered insensible at the first blow, as others suggested, but that, violently resisting, she grappled with her assailants, who, fearing discovery, committed a crime which at first they might not have contemplated.

WILL THIS PROVE IMPORTANT?

There is a rumour in the district that two men were seen to hurriedly leave No. 86, George-street, late on Friday night, hail a cab near, and depart in the direction of Baker-street; but at present no direct confirmation of this statement is forthcoming.
Dr. Thomas has already received full particulars as to the tragedy, and an inquest will shortly take place on the body, which has been removed to the local mortuary.

Source: The Echo, Wednesday January 25, 1888, Page 4



Last edited by Karen on Sat 13 Nov 2010 - 19:02; edited 1 time in total

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Murdered Under Mysterious Circumstances

Post by Karen on Sat 13 Nov 2010 - 12:41

THIS DAY'S NEWS.
THE MARYLEBONE TRAGEDY.

THE POST-MORTEM EXAMINATION.
SENSATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ANTICIPATED.

The police today are making strenuous efforts, in connection with the tragical death of Miss Clark, who was found murdered at the foot of the staircase in No. 86, George-street. Dr. Spurgin has this morning made an elaborate post-mortem examination, but, being the divisional surgeon of police, he declines positively to give the minutae of his investigations, which will be made known at the Coroner's inquiry.

HOW THE CRIME WAS COMMITTED.

This opinion, however, has been definitely arrived at - that the young dressmaker received a terrible blow from a heavy blunt instrument, the effect of which was to completely fracture her skull. At the time Miss Clark was thus struck, she had, to all appearances, been standing on the stair-landing, the effect of the blow being to send her reeling forward to the bottom of the staircase, where her throat was cut. There are but slight injuries on the hands, and these were received, it is evident, while Miss Clark, holding up her arms to struggle with her assailant, was endeavouring to make her escape from the house. Her cries were then stopped by her throat being cut. At present it is thought that not more than one blow on the head was given, but the effect of this so stunned her that she was unable to scream, which accounts for no noise having been heard by Mr. T. Thomas, who resides next door.

AN ARREST EXPECTED.

Inspector Robson (who, it may be mentioned, was instrumental in getting the clue respecting Lefroy which led to his capture) is using the most strenuous exertions in regard to this Marylebone mystery, and it is not improbable that an arrest may take place at an early date. It is now asserted that one of the men detained the day before yesterday was a distant relative of the deceased. Even amongst those who have endeavoured to unravel the circumstances of the tragedy from the commencement there is a wide difference of opinion both as to the original motive for the crime, and as to the character of the probable perpetrator, but from facts which have come to the notice of the authorities suspicion rests in a quarter which may give a still more sensational aspect to the mysterious tragedy.

ANOTHER THEORY.

Another theory was this morning started. It is thought that a man had, while Miss Clark was absent, secreted himself in the house, or opened the front door (which has a very ordinary lock) with a latchkey, his object being robbery, it being generally thought (as stated in The Echo yesterday) that Miss Clark - a frugal, careful, young woman - was possessed of money as well as jewellery. It is conjectured that then, while disturbed by the deceased's return, he struck her a blow when she was ascending the staircase, and then deliberately followed up the attack as she lay wounded at the foot of the stairs.

DECEASED'S SISTERS INTERVIEWED.

Mrs. Mees, a widow, who is a sister of the deceased, is staying at Mr. Brigstock's, 27, King-street, Marylebone, where Miss Clark was well known. Another sister and a brother of the deceased have also arrived there, and this morning they were interviewed by Inspector Robson and the other officers engaged in the case with a view to gaining further particulars as to the possibility of the deceased have any male acquaintances. Though nearly 40 years of age, Miss Clark looked much younger, and some months ago it is stated that she contemplated marriage. All these facts have been tendered to the proper authorities investigating the murder. So far as can be gathered from her friends, all the jewellery belonging to the deceased young woman has been described in the police informations, and it is hoped that this may lead to tracking the murderer, should he not have been a professional burglar.
Mr. Jarman, the Coroner's officer, has been making full inquiries today, so as to place evidence before the Coroner, and at the inquest a letter, found on the deceased, will be produced. This letter however, throws no light upon the main facts of the case. It was from documents discovered in the house that the deceased's friends - some of whom have now come from Somersetshire - were communicated with. When the Coroner's officer was first called the quantity of blood on the face of the deceased was so great as to obliterate the features, and this had to be washed off prior to recognition by her relatives.

THE DECEASED A RELIGIOUS WOMAN.

Miss Clark, was, today, described as a young woman of exemplary and even devout character, and was accustomed on Sundays to frequent a place of worship. Last Sunday week she was at Portman Chapel, Baker-street, where she was a regular attendant.

MISS CLARK'S CHURCH CONNECTION.

Mr. C. Robinson, of 8, Baker-street, who is a member of Portman Chapel, the pastor of which is the Rev. H. Nevile Sherbrooke, states that, being the collector of pew rents, he is in a position to say that Miss Clark was a seatholder at that place of worship, which she attended regularly. Upon referring to his books he found the entries of payments made by the deceased, who has rented a pew continuously from June, 1886. Mr. Robinson added, "She was not only a well-conducted young woman, but very religious."
Mr. Reynolds, the verger of Portman Chapel, and living at 29, King-street, says he was astounded at hearing of the tragedy. Miss Clark was highly spoken of as a member of the chapel, at which she was a very regular attendant.

NO FURTHER CLUE.

Up to late this afternoon no further clue had been obtained as to Miss Clark's murderer; but the theory is more than ever apparent that robbery was the principal motive. As stated yesterday, Miss Clark had a high-class connection as a dressmaker, one of her customers being the sister of Lord Lonsdale, and this being known in the neighbourhood, the general surmise was that she was possessed of considerable means. The theory therefore, that some man, bent on robbery, secreted himself in the house, was disturbed, and then murdered the occupant, has gained credence, especially as every vestige of jewellery - even a turquoise ring on her finger - was stolen. The deceased had frequently been asked why she lived alone, but her joking answer was that, until she married, she had no wish to change her residence, especially as her business in George-street was so well known.

THE JEWELLERY MISSING.

