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Jackson Inquest

Post by Karen on Sat 16 Oct 2010 - 2:37

THE THAMES MYSTERY.

The inquest on the remains found in the Thames was resumed on Monday last by the coroner, Mr. A. Braxton-Hicks. - The first witness called was P.C. Chinn, 493 T, stationed at South Fulham, who said on the 7th of June, he received the right foot and leg from Inspector Brown, and removed it to the Battersea mortuary. - Catherine Jackson, the wife of John Jackson, a stonemason, now an inmate of the Chelsea Workhouse, said she had a daughter named Elizabeth Jackson, who was 24 years of age last March. Witness last saw her daughter on the 31st of May. The daughter was 5ft. 5in. high, and a well-formed girl, being stout and plump. Her hands had the appearance of her not having done much work, witness had never seen her daughter bite her nails. Her teeth were in good condition. She was a fair-complexioned girl, with natural golden hair. On the last occasion that witness saw her daughter, which was accidentally in Queen's-road, Chelsea, she had on an ulster. Her daughter endeavoured to run away from her, but witness stopped her. When asked why she ran away, she replied that it was because she was ashamed to see witness. Witness had not seen her daughter previous to this since October last. On the occasion in question, the 31st of May, witness met her daughter about noon and they remained together till 8:30 p.m. On parting her daughter did not say where she was going. The piece of ulster produced was similar to the one her daughter was wearing when witness last saw her. The button on the sleeve of ulster produced was also similar to the buttons on the ulster. Witness inquired as to her condition and found that she expected to be confined during the first week in September. She also told witness that she was living with a man named Jack Fairclough, at Ipswich. Subsequently they came to Poplar, and then they went to Battersea, where Fairclough left her, with the understanding that he would soon return, but he never returned, and she had not seen him since. Her daughter had corresponded with her father and sisters. She had been out to service. As far as witness knew her daughter had been a virtuous girl up to seven months ago. She had a long scar on one of her arms. The next witness was Mary Jackson, a domestic servant, and daughter of the last witness, who stated that Elizabeth Jackson was a sister of hers, whom she last saw about seven or eight weeks ago at West Brompton. Witness then gave her some money to enable her to get something to eat. She was dressed in a light brown ulster, but it was nothing like the material produced. Witness particularly noticed that she was wearing an old brown linsey dress, with two flounces and a red selvedge, and she was certain that the piece of material produced belonged to that skirt. What made her notice it was the fact that she had previously given her a better dress, and she admitted having sold it. Her sister had a scar on her arm, and she had also chopped a small piece off one of her fingers. Witness had noticed that she was enceinte, and her sister had told her that she would have to go into the workhouse to be confined. She gave no reason. She had fair hair on her head and arms. Her last situation was at the Beehive Coffee-house, Vauxhall Bridge-road; she left there about 12 months ago. Witness began to suspect that her sister was not living respectably about 18 months since. When she left the Vauxhall Bridge-road she went to live in a lodging-house in Turk's-row, Chelsea. The next that witness heard of her was that she was at Ipswich, whither she had gone with a man named Fairclough, who, she said, would never leave her alone. Witness saw her in London on May 1st, when she said she had been staying at Millwall with Fairclough, who had gone away, as she supposed, to look for work. She complained that Fairclough used to beat her at Ipswich, and she showed witness a cut on her head which he had inflicted with the heel of a boot. She began taking too much to drink about 18 months ago. Witness had never seen Fairclough. Her sister did tell her that she used to wear a wedding-ring "because people thought she was married to Fairclough," but she was not wearing it when witness saw her for the last time. - Madame Marie Gerrads, a dressmaker, of 16, Lavender-sweep, Battersea, who created much amusement by saying that her husband managed her as well as a restaurant, identified the pieces of ulster found round various portions of the body as belonging to a garment which she gave to a Mrs. Minter, of Cheyne-row, Chelsea, about three months ago. - Annie Jackson said that Elizabeth Jackson was her sister, and she was more communicative to her than to anyone else. - Further evidence having been taken, the inquiry was adjourned.

