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Mylett Inquest

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Mylett Inquest

Post by Karen on Wed 6 Oct 2010 - 9:33

SUPPOSED MURDER AT POPLAR.

Mr. Wynne E. Baxter opened an inquiry at Poplar Town hall, on Friday, into the circumstances attending the death of a woman unknown, whose body was discovered on the previous day in Clarke's-yard, High-street, Poplar.
Police-serjeant Gelding stated that at 4:15 a.m., on Thursday, he was on duty in High-street, Poplar. While he was passing Clarke's-yard, in company of another policeman, he saw something lying in the yard. He found it to be the body of a woman. She was lying on her left side. The body was warm. The clothes were not disarranged. He went for the divisional surgeon, whose assistant came and pronounced life extinct. The body was removed to the mortuary. He found on it 1s. in silver and 2d. in bronze, together with a phial, which was empty. The woman had no hat on, and her hair was all rough and fell over her face. The witness did not see anyone in High-street. He could not find any marks of a scuffle having taken place. The features of the woman were familiar to him, and be believed she led an immoral life.
Thomas Dean, a blind-maker, said that he passed through Clarke's-yard late on Wednesday night. He did not notice the body then, as he must have done had it been there. His house was opposite to the yard, but during the night he heard no noise.
Mr. Matthew Brownfield, divisional surgeon of police, said that he made that morning a post-mortem examination of the body. He found the body, which was that of a woman about 30 years of age, to be well nourished. Blood was oozing from the nostrils, and on the right side was a slight abrasion. On the neck he found a mark which had evidently been caused by a cord drawn tightly round from the spine at the back to the lobe of the left ear. He had since found that the mark could be produced by a piece of four-told cord. Beside that mark, the impression of thumbs and middle and index fingers was plainly visible on each side of the neck. There was no sign of poison in the stomach. The cause of death, in the witness's opinion, was suffocation by strangulation. There were no signs of a struggle, except a mark on the cheek.
The Coroner: To what do you ascribe the fingermarks?
The Witness: I think they were made in her efforts to pull off the cord.
The Coroner: I think you said that the string had not gone right round the neck, but only from the spine to beneath the left ear, travelling round by the throat. How do you account for that?
The Witness: I think the murderer must have stood behind the woman on the left side, and having the ends of the string round his hands, thrown the cord round her throat, and crossing his hands, so strangled her. Where the hands crossed would be just where the marks of the cord are absent. The cords being tight would prevent the woman from calling out for help. I think it quite possible that the cord would be run through two holes or rings, and then twisted by a turn of the wrist till death ensued.
Police-constable Thomas Costella said that his beat extended the whole length of High-street, and took in the spot where the woman was found. He went on duty at 10 p.m. on Wednesday, and between then and the time the woman was found he passed the spot six times. On none of these occasions did he see anything to arouse his suspicions.
By the Jury: Besides the witness there was another constable who patrolled the left-hand side of High-street.
A Juror: Yes, but how often? I have seen a fight lasting over an hour take place in High-street, and people screaming, without ever a constable appearing on the spot. The inhabitants of Poplar are left far more unprotected than the people of Whitechapel, and it is a great wonder that more murders of this kind have not been done in the neighbourhood.
The coroner said that it seemed very much as if a murder had been committed, and all the available evidence should be got before the jury concluded the case. Under these circumstances he thought it would be better to adjourn at this point and give his officer and the police time to make inquiries. - The inquiry was therefore adjourned.

IDENTIFICATION OF THE BODY.

