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Details of Stride's Murder and Inquest

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Details of Stride's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Wed 29 Sep 2010 - 13:05

EAST END HORRORS.

BERNER STREET TRAGEDY.

Mr. Wynne Baxter opened an inquest at the Vestry hall, Cable-street, St. George's-in-the-East, on Monday, on the body of the woman murdered in a yard at the side of a club in Berner-street, Commercial-road, early on Sunday morning. The jury having been sworn, proceeded to view the body, which lay in the mortuary adjoining the vestry hall. The murder, it appears, was committed in the parish of St. George's-in-the-East, within 50 yards of the Whitechapel boundary. After looking upon the horrible spectacle of the dead woman, still fully dressed in the clothes she wore, with her throat cut and bloodstained face, the jury returned to the vestry hall. At the opening of the inquest it was announced that it was to inquire "how Elizabeth Stride came by her death," but no evidence of identification was offered.
Detective-inspector Reid, H Division, announced that he watched the case on behalf of the police.
William Wess, who affirmed instead of being sworn, was the first witness examined. He said: I reside at No. 2 William-street, Cannon-street-road, and am overseer in the printing office attached to No. 40, Berner-street, Commercial-road, which premises are in the occupation of the International Working Men's Education society, whose club is carried on there. On the ground floor of the club is a room, the door and window of which face the street. At the rear of this is the kitchen, whilst the first floor consists of a large room which is used for our meetings and entertainments, I being a member of the club. At the south side of the premises is a courtyard, to which the entrance can be obtained through a double door, in one section of which is a smaller one, which is used when the larger barriers are closed. The large doors are generally closed at night, but sometimes remain open. On the left side of the yard is a house, which is divided into three tenements, and occupied. I believe, by that number of families. At the end is a store or workshop belonging to Messrs. Hindley and Co., sack manufacturers. I do not know that a way out exists there. The club premises and the printing-office occupy the entire length of the yard on the right side. Returning to the club-house, the front room on the ground floor is used for meals. In the kitchen is a window which faces the door opening into the yard. The intervening passage is illuminated by means of a fanlight over the doors. The printing-office, which does not communicate with the club, consists of two rooms, one for compositors and the other for the editor. On Saturday the compositors finished their labours at two o'clock in the afternoon. The editor concluded earlier, but remained at the place until the discovery of the murder.
How many members are there in the club? - From 75 to 80. Working men of any nationality can join.
Is any political qualification required of members? - It is a political - a Socialist - club. On Saturday a discussion was proceeding in the lecture-room, which has three windows overlooking the courtyard. From 90 to 100 persons attended the discussion, which terminated soon after half-past 11, when the bulk of the members left, using the street door, the most convenient exit. From 20 to 30 members remained, some staying in the lecture-room and the others going downstairs. Of those upstairs a few continued the discussion, while the rest were singing. The windows of the lecture-room were partly open.
How do you know that you finally left at a quarter-past 12 o'clock? - Because of the time when I reached my lodgings. Before leaving I went into the yard, and thence to the printing-office, in order to leave some literature there, and on returning to the yard I observed that the double door at the entrance was open. There is no lamp in the yard, and none of the street lamps light it, so that the yard is only lit by the lights through the windows at the side of the club and of the tenements opposite. As to the tenements, I only observed lights in two first-floor windows. There was also a light in the printing-office, the editor being in his room reading.
Was there much noise in the club? - Not exactly much noise; but I could hear the singing when I was in the yard.
Did you look towards the yard gates? - Not so much to the gates as to the ground, but nothing unusual attracted my attention.
Can you say that there was no object on the ground? - I could not say that.
Did you meet anyone in the street? - Not that I recollect. I generally go home between 12 and one.
Do low women frequent Berner-street? - I have seen men and women standing about and talking to each other in Fairclough-street.
Morris Eagle, who also affirmed, said: I live at 4, New-road, Commercial-road, and travel in jewellery. I am a member of the International Workmen's club, which meets at 40, Berner-street. I was there on Saturday, several times during the day, and was in the chair during the discussion in the evening. After the discussion, between half-past 11 and a quarter to 12 o'clock, I left the club to take my young lady home, going out through the front door. I returned about 20 minutes to one. I tried the front door, but, finding it closed, I went through the gateway into the yard, reaching the club in that way.
Did you notice anything lying on the ground near the gates? - I did not. - It was rather dark. There was a light from the upper part of the club, but that would not throw any illumination upon the ground. It was dark near the gates.
Did you see anyone about in Berner-street? - I dare say I did, but I do not remember them. As soon as I entered the gateway on Saturday night I could hear a friend of mine singing in the upstairs room of the club. I went up to him. He was singing in the Russian language, and we sang together. I had been there twenty minutes when a member named Gidleman came upstairs, and said "There is a woman dead in the yard." I went down in a second and struck a match, when I saw a woman lying on the ground in a pool of blood, near the gates. Her feet were towards the gates, about six or seven feet from them. She was lying by the side of and facing the club wall. When I reached the body and struck the match another member was present.
Did you touch the body? - No. As soon as I struck the match I perceived a lot of blood, and I ran away and called the police.
Were the clothes of the deceased disturbed? - I cannot say. I ran towards the Commercial-road, Diemshietz, the club steward, and another member going in the opposite direction down Fairclough-street. In Commercial-road I found two constables at the corner of Grove-street. I told them that a woman had been murdered in Berner-street, and they returned with me.
Was any one in the yard then? - Yes, a few persons - some members of the club and some strangers. One of the policemen turned his lamp on the deceased and sent me to the station for the inspector, at the same time telling his comrade to fetch a doctor. The onlookers seemed afraid to go near and touch the body. The constable, however, felt it.
Can you fix the time when the discovery was first made? - It must have been about one o'clock. On Saturday nights there is free discussion at the club. And among those present last Saturday were about half-a-dozen women, but they were those we knew - not strangers. It was not a dancing night, but a few members may have danced after the discussion.
If there was dancing and singing in the club you would not hear the cry of a woman in the yard? - It would depend upon the cry.
The cry of a woman in great distress - a cry of "Murder"? - Yes, I should have heard that.

THE MAN WHO FOUND THE BODY.

Lewis Diemshietz, having affirmed, deposed: I reside at 40, Berner-street, and am steward of the International Workmen's club. I am married, and my wife lives at the club too, and assists in the management. On Saturday I left home about half-past 11 in the morning and returned exactly at one o'clock on Sunday morning. I noticed the time at the baker's shop at the corner of Berner-street. I had been to the market near the Crystal palace, and had a barrow like a costermonger's, drawn by a pony, which I keep in George-yard, Cable-street. I drove home to leave my goods. I then drove into the yard, both of the gates being wide open. It was rather dark there. All at once my pony shied at some object on the right. I looked to see what the object was, and observed that there was something unusual, but could not tell what. It was a dark object. I put my whip handle to it, and tried to lift it up, but as I did not succeed I jumped down from my barrow and struck a match. It was rather windy, and I could only get sufficient light to see that there was some figure there. I could tell from the dress that it was the figure of a woman.
You did not disturb it? - No, I went into the club and asked where my wife was. I found her in the front room on the ground floor.
What did you do with the pony? - I left it in the yard by itself, just outside the club door. There were several members in the front room of the club, and I told them all that there was a woman lying in the yard, though I could not say whether she was drunk or dead. I then got a candle and went into the yard, where I could see blood before I reached the body.
Did you touch the body? - No; I ran off at once for the police. I could not find a constable in the direction which I took, so I shouted out "Police!" as loud as I could. A man whom I met in Grove-street returned with me, and when we reached the yard he took hold of the head of the deceased. As he lifted it up I saw the wound in the throat.
Had the constables arrived then? - At the very same moment Eagle and the constables arrived.
How soon afterwards did a doctor arrive? - About 20 minutes after the constables came up. No one was allowed by the police to leave the club until they were searched, and then they had to give their names and addresses.
Did you notice whether the clothes of the deceased were in order? - They were in perfect order.
How was she lying? - On her left side, with her face towards the club wall.
Was the whole of the body resting on the side? - No; I should say only her face. I cannot say how much of the body was sideways. I did not notice what position her hands were in, but when the police came I observed that her bodice was unbuttoned near the neck. The doctor said the body was quite warm.
What quantity of blood should you think had flowed from the body? - I should say quite two quarts.
In what direction had it run? - Up the yard from the street. The body was about one foot from the club wall. The gutter of the yard is paved with large stones, and the centre with smaller irregular stones.
Have you ever seen men and women together in the yard? - Never.
A Juror: Could you in going up the yard have passed the body without touching it? - Oh, yes.
Any person going up the centre of the yard might have passed without noticing it? - I, perhaps, should not have noticed it if my pony had not shied. I had passed it when I got down from my barrow.
How far did the blood run? As far as the kitchen door of the club.
Was any person left with the body while you ran for the police? Some members of the club remained; at all events, when I came back they were there. I cannot say whether any of them touched the body.
Inspector Reid (interposing): When the murder was discovered the members of the club were detained on the premises, and I searched them, whilst Dr. Phillips examined them.
A Juror: Was it possible for anybody to leave the yard between the discovery of the body and the arrival of the police?
Witness: Oh yes - or, rather, it would have been possible before I informed the members of the club, not afterwards.
When you entered the yard, if any person had run out you would have seen them in the dark? - Oh, yes, it was light enough for that. It was dark in the gateway, but not so dark further in the yard.
The Coroner: The body has not yet been identified? - Not yet.
The Foreman: I do not quite understand that. I thought the inquest had been opened on the body of one Elizabeth Stride.
The Coroner: That was a mistake. Something is known of the deceased, but she has not been fully identified.



Last edited by Karen on Wed 26 Oct 2011 - 6:12; edited 1 time in total

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Stride Inquest

Post by Karen on Thu 30 Sep 2010 - 1:31

SECOND DAY.

On Tuesday Constable Henry Lamb, 252 H division, said: Last Sunday morning, shortly before one o'clock, I was on duty in Commercial-road, between Christian-street and Batty-street, when two men came running towards me and shouting. I went to meet them, and they called out, "Come on, there has been another murder." I asked where, and as they got to the corner of Berner-street they pointed down and said, "There." I saw people moving some distance down the street. I ran - followed by another constable 426 H. Arriving at the gateway of No. 40 I observed something dark lying on the ground on the right-hand side. I turned my light on, when I found that the object was a woman, with her throat cut and apparently dead. I sent the other constable for the nearest doctor, and a young man who was standing by I despatched to the police-station to inform the inspector what had occurred. On my arrival there were about 30 people in the yard, and others followed me in. No one was nearer than a yard to the body. As I was examining the deceased the crowd gathered round, but I begged them to keep back, otherwise they might have their clothes soiled with blood, and thus get into trouble.
Up to this time had you touched the body? - I had put my hand on the face.
Was it warm? Slightly, I felt the wrist, but could not discern any movement of the pulse. I then blew my whistle for assistance.
Did you observe how the deceased was lying? - She was lying on her left side, with her left hand on the ground.
Was there anything in that hand? - I did not notice anything. The right arm was across the breast. Her face was not more than five or six inches away from the club wall.
Were her clothes disturbed? - No.
Only her boots visible? - Yes, and only the soles of them. There were no signs of a struggle. Some of the blood was in a liquid state, and had run towards the kitchen door of the club. A little - that nearest to her on the ground - was slightly congealed. I can hardly say whether any was still flowing from the throat. Dr. Blackwell was the first doctor to arrive; he came 10 or 12 minutes after myself, but I had no watch with me.
Did any one of the crowd say whether the body had been touched before your arrival? - No. Dr. Blackwell examined the body and its surroundings. Dr. Phillips came 10 minutes later. Inspector Pinhorn arrived directly after Dr. Blackwell. When I blew my whistle other constables came, and I had the entrance of the yard closed. This was while Dr. Blackwell was looking at the body. Before that the doors were wide open. I examined the hands and clothes of all the members of the club. There were from 15 to 20 present.
Did you discover traces of blood anywhere in the club? - No.
Witness: I did not see any person leave. I did not try the front door of the club to see if it was locked. I afterwards went over the cottages, the occupants of which were in bed. I was admitted by men, who came down partly dressed; all the other people were undressed. As to the waterclosets in the yard, one was locked and the other unlocked, but no one was there.
There is a recess near the dustbin. Did you go there? - Yes; afterwards, with Dr. Phillips.
The Coroner: But I am speaking of at the time?
Witness: I did it subsequently. I do not recollect looking over the wooden partition. I, however, examined the store belonging to Messrs. Hindley, sack manufacturers, but I saw nothing there.
When you were found what direction were you going in? - I was coming towards Berner-street. A constable named Smith was on the Berner-street beat. He did not accompany me, but the constable who was on fixed-point duty between Grove-street and Christian-street in Commercial-road. Constables at fixed-points leave duty at one in the morning. I believe that this is the practice nearly all over London.