The adjourned inquest was opened at the Star and Garter, Battersea, on Thursday morning, by Mr. A. Braxton-Hicks, the coroner for the district. The first witness called was Margaret Minter, a married woman, who stated that the ulster produced in which portions of the remains were found wrapped in, was the same at that she obtained from Madam Gerard. About three months ago she gave it to Elizabeth Jackson. Two months back Jackson called at witness's residence, and as she seemed in a starving condition, witness gave her some food. - Johanna Keefe, a single woman, sister of last witness, deposed to meeting Jackson at Chelsea. At a subsequent time witness supplied Jackson with some black cotton, to sew a tape on her drawers. The garment mentioned was produced, and witness, who washed it for Jackson whilst she waited in the house, said the string was sewn on with black cotton similar to that which witness supplied Jackson with. - Annie Dwyer, whose husband is a labourer, and who keeps a lodging-house in Chelsea, deposed to knowing the deceased for the past two years, and when Jackson last left witness's house she left a light brown ulster (produced) behind her. - Jennie Lee, who resides at Chelsea, said she had known Jackson about two years. For the last seven months Jackson had led a loose life and witness had seen Jackson with different men during the last two months. On the 3rd of June, about 9 p.m., witness last saw Jackson, and then she was in company with a man who had on light moleskin trousers, dark cloth coat, and a rowing cap. He was about 5ft. 7in. or 5ft. 8in. in height. She did not notice his features. Witness went away and left Jackson with the man. The ulster produced was the one Jackson was wearing when witness last saw her. - Elizabeth Pomeroy said she had known Jackson for the past two years, and had seen Jackson with men at times. - Kate Paine, married, said she had seen Jackson at Millwall in company with a man and accommodated them with lodgings on April the 17th. The man gave his name as Fairclough, and said Jackson was his wife, whom he called "Lizzie." "Lizzie" told witness that she had friends in Chelsea and Kensington. Witness noticed that the man was very rough to the woman. After the lodgers had left witness missed an ulster and a counterpane. - The latter article it was stated had been pawned by Jackson, who sold the ticket to one of the previous witnesses. - Witness, continuing, gave the description of the man Fairclough as follows: Aged 37, height 5ft. 9in., complexion fair, clean shaven, slightly pock pitted, deaf, nose twisted, broad-shouldered, and "steel" marks on the backs of his hands. When witness last saw him he was attired in a light green and black striped jacket, light, striped trousers, with a piece of light check let in waistband. These trousers were worn over another pair. He had on a blue-and-white Oxford shirt with new sleeves, laced boots, light grey or mouse-coloured hat. He was a miller and millstone maker, a native of Cambridgeshire, and was discharged from the 3rd Battalion Grenadier Guards on April 19th, 1887. He was also a pedlar and when out of work sold watches, &c. At this point the inquiry was adjourned to the 25th inst., the coroner remarking that if the police found Fairclough before that date, the jury might be summoned earlier.

Source: The Wandsworth And Battersea District Times, Saturday July 6, 1889, Page 6


Last edited by Karen on Sat 16 Oct 2010 - 14:21; edited 2 times in total

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Jackson Inquest

Post by Karen on Sat 16 Oct 2010 - 8:16

THE THAMES MYSTERY.