It is stated that a gold ring - one not usually worn by Miss Clark - was found on the floor of her bedroom, apparently as if it had been hastily dropped, while a jewellery case was being ransacked. Miss Clark's missing jewellery consists of a gold lever watch and chain, a gold necklet, with a gold telescope pencil attached, three gold rings - set with pearls, coral, diamonds, and turquoise - two pairs of bracelets, some gold earrings, and a gold brooch. Pawnbrokers have been visited by the police, with a view to seeing if any of the missing valuables can be traced. The police are also anxious to obtain information as to a cabman who was seen on Monday evening to take two men as fares from within a short distance of 86, George-street.

Source: The Echo, Thursday January 26, 1888, Page 4

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The Cabman Found

Post by Karen on Sat 13 Nov 2010 - 16:54

THE MARYLEBONE MYSTERY.
DETECTIVES AT WORK.

THE CABMAN FOUND.
HE COULD RECOGNISE HIS FARE.

This morning it is asserted that the cabman who is stated to have, on Friday evening, taken up two men near Miss Clark's house, has been found. The statement concerning these two men is, that after coming from or near Miss Clark's house they walked some short distance up the street and then hailed the vehicle. The cabman in question fixes the hour at which he took up two men in the street at half-past ten. He then, he says, drove them to Cannon-street Station. His description of his fare certainly corresponds with that given of the persons who are alleged to have left the house. The cabman has also expressed the opinion that he will be able to identify the men. Of course, up to the present there is nothing to show that these had anything to do in Miss Clark's house - but the popular idea in the neighbourhood is that the incident may have an important bearing on the elucidation of the mystery.
This morning, Inspector Robson and a number of experienced detectives had a consultation with a view to considering the course to be pursued with reference to the investigation of the circumstances surrounding Miss Clark's terrible murder at 86, George-street. Although today there are a few additional facts to work upon, any special action will not be taken by Inspector Robson until after the inquest.

AN OMINOUS INCIDENT.

Respecting the deceased as a worshipper at Portman Chapel, Baker-street, Mr. Reynolds, the verger, has made an additional statement, in which he repeats that the young woman was of an exemplary character and a constant attendant. Mr. Reynold's added that there was an ominous incident connected with his first knowledge of the tragedy. He was taking a walk, when a gentleman connected with the chapel stopped him and said, "You have heard of poor Miss Clark's death?" Mr. Reynolds replied that he had not. He was then also informed of the very sudden decease of the bell-ringer at the chapel. He tolled the bell when Miss Clark last occupied her pew there - on the 15th inst. He was shortly after taken ill, and died on the very day that the corpse of the deceased was discovered.

MR. BRIGSTOCK MAKES A FULL STATEMENT.

Mr. W. Brigstock, of 27, King-street, Marylebone, an old friend of Miss Clark and her family, and with whom the relatives of the deceased are now staying, has made a statement to our reporter. Mr. Brigstock says: - "I have seen Miss Clark since she was taken to the mortuary. From the condition of her face when she was first discovered - the whole features being hidden with coagulated blood - I feared I should be unable to recognise her; besides, I did not exactly know what injuries she had received, whether the front of her head was battered as well as the back. But the face had been carefully washed, and there she was, poor thing, lying in her coffin, the very image of what I had seen her a few days ago. Though the wound in her throat was of a terrible character, her features were not in any way distorted. I do not know what the doctor says; but this, I should think, shows that she was quite insensible when her throat was cut - otherwise her face would have had a pained expression. Poor Miss Clark! She was as sprightly a girl as you would see anywhere, with a commanding appearance - demure, but invariably cheerful. I can vouch for the fact that she was not engaged to be married at the time of her death, but when she first went to 86, George-street - over two years ago - there was some talk of her settling down in life with a young man whom she had known. Though I did not see her immediately after she was found murdered, I am told that she had her bonnet on, which is a remarkable thing. It looks almost as if she had just come indoors and was trying to escape from the house. But the soles of her boots were clean, and this makes the police think that she had not just come indoors when she was attacked. I confess I can't understand it. One of her rooms was not disturbed in the least - only the bedroom, where all her jewellery and her money were taken - but other portable things of worth were not touched. The murderer evidently only wanted to take what he could get in his pockets. She was fully dressed when discovered. The blood on either side of the passage, and the stream on the floor almost looks as if there had been a desperate struggle, but that does not correspond with the placid expression of her face. As far as I could see, her body was in this position - her legs resting upon the passage, while her head lay at the foot of the three stairs leading down to the kitchen. The sight was a truly shocking one."

MISS CLARK WELL OFF.

"As to Miss Clark being well off, that I can vouch for, but her friends are almost astounded. They knew that she had money, but now they have discovered that she had a banking account with about 500 pounds to her credit. Then the jewellery stolen was of considerable value. No one knew that the poor thing, living a lonely life in that house, had so much money. Perhaps that was why she was murdered. The police, I hear, are doing their very best, but the whole thing is so mysterious, and the clue so vague, that I doubt myself if the murderer will be discovered."

EXAMINING THE FLOORING AND DRAINS.

Yesterday afternoon detectives and some skilled workmen made a thorough examination of the flooring of the house at 86, George-street, in order to, if possible, discover any weapon that might have been used to murder Miss Clark. The drains running from the premises have been flushed with powerful streams of water, and other means adopted to see if anything had been thrown down the closet and worked its way to the pipes underneath. So far, however, no additional light has been thrown on the crime, and the police themselves regard the murder as one more and more mysterious as the investigations proceed. The bed on which Miss Clark slept was undisturbed when the body was discovered, thus indicating that the murder was committed before she retired to rest.

Source: The Echo, Friday January 27, 1888, Page 4

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Inquest of Lucy Clark

Post by Karen on Sat 13 Nov 2010 - 21:33

MYSTERIOUS MURDER IN MARYLEBONE.
ROBBERY OF MONEY AND JEWELLERY.