On Saturday afternoon several persons visited the Poplar hospital for the purpose of identifying the latest victim of the series of horrible murders which have taken place in the East-end. Amongst these was a woman named Jenny Hill, of Simpson's-row, High-street, Poplar, who immediately recognised the body as that of an acquaintance, who had latterly been leading a fast life. She, however, was unable to state her name, or where the poor woman had been living. She informed Mr. Chivers, the coroner's officer, that she saw the deceased at half-past 11 on the night previous to the murder, and that she had then said she was without money and did not know what to do. Hill gave her twopence, and bade her good night. The deceased was perfectly sober at that time. Hill also stated that the deceased had been an inmate of the Bromley Sick asylum, and only came out about a month ago.
It transpired on Saturday that late on Wednesday night a man found a woman's hat lying in the roadway near the Eagle tavern, East India-road, which, it is thought, might have belonged to the deceased.
The clue afforded by the woman Hill led to the identification. She was known in Poplar by the name of Downey, or Downe, and in Whitechapel, which it has been discovered was the last neighbourhood in which she resided, by the name of Davis. Both these, however, were assumed names. The police secured the attendance at the Poplar mortuary of Elizabeth Usher, the head nurse of the Bromley Sick asylum, where the deceased woman was stated to have been an inmate. Miss Usher immediately recognised the woman as Rose Mylett, who had been an inmate of that institution on several occasions. The books of the asylum were referred to, and it was discovered that she last entered the asylum on the 20th of January, 1888, and discharged herself on the 14th of March. The deceased had informed most of her acquaintances that she had a mother living in Baker's-row, or Old Montague-street, Spitalfields. The police, however, failed to discover any relatives in this neighbourhood, but found that the deceased resided in a common lodging-house in George-street, Spitalfields. The house is next door to the lodging-house in which the last victim of the Whitechapel murderer lived. Mary Smith, the deputy at this establishment, on being interviewed, was somewhat reticent regarding the sad affair, but she described the deceased as being "a very respectable person." Mrs. Smith said that the deceased had lodged with her for about three months, and had, until within the last fortnight, had a companion in a man named Goodson, but this man had not seen the deceased for two weeks. The last time Mrs. Smith saw the deceased was on Wednesday night, the 19th, when, between six and seven o'clock, Rose Mylett left for Poplar, Mrs. Smith giving her twopence to pay her tram fare. The deceased was seen the same evening about midnight by Jenny Hill. At half-past two she was seen in Commercial-road by Alice Groves, who lodged with the deceased at 18, George-street, outside the George with two men, apparently seamen. When seen by these two women she was the worse for liquor.
A young girl, residing in High-street, Poplar, named Neos Green, made a statement regarding two men, apparently sailors, whom she saw under suspicious circumstances near the scene of the murder. She says that a short time before Serjeant Golding found the body of Rose Mylett two sailors came up to her in a great hurry in the High-street, and inquired the way to the West India-docks. She directed them, whereupon one of the men said to the other, "Make haste, Bill, and we shall be in time to catch the ship."
Since the commission of the crime the police have been inundated with statements from persons who fancy they have seen some clue to the murderer. These, in each case, have been sifted by trustworthy officers, but have been proved to be positively of no value whatever. This week a thorough search was made at the docks, but no information was obtained.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, December 30, 1888, Page 12

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Rose Mylett/Catherine Milett

Post by Karen on Fri 19 Nov 2010 - 23:12

THE POPLAR MYSTERY.

RESUMED INQUEST TODAY.

Mr. Wynne E. Baxter resumed the inquiry, at the Poplar Town-hall, this afternoon, relative to the death of Catherine Milett, alias Davis, whose dead body was discovered, under mysterious circumstances - it was stated at the time that the deceased had been strangled - in Clarke's-yard, High-street, Poplar.
At the commencement of the inquiry there was a rumour that a more definite conclusion had been arrived at as to the probable cause of death. It was even hinted that the woman had died from apoplexy, induced by excessive drinking - as was suggested in The Echo shortly after the discovery of the body was made. Indeed, there is a belief that this view is taken by the police authorities, and this afternoon Mr. St. John Wontner appeared to represent Mr. James Munro, the Chief Commissioner of Police; Mr. Superintendent Steed and Inspector Wildey were also present. In consequence of the peculiar nature of the case, and the publicity given to it, considerable interest was manifested in the proceedings.

THE MOTHER IN THE WITNESS-BOX.

Margaret Milett, of 16, Pelham-street, Whitechapel, said she was a widow. She identified the deceased as her daughter. She was, she said, about 23 years of age, although she could not remember her birthday. She (witness) thought her daughter was married. The deceased, however, had never told her so herself. She had seen her daughter's husband once - at the Whitechapel Workhouse.
The Coroner - Had she any children? - Only one, as far as I know. I brought it up myself for four years. The deceased used to live with me now and then during that period.
Did her husband live with her? - Not that I know of.
The Coroner - Not that you know of! But, surely, you must know.
Witness - No man lived with her then.

WHEN SHE SAW HER DAUGHTER.

Replying to further questions, the witness said her daughter called at her house some time before she died - about a week before Christmas - and arranged with witness to meet her at the corner of Bradfield-street on the following Thursday.
Did she meet you? - No. I have not seen her since. I went too late. When I saw her last she told me she had been "hopping," with another woman, and had no money. The deceased then told me her child was "somewhere in Surrey."
By Mr. Wontner - Witness could not say whether the deceased was given to intemperance.
Several questions were put to the witness as to how she herself got her living. She replied that her son, William Millett, allowed her so much a week.
The Coroner - Where does he live?
Witness - I cannot say.
The Coroner - Come, now. He allows you so much a week. How do you get it?
Witness - I went for it a week or two ago. My son is in a Government office.
The Coroner (repeating the question) - Where did you go to get the money?
"Somewhere near the Marble Arch," was the witness's reply, she subsequently adding, "in Fetter-lane."
The Coroner - That is a long distance from the Marble Arch.
By the Jury - Witness could not say the name of a person with whom the deceased went to live at Bow.

"NO MURDER AT ALL."

An inspector, in an interview with a Press Association representative today, corroborated the statement of our reporter. He says that the authorities hold the theory that no murder at all has been committed.

Source: The Echo, Wednesday January 2, 1889, Page 3

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Re: Mylett Inquest

Post by Karen on Thu 21 Mar 2013 - 17:48

The inquest was resumed and concluded on Wednesday into the circumstances of the death of Rose Millett, whose body was found early in the morning of Dec. 20 in Clarke's-yard, Poplar. Five doctors who had examined the body agreed that death was caused by strangulation, four thinking it a case of murder and the fifth holding that it was not murder. In the result the jury returned a verdict of "Wilful murder against some person or persons unknown."