A COINCIDENCE IN TIME.

The Coroner: I think this is important. The Hanbury-street murder was discovered just as the night police were going off duty. (To witness): Did you see anything suspicious? - I did not at any time. There were squabbles and rows in the streets, but nothing more.
The Foreman: Was there light sufficient to enable you to see, as you were going down Berner-street, whether any person was running away from No. 40? - It was rather dark, but I think there was light enough for that, though the person would be somewhat indistinct from Commercial-road.
The Foreman: Some of the papers state that Berner-street is badly lighted; but there are six lamps within 700 feet, and I do not think that is very bad.
The Coroner: The parish plan shows that there are four lamps within 350 feet, from Commercial-road to Fairclough-street.
Witness: There are three, if not four, lamps in Berner-street, between Commercial-road and Fairclough-street. Berner-street is about as well lighted as other side streets. Most of them are rather dark, but more lamps have been erected lately.
Edward Spooner, in reply to the coroner, said: I live at 26, Fairclough-street, and am a horse-keeper with Messrs. Meredith, biscuit bakers. On Sunday morning, between 12:30 and one o'clock, I was standing outside the Beehive public-house, at the corner of Christian-street, with my young woman. We had left a public-house in Commercial-road at closing time, midnight, and walked quietly to the point named. We stood outside the Beehive about 25 minutes, when two Jews came running along, calling out "Murder!" and "Police!" They ran as far as Grove-street, and then turned back. I stopped them and asked what was the matter, and they replied that a woman had been murdered. I thereupon proceeded down Berner-street and into Dutfield's-yard, adjoining the International Workmen's club-house, and there saw a woman lying just inside the gate.
Was anyone with her? - There were about 15 people in the yard.
Were they touching her? - No. One man struck a match, but I could see the woman before the match was struck. I put my hand under her chin when the match was alight.
Was the chin warm? - Slightly.
Was any blood coming from the throat? - Yes; it was still flowing. I noticed that she had a piece of paper doubled up in her right hand, and some red and white flowers pinned on her breast. I did not feel the body, nor did I alter the position of the head.
Did you notice whether the blood was still moving on the ground? - It was running down the gutter. I stood by the side of the body for four or five minutes, until the last witness arrived.
Did you notice anyone leave the yard when you were there? - No. I believe it was 25 minutes to one o'clock when I arrived in the yard.
Witness: The legs of the deceased were drawn up, but her clothes were not disturbed. When Police-constable Lamb came I help him to close the gates of the yard, and I left through the club.
Inspector Reed: I believe that was after you had given your name and address to the police? - Yes.
And had been searched? - Yes.
And examined by Dr. Phillips? - Yes.
By the Jury: I did not meet anyone as I was hastening through Berner-street.

IDENTIFYING THE BODY.

Mary Malcolm, who appeared deeply affected while giving her evidence, said: I live at 50, Eagle-street, Red Lion-square, Holborn, and am married. My husband, Andrew Malcolm, is a tailor. I have seen the body at the mortuary. I saw it once on Sunday and twice yesterday.
Who is it? - It is the body of my sister, Elizabeth Watts.
You have no doubt about that? - Not the slightest.
You did have some doubt about it at one time? - I had at first.
When did you last see your sister alive? - Last Thursday, about a quarter to seven in the evening.
Where? - She came to me at 59, Red Lion-street, where I work as a trouser-maker.
What did she come to you for? - To ask me for a little assistance. I have been in the habit of assisting her for five years.
Did you give her anything? - I gave her a shilling and a short jacket - not the jacket which is now on the body.
How long was she with you? - Only a few moments.
Did she say where she was going? - No.
Where was she living? - I do not know. I knew it was somewhere in the neighbourhood of the tailoring Jews - Commercial-road or Commercial-street, or somewhere at the East-end.
Did you understand that she was living in a lodging-house? - Yes.
Did you know what she was doing for a livelihood? - I had my doubts.
Was she the worse for drink when she came to you on Thursday? - No; sober.
But she was sometimes the worse for drink, was she not? - That was, unfortunately, a failing with her. She was 37 years of age last March.
Had she ever been married? - Yes.
Is her husband alive? - Yes, so far as I know. She married the son of Mr. Watts, wine and spirit merchant, of Walcot-street, Bath. I think her husband's Christian name was Edward. I believe he is now in America.
Did he get into trouble? - No.
Why did he go away? - Because my sister brought trouble upon him.
When did she leave him? - About eight years ago, but I cannot be quite certain as to the time. She had two children. Her husband caught her with a porter, and there was a quarrel.
Did the husband turn her out of doors? - No; he sent her to my poor mother, with the two children.
Where does your mother live? - She is dead. She died in the year 1883.
Where are the children now? - The girl is dead, but the boy is at a boarding school kept by his aunt.
Was the deceased subject to epileptic fits? - Witness (sobbing bitterly): No, she only had drunken fits.
Was she ever before the Thames police magistrate? - I believe so.
Charged with drunkenness? - Yes.
Are you aware that she has been let off on the supposition that she was subject to epileptic fits? - I believe that is so; she was not subject to epileptic fits.
Has she ever told you of troubles she was in with any man? - Oh yes; she lived with a man.
Do you know his name? - I do not remember now, but I shall be able to tell you tomorrow. I believe she lived with a man who kept a coffee-house at Poplar.
Inspector Reid: Was his name Stride? - No; I think it was Dent, but I can find out for certain by tomorrow.
The Coroner: How long had she ceased to live with that man? - Oh, some time. He went away to sea, and was wrecked on the Isle of St. Paul, I believe.
How long ago should you think that was? - It must be three years and a half; but I could tell you all about it tomorrow, even the name of the vessel that was wrecked.
Had the deceased lived with any man since then? - Not to my knowledge, but there is some man who says that he has lived with her.
Have you ever heard of her getting into trouble with this man? - No; but at times she got locked up for drunkenness. She always brought her trouble to me.
You never heard of anyone threatening her? - No; she was too good for that.
Did you ever hear her called "Long Liz"? - That was generally her nickname, I believe.
Have you ever heard of the name of Stride? - She never mentioned such a name to me. I think that if she had lived with anyone of that name she would have told me. I have heard what the man Stride has said, but I think he is mistaken.
The Coroner: How often did your sister come to you? - Every Saturday, and I always gave her 2s. That was for her lodgings.
Did she come to you at all last Saturday? - No; I did not see her on that day.
The Thursday visit was an unusual one, I suppose? - Yes.
Do you think it strange that she did not come on the Saturday? - I did.
Had she ever missed a Saturday before? - Not for nearly three years.
Did you think there was something the matter with her? - On the Sunday morning when I read the accounts in the newspapers I thought it might be my sister who had been murdered. I had a presentiment that that was so. I came down to Whitechapel and was directed to the mortuary; but when I saw the body I did not recognise it as that of my sister.

STRANGE PRESENTIMENT OF A SISTER'S DEATH.

How was that? Why did you not recognise it in the first instance? - I do not know, except that I saw it in the gaslight, between nine and ten at night. But I recognised her the next day.
Did you not have some special presentiment that this was your sister? - Yes.
Tell the jury what is was - I was in bed, and about 20 minutes past one on Sunday morning I felt a pressure on my breast and heard three distinct kisses. It was that which made me afterwards suspect that the woman who had been murdered was my sister.
The Coroner (to the Jury): The only reason why I allow this evidence is that the witness has been doubtful about her identification. (To witness) Did your sister ever break a limb? - No.
Never? - Not to my knowledge.
The Foreman: Had she any special marks upon her? - Yes, on her right leg there was a small black mark.
The Coroner: Have you seen that mark on the deceased? - Yes.
When did you see it? - Yesterday morning.
But when, before death, did you see it on your sister? - Not for years. It was the size of pea. I have not seen it for 20 years.
Did you mention the mark before you saw the body? - I said that I could recognise my sister by this particular mark.
What was the mark? - It was from the bite of an adder. One day, when children, we were rolling down a hill together, and we came across an adder. The thing bit me first and my sister afterwards. I have still the mark of the bite on my left hand.
The Coroner (examining the mark): Oh, that is only a scar. Are you sure that your sister, in her youth, never broke a limb? - Not to my knowledge.
Has your husband seen your sister? - Yes.
Has he been to the mortuary? - No, he will not go.
Have you any brothers and sisters alive? - Yes, a brother and a sister, but they have not seen her for years. My brother might recognise her. He lives near Bath. My sister resides at Folkestone. My sister (the deceased) had a hollowness in her right foot, caused by some sort of accident. It was the absence of this hollowness that made me doubt whether the deceased was really my sister. Perhaps it passed away in death. But the adder mark removed all doubt.
Did you recognise the clothes of the deceased at all? - No. (Bursting into tears.) Indeed, I have had trouble with her. On one occasion she left a naked baby outside my door.
One of her babies? - One of her own.
One of the two children by her husband? - No; another one; one she had by a policeman, I believe. She left it with me, and I had to keep it until she fetched it away.
Inspector Reid: Is that child alive, do you know? - I believe it died in Bath.

THE DOCTOR'S EVIDENCE.

Mr. Frederick William Blackwell deposed: I reside at No. 100, Commercial-road, and am a physician and surgeon. On Sunday morning last, at 10 minutes past one o'clock, I was called to Berner-street by a policeman. My assistant, Mr. Johnston, went back with the constable, and I followed immediately I was dressed. I consulted my watch on my arrival, and it was 1:16 a.m. The deceased was lying on her left side obliquely across the passage, her face looking towards the right wall. Her legs were drawn up, her feet close against the wall of the right side of the passage. Her head was resting beyond the carriage-wheel rut, the neck lying over the rut. Her feet were three yards from the gateway. Her dress was unfastened at the neck. The neck and chest were quite warm, as were also the legs, and the face was slightly warm. The hands were cold. The right hand was open, and on the chest, and was smeared with blood. The left hand, lying on the ground, was partially closed, and contained a packet of cachous wrapped in tissue paper. There were no rings, nor marks of rings on her hands. The appearance of the face was quite placid. The mouth was slightly open. The deceased had round her neck a check silk scarf, the bow of which was turned to the left and pulled very tight. In the neck there was a long incision which exactly corresponded with the lower border of the scarf. The border was slightly frayed, as if by a sharp knife. The incision in the neck commenced on the left side, two and a half inches below the angle of the jaw, and almost in a direct line with it, nearly severing the vessels on that side, cutting the windpipe completely in two, and terminating on the opposite side one and a half inches below the angle of the right jaw, but without severing the vessels on that side. I could not ascertain whether the bloody hand had been moved. The blood was running down the gutter into the drain in an opposite direction to the feet. There was about 1lb. of clotted blood close by the body, and a stream all the way from there to the back door of the club.
Were there no spots of blood about? - No; only some marks of blood which had been trodden in.
Was there any blood on the soles of the deceased's boots? - No.
No splashing of blood on the wall? - No, it was very dark, and what I saw was by the aid of a policeman's lantern. I have not examined the place since. I examined the clothes, but found no blood on any part of them. The bonnet of the deceased was lying on the ground a few inches from the head. Her dress was unbuttoned at the top.
Can you say whether the injuries could have been self-inflicted? - It is impossible they could have been.
Did you form any opinion as to how long the deceased had been dead? - From 20 minutes to half an hour when I arrived. The clothes were not wet with rain. She would have bled to death comparatively slowly on account of vessels on one side only of the neck being cut and the artery not completely severed.
After the infliction of the injuries was there any possibility of any cry being uttered by the deceased? - None whatever. Dr. Phillips came about 20 minutes to half an hour after my arrival. The double doors of the yard were closed when I arrived, so that the previous witnesses must have made a mistake on that point.
A Juror: Can you say whether the throat was cut before or after the deceased fell to the ground? - I formed the opinion that the murderer probably caught hold of the silk scarf, which was tight and knotted, and pulled the deceased backwards, cutting her throat in that way. The throat might have been cut as she was falling, or when she was on the ground. The blood would have spurted about if the act had been committed while she was standing up.
The Coroner: Was the silk scarf tight enough to prevent her calling out? - I could not say that.
A hand might have been placed on her nose and mouth? - Yes, and the cut on the throat was probably instantaneous.