On Friday, at the Ossington coffee tavern, Paradise-street, Dr. Danford Thomas, coroner, opened an inquiry as to the circumstances connected with the murder of Miss Lucy Clark, 49 years of age, who was discovered on Monday evening with her throat cut and her skull fractured, at 86, George-street, Marylebone.
Francis Clark, a stonecutter, of 150, Walworth-road, deposed: I have one brother and four sisters living. I had a sister named Lucy Clark, aged 49, residing at 86, George-street. She was a dressmaker. I last saw her alive on Sunday, the 8th of January. She was then quite well, with the exception of a cold. She occupied three rooms on the first floor. She had been residing there nearly three years. She earned her own living at dressmaking, and was able to keep herself comfortably. When I visited her on Dec. 31st the shop was to let. She was the sole tenant of the house. On Saturday night, the 21st. inst., I went to invite her to come to dinner on the Sunday. I rang the bell three or four times, but received no answer. I waited three-quarters of an hour, and slipped a note under the door asking her to come to dinner. On Monday evening a police-officer came to me, and from what he told me I came up. I heard that my sister was found dead, and had been taken to the mortuary.
Had your sister a banking account? - I don't know. She had a good deal of jewellery - a watch and chain, rings, and trinkets. I don't know whether she kept money in the house. My brother is in America.
Do you know of any other member of your family who has recently visited her? - Yes; two nephews. I know that, because when I saw my sister alive on Jan. 8 she told me so.
What are their names? - Harry and Walter Chadwick, aged about 22 and 19. They live at Pimlico. The elder is in an architect's office.
Was the deceased on friendly terms with her sisters? - There was some disagreement between one of them concerning the nephews.
Was the disagreement with your two sisters? - No; but a disagreement between my deceased sister and her nephews. Deceased said she had lost some trinkets, and she thought they had taken them. She told me that she meant to accuse them of the theft. Last Monday evening I saw her nephews at the station.
When did Miss Clark accuse the nephews? - When she was at my sister's in Pimlico. Deceased told me her drawers had been broken open. She told me what she lost, and I gave a description of them to the police.
Then, rightly or wrongly, she was going to accuse them? - Yes.
Is this (reading a letter) the communication that you dropped into the door at 86, George-street, on January 21: - "My dearest Loo, I called up tonight (Saturday) asking you to come to dinner tomorrow. We shall be alone. I want a sister's advice. - Yours, FRANK"? - Yes; that was the letter I put under the door. I can throw no further light on the death.
Sydney Mees, a corn merchant residing near Frome, Somerset (deceased's brother-in-law), said he last saw Miss Clark alive in November.
Have you ascertained that Miss Clark had a banking account? - Yes; from what I have heard - 300 or 400 pounds, perhaps.
Inspector Robson said the deceased also had some Consols, and there was also a cheque.
William George Betts, clerk to Mr. Holkham, land agent, said he had the premises to let at 86, George-street. On Monday evening he went to the house, in company with two ladies, to show them the unoccupied portion of the house. Miss Clark occupied three rooms on the first floor. The shop and the second floor were to let. He let the ladies into the shop, walked into the passage, and was returning to the shop when he saw the body of the deceased at the foot of the staircase. The staircase was at the back. The head was lying down the basement of the staircase, but it was comparatively dark, and he could only see that it was a female. He at once took the ladies out. There was a quantity of blood. He spoke to a constable, and accompanied him to the house. He had seen Miss Clark only once.
James Grayston, 136 D, deposed that on Monday he was on "fixed point" at Portman-square, when the last witness said, "I have been to 86, George-street, with two ladies, and I think there is a female dead." Witness went to the house, struck a match, and caught hold of the deceased's hand. I exclaimed then, "Oh, yes; she is dead." I felt she was cold and stiff. I went to get a doctor, but went to six houses before I could find one at home. Dr. Times went back with me, and said he thought the woman had been dead three or four days. I had got a brother constable, and we went upstairs, and found a room in disorder. We went into all three rooms occupied by deceased. In the front room there was a jewel-case lying on the floor: by the side of that a watch-case - empty. We then went into the bedroom, which was all in disorder. The drawers had been pulled out, and linen and clothing scattered about. I went back down the passage, and got a brother constable to go for an inspector, and Dr. Spurgin, the divisional surgeon. I noticed injuries on the woman's throat, but I did not see any injuries on the head. I saw no weapons - no knife, razor, or anything of the kind. I did not know Miss Clark by sight.
Dr. Henry Times, 23, Manchester-street, said: I am a general medical practitioner. On Monday evening a policeman called me. I went to the house, 86, George-street, and saw the body of Miss Clark at the foot of the staircase, with her head down the kitchen stairs. Her feet were on the mat above. I found she had been dead some days. Upon examining the head I discovered that there had been a severe fracture. There was a quantity of blood down the kitchen stairs and all along the passage. I went upstairs. I did not notice any blood in the room upstairs. I confirm the constable's evidence as to disorder. It seemed as if someone had hurriedly searched the drawers. Everything was in confusion. I afterwards examined the body. The skull was extensively fractured; and there were also injuries to the throat. The wounds were so severe that they had reached the vertebrae and the column behind.
Do you think the woman could have inflicted the injuries herself? - Impossible. One fracture of the skull measured two inches in diameter and pieces of bone were driven into the head. There were other wounds which, I think, were not inflicted with the same weapon. The principal fracture, I think, was caused by a mallet or some such instrument.
Dr. Frederick W. Spurgin, 14, Henrietta-street, Manchester-square, deposed: I was sent for by the police, and found the body had been turned over. I am of opinion that Miss Clark had been dead some days. The throat was severely cut. There was a bruise over the right eye, and another over the left. There was commencing putrefaction of the abdominal walls. In connection with Dr. Times I have made a post-mortem examination. On the right arm there were two small bruises. On the left arm there was a large patch, as if it might have been rubbed. Over the right eye there was a bruise, and on the other eye also. The bruising there had extended right into the eyeball. The left knee was also bruised under the kneecap. On the right side of the head there was a minute bruise. On the left side there was a patch of bruising two-and-a-half inches in diameter. Behind the ear there was a lacerated wound, and behind that an extensive fracture of the skull. There was also another fracture under. Still further back there was another wound at the edge of the occipital bone, which penetrated through to the scalp, but no fracture. Immediately over these there were three more wounds, each about three-quarters of an inch in length, running one into the other. It appeared to me as if the three latter wounds were caused by one blow. It might have been caused by the side of a sledge-hammer, or many other things. Under the larger wound the fracture could plainly be felt; the others were discovered after the removal of the hair. The injuries to the head could not have been caused by the woman falling downstairs, although the wound at the back of the head might. The direction of the wound in the throat was from below upwards, and went right through to the spinal column. It was very difficult to say whether the throat was cut first; but all the injuries were inflicted during life. The direction of the wound - from right to left and from below upward - was quite against the probability of the deceased having cut her own throat. There was no blood upstairs to indicate that she had her throat cut there.
By a Juror: The appearance of the cuts in the throat indicated that they were inflicted by someone standing in front.
Coroner: Then you are of opinion that these injuries were inflicted by some other person, and not be the deceased herself? - Quite certain. Death must have soon taken place. I should say she had been dead from three to five days. In the stomach we found a portion of a potato, a portion of an orange, and the pips of an orange. Death might have taken place soon after dinner or supper. The wound on the throat was not so clearly incised as one could expect from a sharp instrument. A blunt but powerful weapon had evidently been used to cut the throat. On the middle finger of the left hand there was a streak of blood and abrasions, as if a ring had been wrenched off.
Inspector Robson deposed that when he got upstairs he found a small jewel-case, which had been forced open. That was in the front room, where nothing else had been disturbed. In the bedroom a chest of drawers had been ransacked. There were several little empty cases, which had evidently contained jewels. In one drawer he found a letter (proved to be in Miss Clark's handwriting) addressed to "Mr. Henry Chadwick, 78, Gloucester-street, South Belgravia." Witness thought death occurred on the 17th. The letter was as follows: -