Dr. Braxton Hicks on Monday resumed, at the Star and Garter, Battersea, the inquiry into the cause of death of the woman, since identified as Elizabeth Jackson, portions of whose body were found in the Thames and at Battersea-park.
Police-constable Frederick Chin, 493 T, stationed at South Fulham, spoke as to the recovery of the right leg and foot of a female, and to removing it to Battersea mortuary on June 7.
Mrs. Caroline Jackson said that she was an inmate of Chelsea workhouse. She had a daughter, Elizabeth Jackson who was 24 years of age on May 31 last. She was five feet five inches in height, well-formed, and stout. She had not done much work lately, so that her hands were in pretty good condition, but witness did not notice her nails. She had never seen deceased bite her nails. She had a remarkably good set of teeth, and was of fair complexion, with golden hair. Witness last saw her by accident in Queen's-road, Chelsea, when Elizabeth ran away. Witness stopped her, and said, "Why did you run away from me?" She answered that she was ashamed to see her mother. Before this they had not seen each other for nearly six months, when they met by chance at the same spot. It was about noon when they met, and her daughter remained with her until half-past eight in the evening, going away without stating her destination. Turk's-row was just close to where they met. Deceased was wearing a check ulster, and the witness identified a piece produced (in which some of the remains were found) as being apparently part of the garment. A button on the sleeve witness also recognised. She noticed the condition of her daughter, who stated that she expected to become a mother the first week in September, adding that the father was a stonemason, named Jack Fairclough, with whom she had lived at Ipswich. She said that they had come from Ipswich to Poplar, and from thence to Battersea, where the man left her, saying, "Lizzie, I am going away. I will be back shortly." This was on May 27, but he had not returned when witness met her on May 31. Her daughter from time to time had written to her sisters and her father, but not to witness. The deceased had been in service in Chelsea as a general servant, and whilst so was a good girl. As far as the witness knew, Elizabeth had been a virtuous girl up to about seven months ago. The witness did not think that Fairclough was responsible for the deceased's seduction. Her daughter had a scar on one of her wrists, caused by a broken vase about 12 years ago. She believed her daughter first met Fairclough on October 6 last.
Mary Jackson, a domestic servant and daughter of the last witness, stated that Elizabeth Jackson was a sister of hers, whom she last saw about seven or eight weeks ago at West Brompton. Witness then gave her some money to get something to eat. She was dressed in a light brown ulster, but is was nothing like the material produced.
Madame Marie Gerards, a dressmaker, of 16, Lavender-sweep, Battersea, who created much amusement by saying that her husband managed her as well as a restaurant, identified the pieces of ulster found round various portions of the body as belonging to a garment which she gave to a Mrs. Winter, of Cheyne-row, Chelsea, about three months ago. Being reminded by the coroner that the jury were not dressmakers, the witness curtly replied, "No, but they might be tailors though." (laughter).
On Thursday, when the inquest was resumed, further evidence of identification was taken. - Margaret Minter, a married woman, of 3, Cheyne-row, Chelsea, was positive that the body was that of Elizabeth Jackson. She stated that about three months ago she received an ulster from a Madame Gerards, for whom she did laundry work. She was certain that the piece of material produced belonged to the same ulster. After keeping it a month she gave it to the deceased, Lizzie Jackson, whom she had known about two years and a-half as a domestic servant.
Inspector Tunbridge, in reply to the coroner, said the deceased had a brother, who was not satisfied as to her identification, but he merely went by the condition of her hands.
Johanna Keefe, of 3, Cheyne-row, Chelsea, a sister of Mrs. Minter, swore to the ulster. She said Lizzie Jackson used to bite her nails very much. When she washed herself the witness remarked what a nice genteel hand she had, and what a pity it was she bit her nails. The deceased laughed, and replied, "They will be more genteel shortly."
Annie Dwyer, a married woman, of 14, Turk's-row, Chelsea, a common lodging-house, said she had been there nearly two years. With the exception of two rooms the house was let entirely to women. She had known the deceased about a year and eight months, and saw her for the last time about three weeks before the remains were found.
Jenny Lee, of 14, Turk's-row, Chelsea, identified the body as that of Lizzie Jackson, and said she last saw her on Monday, June 3, when she was with a man. She could not describe his features, but he had on light moleskin trousers, dark cloth coat, and a rough cap, such as men wore who worked on the roads, and she should suppose he was a navvy or something of that sort. She was wearing the check ulster and skirt produced at the time. A woman named Elizabeth Pomeroy was with her, and she said she was going to Battersea.
Elizabeth Pomeroy said she had known Lizzie Jackson four years. She last saw her on the 31st of May, and the same day she found the ulster produced (the second one) hanging up in the kitchen. On June 3rd she and Jenny Lee met the deceased outside the Royal Hospital tavern with a man. - By the jury: The man had a little bit of whiskers. The coat he had on was a heavy pilot jacket. He did not look like a bargeman, but like a navvy.
Kate Paine, a married woman, of 5, Manilla-street, Poplar, said that a man and woman came to her on April 18 and asked her for a room, which she let them, and they paid her 4s. He gave the name of John Fairclough. They had no luggage, only a small linen bag and cardboard box. During the time they were together she did not hear him beat her, but he seemed to treat her very roughly. After they had left, she missed a counterpane off the bed and an ulster, but neither of those produced was like it. The man she described as follows: - Age about 37; height, 5ft. 9in.; complexion fair; clean shaven; slightly pitted with smallpox and deaf. His nose was twisted as if he had broken it, and he was broad-shouldered, and had "steel marks" on the left hand - which Inspector Moore stated to be occasioned by chipping stone. When she last saw him he was dressed in a light green and black striped jacket, lightly striped trousers, with a piece of check let into the waist, which she did while in their house. The trousers were worn over a darker pair. He had a blue and white striped Oxford shirt, which had been newly sleeved with the same material; white muffler, laced boots, light grey or mouse-coloured felt hat. He also carried a soft cap with a peak.
The coroner adjourned the inquiry till the 25th inst.