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Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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Stride Inquest

Post by Karen on Thu 30 Sep 2010 - 3:09

THIRD DAY.

On Wednesday, Elizabeth Tanner, deputy for the common lodging-house at 32, Flower and Dean-street, said: I identify the body as that of a woman who has lodged in our lodging-house on and off for about six years. She was known by the name of "Long Liz."
Do you know her right name? - No, sir, I don't.
She used to tell me that she was a Swedish woman. She told me that her husband went down in the Princess Alice ship.
When did you last see her alive? - At half-past six on Saturday afternoon. She was in the Queen's Head public-house with me in Commercial-street. We left the Queen's Head, and walked back to the lodging-house. At that time deceased had no bonnet or cloak on. Deceased went into the kitchen of the lodging-house. I went to some other part of the building.
You are quite certain it is her? - Yes. I recognise the features. She told me that she lost the roof of her mouth at the time the Princess Alice went down, and I recognise her by that. She was in the Princess Alice when it went down, and her mouth was injured. Deceased stayed at the lodging-house last week only on Wednesday and Thursday nights. She had not paid for a bed for Saturday night.
Do you know any of her male acquaintances? - Only one, sir.
Do you know his name? - No, I don't. She left the man she was living with on Thursday to come and stay at my lodging-house. That is what she told me.
Have you ever seen this man? - Yes; I saw him the following Sunday evening. I do not know that she had ever been at the Thames police-court. I do not know that she was subject to fits, and I never heard she was.
What sort of woman was she? - Was she quiet or no? - She was very quiet, sir.
Was she a sober woman? - Yes, sir.
Did she use to stop out late at night? - Sometimes.
A Juror: Did you ever know any other woman who was known as "Long Liz?" - No other "Long Liz" ever stayed at my house. I never heard her say she was assisted by her sister.
By Detective-inspector Reid: I have never heard the name of Stride mentioned in connection with her.
By a Juror: Deceased had been away from my lodging-house for about three months, and only returned last Thursday. I have seen her frequently in the meantime, sometimes once a week, and at other times every other day.
The Coroner: Did she tell you what she was doing? - She told me she was working among the Jews. She said she was living with a man in Fashion-street.
Did she speak English well? - She spoke English as well as an Englishwoman, but she could speak Swedish as well.
By Detective-inspector Reid: I have heard her speak two or three words in Swedish, but not carry on a conversation.
Catherine Lane deposed: I live at Flower and Dean-street, Spitalfields. I am a charwoman; I am married; and my husband is alive. His name is Patrick Lane, and he is a dock labourer. We have lived at the lodging-house since Feb. 11 last. I have seen the body in the mortuary. I recognise it as "Long Liz," who used to live in the lodging-house lately. I have known her six or seven months.
Charles Preston, a barber, said: I live at 32, Flower and Dean-street. I have seen the body in the mortuary. I saw it on Sunday afternoon, and I identified it.
You are quite sure it is "Long Liz?" - Yes, sir.

A SECOND IDENTIFICATION.

Michael Kidney called, and examined: I live at 38, Dorset-street, Spitalfields. I am a waterside labourer.
Have you seen the body in the mortuary? - Yes.
Is it the woman you have been living with? - Yes.
Do you know what her name was? - Elizabeth Stride.
How long have you known her? - About three years.
How long has she been living with you? - Nearly all the time.
Do you know what her age was? - Between 36 and 38. She told me she was 35. She told me that she was a Swede, and that she was born three miles from Stockholm. She said she first came to England to see it; but I have great doubts about this. She afterwards told me that she came to England with a family in a situation. She told me that she was a widow, and that her husband was a ship's carpenter belonging to Sheerness.
Did he ever keep a coffee-house? - She told me did at Chrisp-street, Poplar, and that he was drowned in the Princess Alice disaster.
Was the roof of her mouth deficient? - Yes.
When did you last see deceased alive? - On Tuesday week. I left her on friendly terms in Commercial-street, as I was coming from work between nine and 10 o'clock at night. I got home half an hour afterwards, and she had been in and gone out. I did not see her again until I saw the body at the mortuary. She left me through drink. She had done it before and come back. I treated her the same as I would a wife.
Having given his evidence, witness in a somewhat mysterious manner complained that he had gone to the police-station in Leman-street and asked to be allowed to have the assistance of a trained detective, as he would catch the murderer, but they would have nothing to do with him.
Inspector Reid: Were you intoxicated?
Witness: Yes.
The Coroner: What information have you?
Witness: I have heard something said which would lead me to get a good deal more information if I had police help.
A Juror: You must have had special information to have wanted a detective.
Witness: I had.
The Coroner: Well, give us your information; we are all interested in catching the murderer.
Witness: I believe I could capture him if I had control of the force. If I could place 100 men, the murderer would be caught in the act.
Inspector Reid: But you have no information to give.
Witness: If I placed the men, one of them would catch him in the act.
Further questioned, the witness said: Mrs. Malcolm very much represents the appearance of the deceased woman. She told me that a policeman used to court her when she was staying at Hyde-park, and before she was married to Stride. She never had a child by me, and I never heard of her having a child by the policeman. She said she had had nine children. Two were drowned on the Princess Alice, and the remainder were in a school in connection with the Swedish church on the other side of the Thames. I have heard her say that some friends of her husband had some of the children.
The Foreman of the Jury: Do you think she was telling the truth when she said she was Swedish? - Yes; I firmly believed she was a Swede. Deceased and her husband were employed on the Princess Alice.
Mr. Edward Johnston said: I live at 100, Commercial-road, and am assistant at Drs. Kay and Blackwell at that address. On Sunday morning last, a few minutes past one o'clock, I received a call from Constable 436 H. After informing Dr. Blackwell, who was in bed, of the case, I accompanied the constable. In the yard adjoining No. 40 I was shown the figure of a woman lying on the left side. I found she was dead. What light there was came from the policemen's lantern. I examined the woman and found a deep incision in the throat.
Was there blood coming from the wound? - No; it had stopped. I also felt the body to see if it was warm, and found it all warm except the hands.
Was it you who undid the dress? - Yes; I undid the dress to see whether the chest was warm.

DISCOVERY OF A KNIFE.

Thomas Corim said: I live at 67, Plummer's-road Commercial-road. I am employed in the cocoa-nut business. On Sunday night last I was coming away from a friend's at 16, Bath-gardens, Brady-street. I walked straight down Brady-street towards Whitechapel-road. I then crossed the road. When opposite No. 253 I saw a knife lying on the doorstep. No. 253, Whitechapel-road, is a laundry. There are two steps, and the knife was on the bottom one.
The knife was produced. It was a long narrow-bladed knife, with a keen edge, with a handkerchief folded neatly round the handle. Both knife and handkerchief were stained with blood. It is a knife such as is commonly used in cookshops and by provision dealers. Witness further said he pointed out the knife to a police-constable, but never touched it.
Witness, continuing, said there were not many persons passing at the time he found the knife. It was light, and the knife could easily be seen. Between Brady-street and the place where the knife was he passed three policemen and about nine civilians.
Police-constable Drage gave evidence as to receiving the knife from the last witness, and taking it to Leman-street station. The knife was smothered with dry blood. The handkerchief which was bound round the handle was tied with string. The handkerchief was also blood-stained. It was 12:30 o'clock. The last witness remarked to him, "When I saw the knife it made my blood run cold; you hear such funny things now-a-days." A cab horse had fallen down there a few minutes previously, and witness helped to pick it up. The knife would probably have been laid down during that time. He had been past the step a quarter of an hour previously, and he believed the knife was not there then.

DR. PHILLIPS' EVIDENCE.

Dr. Phillips, called, and examined: I am police divisional surgeon, H division. On Sunday afternoon Dr. Blackwell and I made a post-mortem examination, Dr. Blackwell making the dissection, and I took notes. We found the body fairly nourished. On the neck, taking it from left to right, there was a clean cut incision six inches in length, the incision commencing two and a half inches in a straight line below the angle of the jaw. There was a deformity in the lower fifth of the bones of the right leg, which was not straight, but bowed forward; there was a thickening above the left ankle. The bones were here straighter. There was no external recent injury, save to neck. The soles of the feet were scaling, probably through want of cleanliness. The body being washed, more thoroughly, I saw six, more or less scabbed, healing sores on the forehead. The lower lobe of the ear was torn, as if by the forcible removing or wearing through of an ear-ring, but it was thoroughly healed. The right ear was pierced for an ear-ring, but had not been so injured, and the ear-ring was wanting. - Dr. Phillips then gave the details of the body, the heart being small and stomach large.
A Juror: You have not mentioned anything about the roof of the mouth. One witness said part of the roof of the mouth was gone. - That was not noticed.
The Coroner: What was the cause of death? - The cause of death was undoubtedly from the loss of blood from the left carotid artery and the division of the windpipe.
By a Juror: I did notice a black mark on one of the legs of the deceased, but I could not say that it was due to an adder bite.
At this stage the inquest was further adjourned till Friday.

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Stride Inquest

Post by Karen on Thu 30 Sep 2010 - 3:49

FOURTH DAY.

On Friday Dr. Phillips said that in the interval since Wednesday he had examined the roof of the deceased's mouth, and could not find any injury to or absence of any part of either the hard or soft palate. He had also examined the two handkerchiefs found upon the woman, and found only fruit stains upon them. Neither in the hand nor about the body of the deceased did he find any grapes or connection therewith. He was convinced that the deceased had not swallowed either skin or seed of a grape within many hours of her death. He had come to a conclusion as to the position of the victim and her assailant. He believed she was seized by the shoulders, placed on the ground, and that the perpetrator of the deed was on her right side when he inflicted the cut. There was no perceptible trace of any anaesthetic or drug having been used. The absence of noise was a difficult matter in this case, under the circumstances, to account for; but it must not be taken for granted there was no noise. If there was an absence of noise, there was nothing in this case to account for it. She could not have cried after the cut, but why should she not have cried out when she was put upon the ground? His reason for saying the deceased was murdered when on the ground was the absence of blood anywhere but on the left side of the body, and between it and the wall.
Mr. Blackwell, recalled, said the woman would die in a fainting condition, from rapid loss of blood. Taking all the facts into consideration, and more especially the absence of any weapon, it was impossible for it to have been a suicide. He had seen more severe cuts made by suicides. He was of the same opinion as Dr. Phillips, that although the knife found might have inflicted the injury, it was an extremely unlikely one to have been used.
Mr. Sven Olison, 32, Prince's-square, St. George's-in-the-East, said: I am clerk of the Swedish church in Prince's-square. I saw the body of the deceased last Tuesday, and I recognise her as a person I have known for 17 years. She was a Swede, and her name was Elizabeth Stride, the wife of John Thomas Stride, a carpenter. Her maiden name was Gustafsdotter, and she was born at Dorslander, near Gottenburg, on November 27, 1843. At the church we keep a register of all Swedes coming to this country who desire to be registered, and deceased was registered as an unmarried woman on July 10, 1866. She was not married at my church. In the registry I find a memorandum (undated), written by the Rev. Mr. Frost in Swedish, stating that the deceased had been married to an Englishman, John Thomas Stride. I don't know when this entry was made, but it must have been many years ago. I know the hymn book produced. It is an old one, published in 1821. There is no name in it, but I gave it to the deceased last winter. I believe the deceased was married to Stride in 1869. She told me that he was drowned in the wreck of the Princess Alice. At the time of his death she was very poor, and I gave her assistance.