"86, George-street, Saturday Jan. 13, 1888.

Harry,

I am waiting an answer from you to know what is your intention - to pay for the damage you did to my gold chain, and make good the other things you have stolen from me. I have taken my claim to a jeweller. But you have broken and twisted it so badly, and one piece you have broken off, he cannot mend it for less than 7s. 6d., and the double ring, of the same quality, would be 10s. I think the action you did was that of a villain. You know I had it in my power to make you pay one way or another, so you had better let me know if you wish to do so of your own free will. - L. CLARK."

The letter, witness added, was evidently misdated, as the 13th was not a Saturday. In the front room there were two small gold rings. There was also a letter which, from the date, Miss Clark had evidently received on the 17th, and opened herself, as the envelope was cut at the back in her usual way. In the bedroom there was a tin box, containing 250 pounds in Stock, a savings bank book, and a deposit of 97 pounds and other things. Witness obtained an interview with Henry Chadwick, the nephew. He asked him if he had had a quarrel with his aunt about jewellery, and he replied, "Surely she has not told you about that?" The nephew then said that Miss Clark was staying at Pimlico three weeks ago. She sent him to 86, George-street, to feed the cat. He (the nephew) was accompanied by his brother. They opened the box, and took two gold stoppers, which Walter Chadwick sold for 10s. In consequence of that he went and asked her to forgive him. He went on the 16th inst., and told her he would pay for what damage he had done. That was the last time he saw his aunt. Walter Chadwick made a similar statement, and said he had not seen Miss Clark since the 3rd or 4th inst., when she left his sister's house in Gloucester-street, Pimlico.
Detective-inspector John Tunbridge, of Scotland-yard, stated that on the 24th inst. he went to the Chadwicks' residence, and there he saw Henry and Walter Chadwick, and after searching them and the premises he took them to the Marylebone-lane police-station, but, after being detained for some time, they were allowed to go. Henry Chadwick stated that on Monday he was at business all day, and that at six he went to George-street, and saw the deceased, to whom he apologised for what he and his brother had done. The deceased invited him upstairs, but, feeling ashamed, he declined to go, and left her. He went home, and on the way he called at the Warwick, and met his brother there. They arrived home at about 10 o'clock. On Tuesday he was at business till 6:30, and then he went straight home. He went to the Warwick at about 10 o'clock, and after staying there for half-an-hour he went home. On Wednesday he was at business till six, after which he went home to dinner. After that he spent the evening at the Warwick and at another public-house. On Thursday he was at business till six o'clock, after which he went home and had his dinner. He spent that evening at the Warwick, at the Horse Shoe, Tottenham-court-road, and at the Primrose, and got home about one o'clock. That night he was in company with Harry Clark. On Friday, after leaving business, he remained at home playing chess with his brother. On Saturday he stayed at home on return from business, and on Sunday he did not go out. Walter Chadwick stated that on the Monday he left home with his brother and went about a situation. He returned home at about 11 o'clock a.m., and remained there till nine p.m., when he went with his brother to the Warwick. On Tuesday he remained at home till one p.m., after which he left and went to the Radical club, High-street, Stratford, where he saw the manager, a friend of his; after which he went to the Manby Arms, Stratford. When examining the two Chadwicks witness believed that they knew that there was suspicion resting on them, and that at that time they knew that their aunt was dead. Since the statement was given he had made inquiries, and found that Walter Chadwick was not in Stratford on the Tuesday, as he had stated, but that it was on Wednesday that he was there.
Henry Montague Chadwick, clerk to an architect and surveyor, stated that he resided with his mother at 78, Gloucester-street, Pimlico. He was a nephew of the deceased. He did not frequently visit his aunt. He remembered the deceased coming on a visit to them on New Year's eve, and she stayed four or five days. During the time that the deceased was at their house he went with his brother to her house for the purpose of feeding the cat. On Monday, the 16th, he went to the house of the deceased, and he saw her on the doorstep, but he did not go upstairs. He went to see his aunt to ascertain what was the reason she had not come on the Sunday, and also to apologise for having broken a necklace, and to apologise on behalf of his brother, who had taken some stoppers, which were sold. His brother had been out of employ for about two years. His mother would not be able to provide his brother with pocket money. Occasionally witness gave his brother money, and the last that he gave him was 4s. or 5s. on Saturday week.
By the Coroner: On his return from visiting his aunt he met his brother in the Warwick, but whether he told him anything of what transpired with his aunt he could not state. On Tuesday or Wednesday his brother told him he had been to Stratford. He could not state positively whether his brother on the Tuesday walked to the City with him or not. The jewel case produced he knew, and when he went to feed the cat the case was locked, and his brother opened it with some keys that they found in a tin box which was under the table. The jewel case was not broken when they left, but it was broken now. They locked the box, which had some trinkets in it, and left it. He had not visited the deceased more than four times altogether. On Tuesday evening he did not go out with the deceased. He knew nothing whatever about the death of his aunt.
The coroner said that if the witness knew anything further connected with the case it was his bounden duty to inform the court.
The witness said that he wished to state that on the Tuesday night he was out till about 12 o'clock.
The coroner wished to know how witness's brother could get money to go to Stratford.
The witness replied that he had no idea, but it might be that he had some of the 4s. or 5s. left that he (witness) had given him on the previous Saturday.
Walter James Chadwick said he resided with his mother at Gloucester-street. He had been out of active work for two years. Previous to that he was in the Army and Navy stores. His mother did dress-making occasionally. He visited his aunt now and then, but not in her own house, until with his brother he visited her at 86, George-street, when they took away and disposed of some gold stoppers. Witness continued: This was found out by my aunt (the deceased), who wrote to my mother about it. On the 16th January my brother again visited my aunt, and on his return I heard of his interview. On the following Monday I walked with my brother to the City, and on the Tuesday I went to Stratford; at least, I believe it was on the Tuesday. I went by train, took a return ticket, which cost 5d., and I visited a club where I might have spent 5s., but I can't say how much, because on the previous Saturday a friend gave me a few shillings, perhaps four or five. I might have had half-a-crown piece in my pocket. - Being shown the jewel-box, witness stated that he remembered it, and had opened it with the keys. [Here the memory of the witness seemed defective, and he was unable to speak with certainty as to which day it was that he visited his aunt.]
The coroner summed up very briefly to the effect that the robbery had not been the work of a professional hand, there being a bank-note, gold and silver coins, and other things left behind. A suspicion pointed to one or two who were not strangers to the deceased, and her own nephews had acknowledged that they had been guilty of wronging her.
The jury returned a verdict of "Wilful murder" against some person or persons at present unknown.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, January 29, 1888, Page 3