THE SECOND INQUEST AT WAPPING.

On Wednesday Mr. Baxter resumed the inquiry, at the Wapping vestry hall, on the portion of the remains found at Wapping. They were the first portion of the body that was discovered in separate parts in the Thames. They were found wrapped in an old skirt floating off Wapping stairs.
Mr. M. M'Coy, assistant acting divisional surgeon, of Commercial-road, deposed that on Tuesday, the 4th of June, he was called to the Wapping police-station, and shown the lower part of a woman's body. They were two parts of the abdomen and the uterus. It appeared to him that the remains were those of a woman who had been pregnant about eight months.
Inspector John Tonbridge stated that the portion referred to was taken after the opening of this inquest to the Battersea mortuary. The whole of the body, except the head and the neck, was now collected, and was stated by Dr. Bond, of Westminster hospital, to be that of a female named Elizabeth Jackson. The identity was discovered by marks that were on the breast. She was a single woman, aged 24, and her last address was 14, Church-road, Chelsea. The medical evidence showed that the body was cut up after death; but the cause of death had not been stated.
The coroner said that was the whole of the evidence which he proposed calling, as the largest part of the body was found at the West-end, and he thought it useless that two inquiries should be taking place on the same body. He advised them to return a formal verdict, which was done.
They found "That the part of the body was found and had been identified as that belonging to the body of Elizabeth Jackson; but how it came into the water there was no evidence to show."

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, July 7, 1889, Page 8

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By Some Person Unknown

Post by Karen on Thu 4 Nov 2010 - 1:12

The coroner's inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of Elizabeth Jackson, a single woman, whose mutilated remains (minus the head and certain of the internal organs) were found in various parts of the Thames and other places on June 4 and subsequent days, has been resumed and concluded. The jury found that the body was that of Elizabeth Jackson, and that she was murdered by some person or persons unknown.

Source: The Courier And London & Middlesex Counties Gazette, August 3, 1889, Page 2

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Re: Jackson Inquest

Post by Karen on Fri 22 Mar 2013 - 1:42

THE THAMES MYSTERY.

The inquest was resumed at Battersea on Monday as to the death of Elizabeth Jackson, whose mutilated remains were found in various parts of the Thames early last month. In opening the proceedings, the Coroner commented at some length on the fact of the discovery of Fairclough, the paramour of the deceased, having been announced by the press,
and he complained that all through the case the evidence had been anticipated by the newspapers. - John Fairclough, in answer to the coroner, then said he was a millstone dresser, of no fixed abode. He spoke to becoming acquainted with the deceased towards the end of last September, after she had been living with a man whom she called "Charlie."
She afterwards accompanied witness to various parts of the country, subsequently returning to London and staying at Millwall until the 20th of April last. On that day he left, with the intention of going to Croydon, but the deceased would not accompany him. She said she would go to her mother. Witness did not leave her any money, as he had none.
Witness then detailed his travels in the country, eventually arriving at Ottery St. Mary, Devon, last Wednesday. There he was met by Detective-inspector Tonbridge, who brought him to London. He had heard nothing of the remains being discovered. He had heard Jackson, who was "enceinte," say that she would be glad to get rid of the child, but he was not aware
that she knew anyone to whom to go for that purpose. Witness remonstrated with her. He identified the skirt produced as having been worn by the deceased, but he could not recognise the ulster.
- At this stage the inquiry was adjourned until the 25th inst.