DECEASED SEEN WITH A MAN.

William Marshall, 64, Berner-street, deposed: I am a labourer in an indigo warehouse. I have seen the body of the deceased at the mortuary. I saw deceased on Saturday evening in Berner-street, about three doors off from where I am living. She was on the pavement opposite about No. 58. She was between Boyd-street and Fairclough-street. It was then about a quarter to 12 o'clock at night. She was standing on the pavement talking with a man.
How did you know this was the same woman? - I recognised the deceased was the same woman by her face and her dress. She was not wearing a flower in her breast. She and the man were talking quietly. There was no lamp near. The nearest lamp was some yards off. I did not see the face of the man distinctly.
Did you notice how he was dressed? - Yes; he had a black small coat and dark trousers.
How old was he, do you think - young, or old, or middle-aged? - He seemed to me to be a middle-aged man. He was not wearing a hat; he was wearing a round hat with a small peak to it - somewhat like what a sailor would wear.
What height was he? - He was about 5ft. 6in.
Was he thin or stout? - Rather stoutish. He looked decently dressed.
What class of man did he look? - He looked as if he worked at some respectable business.
Everybody works at a respectable business (laughter). - He did not look like a dock labourer nor a sailor. He had more the appearance of a clerk than anything I can suggest. I do not think he had any whiskers. He was not wearing gloves. He had no stick or umbrella in his hand. He had a cutaway coat.
What attracted your attention to them? - I was first attracted by their standing there for some time, and he was kissing and cuddling her.
Did you overhear anything they said? - I heard the man say to the deceased, "You would say anything but your prayers."
Did his voice give you the idea of a clerk? - Yes; he was mild speaking. From the way he spoke I thought that he was an educated man. I did not hear them say anything more. They went away after that. I did not hear the woman say anything, but after the man made the observation she laughed. When they went away they went towards Helen-street. They walked in the middle of the road. They would not pass No. 40 (the International club) on their way. The woman was dressed in a black jacket and a black skirt. Neither of them appeared to me to be the worse for drink. I went indoors about midnight. I did not hear anything till I heard "Murder" being called in the street just after one o'clock on the Sunday morning.
James Brown, dock labourer, said: I live at Fairclough-street. I have seen the body at the mortuary. I do not know the woman. I saw her on Sunday morning about a quarter before one o'clock. I was going from my own house to get some supper at a chandler's shop at the corner of Berner-street and Fairclough-street. On my way back three minutes later I saw a man and woman standing against the wall by the Board school in Fairclough-street. I heard the woman say, "No; not tonight, some other night." They made me turn round, and I looked at them. I saw enough then to enable me to say that I am almost certain deceased was that woman. I did not notice any flower in her dress. The man was standing with his arm leaning against the wall. The woman was standing with her back against the wall facing me.
Did you notice the man? - Well, I noticed that he had a long coat on, which reached very nearly down to his heels. It appeared to be an overcoat. I could not say what kind of hat or cap he had on. They were in rather a dark place. He was wearing a dark coat. When I had nearly finished my supper I heard screams of "Police!" and "Murder!" There had been an interval of about a quarter of an hour between my getting home and these screams.
Did you notice the height of the man? - I should think he was about the same height as myself - 5ft. 7in. He was of average build. Neither of them seemed the worse for drink. When I heard the screams of "Murder!" and "Police!" I went up to the window and looked out, but I did not see whence they proceeded. They ceased when I got to the window. The cries were those of moving persons, going in the direction of Grove-street. Shortly afterwards I saw a policeman standing at the corner of Christian-street.
Constable Smith, 452 H, said: On Saturday last I went on duty at 10 p.m., beat including Berner-street. When I was in Berner-street at 12:30 I saw a man and woman together. The woman was like the deceased, and I have no doubt that the body in the mortuary is that of the person I saw. The two stood a few yards up Berner-street, on the opposite side to where she was found. I noticed the man. He had a parcel done up in a newspaper in his hand. It was about eight inches long and six or eight inches wide. As near as I could see he was about 5ft. 7in. high, and he was wearing a hard felt deerstalker hat, dark colour. His clothes were dark, and he wore a cutaway coat. I did not overhear any conversation. Both persons appeared to be sober. I did not see the man's face very clearly, but I noticed that he had no whiskers. He seemed to be about 23 years of age and had a respectable appearance. I observed that the woman had a flower in her dress.
Michael Kidney, the man with whom the deceased lived, identified the Swedish hymn book as having belonged to the deceased, who gave it to a Mrs. Smith on the previous Tuesday, saying she was going away. She gave it to Mrs. Smith, not as a gift, but to take care of.
By Inspector Reid: When deceased and I lived together the door was padlocked when we were out. I had a key, and she borrowed one to get in, or waited till I came. On the Wednesday before her death I found she had got into the room and taken some things, although it was locked.
By the Coroner: I only think she had something the matter with the roof of her mouth, because she said there was. I do not know from examination.
Philip Krantz, of 40, Berner-street, said he was editor of a Hebrew Socialist paper. He was in his room at the club on the night of the murder, and if a woman had screamed he should have heard it.
Police-constable Albert Collins, 12 H reserve, stated that he arrived at Berner-street shortly after one o'clock, and in accordance with instructions, washed away all traces of the blood.
Detective-inspector Reid, H division, said: I received a telegram at 25 minutes past one a.m. on Sunday at Commercial-street police-office, and I at once proceeded to 40, Berner-street. I found there Chief-inspector West, Inspector Pinhorn, several serjeants and constables, Dr. Phillips, Dr. Blackwell, a number of residents in the yard, and club members, as well as bystanders, who had been shut in by the police. At the time Dr. Phillips and Dr. Blackwell were examining the throat of the deceased woman, Superintendent Arnold came and several other officers. When it was found murder was committed, a thorough search was made by the police of the yard, the houses near, and the club premises. No trace could be found of any person who might have committed the deed. As soon as the search was over, the persons in the yard and the club members were interrogated, their names and addresses taken; their pockets were searched, and they were required to give an account of themselves. The adjacent houses were examined; one door had to be forced; the loft was searched, but no trace of the murderer was obtained. A description was taken of the body and circulated to the surrounding stations by wire. Inquiries were made at houses in the street, and no one could be found who had heard screams or the noise of disturbance during the time the murder must have been committed. About half-past four a.m. the body was removed to the mortuary. I found no marks of any person having scaled the walls. At the mortuary I examined the corpse, and took the following particulars: - I guessed her age at 42; the length was 5ft. 2in.; complexion pale; hair, dark brown and curly; eyes, light grey; upper teeth, lost. She had on an old black skirt, dark brown velvet bodice, a long black jacket trimmed with black fur. There was a small bunch of flowers on the right side (maidenhair fern and a red rose). She had two light serge petticoats; white stockings, white chemise (with insertion); side-spring boots, and black crepe bonnet. In her jacket pocket I found two pocket-handkerchiefs, a thimble, and a piece of wool on a card. The description was circulated. Since then the police engaged in the matter have made a house-to-house inquiry in the immediate neighbourhood, with the result that we have been able to produce the witnesses that have appeared before you. This inquiry is still going on, and every endeavour is being made to arrest the assassin, but up to the present time without success.
The inquiry was adjourned until October 23.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, October 7, 1888, Page 4

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Antecedents Of Elizabeth Watts

Post by Karen on Wed 6 Oct 2010 - 0:41

THE ANTECEDENTS OF ELIZABETH WATTS.

The Press Association's Bath Correspondent telegraphs corroborating the statement of Mrs. Malcolm at the inquest, yesterday, as to the history and habits of the woman, Elizabeth Watts. She married, about twenty-seven or twenty-eight years ago, William Watts, son of a wine merchant in Bath, her husband being then only about twenty years of age. She was a servant at his father's house. They only lived together two years, when the deceased left her husband, who went to America, but he returned from that country four years ago.

Source: The Echo, Wednesday October 3, 1888, Page 3

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Stride Inquest

Post by Karen on Wed 6 Oct 2010 - 5:14

THE BERNER-STREET VICTIM.

INQUEST AGAIN RESUMED.

The inquest on the body of the woman was was murdered in Berner-street, Whitechapel, and who has been identified as Elizabeth Watts, was again resumed by Coroner Wynne E. Baxter, at the St. George's Vestry-hall, Cable-street, E. Today.
The evidence of identification was continued. Elizabeth Tanner, a widow, said - I live at 32, Flower and Dean-street. I am deputy of a common lodging-house there. I have seen the body in the mortuary, and recognise the features as those of woman who had lodged on and off at our lodging-house during the last six years. She was known by the name of "Long Liz."
The Coroner - Do you know her right name? - No, I do not.
Do you know whether she was married? - She told me she had been married, but that her husband and children went down in the Princess Alice. She did not tell me her husband's name or occupation.

WHEN LAST SEEN.

When did you see her last alive? - I saw her at about six o'clock on Saturday evening. We were together in the Queen's Head public-house, in Commercial-street. When we left the public-house we walked together to the lodging-house. At that time the deceased had no bonnet or cloak on. She came into the lodging-house with me, and I left her in the kitchen. I then went to some other part of the building, and I never saw her again until I saw her in the mortuary.
You are quite sure it is the woman you mention? - Yes. I recognise her by her features, and also by the fact that the roof of her mouth is missing. She accounted for that injury by the fact that she was in the Princess Alice when it went down, and that her mouth had been injured.
How long had the deceased been staying at your lodging-house continuously before the murder? - From Wednesday night.
Did she pay for a bed for Saturday night? - No, Sir.
Do you know any of her male acquaintances? - Only one.
Do you know his name? - No. Sir. She left the man she was living with to come to my lodging-house.
Have you seen this man? - Yes, I saw him on Sunday last.
Inspector Reed - The man is in the Court.
The Coroner (to witness) - Do you know of the deceased having been before the Magistrate at Thames Police-court? - No, Sir.
Was she subject to fits? - I do not know.
Do you know whether she has lived anywhere with the exception of Flower and Dean-street? - Only in Fashion-street.
Not at Poplar? - No, Sir.
Did you ever hear that she had a sister in Red Lion-street? - No; I never heard of any relatives with the exception of her husband and children.
Was she a sober woman? - Yes, Sir, and very quiet.
Had she any money on Saturday? - I gave her sixpence for cleaning two rooms for me. I do not know whether she had any more.
Are the clothes on the body the same that the deceased was in the habit of wearing? - Yes, Sir. I recognised her long cloak at once.
Did she ever tell you that she was afraid of any one, or that any one had threatened to injure her? - No, Sir.
The fact of her not coming back on Saturday was nothing unusual? - No; I never took any notice of it.
Inspector Reid - Have you ever heard the name of Stride mentioned? - No, Sir.
By a Juror - The deceased was away from the lodging-house before Thursday last for about three months. I saw her very often during that time. She told me that she was at work among the Jews.
By the Coroner - I could not tell that the deceased was not English by her speaking. She could speak English well, but could also speak in the Swedish language.

LODGER'S EVIDENCE.