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Victim Of Burglars?

Post by Karen on Sun 14 Nov 2010 - 0:20

THE MARYLEBONE MURDER.
THE BURGLAR THEORY CONFIRMED.

Today the detective police are pursuing their investigations with regard to the death of Miss Lucy Clark, but since the inquest no further clue has been forthcoming. Special inquiries with a view to tracing anyone disposing of the deceased's jewels have not led to any result.

THE STOLEN JEWELS MELTED.

It is believed that the following is practically a complete list of the articles stolen from 86, George-street: - A lady's gold open-faced watch, with pebble glass, a lady's long neckchain (snake pattern), large telescope pencil case, to which there was attached a gold watch key, a smaller pencil case, a necklet, a Florentine brooch, and a pair of earrings to match, an oval brooch, with a large onyx in the centre, a diamond-shaped brooch, set with a carbuncle, a pair of old-fashioned eardrops, three earrings (one set with pearls, another with coral and diamonds, and the third plain), and a bangle. All the foregoing are of gold, and there are also missing a pair of onyx earrings and two Abyssinian gold bracelets. All the pawnbrokers in the Metropolis have been visited by the police, but up to the present no single article of the missing property has been offered in pledge, and this confirms the theory already mentioned in The Echo, that the crime was the work of a desperate professional burglar. In that case, the police fear that the jewellery has long since been "melted."

INTERVIEW WITH THE NEPHEWS.

This afternoon our representative called upon Miss Lucy Clark's nephews, who reside with their mother at 78, Gloucester-street, Belgrave-road, Pimlico. Both young men are of gentlemanly appearance. Mr. Henry Chadwick, the elder brother, is 5ft. 8in., while Mr. Walter Chadwick stands a little over 6ft.

"THE CRUELTY OF CIRCUMSTANCES."

After alluding to the cruelty of circumstances, by which almost an imputation has been cast upon himself and his brother, Mr. Walter Chadwick expressed his willingness to undergo any cross-examination. In reply to questions, he said: - Miss Clark, my deceased aunt, is being buried today, and my mother has gone to the funeral. My aunt has lived in London for about three years. She stayed with us here for about a year, and then she went to 86, George-street, Portman-square. Before that she travelled about a good deal. She was always extremely nice, but was reserved with strangers. I am afraid the public are inclined to condemn my brother, and I, little thinking that we have our characters at stake,

A YOUNG FELLOW WHO WATCHED MISS CLARK.

Upon being questioned as to whether the deceased had any acquaintance who knew of her moneyed position, Mr. Walter Chadwick continued: - Well, she looked really much younger - years younger - than her age. As for her money, she never told anyone that she had any. You know what maiden ladies are! At the back of her place at George-street there used to be, some months ago, a young fellow who watched my aunt about, and knew her every movement; but I do not think anything came of it by way of an engagement. When the detectives came here they asked her age. We said, "About 50." "Oh! dear, no; very much younger," they replied. That shows how well she carried her years. As to the unfortunate affair about the glass stoppers, my mother went and saw my aunt about it, and Miss Clark then said, "You know I forgive them." Then my mother told my brother Harry he had better go and apologise. Harry did go up on a Monday - this very day fortnight. My brother saw her - the last time he saw her alive - and she kissed him, and said "Good night" in the usual way.

WHAT BECAME OF THE MISSING KEYS?

Mr. Harry Chadwick then observed: -
There is a good deal of mystery about the case, especially as to how the house could have been entered. Perhaps this will explain it. When Miss Clark wanted anything she would leave the door ajar until she came back. My mother told her it was not the right thing to do in London. If you ask me as to acquaintances, I may tell you that Miss Clark had several male acquaintances, but they were only gentlemen above suspicion. About the keys? Well, sometime ago my deceased aunt told us that she went out, and that when she returned she missed her whole bunch of keys, which she thought she had left in the front door. What became of those keys is the question. Of course, in one sense we cannot blame the police. They have their duty to perform, and, having no clue, they came to us. When they did so, they said it was our duty to prove our innocence. When they said "She has been murdered," I certainly felt rather in a funk, as I was the last, so they said, to see her alive. Then, however, some letter, which had been opened in the deceased's peculiar way, was found at the house. It was seen from the postmark that she had received this letter the day after I was there.

SENDING HER NEPHEWS CHRISTMAS CARDS.

My aunt, proceeded the nephew, sent us all Christmas cards. That one (bearing on it hand-painted flowers, surmounted with the inscription, "A joyful Christmas") she sent to my sister. When I called on her on the Monday, I stayed with her for about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour. I really went to ask her to come and see mother.