Source: Aberystwyth Observer, 12 January 1889, Page 3

An inquest has been opened at the Poplar Town Hall touching the death of a woman, name unknown, whose body was discovered in Clarke's-yard, High-street, Poplar, on Thursday morning. The evidence pointed to murder by strangulation. Consequently an adjournment was granted that a full inquiry might be made.

Source: Cardigan Observer, and General Advertiser For the Counties of Cardigan, Carmarthen and Pembroke, 29 December 1888, Page 2

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Re: Mylett Inquest

Post by Karen on Thu 21 Mar 2013 - 17:49

THE MURDER IN LONDON.

On Saturday afternoon several persons visited Poplar Hospital for the purpose of identifying the latest victim of the series of horrible murders which have taken place in the East End. Amongst these was a woman named Jenny Hill, at Sampson's-row, High-street, Poplar, who immediately recognised the body as that of an acquaintance, who had latterly
been leading a fast life. She, however, was unable to state her name or where the poor woman had been living. She informed Mr. Chivers, the coroner's officer, that she saw the deceased at half-past eleven o'clock on the night previous to the murder, and that she had then said she was without money and did not know what to do. Hill gave her twopence, and bade her good night.
The deceased was perfectly sober at that time. Hill also states that the deceased had been an inmate of the Bromley Sick Asylum, and only came out about a month ago. In reply to Mr. Chivers, Hill said she could find someone who would be able to identify the deceased, and left his office for that purpose. It transpired on Saturday that late on Wednesday night a man found a woman's hat
lying in the roadway near the Eagle Tavern, East India-road, which it is thought might have belonged to the deceased.
The "Central News" says: - Inquiries instituted at Poplar on Saturday show that the murder, which has created such intense excitement in the district, is still enveloped in mystery. The police, however, are inclined to attach some importance to the statement of the woman Jenny Hill. At present, however, until some further evidence is obtained, the police are not satisfied with the woman's identification.
The empty bottle found on the deceased woman is believed by Mr. Richard Aubrey, chemist, High-street, Poplar, to have contained sandal wood oil, and not poison, as was at first supposed. In following up the theory as to the method in which death was inflicted, Dr. Brownfield made several experiments, and found that by the means suggested, it was possible for an assailant to disable his victim with marvelous celerity.
The cord which the murderer must have used to accomplish his foul work has formed the subject of a good deal of conjecture among the police authorities. It is a startling fact that in America the police are in the habit of using a thick catgut cord, which they draw tightly round the prisoner's wrist if he resist being taken to the station. The cord is commonly known in America by the name of the "Come-along," and the marks
on the woman's neck bear out the supposition that something of this nature was used to finish her existence. This lends some colour to the theory that the East End murderer is an American.

one paragraph is completely washed away (it appears that water may have spilled on to the newspaper);


who had been an inmate of that institution on several occasions. Little doubt is entertained that the name under which Miss Usher recognised her is her real name, for the books of the Asylum were referred to, and it was discovered that she last entered the Asylum on the 20th of January, 1888, and discharged herself on the 14th of March. On each occasion she went in under the same name. The deceased has informed most of her acquaintances
that she had a mother living in Baker's-row, or Old Montague-street, Spitalfields. The police, however, failed to discover any relatives in the neighbourhood, but have found that the deceased resided in a common lodging-house in George-street, Spitalfields. This house is next door to the lodging-house in which the last victim of the Whitechapel murderer lived. Mary Smith, the deputy at this establishment, was somewhat reticent on Tuesday evening
regarding the sad affair, but described the deceased as being "a very respectable person." Mrs. Smith said the deceased had lodged with her for about three months, and had, until within the last fortnight, had a companion in a man named Goodson, but this man had not seen the deceased for the past two weeks. The last time Mrs. Smith saw the deceased was on Wednesday night, when, between six and seven o'clock, Rose Mylett left for Poplar, Mrs. Smith giving her
twopence to pay her tram fare. The desceased was seen the same evening about midnight by Jenny Hill. At half past two she was seen in Commercial-road by Alice Groves, who lodged with the deceased at 18, George-street, outside the George with two men, apparently seamen. When seen by these two women she was the worse for liquor.
A young girl, residing in High-street, Poplar named Neos Green, has made a statement regarding two men, apparently sailors, whom she saw under suspicious circumstances near the scene of the murder. She says that a short time before Sergeant Golding found the body of Rose Mylett two sailors came up to her in a great hurry in the High-street, and inquired the way to the West India Docks. She directed them, whereupon one of the men said to the other, "Make haste, Bill,
and we shall be in time to catch the ship." The police are endeavouring to follow up this clue; but up to midnight their endeavours had not been successful.

Source: Pembrokeshire Herald and General Advertiser, 28 December 1888, Page 4

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Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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