Catherine Lane, a lodger at 32, Flower and Dean-street, was then examined. She said she was married, and was a chair-maker. Her husband was a dock labourer, and he also lived at lodging-houses. They had been living there since February of this year. She had seen the body in the mortuary, and recognised it as "Long Liz." Witness saw the deceased on Thursday last in the lodging-house. She said she had had a few words with the young man, and was coming back to the lodging-house to live.
The Coroner - Where did you see her on Saturday? - In the deputy's room.
When did you see her last? - Between six and seven in the evening. She was then in the kitchen. She had a long cloak on and a black bonnet.
Are they the same as you saw in the mortuary? - "I did not see them in the mortuary," replied the witness. "I saw the woman between six and seven on Sunday evening.
What! ejaculated a Juryman in evident surprise.
The witness repeated her words.
"Alive?" asked the Coroner.
"Oh, no, dead."
In answer to the further questions, witness said that on Saturday evening the deceased left a piece of velvet with witness to mind for her.
The Coroner - Did she give you any idea where she was going to? - No, Sir.
Had she any money? - She had a sixpence. She showed it to me, and said the deputy had given it to her. She then walked out of the kitchen.
Had she been drinking? - Not that I am aware of.
Do you know of anyone that is likely to have injured her? - No, I don't, Sir.
Witness, continuing, said she could tell by her accent that the deceased was not an English woman. Witness had also heard her speaking with people whom she worked for in the Swedish tongue.
Charles Preston, a barber, gave generally corroborative evidence.
Michael Kidney, who had lived with the deceased, while giving somewhat similar evidence to former witnesses, said deceased had told him she had kept a coffee-house at Poplar.
(The inquiry is proceeding.)

Source: The Echo, Wednesday October 3, 1888, Page 3

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Re: Details of Stride's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Wed 26 Oct 2011 - 6:18

Panic in London.

The mysterious murders in London. It has now organized a band of vigilance committees, whose members walk at night by crossing the infamous quarters in London's suburbs. There are likewise constables, who are dressed as women to better enable them to detect offenders. Several newspapers have acquired the letters, which show good examples of the most different signatures, and whose authors explain that they had committed the murders. Two of these letters, signed Jack the Ripper, have been published now and clearly prove to be written by a deranged individual. They are subordinated to the Central News Agency telegraphic and written in good handwriting in red ink. The first is dated Sept 25. and reads thus:

Old boy! I still hear that the police had already caught me, but they shall not trouble me so soon. I laugh at how clever they look and talk about that they are on track. The joke about the apron was awfully funny. I just about fell over laughing. I want to do away with them and not stop ripping, until I sit in a cage. The final work was magnificent, I gave the woman hardly the time to roar. How will they now get hold of me? I enjoy my work and intend to go on with it. You shall soon again receive word of my funny little games. I saved from last time in a bottle of ginger beer some of the proper red stuff to write with, but it was thick as glue and not good enough. Red ink is good enough. Ha, Ha! At the next work, I will cut the ears of the woman and send them to the police, for fun. Keep this letter, until I do some more! Then go forward with it! My knife is nice and sharp. It will be good work, as soon as I have an occasion. Good luck. Yours affectionately, Jack the Ripper.

I have nothing against the ugly name. Send not this before I have done everything. I wrote this letter when my hands were red. I will stop at nothing. The story that I am a doctor! Ha! ha!

Four days later there were two important murders. The woman who was found in Mitre Square, he had attempted to cut off her ears. October 1 the Central News received a blood stained post card of the same handwriting. After this letter had clerk-like printed his seal - a mark of a thumb, dipped in blood. This mark is believed to be able to give any direction to the murder years discovered. The letter ran thus:
Dear old Boss! I started shame not last. You are about to hear about other feats of Jack, before many mornings are bygone. This time - two at once! One roared somewhat, could not immediately be finished with her. Had no time to cut off the ears for police. I would be grateful if you would not send out my first letter, until I returned to work. Jack the Ripper.
Boss is an American expression, which never occurs in England. Police in the East End were increased after the recent murders en masse, said that now every point gates are crossed every eight minutes. One evening this past week was arrested under a great stir an American in Cable Street. He was well dressed, tall, slender and handsome. He spoke to a woman and asked if she wanted to go with him, when she refused, he threatened to cut her up. The woman screamed and the man rushed into a cab. A crowd of people gathered themselves and ran after the cab, the police had stopped and arrested the man, who was taken to the nearest police station. He asked the commissioner, "are you the boss?" He refused to give his name or to account for himself. The following day, however, they released the man, who was found innocent, but they secretly watch over him to see what he is up to.

From New York it was communicated to the Daily News, that some months ago in Texas occurred a series of murders, no less than a dozen, of the same nature as the murders, which are now happening in London. The victims were mostly negro women, whose murders attract less attention than usually would have been the case. Deeds became ever discovered. It is possibly the murderer from Texas, who is now committing his atrocious activities in London. Most of the experts believe that the person who has to do with the murders is possessed of a mania: A doctor tells of a large number of them in Whitechapel, they would soon be increasing unto the people. In Whitechapel a real terror grows. Trade ends early and in the evenings the women go out only under strong protection. Those who could give information, probably for fear of revenge, only reluctantly speak to the police. The murders were girlfriends to take the corpses lives in order to establish their name and descent.
Four days led to the ransacking of the mutilated woman, who was killed on the night of September 30. The corpse was terribly ill mauled. The lower part of the face was completely unrecognisable, and acquaintances of the dead could only identify the corpse by her hair and forehead. The murder victim was named Catherine Eddowes. The first witness was the victim's sister, who said that the murdered woman had lived with a man named Kelly, who said they had just come back from hop-picking in Kent, but had returned as poor as they went there. They had the night before the murder, as usual, slept in a lodging-house, and in the day they parted, as she was about to go to his sister and try and get some ore from her, said she would not have to go out on the street. Then Kelly got to know that she had been familiar for what she has to take one. He did not trouble himself about it, for he knew she would be back on Sunday morning. But then, her life ended miserably, she was the only one who had been mutilated like that. It was a sad picture out of her life, which was an unjust sentence, but the unfortunate creature seemed to have taken life as easy as most of her class. She was always cheerful and a happy woman, "said an occupant of one of the lodging houses, where she lived for 7 years. She sang and perpetually went out on the town at the same time. Her older sister said: I saw her only occasionally, and she always cried when she saw me, and said, 'I wish I were you! "At about half-past one on the night of June 5 d:s saw a man in black and bad clothing wait outside a house where a tea party was held for a number of those unfortunate women who at night populate the street. He seemed to be waiting for one of them to come out, and you saw that he had a weapon hidden under his coat. Police were advised about it, and when he was arrested, he did resist. Under his coat, he had a bayonet in its sheath. He gave up his home and said he was on the lookout for murder machine in order to Ranna bayonet through life with him. What nationality he belongs to, you know one does not. The five d:s a leg was found in Guildford by a woman. It had apparently been boiled. It is said now to be a most important discovery, which shall lead to a murder arrest. But the same has been said many times before.

The wildest rumors are in circulation in London, and the panic is indescribable. Since strangling days - thugs, who attacked people on the street from behind and strangled them in order to plunder them - has the English capital experienced such a panic. Over the past 14 days, a total of eight murders have been committed. Even the hvimlar it by all possible and impossible proposals to achieve greater security. Among these are one of establishing a voluntary police reserve of 10,000 men. Colonel Sir Alfred Kirzby, is the head of a battalion of engineers and has offered the authorities 200 men for the protection of the population in Whitechapel. The editorial staff of a Finance Journal has sent directly to the police commissioner, Sir Charles Warren, a cheque for 300 pounds sterling, which would be given to the person who discovered the murderer, because the government was too poor to be able to allocate any funds from the treasury," they write. Sir Warren has sent instructions back and adds, given that the government was not too poor to pay a premium, that they would handle these types of rewards.

Source: Helsingfors Dagblad, 13 October 1888, No. 192, Page 4

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Re: Details of Stride's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Wed 26 Oct 2011 - 6:19

More Horrible Murders in London.

The East-end of London was again on Sunday, Sept. 30, much excited by the discovery of two more revolting murders. About one o'clock in the morning the body of a woman, with her throat cut, was found in a yard belonging to a workmen's club, in Berner-street, and an hour later another woman was found murdered in the corner of Mitre-square, Aldgate. In the latter case the body was also mutilated, and as this was not the case with the woman found in Berner-street, it is supposed that the murderer was disturbed before completing his dreadful work, and that he then proceeded towards the City and committed the second crime.
The first of the two murders in point of time took place in Berner-street, a narrow, badly lighted, but tolerably respectable street, turning out of the Commercial road, a short distance down on the right-hand side going from Aldgate. It is a street mainly consisting of small houses, but which has lately been brightened and embellished by one of the new buildings of the London School Board. Just opposite this is an "International and Educational Club," domiciled in a private house, standing at the corner of a gateway leading into a yard, in which are small manufacturing premises and four small houses occupied by Jewish families. The yard gates are usually closed at night, a wicket affording admission to the lodgers and others residing in the houses. Friday or Saturday, however, brought round the close of the Jewish holiday season, and down in this part of London, where the people are largely composed of foreign Jews, some departure from regular habits was more or less general. The International and Educational Club was on Saturday evening winding up the holidays by a lecture on "Judaism and Socialism." A discussion followed, which carried on proceedings to about half-past twelve, and then followed a sing-song and a general jollification, accompanied, as the neighbours say, by a noise that would effectually have prevented any cries for help by those around being heard. The hilarious mirth, however, was brought to a sudden and dreadful stop. The steward of the club, who lives in one of the small houses in the yard, and had been out with a market-cart, returned home just before one. He turned into the gateway, when he observed some object lying in his way under the wall of the club, and without getting down prodded it with his whip. Unable to see clearly what it was, he struck a match and found it was a woman. He thought at first she was drunk, and went into the club. Some of the members went out with him and struck another light, and were horrified to find the woman's head nearly severed from her body, and blood streaming down the gutter. The body when found was quite warm. In one hand was clutched a box of sweets, and at her breast were pinned two dahlias.
At once a messenger was despatched to the police station in Leman-street, and some constables quickly arrived on the scene with an ambulance, the superintendent and an inspector of the H Division speedily following. The first precaution taken was to close the doors of the yard and the entrance of the club, the members of which were informed that they could not leave until each individual had been searched and his belongings examined - a process which occupied until nearly five o'clock in the morning, when the men were told that they were free to depart, no clue to the murder having been obtained. Meanwhile, the divisional surgeon was fetched, and it was then found that the jugular vein and the windpipe had been severed, and that death must have been instantaneous. The body was perfectly warm, and life could not have been extinct for more than twenty minutes. The deceased was identified as a woman who had been living in a common lodging-house in Flower and Dean-street, and had been in the habit of frequenting this neighbourhood. Her name was Elizabeth Stride, and she was the widow of a sailor who was drowned some years ago.

The scene of the Mitre-square murder is within the area over which the city police exercise authority. Mitre-square, as a whole, is well lighted at night, but there is one corner which is but poorly illuminated. It was this corner that the murderer selected for his purpose. A police-constable, passing through the square on his beat, found the body of a woman lying upon the pavement. The poor creature had been subjected to the same usage as the women Nicholls and Chapman, though in her case some additional mutilations had been effected. The face was slashed with a knife, the left ear and the nose being almost cut off. It is stated that some anatomical skill seems to have been displayed in the way in which the lower part of the body was mutilated, but the ghastly work appears to have been done more rapidly and roughly than in the cases of the women Nicholls and Chapman. The news of the policeman's discovery brought a number of constables quickly upon the scene, and the body was removed to the city mortuary.
During the whole of the day almost frantic excitement prevailed in the East-end. Thousands of people visited both Mitre-street and Berner-street, and journals containing details of the crimes were brought up by crowds of men and women in Whitechapel, Stepney, and Spitalfields. The Vigilance Committee, of which Mr. George Lusk is chairman, have again pressed for the offer of a Government reward for the apprehension of the assassin. To make up for the Home Secretary's inaction as far as possible, the committee determined to offer a reward themselves. Many of the leading residents have assisted them, and they have received promises of subscriptions amounting to about 800 pounds. In addition to this, Mr. Montagu, M.P., has offered 100 pounds, and a similar sum had been forthcoming from another private source. But it is felt that these sums will not have the same effect as a reward offered on the authority of the Government, and accordingly it was suggested at the committee that as the Home Secretary declined to do anything, the Queen herself should be asked to authorise the issue of a reward. Mr. Lusk drew up a petition, which - before the knowledge of the new atrocities - was sent to Her Majesty.
The Lord Mayor, acting upon the advice of Colonel Sir James Fraser, the Commissioner of the City Police, has, in the name of the Corporation of London, offered a reward of 500 pounds for the detection of the Whitechapel murderer, the last crime having been committed within the jurisdiction of the city.

