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Identification Of The Remains

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Identification Of The Remains

Post by Karen on Sat 16 Oct 2010 - 14:21

THE THAMES MYSTERY.

THE REMAINS IDENTIFIED.

After more than a fortnight of patient and unremitting inquiries and investigation the Metropolitan police have at length been able to place practically beyond doubt the identity of the woman portions of whose mutilated remains have been found in the Thames from time to time since the 4th inst. All the important portions of the body with the exception of the head are still preserved in spirit at the Battersea mortuary. It was feared that in the absence of the head it would be impossible to establish the identity of the unfortunate victim of what was evidently a foul crime; but by means of certain scars, and by the portion of clothing incautiously or recklessly left by the murderer, a number of persons have been enabled to declare in the most positive manner that the murdered woman was Elizabeth Jackson, a homeless woman, well-known in some of the common lodging-houses in the Chelsea district. Elizabeth Jackson was last seen alive on May 31. Since then she has not been in any of her accustomed haunts, and a number of convergent facts in the possession of the police leave little doubt that upon the evening of that day the wretched woman met her murderer. The various articles of clothing found with portions of the body have been identified by a number of women who knew Elizabeth Jackson intimately, and were in fact her companions. All identified them without hesitation as having belonged to Jackson, who it appears was also pretty well known to the police in the Chelsea district. The police on their part traced the woman's movements up to the hour almost of her disappearance. She certainly has not been in any the many common lodging-houses within the Metropolitan area, nor an inmate of many of the casual wards, workhouses, or hospitals in London. Living from hand to mouth she must have been without means to leave London except on foot, and her physical condition made it practically impossible for her to go on tramp. She disappeared on the evening of May 31, and upon the morning of June 4 the first dreadful discoveries were made at Battersea and at Horselydown.
The Central News understands that the clue first taken up by the police was that afforded by the name "E.L. Fisher," which was written in marking ink on the linen band of the under-garment found on the first portion of the body found at Battersea. It was ascertained that the garment originally belonged to a lady in a good position in society who upon her marriage, some five or six years ago, gave it away with other cast-off wearing apparel. The police traced the garment from owner to owner until they found the person who gave it to the missing woman, Elizabeth Jackson. Several women have deposed positively to the wearing of the garment by Jackson, and the portions of wearing apparel recovered from time to time with the various parcels of human remains have also been positively identified as having belonged to the murdered woman. Among the other evidences of identification was that furnished by the sister of Jackson, who stated that her missing sister had a peculiar scar on one of her wrists. The remains in Battersea mortuary were in consequence of this statement again examined by Dr. Bond, Dr. Hibbert, and Dr. Felix Kempster. The flesh of the wrists was somewhat decomposed, but on lifting the skin the experts mentioned arrived at the conclusion that a scar similar to that described by the sister had certainly existed. A woman known as Sally, who lives at Sharpe's boarding house, in Turk's-row, has also made a statement as to Elizabeth Jackson's condition, which agrees with the opinion formed by the surgeons who conducted the post-mortem examination. Jackson's favourite promenade was in Battersea-park, off which portions of her remains were found. She often walked there at night. Several weeks ago the police approached Sally and made inquiries of the whereabouts of Jackson. She was unable to give them any information. The description furnished by the police of the woman whose remains were found in the Thames coincided exactly with that of Jackson. The latter was 23 years old, fair, and about five feet six or seven inches in height. Sally knew the man with whom Jackson was living, and another man, probably a detective, was looking for him less than three weeks ago. Ada, another inhabitant of Turk's-row, knew Jackson well, and last saw her about five weeks ago. She was then dressed in some dark-coloured dress, and wore an ulster, black and grey in colour - a kind of check pattern. Jackson used to wear a brass ring on one of her fingers. She had given away to drink since Christmas. Various circumstances connected with the fate of Jackson lead to the belief that she was really a victim of the Whitechapel fiend, Jack the Ripper. A reporter was successful in discovering the brother of the woman Jackson, and had an interview with him. He is a lame crossing-sweeper, and lives in Church-street, and does not think the remains are those of his sister.

Source: The Courier And London & Middlesex Counties Gazette, June 29, 1889, Page 8


Last edited by Karen on Sat 16 Oct 2010 - 15:01; edited 1 time in total

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Identification

Post by Karen on Sat 16 Oct 2010 - 14:43

THE THAMES MYSTERY.

IDENTIFICATION OF THE REMAINS.