MRS. CHADWICK'S MENTAL DISTRESS.

The distressing affair has so affected my poor mother that on Saturday night I feared she was going mentally wrong. It is a sore trouble to us all. What was said at the inquest about not remembering days is all very well, but it is a difficult matter always to remember. (Mr. Walter Chadwick here explained that he had a bad ulcerated throat for a week prior to the deceased's discovery, and consequently went out very little.

A PERFECT MYSTERY.

Concluding his remarks, Mr. George Chadwick added: -
"It is a wonderful thing - a perfect mystery - that my aunt should have had such severe injuries to her head, which the doctors said were also sufficient to cause death, and then that she should have her throat cut also, gashed in such a terrible fashion. It is a sad - shocking - affair indeed, but, next to my poor aunt, I think we are the most unfortunate people in the transaction, for we have unjustly suffered the risk of a dreadful imputation.

Source: The Echo, Monday January 30, 1888, Page 2

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Jewellery Found

Post by Karen on Sun 14 Nov 2010 - 16:34

THE MARYLEBONE MURDER MYSTERY.

In our Special Edition of Sunday last we announced that one of our own reporters had ascertained that the account published of the discovery by a ratcatcher of jewellery belonging to the murdered Miss Clark, was perfectly correct - notwithstanding the denials of the police and the railway officials at Victoria station. Though this was contradicted by certain morning papers on Monday, it is now confirmed on the best authority. In consequence of the discovery the Assistant Commissioner of Police, Mr. Munro, has written a letter to Mr. Page, the pawnbroker, thanking him for the information he has given. The letter is as follows: -

Criminal Investigation Department, Great Scotland-yard, S.W.
To Mr. Page, pawnbroker, &c., 21, Borough-road.
Re murder of Miss Lucy Clark, at Grove-street, Baker-street, W.

SIR. - With reference to the above case, and to certain articles of jewellery which were offered in pledge at your establishment on the 4th inst. by one John Dalton, jun., I have to request that you will be good enough to accept the expression of my best thanks for the action taken by yourself and your assistants in the matter. - I am, sir, your obedient servant, J. MUNRO.

Mr. William Pettigrew, jeweller, of 1, New Quebec-street, Portman-square, wrote to the Star as follows -

Having seen in your paper that the jewellery belonging to Miss Lucy Clark has been found, and having also seen in other papers the statement denied, I wrote to Sir Charles Warren asking if the jewellery had been recovered, so that I should know whether to retain or strike the list off my book, I enclose you the official reply: -

SPECIAL MEMORANDUM. - CO (C.I.D.).
Re murder of Miss Lucy Clark.

The articles of jewellery described in bills distributed on 3rd inst. have been recovered except the three rings, carbuncle brooch, Florentine earrings, and the old-fashioned gold ear-drops.

The man who pledged the watch with Mr. Attenborough gave his address as St. George's-road, Pimlico.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, Sunday February 26, 1888

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Re: Miss Clark Murdered In Early 1888

Post by Karen on Sun 14 Nov 2010 - 17:48

MARYLEBONE MURDER MYSTERY.

LATEST PARTICULARS.

Down to one o'clock this (Sunday) morning no arrest had been made for the murder of Miss Clark. Detectives, however, were actively engaged in prosecuting inquiries throughout the whole of the day.
At the wish of the rector of Frome, where deceased was brought up, and where her relatives live and are highly respected, the funeral has been postponed till Monday morning. The service will be conducted by the rector at Brompton cemetery, the cortege starting from King-street, Portman-square, where the relatives of the deceased are staying.
Detective-inspector Robson has received information to the effect that a cabman who was supposed to have driven two men from a spot near the house in George-street on the day of the supposed murder, had been found. He states that on Friday evening, about half-past 10, he took up two men and drove them to Cannon-street railway-station, and his description of them corresponded in every particular with that given by persons who are alleged to have seen them leave the house in George-street. The cabman believes that he will be able to identify the two men.
Special inquiries are being made at pawnbrokers' and dealers' with the view of tracing some of the property missed from the room of Miss Clark at 86, George-street, Portman-square, including a lady's gold lever watch, a lady's gold chain, a gold necklet having a gold telescope pencil case, and other trinkets attached to it; three gold rings, one set with pearls, one set with coral and diamonds, and one plain; three pairs of gold earrings, a gold brooch, and two pairs of bracelets.
On Thursday detectives and some skilled workmen made a thorough examination of the flooring of the house at George-street, in order to, if possible, discover any weapon that might have been used to murder Miss Clark. The drains running from the premises have been flushed with powerful streams of water, and other means adopted to see if anything had been thrown down the closet and worked its way to the pipes underneath. So far, however, no additional light has been thrown on the crime. The bed on which Miss Clark slept was undisturbed when the body was discovered, thus indicating that the murder was committed before she retired to rest, and her boots were found to be clean on the soles, thus indicating that she was about to leave her dwelling when she was undoubtedly met and murdered.
The unfortunate victim, Miss Lucy Clark, was born of respectable parents, near Frome, Somersetshire, in 1839. From a girl upwards she had been of industrious and thrifty habits, and, being of a cheerful and generous disposition, she was greatly respected. In early life she learned the dressmaking. When she grew up she became lady's maid to Lady Lonsdale. While in this employment she received many presents. All these she saved, and many of them helped to adorn her rooms, which were well furnished when she commenced dressmaking on her own account at 86, George-street. They consisted of Dresden china and other ornaments, whilst on the mantelpiece was a portrait of the then Hon. Gladys Lowther, signed in the handwriting of that lady herself. When Miss Clark began business at the West-end her connection with the aristocracy rapidly grew. In addition to being very industrious in her habits, she was also a religious woman, and held a pew at Portman chapel, Baker-street. She was last seen at chapel on Sunday night week.

INTERVIEW WITH THE RELATIVES.