Both Sir Charles Warren, for the Metropolitan Police Force, and Colonel Fraser, of the City Police Force, have drafted a large force of men into the neighbourhood for special duty at night.
Six women have now been murdered in the East-end under mysterious circumstances, five of them within a period of eight weeks. The following are the dates of the crimes and names of the victims so far as known: 1. Last Christmas week. - An unknown found murdered near Osborne and Wentworth-streets, Whitechapel. 2. August 7. - Martha Turner found stabbed in thirty-nine places on a landing in model dwellings known as George-yard-buildings, Commercial-street, Spitalfields. 3. August 31. Mrs. Nicholls, murdered and mutilated in Buck's-row, Whitechapel. 4. Sept. 7. - Mrs. Chapman, murdered and mutilated in Hanbury-street, Spitalfields. 5. Sept. 30. - Elizabeth Stride, found with her throat cut in Berner-street, Whitechapel. 6. - Sept. 30. - Woman, unknown, murdered and mutilated in Mitre-square, Aldgate.
Although two or three arrests have been made in connection with the murders, they are not considered of much importance, and the police are still without any reliable clue upon which to act. Sir. C. Warren has written a letter in reply to one from the Whitechapel Board of Works, in which he states that the police are doing their best to discover the perpetrator of the crimes, and asking the inhabitants to render them all the assistance they can. It is stated that the Mitre-square victim has been identified. At the inquest on the body of the woman found murdered in Berner-street, the evidence given leaves the identification of the deceased still in doubt. Several witnesses stated that the woman had always said that she was a native of Sweden, and that her husband had been drowned in the Princess Alice disaster. The most important evidence related to the discovery of a formidable looking blood-stained knife in the Whitechapel-road by a youth who was passing about the time the crimes were committed. The inquest on both of the bodies has been adjourned.
Another horrible discovery was made on Tuesday, the 2nd inst., in the vicinity of the Victoria Embankment, not far from Westminster Bridge. The unfinished buildings upon which it was once intended to erect a National Opera House are in course of alteration to prepare them as the new police quarters, and here, early in the afternoon, a workman came upon the trunk of a woman's body, from which the head and limbs had been unskilfully severed. The remains are those of a young and well-nourished woman, and there are strong grounds for supposing that the arm which was found in the Thames near Grosvenor Railway Bridge, three weeks ago, formed part of the same body. It is certain, moreover, that the corpse, which is extensively decomposed, was not there at five o'clock on the previous Saturday afternoon as the spot where it was afterwards found was at that hour inspected by a workman. A post-mortem examination has been held on the body but nothing transpired which would in any way help to elucidate the mystery.
With reference to the recent atrocious murders in London, attention, says the Vienna correspondent of the Times, may be called to a crime of an exactly similar kind which preoccupied the public in Austria for nearly three years. A Galician Jew named Ritter was accused in 1884 of having murdered and mutilated a Christian woman in a village near Cracow. The mutilation was like that perpetrated on the body of the woman Chapman, and at the trial numbers of witnesses deposed that among certain fanatical Jews there existed a superstition to the effect that if a Jew became intimate with a Christian woman he would atone for his offence by slaying and mutilating the object of his passion. Sundry passages of the Talmud were quoted which, according to the witnesses, expressly sanctioned this form of atonement. The trial caused an immense sensation, and Ritter, being found guilty, was sentenced to death. The Judges of the Court of Appeal, however, feeling that the man was the victim of popular error and anti-Semitic prejudice, ordered a new trial upon some technicality. Again a jury pronounced against Ritter, and once more the Court of Appeal found a flaw in the proceedings. A third trial took place, and for the third time Ritter was condemned to be hanged, but upon this the Court of Appeal quashed the sentence altogether, and Ritter was released, after having been in prison 37 months. There is no doubt that the man was innocent, but the evidence touching the superstitions prevailing among some of the ignorant and degraded of his co-religionists remains on record and was never wholly disproved.
John Pizer, known as "Leather Apron," has commenced actions against two London journals for hastily assuming that he was the perpetrator of the Whitechapel murders, and has valued his character in each case at 5000 pounds.

Sir Charles Warren, in the course of a letter to the Whitechapel Board of Works, points out the difficulty of protecting victims who actually, though unwittingly, connive at their own destruction. He assures the board that the Detective Department is doing its utmost to discover the author of the recent atrocities, but he naturally declines to make public the measures they are taking or to disclose their methods of procedure. Although fully cognisant of the need for increasing the police service in the East End, Sir Charles Warren confesses his inability to do much towards that end without reducing the force in other districts.

Source: The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser, Tuesday 13 November 1888

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Re: Details of Stride's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Wed 26 Oct 2011 - 6:21

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Re: Details of Stride's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Wed 26 Oct 2011 - 6:26

So the Spiritualists are on the track at last! Elizabeth Stride is said to have appeared at a seance at Cardiff on Saturday night, and to have denoted the whereabouts of her murderer. It would be very interesting to see how many people would turn Spiritualists if the murderer were found out by any such means.

Source: The Echo, Monday October 8, 1888, Page 2

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Re: Details of Stride's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Thu 27 Oct 2011 - 4:47

The inquest on Elizabeth Stride, who was recently murdered in Berner-street, Whitechapel, was concluded yesterday. On a previous occasion Mrs. Malcolm, of Eagle-street, Holborn, stated that the victim was her sister, Elizabeth Stokes; but Elizabeth Stokes now came forward to prove that her sister had been mistaken. The jury returned a verdict of wilful murder against some person or persons unknown, and found that the deceased was the widow of John Stride, a carpenter.

Source: The Guardian, October 14, 1888, Page 1594

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Re: Details of Stride's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Tue 1 Nov 2011 - 14:17

The Whitechapel Murders.

LONDON, 27. - The evidence so far elicited seems to indicate that the Whitechapel murders have been committed in the interest of the medicos.

MORE MURDERS.

LONDON, 1. - This evening the whole city was again startled by the news that two more murders had been added to the list of mysterious crimes that have recently been committed in Whitechapel. The two victims as in former cases dissolute women of the poorest class. The first murder occurred in a narrow court off Berner-street at an early hour this morning, beneath the window of a foreign socialist club. A concert was in progress and many members of the club, were present, but no sound was heard from the victim. The woman had been seized by her throat and her cries choked while the murderer with one sweeping cut severed her throat from ear to ear. The other murder was committed three-quarters of an hour later in Mitre-square. A policeman patrols the square every few minutes. The body of the unfortunate woman had been disemboweled, her throat cut and her nose severed. The heart and lungs had been thrown aside and the entrails were twisted into a gaping wound around the neck.

NO CLUE YET.

LONDON, 2. - The police have got no clue to the Whitechapel murders. Several arrests have been made on suspicion, but there is little hope of any one of them being the man wanted. The Lord Mayor has offered five hundred pounds reward for the arrest of the murderers.

Source: Calgary Weekly Herald, Wednesday October 3, 1888, Volume VI, Number 5

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Re: Details of Stride's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 17 Mar 2013 - 11:12

THE EAST LONDON HORRORS.
INQUEST ON THE BERNER-STREET VICTIM.

On the 23rd inst., at the Vestry Hall, St. George's-in-the-East, Mr. Wynne E. Baxter, coroner for the south-eastern division of Middlesex, resumed the inquest on the body of Elizabeth Stride, who was found murdered in Berner-street on Sunday morning, the 30th ult.
Edward Reed, an inspector of the police, deposed that he had made inquiries and examined the books of the Poplar and Stepney Sick Asylum, and had found the entry of the death of John Thomas Stride, a carpenter, of Poplar. His death took place on Oct. 24, 1884. He had also seen Elizabeth Watts,
now Stokes, who declared that the statement made by Mrs. Malcolm was false. She had not seen her sister for years, and believed her to be dead. She further stated that she had not received money from her sister, and that it was not true that she had seen her sister on the Thursday before the murder.
Walter Stride, police-constable 385 W, had seen the photograph of the deceased, and identified her as the person who married his uncle in 1872 or 1873. His uncle was John Thomas Stride, a carpenter, living in the East India Dock-road, Poplar.
Elizabeth Stokes, of 5, Charles-street, Tottenham, said that her husband was a brick-maker. Her first husband was Mr. Watts, a wine merchant, of Bath. She believed that he was dead.
The witness here handed to the coroner a letter signed "X.Y.Z.," containing a statement to the effect that her husband, Watts, was alive.
Elizabeth Stokes, resuming her evidence, stated that Mrs. Malcolm was her sister. She had not seen her for years, and had never received a penny from her. She wanted to clear her character from the vile assertions made by her sister.
A Juryman: Could Mrs. Malcolm have identified the deceased as another sister?
Inspector Reed: Mrs. Malcolm identified the deceased by a crippled foot, and this witness has a crippled foot.
Elizabeth Stokes declared that she wished to clear her character. Her sister, Mrs. Malcolm, knew her, and what she had stated was "an infamous lie."
The Coroner, in addressing the jury, said it would be unreasonable to adjourn the inquiry again on the chance of something further being ascertained to elucidate the msyterious case. Having referred to the trouble occasioned by Mrs. Malcolm, who swore that the deceased was her sister, a Mrs. Elizabeth Watts, of Bath, he said it was satisfactorily proved that the deceased was Elizabeth Stride. There was no clue to the murderer, and no suggested motive for the murder. He regretted that the time and attention given to the case had not eventuated in a result that would be a relief to the metropolis - the detection of the criminal.
The jury returned a verdict of wilful murder against a person or persons unknown, and added their belief that the deceased was Elizabeth Stride, wife of John Stride, carpenter, of Poplar.

Source: Cardigan Observer, and General Advertiser For the Counties of Cardigan, Carmarthen and Pembroke, 27 October 1888, Page 2

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Re: Details of Stride's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Mon 18 Mar 2013 - 14:12

EAST LONDON ATROCITIES.
TWO MORE HORRIBLE TRAGEDIES.