The inquiry into the cause of the death of the woman, portions of whose body were found in the Thames and at Battersea-park, who has since been identified as Elizabeth Jackson, was resumed on Monday. - Mrs. Caroline Jackson, a respectable-looking woman and an inmate of Chelsea Workhouse, said she had a daughter, Elizabeth Jackson, who was 24 years of age on May 31 last. She was 5ft. 5in. in height, well formed, and stout. She had not done much work lately, so that her hands were in pretty good condition, but witness did not notice her nails. She had never seen her daughter bite her nails. She had a remarkably good set of teeth and was of fair complexion, with golden hair. Witness last saw her by accident in Queen's-road, Chelsea, when she (the daughter) ran away. Witness stopped her, and said, "Why did you run away from me?" She replied that she was ashamed to see her mother. Before this they had not met for nearly six months, when they met by chance at the same spot. It was about noon when they met, and her daughter remained with her until half-past eight in the evening, going away without stating her destination. Turk's-row was just close to where they met. Her daughter was wearing a check ulster, and the witness identified a piece produced (in which some of the remains were found) as being apparently part of the garment. A button on the sleeve witness recognised. She noticed her daughter's condition, who replied that she expected to become a mother in the first week in September. Her daughter said the father was a stonemason, named Jack Fairclough, with whom she had been living at Ipswich. She said that the man and herself had come from Ipswich to Poplar, and from thence to Battersea, where the man left her, saying, "Lizzie, I am going away; I will be back shortly." This was on May 27, but he had not returned when witness met the deceased on May 31. Her daughter from time to time had written to her sisters and her father, and not to witness. Her daughter had been in service in Chelsea as a general servant, and whilst so, was a good girl. As far as the witness knew, her daughter had been a virtuous girl up to about seven months ago. Witness did not think that Fairclough was responsible for the deceased's seduction. Her daughter had a scar on one of her wrists, caused by a broken vase about 12 years ago. She believed her daughter first met Fairclough on Oct. 6 last. - Mary Jackson, a domestic servant and daughter of the last witness, stated that Elizabeth Jackson was a sister of hers, whom she last saw about seven or eight weeks ago at West Brompton. Witness then gave her some money to get something to eat. She was dressed in a light brown ulster, but it was nothing like the material produced. - Madame Marie Gerards, a dressmaker, of Battersea, who created much amusement by saying that her husband managed her as well as a restaurant, identified the pieces of ulster found round various portions of the body as belonging to a garment which she gave to a Mrs. Winter, of Cheyne-road, Chelsea, about three months ago. Being reminded by the coroner that the jury were not dressmakers, the witness curtly replied, "No, but they might be tailors though" (laughter). - Dr. Kempster having given evidence as to a trifling scar on the right arm of the deceased, the Coroner said he thought that the evidence was sufficient to justify him in ordering the remains to be buried as those of the missing woman Jackson. - The inquiry was then adjourned.

Source: The Courier And London & Middlesex Counties Gazette, July 6, 1889, Page 2

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Identification

Post by Karen on Sat 16 Oct 2010 - 15:08

After a fortnight of investigation the metropolitan police are supposed to have placed practically beyond doubt the identity of the woman, portions of whose mutilated remains have been found in the Thames from time to time since the 4th inst. By means of certain scars, and the clothing incautiously or recklessly left by the murderer, a number of persons have been enabled to declare in the most positive manner that she was Elizabeth Jackson, well known in some of the common lodging-houses in the Chelsea district, and last seen alive on 31st May. Among the other evidences of identification was that furnished by a sister of Jackson, who stated that she had a peculiar scar on one of her wrists. The flesh of the wrists is somewhat decomposed, but on lifting the skin some experts arrived at the conclusion yesterday that a scar similar to that described by the sister had certainly existed.

Source: The Guardian, June 26, 1889, Page 966

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Re: Identification Of The Remains

Post by Karen on Thu 4 Nov 2010 - 1:36

THE THAMES MYSTERY.

IDENTIFICATION OF THE BODY.

The Metropolitan police have at length been able to place practically beyond doubt the identity of the woman, portions of whose mutilated remains have been found in the Thames from time to time since the 4th inst. By means of certain scars, and the clothing incautiously or recklessly left by the murderer, a number of persons have been enabled to declare in the most positive manner that she was Elizabeth Jackson, well known in some of the common lodging-houses in the Chelsea district. She was last seen alive on the 31st of May. Since then she has not been in any of her accustomed haunts, and facts in the possession of the police leave little doubt that upon the evening of that day she met her murderer. The police on their part have traced the woman's movements up to the hour almost of her disappearance. She certainly has not since been in any of the many common lodging-houses within the metropolitan area, nor an inmate of any of the casual wards, workhouses, or hospitals in London. Living from hand to mouth she must have been without means to leave London, except on foot, and her physical condition made it practically impossible for her to go on tramp. Among the other evidence of identification was that furnished by a sister of Jackson, who stated that she had a peculiar scar on one of her wrists. The remains in Battersea mortuary were, in consequence of this statement, again examined by Dr. Bond, Dr. Hibbert, and Dr. Felix Kempster. The flesh of the wrists was somewhat decomposed; but on lifting the skin the experts mentioned arrived at the conclusion that a scar similar to that described by the sister had certainly existed. The clue first taken up by the police was that afforded by the name "E.L. Fisher," which was written in marking ink on the linen band of the under garment on the first portion of the body found at Battersea. It was ascertained that the garment originally belonged to a lady in a good position in society, who, upon her marriage some five or six years ago, gave it away with other cast-off underclothing and wearing apparel. The police traced the garments from owner to owner, until they found the person who gave it to the missing woman Elizabeth Jackson. It is noteworthy that the houses in which Elizabeth Jackson lodged from time to time, and the thoroughfares which she used to promenade at night, are all within a short distance of Battersea-bridge, from whence the lighter parts of the body were evidently thrown into the river, and Battersea-park, where the upper portion of the trunk was found. It is further stated that some time ago the woman lived at Ipswich with a millstone dresser named Fairclough, who cannot be traced, and that on his deserting her she returned to London in depressed spirits and needy circumstances.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, June 30, 1889, Page 7

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