Source: Pembrokeshire Herald and General Advertiser, 12 July 1889, Page 4

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Re: Jackson Inquest

Post by Karen on Fri 22 Mar 2013 - 1:43

THE THAMES MYSTERY.

On Monday afternoon Mr. A. Braxton Hicks resumed his inquiry at Battersea into the circumstances attending the death of Elizabeth Jackson, aged 24 years, a single woman, late of 14, Turk's-row, Chelsea, whose mutilated remains were found in various parts of the Thames, in Battersea-park, and in a garden on the Chelsea Embankment, on June 4 and subsequent days.
John Fairclough, who had cohabited with the deceased, was called, and stated that he knew the deceased, Elizabeth Jackson, having made her acquaintance at the end of last November. He met her at a public-house at the corner of Turk's-row. She then told him that she had been living with a man named Charlie. It was on a Sunday night that witness met her, and on the
following day she agreed to accompany him to Ipswich, where he was employed for four months. She was a sober woman, and they only quarrelled now and then. On March 30 they left Ipswich and took the train for Colchester, from which place they tramped to London. They lived at different lodging-houses. He finally left her on April 28, and had not seen her since. On June 3
he was at High Wycombe, and he called at Great Marlow on his way to Reading, where he stayed two nights. He subsequently traveled to Ottery St. Mary, where the police found him on Saturday. From the time he left Jackson at Millwall he had neither seen nor heard anything of her. He never read the newspapers; in fact, he seldom saw one in the parts he had visited. He had not
heard of a body being found in the Thames. The Coroner said that was as far as he could carry the case that day. The police had so far been very successful in procuring the identification of the woman, and they might yet be able to bring out other facts. That being so, he would adjourn the inquiry until the 25th inst.

Source: Aberystwyth Observer, 13 July 1889, Page 7

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Re: Jackson Inquest

Post by Karen on Fri 22 Mar 2013 - 1:43

THE THAMES MYSTERY.
THE REMAINS IDENTIFIED.

After more than a fortnight of patient and unremitting inquiries and investigation the Metropolitan police have at length been able to place practically beyond doubt the identity of the woman portions of whose mutilated remains have been found in the Thames from time to time since the 4th inst. All the important portions of the body with the exception of the head are still preserved
in spirit at the Battersea mortuary. It was feared that in the absence of the head it would be impossible to establish the identity of the unfortunate victim of what was evidently a foul crime, but by means of certain scars, and by the portion of clothing incautiously or recklessly left by the murderer, a number of persons have been enabled to declare in the most positive manner that the
murdered person was Elizabeth Jackson, a homeless woman, well-known in some of the common lodging-houses in the Chelsea district. Elizabeth Jackson was last seen alive on May 31. Since then she has not been in any of her accustomed haunts, and a number of convergent facts in the possession of the police leave little doubt that upon the evening of that day the wretched woman met her murderer.
The various articles of clothing found with portions of the body have been identified by a number of women who knew Elizabeth Jackson intimately, and were in fact her companions. All identified them without hesitation as having belonged to Jackson, who, it appears, was also pretty well known to the police in the Chelsea district. The police on their part traced the woman's movements up to hour almost
of her disappearance. She certainly has not since been in any of the many common lodging-houses within the metropolitan area, nor an inmate of any of the casual wards, workhouses, or hospitals in London. Living from hand to mouth, she must have been without means to leave London except on foot, and her physical condition made it practically impossible for her to go on tramp. She disappeared on the evening
of May 31, and upon the morning of June 4 the first dreadful discoveries were made at Battersea and at Horselydown.

Source: Cardigan Observer, and General Advertiser For the Counties of Cardigan, Carmarthen and Pembroke, 29 June 1889, Page 2

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