The metropolis was on Sunday morning thrown into a state of renewed consternation by the announcement that the bodies of two more murdered women had been discovered in the East-end of London. This report, unhappily, proved too true, and the terrible character of the crimes is intensified by the circumstance that the locality
and manner in which the murders were committed point very strongly to the conclusion that the same miscreant who was responsible for at least two of the previous murders is also guilty of the present crimes. It will be remembered that the first of the series of murders was committed so far back as last Christmas, when a woman, whose identity
was never discovered, was found murdered in or contiguous to the district known as Whitechapel. There were circumstances of peculiar barbarity about the mode in which the body was treated. This fact did not attract so much attention at the time as it did when on August 7 last a woman named Martha Turner, aged 38, was found dead on the first-floor landing of
some model dwellings in Whitechapel, with 39 bayonet or dagger wounds on the body. On the 31st of the same month the woman Nichols, an unfortunate, was found dead in Buck's-row, Whitechapel. With this probably begins the series of crimes which have lately horrified and terrified the public, for the mutilation of the body was done with so much technical skill and audacity
as to suggest a definite but extraordinary, and, at that time, unexplained purpose. What that object was the coroner recently suggested in the summing-up at the inquest on the woman Chapman, who was murdered in the same district, and under similar circumstances, on Sept. 8. That crime created almost a panic, which had scarcely died away when it became known on Sunday that two more
murders, of apparently the same kind, had been committed under circumstances detailed hereunder.
The scene of the first outrage is a narrow court in Berner-street, a quiet thoroughfare, running from Commercial-road down to the London, Tilbury, and Southend Railway. At the entrance to the court are a pair of large wooden gates, in one of which is a small wicket for use when the gates are closed. At the hour when the murderer accomplished his purpose these gates were open; indeed,
according to the testimony of those living near, the entrance to the court is seldom closed. For a distance of 18 or 20 feet from the street there is a dead wall on each side of the court, the effect of which is to enshroud the intervening space in absolute darkness after sunset. Further back some light is thrown into the court from the windows of a workmen's club, which occupies the whole
length of the court on the right, and from a number of cottages, occupied mainly by tailors and cigarette makers, on the left. At the time when the murder was committed, however, the lights in all of the dwelling-houses in question had been extinguished, whilst such illumination as came from the club, being from the upper storey, would fall on the cottages opposite, and would only serve to intensify
the gloom of the rest of the court. From the position in which the body was found, it is believed that the moment the murderer had got his victim in the dark shadow near the entrance to the court, he threw her to the ground, and with one gash severed her throat from ear to ear. The hypothesis that the wound was inflicted after and not before the woman fell is supported by the fact that there are severe bruises
on her left temple and left cheek, thus showing that force must have been used to prostrate her, which would not have been necessary had her throat been already cut. When discovered the body was lying as if the woman had fallen forward, her feet being about a couple of yards from the street, and her head in a gutter which runs down the right-hand side of the court close to the wall. The woman lay on her left side,
face downwards, her position being such that, although the court at that part is only nine feet wide, a person walking up the middle might have passed the recumbent body without notice. The condition of the corpse, however, and several other circumstances which have come to light during the day, prove pretty conclusively that no considerable period elapsed between the committal of the murder and the discovery of the body.
In fact, it is pretty generally conjectured that the assassin was disturbed while at his ghastly work, and made off before he had completed his designs. All the features of the case go to connect the tragedy with that which took place three-quarters of an hour later a few streets distant. The obvious poverty of the woman, her total lack of jewellery or ornaments, and the soiled condition of her clothing, are entirely opposed
to the theory that robbery could have been the motive, and the secrecy and dispatch with which the crime was effected are equally good evidence that the murder was not the result of an ordinary street brawl. At the club referred to above - the International Workmen's Educational Club - which is an offshoot of the Socialist League and a rendezvous of a number of foreign residents, chiefly Russians, Poles, and Continental Jews of
various nationalities, it is customary on Saturday nights to have friendly discussions on topics of mutual interest, and to wind up the evening's entertainment with songs, &c. The proceedings commenced on Saturday about half-past eight with a discussion on the necessity for Socialism amongst Jews. This was kept up until about eleven o'clock, when a considerable portion of the company left for their respective homes. Between 20 and 30
remained behind, and the usual concert which followed was not concluded when the intelligence was brought in by the steward of the club that a woman had been done to death within a few yards of them and within ear-shot of their jovial songs. The people residing in the cottages on the other side of the court were all indoors and most of them in bed by midnight. Several of these persons remember lying awake listening to the singing, and they
also remember the concert coming to an abrupt termination; but during the whole of the time from retiring to rest until the body was discovered, no one heard anything in the nature of a scream or woman's cry of distress. It was Lewis Diemshitz, the steward of the club, who found the body. Diemshitz, who is a traveller in cheap jewellery, had spent the day at Westow-hill market, near the Crystal Palace, in pursuance of his vocation, and had driven
home at his usual hour, reaching Berner-street at one o'clock. On turning into the gateway he had some difficulty with his pony, the animal being apparently determined to avoid the right hand wall. For the moment Diemshitz did not think much of the occurrence, because he knew the pony was given to shying, and he thought perhaps some mud or refuse was in the way. The pony, however, obstinately refused to go straight, so the driver pulled him up to see
what was in the way. Failing to discern anything in the darkness, Diemshitz poked about with the handle of the whip and immediately discovered that some large obstacle was in his path. To jump down and strike a match was the work of a second, and then it became at once apparent that something serious had taken place. Without waiting to see whether the woman whose body he saw was drunk or dead, Diemshitz entered the club by the side door higher
up the court, and informed those in the concert-room upstairs that something had happened in the yard. A member of the club named Kozebrodski, but familiarly known as Isaacs, returned with Diemshitz into the court, and the former struck a match, while the latter lifted the body up. It was at once apparent that the woman was dead. The body was still warm, and the clothes enveloping it were wet from the recent rain, but the heart had ceased to beat,
and the stream of blood in the gutter terminating in a hideous pool near the club door showed but too plainly what had happened. Both men ran off without delay to find a policeman, and at the same time other members of the club who had by this time found their way into the court went off with the same object in different directions. The search was for some time fruitless; at last, however, after considerable delay, a constable, 252 H, was found in Commercial-road.
With the aid of the policeman's whistle more constables were quickly on the spot, and the gates at the entrance to the court having been closed, and a guard set on all the exits of the club and the cottages, the superintendent of the district and the divisional surgeon were sent for. In a few minutes Dr. Phillips was at the scene of the murder, and a brief examination sufficed to show that life had been extinct some minutes. Careful note having been taken
of the position of the body it was removed to the parish mortuary of St. George's in the East, Cable-street, to await identification.

A representative of the Press Association who has seen the corpse states that the woman appears to be about 20 years of age. Her hair is very dark, with a tendency to curl, and her complexion is also dark. Her features are sharp and somewhat pinched as though she had endured considerable privations recently, an impression confirmed by the entire absence of the kind of ornaments commonly affected by women of her station. She wore a rusty black dress of a cheap kind of sateen
with a velveteen bodice, over which was a black diagonal worsted jacket with fur trimming. Her bonnet, which had fallen from her head when she was found in the yard, was of black crepe, and inside, apparently with the object of making the article fit closer to the head, was folded a copy of a newspaper. In her right hand were tightly clasped some grapes, and in her left she held a number of sweetmeats. Both the jacket and the bodice were open towards the top, but in other respects
the clothes were not disarranged. The linen was clean and in tolerably good repair, but some articles were missing. The cut in the woman's throat, which was the cause of death, was evidently effected with a very sharp instrument, and was made with one rapid incision. The weapon was apparently drawn across the throat rather obliquely from left to right, and in its passage it severed both the windpipe and the jugular vein. As the body was lying in the mortuary the head seemed to be almost
severed, the gash being about three inches long and nearly the same depth. In the pocket of the woman's dress was discovered two pocket-handkerchiefs, a gentleman's and a lady's, a brass thimble, and a skein of black darning worsted. In addition to Dr. Phillips, the body was examined both before and after removal to the mortuary by Dr. Kaye and Dr. Blackwell, both of whom reside in the vicinity of Berner-street. On the arrival of the superintendent from Leman-street Police-station, which took
place almost simultaneously with that of the divisional surgeon, steps were immediately taken to ascertain whether the members of the club were in any way connected with the murder. The names and addresses of all the men present were taken, and a rigorous search of persons and premises were instituted, much to the annoyance of the members. The residents in the court had to submit to a similar scrutiny. In neither case, however, was any incriminating evidence discovered. It was five o'clock before the police had finished their investigations at the club, for, in addition to the search referred to above, inquiries were made which resulted in a number of written statements, which had to be signed by members.
Several matters have transpired which tend to fix precisely the time at which the unfortunate woman was murdered. Morris Eagle, one of the members of the club, left Berner-street about twelve o'clock, and after taking his sweetheart home returned to the club at about twenty minutes to one, with the intention of having supper. He walked up the yard and entered the club by the side entrance, but neither saw nor heard anything to make him suspect that foul play was going on.
Of course, he might have passed the body in the darkness; but the probability is that he would have stumbled over it if the murder had been committed before that time. Another member of the club, a Russian named Joseph Lave, feeling oppressed by the smoke in the large room, went down into the court about 20 minutes before the body was discovered, and walked about in the open air for five minutes or more. He strolled into the street, which was very quiet at the time, and returned to the concert-room
without having encountered anything unusual. During the day there have been many persons at the mortuary, but up to three o'clock none had succeeded in identifying the body. Several policemen on duty in the district declare that they have seen the deceased about the locality, and it is believed that she belonged to the "unfortunate" class, but although the visitors to the mortuary have been drawn mainly from the same class, all have up to now failed to identify deceased as one of their associates.
Mr. Wynne Baxter, the coroner of the district, was communicated with as soon as the details were ascertained, and fixed the inquest for Monday morning at eleven o'clock, at the Vestry-hall, Cable-street. It is believed in police circles that the murderer was disturbed at his work by the arrival of Diemshitz, and that he made off as soon as he heard the cart at the top of the street. Sir Charles Warren and Major Smith, of the City Police, visited the scene of the murder in the course of Sunday morning.
The following description has been circulated by the police of a man said to have been seen in company of deceased during Saturday evening: "Age 28; slight; height 5ft. 8in.; complexion dark; no whiskers; black diagonal coat, hard felt hat; collar and tie; carried newspaper parcel; respectable appearance."

THE ALDGATE MURDER.