A representative of Lloyd's yesterday interviewed the Chadwick family. The family consists of the mother, two sons, aged 23 and 19, and a daughter about 20. They occupy the upper part of a rather large house in Gloucester-street, Pimlico. Mrs. Chadwick was very lady-like and courteous in her demeanour, but showed traces of deep mental anguish. She said that when last Monday she first received the intelligence of her sister's death it came like a second shock to her, similar to the one that she felt five years ago, when her husband, whom she greatly loved, dropped down dead. Left with a family of course she had had trouble since, but the daily troubles of life were nothing to those deep troubles which come of sudden bereavement and great mental shocks. It was a terrible shock to her when she first had the information that her sister was dead; but when some time afterwards she heard that there was a belief that she had been murdered, the shock was more terrible still. Then, when one of her relations came and openly accused her own children of the murder of their aunt, she felt that she would never be able to bear up against the heavy trouble gathering round her. Of course she said her sons were taken by surprise and greatly angered. Then, when the detectives came and put the questions they did, she felt that she would be completely overwhelmed, and when they took them to the police-station all strength seemed to leave her. But she said, "I felt in my heart that they were innocent, and that all would come right. The young men I knew did wrong in taking some of her valuables, but they had too much affection for their aunt ever to think of murdering her. No! The murderer or murderers must be sought for somewhere else. But this untimely end, I am sorry to say, is no more than what all of us have feared and expected, and I can prove it." She then produced a large bundle of family letters from some of her sisters, all written in a spirit of great affection, and in one of which, from one who is housekeeper to Lord Carrington, occurs this sentence, "Do try and persuade dear Lucy not to live in that house by herself, or else to get some one to live with her; for I am so uneasy and I do not consider it safe." In consequence of these entreaties and other reasons I let my daughter go and stay with her for a time." In reply to a question put as to what her reasons were she said there were many. "First, deceased's own fears arising from some very suspicious circumstances, which led her to think that there had been one or two attempts to rob the house, and which made her at times feel very nervous. She came several times in a great fright. Then whether you believe in presentiment or not, she at all times was depressed, and sometimes said she had had such an unpleasant dream that she thought something was going to happen to her. I may tell you that I have had also the same unpleasant fears for her safety." Continuing, she said, "the great fears we all had arose from her constant habit of going out at night to get little things in, and leaving the door ajar. We have all remonstrated with her many times, upon this one habit, and we have repeatedly told her how very dangerous it was for her, living alone in that big house with so many rooms empty, to go out and leave the door open the while." In reply to another question as to what some of the suspicious circumstances were which caused the deceased to be afraid, Mrs. Chadwick said that she had come to them on several occasions, and said she had had very little rest all the night, because she had lain awake and heard noises as though someone was endeavouring to force an entrance into the house, but she did not raise an alarm, as she was not quite sure. She had always been the most afraid since last November, when she found that the lock had been so tampered with, as she thought, that she could neither get the key in or out, and when she was a long time before she could unfasten the door. Mrs. Chadwick further added that deceased had told her that she was going to write a letter to her nephews which would frighten them, but that she need not be afraid, as she should not take any action against them.
The young men then both made statements, in which they said that they had no ill-will against their aunt. On the contrary, they had a great affection for her, and she had forgiven them for the theft.
They used to play chess with her when she came. They said she had recently expressed great fears at being in the house, on account of the number of people that came to look at it, and as the house would have been let entirely, different persons were shown into her rooms. In reply to a question which was put to them, they both stated that their belief was that whoever committed the murder must have got blood upon their clothes. Their clothes had been examined by the police, and by the doctors microscopically, and though they wore the same clothes not a spot of blood could be found. The house had been ransacked by the police; their linen had been inspected, and every inquiry had been asked of their laundrywomen, to see whether they had noticed any clothes spotted with blood.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, Sunday January 29, 1888

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Miss Clark's Watch

Post by Karen on Sun 14 Nov 2010 - 18:26

THE MARYLEBONE MURDER.

IS THE WATCH MISS CLARK'S?

Today the police are not inclined to view the supposed clue as to the alleged discovery of Miss Clark's watch as one of great importance. It is not clear that the watch ever belonged to the deceased lady, and her friends only go so far as to say, "To the best of our belief it was her watch." In fact, the police themselves could only get an approximate description of any of the jewellery - with the exception of some of the rings and a brooch, and in this they are of course severely handicapped in their inquiries, which are prosecuted with as much vigour as ever. As to the discovery of the watch, it appears that, from the publicity given to the case by The Echo, the manager of Messrs. George Attenborough and Son, of 193, Fleet-street, remembered having taken in pledge, on the 18th instant, a lady's gold watch, somewhat answering the description given of Miss Clark's. The ticket was made out in the name of "Gill, St. George's-road," which, it appears, is fictitious. This is not considered a suspicious circumstance of itself, as pawnbrokers are aware that many persons give false names and addresses even when pledging their own property. The amount advanced on the watch was 3 pounds. As far as the assistant's recollection goes, it was pledged by a young man between 20 and 30 years of age. Mr. Walter Chadwick and Mr. Henry Chadwick, upon hearing of the supposed discovery, at once volunteered to see Messrs. Attenborough's manager, who failed to identify either of the nephews as having brought the pledge.

LATEST PARTICULARS.

STILL SEARCHING FOR THE WEAPON.
THE MISSING KEYS.

This afternoon the house at 86, George-street, was again minutely searched from the top rooms to the basement; but, so far as the discovery of any knife or other weapon which might have been used in the tragedy is concerned - the investigation has been futile.

THE DECEASED'S PROPERTY.

Mr. Sydney Mees, Mrs. Mees, and another relative also visited the deceased's rooms this afternoon, for the purpose of making arrangements for the removal of the furniture; and as Miss Clark left no will, her brother and sisters have amicably arranged among themselves as to the disposal of her property.
As soon as the premises were entered today the deceased's cat, which was in the passage, was noticed to be perfectly wild, and no attempt was made to approach it. The poor animal has constantly remained on the spot where the body of its mistress was discovered, and at night, when neighbours have listened at the front door, its piteous mews have been plainly heard. Miss Clark was passionately devoted to the pet, but it is stated that such is its ferocious behaviour now that it will have to be killed.

THE WATCH DISCOVERY A MYTH.

Mr. W. Brigstock declares that the alleged discovery of deceased's watch at a Fleet-street pawnbroker's is a "complete myth." When information was given to the police that a lady's watch somewhat answering the description of Miss Clark's had been pawned, it was shown to Mr. and Mrs. Mees and the other relatives, but none of them could identify it in anyway, although, as Mrs. Mees remarked, "It looks something like it."
As corroborative testimony of what was stated by one of Miss Clark's nephews as to the loss of the deceased's keys, Mr. Brigstock says that some months ago - late at night - Miss Clark arrived at his coffee-shop in a state of great agitation, saying, "I have lost my keys, and cannot get into the house." Mrs. Brigstock accommodated the young dressmaker with a bed, and on the following morning Miss Clark obtained a fresh door-key from her landlord. This fact seems now to have an important bearing on the case, as it is conjectured that the latch key was stolen by someone who kept it until a convenient time presented itself for entering the house unobserved and plundered the place of portable valuables.

CONJECTURES SURROUNDING THE MYSTERY.

It is conjectured that this person was not unlikely some one aware of Miss Clark's movements, who, taking advantage of her probable absence, and thus surprised at her appearance, knocked her down when meeting her on the stairs. The terrible injury to the throat is considered to have been an after-thought of the miscreant, and designed to throw around the case a suggestion of suicide, it being pointed out that even a practised criminal, in the terror and excitement of the moment, would be likely to forget that the disordered rooms and evidences of robbery would militate against the idea of suicide. Dr. Spurgin still affirms that the injuries on the head were quite sufficient to cause death. This lends increased mystery to the fact that her murderer should have proceeded to the trouble of cutting the young woman's throat unless he had the intention of mystifying the tragedy, or unless - as the police suggest - the criminal had such a savage personal hatred of the young woman that his ferocity induced him to this cruelly-unnecessary act.

THE POLICE DO NOT DESPAIR.

It is said that the authorities - despite the present absence of any tangible clue - do not yet despair of apprehending the real murderer.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday January 31, 1888, Page 3

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Watch Pawned In Stepney

Post by Karen on Sun 14 Nov 2010 - 18:49

THE MARYLEBONE MYSTERY.

ANOTHER SUPPOSED CLUE.

The police have not relaxed their efforts in endeavouring to trace the murderers of Miss Clark. Indeed, they are working with even more zeal than at the outset. So far, however, they have met with indifferent success. It is stated that a watch resembling that belonging to Miss Clark, has been discovered, having been pawned at Stepney. The pawnbroker's assistant, however, does not feel able to identify the person who pledged the watch. All the witnesses who gave evidence at the inquest attended this morning at the Coroner's office in Paddington, and signed their depositions.

Source: The Echo, Friday February 3, 1888, Page 3

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Strange Male Neighbour

Post by Karen on Sun 14 Nov 2010 - 19:46

THE MURDER IN MARYLEBONE.

The official police notice regarding the missing property of Miss Clark had not long been in circulation when notice was received from Messrs. George Attenborough and Son, of 193, Fleet-street, that they thought the watch had been pawned at their establishment. Some relatives of the deceased woman were taken by the police to the shop, and at once pronounced the watch to be that which the deceased woman had been in the habit of wearing. The man who pledged the watch was described to the police as of from 20 to 30 years of age, very pale, dressed in a dark overcoat, and wearing a high hat. Messrs. Attenborough's manager, who took in the pledge, was taken to Marylebone-lane station, where he was shown from 20 to 30 men, but was unable, after a careful scrutiny, to identify any one of them as being the man who pledged the watch.
All the witnesses who gave evidence at the inquest attended, on Friday, at the coroner's office, at Paddington, and signed their depositions.
The police have issued the following description of the jewellery believed to have been stolen from the murdered woman: -

A lady's long gold neckchain, square or octagon snake pattern, supposed broken and repaired with cotton; a gold German flexible snake necklet, about 1/2 in. wide, broken in centre; a large gold telescope pencil case, a calendar engraved thereon, ring at end; a small gold pencil case or watch key, plain white seal at end; a small gold watch key; a Florentine brooch set in common gold, a small dark bird, probably a swallow, on white ground in mosaic in centre, and pair of earrings to match; an oval brooch, large onyx in centre, surrounded by small stones; a diamond-shaped brooch, set large carbuncle; a pair of large old-fashioned gold ear-drops, ball suspended at end; a pair of onyx earrings; a lady's gold ring, set five corals, small diamonds between corals, one coral damaged; a lady's gold ring, set with five or seven pearls; lady's plain gold ring, two hands clasped; a gold bracelet formed of four or five bangles joined, some plain, others rope cable pattern; two metal bracelets, one buckle pattern, the other with imitation rope cable edges. The pencil cases and watch key were originally attached to neckchain.

LATEST PARTICULARS.

The two nephews of the deceased have been interviewed several times this week by the police as to their movements in the week of the murder, and it is believed that their time is very satisfactorily accounted for. In justice to them, it is only fair to state that they show no hesitation in answering any questions put to them, and that with the utmost candour they appear to court the fullest inquiry.
Mr. Henry Chadwick, in an interview yesterday, said that they were all most anxious that the matter should be cleared up. It was a terrible thing to have such a suspicion hanging over them, which, if not cleared up, might cling to them for life. He stated that he had no suspicion of anyone. As regarded his aunt having any male acquaintance, he repeated his statement that she used to talk of a man living in a room opposite, who was constantly staring at her and watching her through the windows. His aunt had an idea that he wished to form an acquaintance. Mrs. Chadwick and his aunt used to look at him through an opera glass. Mrs. Chadwick stated that her sister seemed to take a fancy to the man, but she herself did not like the look of him. Who he was they did not know; he left the rooms, and her aunt never spoke to him that they knew of.
Mr. H. Chadwick, continuing his statement, said he still adhered to his belief that the crime must have been committed by someone who knew the deceased's habits.
With reference to Mr. Walter Chadwick, it appears he for some time has had an ambition to get on the stage, and he commenced at a music-hall. This led to his becoming friendly with a gentleman now residing at Stratford, and the fact accounts for his visiting that place on one evening in the week of the murder.
From other inquiries by our representative, there appears to be no doubt that the statement made last week by the Chadwick family, that the deceased used to go out and leave the door ajar, is correct. She would order things at one shop, and then pass on to another and order something else. While she has been absent from her home, her rooms have been left entirely unprotected, and the tradespeople have taken their orders up to her rooms and then either left them or waited till her return. Among the places she used to visit was Mr. Brigstock's, refreshment house keeper, from whom she sometimes ordered her meals in order to save the trouble of cooking.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, Sunday February 5, 1888


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Karen Trenouth
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