Shortly before two o'clock on Sunday morning, or about three-quarters of an hour after the crime described above, it was discovered that a second woman had been horribly murdered and mutilated, this being in Mitre-square, Aldgate, within the City boundaries, but on the confines of the now notorious district. It appears that Police-constable Watkins (No. 881), of the City Police, was going round his beat, when, turning his lantern upon the darkest corner of Mitre-square, he saw the body of a woman, apparently lifeless, in a pool of blood.
He at once blew his whistle, and several persons being attracted to the spot he dispatched messengers for medical and police aid. Inspector Collard, who was in command at the time at Bishopsgate Police Station, but a short distance off, quickly arrived, followed a few minutes after by Mr. G.W. Sequeira, surgeon, of 34, Jewry-street, and Dr. Gordon Browne, the divisional police doctor, of Finsbury-circus. The scene then disclosed was a most horrible one. The woman, who was apparently about 40 years of age, was lying on her back quite dead, although the body was still warm.
Her head was inclined to the left side, her left leg being extended, whilst the right was flexed. Both arms were extended. The throat was cut half-way round, revealing a dreadful wound, from which blood had flowed in great quantity, staining the pavement for some distance round. Across the right cheek to the nose was another gash, and a part of the right ear had been cut off. Following the plan in the Whitechapel murders the miscreant was not content with merely killing his victim. The poor woman's clothes had been pulled up over her chest, the abdomen ripped completely open, and part
of the instestines laid on her neck. After careful notice had been taken of the position of the body when found it was conveyed to the City mortuary in Golden-lane. Here a more extended examination was made. The murdered woman was apparently about 40 years of age, about 5ft. in height, and evidently belonged to that unfortunate class of which the women done to death in Whitechapel were members. Indeed, one of the policemen who saw the body expressed his confident opinion that he had seen the woman several times walking in the neighbourhood of Aldgate High-street. She was of dark complexion,
with auburn hair and hazel eyes, and was dressed in shabby dark clothes. She wore a black cloth jacket, with imitation fur collar and three large metal buttons. Her dress was made of green chintz, the pattern consisting of Michaelmas daisies. In addition she had on a thin white vest, light drab lindsey skirt, a very old dark green alpaca petticoat, white chemise, brown ribbed stockings (mended at the feet with white material), black straw bonnet, trimmed with black beads, and green and black velvet, and a large white handkerchief round her neck. In the pockets of the dress a peculiar collection
of articles was found. Besides a small pocket containing tea and other articles, which people who frequent the common lodging-houses are accustomed to carry, the police found upon the body a white pocket handkerchief, a blunt bone-handled table-knife, a short clay pipe, and a red cigarette case with white metal fittings. The knife bore no traces of blood, so could have no connection with the crime. When the news of this additional murder became known the excitement in the crowded district of Aldgate was intense. Usually a busy place on a Sunday morning, Houndsditch, and connecting thoroughfares, presented
a particularly animated appearance, men with barrows vending fruit and eatables, doing a brisk trade. Crowds flocked to the entrances to the square where the body had been discovered, but the police refused admittance to all but a privileged few. Sir Charles Warren visited the spot at a particularly early hour, and made himself thoroughly conversant with the neighbourhood and the details of the affair. Major Smith (Acting Superintendent of the City Police), Superintendent Foster, Detective-inspector M'William (Chief of the City Detective Department), Detective-sergeants Downs and Outram also attended during the morning.
A little while after the finding of the body, all traces of blood had been washed away by the direction of the authorities, and there was little to indicate the terrible crime which had taken place. Mitre-square is an enclosed place in the rear of St. Katherine Cree Church, Leadenhall-street. It has three entrances, the principal one, and the only one having a carriage-way, is at the southern end, leading into Mitre-street, a turning out of Aldgate High-street. There is a narrow court in the north-east corner leading into Duke-street, and another one at the north-west, by which foot passengers can reach St. James's-square,
otherwise known as the Orange-market. Mitre-square contains but two dwelling houses, in one of which, singularly enough, a City policeman lives, whilst the other is uninhabited. The other buildings, of which there are only three, are large warehouses. In the south-east corner, and near to the entrance from Mitre-street, is the back yard of some premises in Aldgate, but the railings are closely boarded. It was just under these that the woman was found quite hidden from sight by the shadow cast by the corner of the adjoining house. The officer who found the body is positive that it could not have been there more than a quarter of an hour
before he discovered it. He is timed to "work his beat," as it is called, in from 10 to 15 minutes, and is spoken of by his superior officers as a most trustworthy man. The police theory is that the man and woman, who had met in Aldgate, watched the policeman pass round the square, and they then entered it for an immoral purpose. Whilst the woman lay on the ground her throat was cut, as described above, causing instant death. The murderer then hurriedly proceeded to mutilate the body, for the wounds, though so ghastly, do not appear to have been caused so skilfully and deliberately as in the case of the murder of Annie Chapman in Hanbury-street.
Five minutes, some of the doctors think, would have sufficed for the completion of the murderer's work, and he was thus enabled to leave the ground before the return of the policeman on duty. None of the police on duty early on Sunday morning appears to have had particular attention drawn to the man and woman together, and this appears strange at first when it is remarked that within the last few weeks the police have been keeping a particularly keen watch upon suspicious couples. The murderer probably avoided much blood-staining on account of the woman being on her back at the time of the outrage, and leaving the square by either of the courts he would
be able to pass quickly away through the many narrow thoroughfares without exciting observation. But one of the most extraordinary incidents in connection with the crime is that not the slightest scream or noise was heard. A watchman is employed at one of the warehouses in the square, and in a direct line but a few yards away on the other side of the square a City policeman was sleeping. Many people would be about in the immediate neighbourhood, even at this early hour, making preparations for the market which takes place every Sunday in Middlesex-street (formerly Petticoat-lane) and the adjacent thoroughfares. Taking everything into account, therefore,
the murder must be pronounced one of startling daring and brutality. The effect it has had upon the residents in the East of London is extraordinary. All day crowds thronged the streets leading to Mitre-square discussing the crime, and the police in the neighbourhood of the square, under Inspector Izzard and Sergeants Dudman and Philps and other officers, were fully occupied in keeping back the excited and curious people.

Morris, the night watchman in Mitre-square, has made a statement, in which he says that at about a quarter to two o'clock the policeman upon the beat knocked at the door of the warehouse. When he replied, the constable said, "For God's sake, man, come out and assist me; another woman has been ripped open!" He said, "All right; keep yourself cool while I light a lamp." Having done so, he accompanied the constable to the south-west corner of the square, where he saw a woman lying stretched upon the pavement, with her throat cut and horribly mutilated. He then left the constable and proceeded into Aldgate, where he blew his whistle, and other police-officers soon made their appearance.
The whole shape of the woman was marked out in blood upon the pavement. In addition to her throat being cut, there were two slashes across the face, one of the cuts almost completely severing the nose. The woman's face was so mutilated that he could not describe what she was like. She wore a dark skirt and a black bonnet, and her appearance was exceedingly shabby. The strangest part of the whole thing was that he did not hear the slightest sound. As a rule he could hear the footsteps of the policeman as he passed on his beat every quarter of an hour, so that it appeared impossible that the woman could have uttered any sound without his detecting it. It was only on the night that he remarked
to some policemen that he wished the "butcher" would come round Mitre-square and he would give him a doing; yet the "butcher" had come and he was perfectly ignorant of it.

Continued in next post..........


Last edited by Karen on Wed 20 Mar 2013 - 17:51; edited 1 time in total

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Re: Details of Stride's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Wed 20 Mar 2013 - 17:50

REWARDS FOR THE DISCOVERY OF THE MURDERER.

At a late hour on Monday night it was decided by the City Police to offer a reward for the discovery and conviction of the criminal, and the following notice was published:
"Murder. - 500 pound Reward.
"Whereas, at 1:45 a.m. on Sunday, the 30th of September last, a woman, name unknown, was found brutally murdered in Mitre-square, Aldgate, in this City, a reward of 500 pounds will be paid by the Commissioner of Police of the City of London to any person (other than a person belonging to a police force in the United Kingdom) who shall give such information as shall lead to the discovery and conviction of the murderer or murderers.
"Information to be given to the Inspector of the Detective Department, 26, Old Jewry, or at any police-station.
"JAMES FRASER, Colonel, Commissioner.
"City of London Police Office, 26, Old Jewry, October 1, 1888."

The Lord Mayor, acting upon the advice of Colonel Sir James Fraser, K.C.B., the Commissioner of City Police, is, in the name of the Corporation of London, offering a reward of 500 pounds for the detection of the Whitechapel murderer, the last crime having been committed within the jurisdiction of the City.

Colonel Sir Alfred Kirby, J.P., the officer commanding the Tower Hamlets Battalion, Royal Engineers, has offered, on behalf of his officers, a reward of 100 pounds, to be paid to anyone who will give information that would lead to the discovery and conviction of the perpetrator or perpetrators of the murders. Sir A. Kirby is ready to place the services of 50 members of his corps at the disposal of the authorities, to be utilised in assisting them in any way they may consider desirable, either for the protection of the public or finding out the criminals. Of course the volunteers would have to be made use of as citizens, and not in a quasi-military capacity.

The following correspondence has passed between the editor of the Financial News and the Home Office:
"11 Abchurch-lane, London, E.C., Oct. 1.
"Sir, - In view of your refusal to offer a reward out of Government funds for the discovery of the perpetrator or perpetrators of the recent murders in the East-end of London, I am instructed on behalf of several readers of the Financial News, whose names and addresses I enclose, to forward you the accompanying cheque for 300 pounds, and to request you to offer that sum for this purpose in the name of the Government.
"Awaiting the favour of your reply, - I have the honour to be your obedient servant,
"HARRY H. MARKS.
"The Right Hon. Henry Matthews, M.P., Secretary of State for the Home Department."
"Oct. 1.
"My dear Sir, - I am directed by Mr. Matthews to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of this date, containing a cheque for 300 pounds, which you say has been contributed on behalf of several readers of the Financial News, and which you are desirous should be offered as a reward for the discovery of the recent murders in the East-end of London.
"If Mr. Matthews had been of opinion that the offer of a reward in these cases would have been attended by any useful result he would himself have at once made such an offer, but he is not of that opinion.
"Under these circumstances I am directed to return you the cheque (which I enclose), and to thank you, and the gentlemen whose names you have forwarded, for the liberality of their offer, which Mr. Matthews much regrets he is unable to accept.
"I am, Sir, your obedient servant,
"E. LEIGH PEMBERTON."

SENSATIONAL COMMUNICATIONS.

The Central News gives the following information, namely, that on Thursday of last week a letter bearing the E.C. post mark, directed in red ink, was delivered at their agency.
"September 25, 1888.
"Dear Boss - I keep on hearing the police have caught me, but they won't fix me just yet. I have laughed when they look so clever and talk about being on the right track. That joke about Leather Apron gave me rare fits. I am down on _______, and I shan't quit ripping them till I do get buckled. Grand work the last job was. I gave the lady no time to squeal.
How can they catch me now? I love my work. I want to start again. You will soon hear of me with my funny little games. I saved some of the proper red stuff in a ginger-beer bottle over the last job. I did write with it, but it went thick like glue, and I can't use it. Red ink is fit enough, ha,ha,ha! The next job I do I shall clip the lady's ears and send them to the police officers just for
folly. Wouldn't you keep this letter back till I do a bit more work; then give it out straight. My knife is so nice and sharp, I want to get to work right away, if I get the chance. Good, cock.
"Yours truly, JACK THE RIPPER."
"Don't mind me giving the trade name. Wasn't good enough to post this before I got all the red ink off my hands, curse it. They say I'm a doctor. Ha! ha! ha! ha!"

The whole of this extraordinary epistle is written in red ink, in a free bold clerkly hand. It was, of course, treated as the work of a practical joker, but it is singular to note that the latest murders have been committed within a few days of the receipt of the letter, and that also in the case of the last victim the murderer made an attempt to cut off the ears, and did actually mutilate the face
in a manner which has never before been attempted. The letter has been placed in the hands of the Scotland-yard authorities.
In connection with the above letter, the Central News agency says that a postcard bearing the stamp "London, E., October 1," was received on Monday morning, addressed to their office, the address and subject matter being written in red, and undoubtedly by the same person from whom the former letter was received. It runs as follows:
"I was not codding, dear old Boss, when I gave you the tip. You'll hear about Saucy Jacky's work tomorrow. Double event this time. Number One squealed a bit; couldn't finish straight off. Had not time to get ears for police. Thanks for keeping last letter back till I got to work again. - JACK THE RIPPER."
The card is smeared on both sides with blood, which has evidently been impressed thereon by the thumb or finger of the writer, the corrugated surface of the skin being plainly shown. Upon the back of the card some words are nearly obliterated by a bloody smear. It is not necessarily assumed that this has been the work of the murderer, the idea that naturally occurs being that the whole thing is a practical joke.
At the same time the writing of the previous letter immediately before the commission of the murders of Sunday was so singular a coincidence, that it does not seem unreasonable to suppose that the cool calculating villain who is responsible for the crimes has chosen to make the post a medium through which to convey to the press his grimly diabolical humour.

INQUEST ON THE BODY OF THE BERNER-STREET VICTIM.

A coroner's inquest was opened on Monday on the body of Elizabeth Stride, the woman murdered in the yard of the Socialist Club in Berner-street. The woman, it has been ascertained, left her lodgings in Dean-street, Spitalfields, at seven o'clock on Saturday evening, and was not seen again until her body was found at one o'clock on Sunday morning. The following is the evidence of the finder of the body:
Lewis Diemschitz called, and examined: I live at 40, Berner-street, and am steward of the International Working Men's Educational Club. I am married, and my wife lives there too. She assists in the management of the club. I left home about half-past eleven on Saturday morning, and returned home exactly at one o'clock on Sunday morning. I noticed the time at Harris's tobacco shop at the corner of Commercial-road and Berner-street.
It was one o'clock. I had a barrow, something like a costermonger's, with me. I was sitting in it, and a pony was drawing it. It is a two-wheeled barrow. The pony is kept at George-yard, Cable-street. I do not keep it in the yard of the club. I was driving home to leave my goods. I drove into the yard. Both gates were wide open. It was rather dark there. I drove in as usual, and, all at once, as I came into the gate, my pony shied to the left.
That caused me to turn my head down to the ground on my right to see what is was that made him shy.
Could you see anything? - I could see that there was something unusual on the pavement. I could not see what it was. It was a dark object. There was nothing white about it. I did not get off the barrow, but I tried with my whip handle to find what it was. I tried to lift it up, but I could not. I jumped down at once and struck a match, and as it was rather windy I could not get sufficient light to see exactly what it is. I could see, however, that there
was the figure of some person lying there. I could tell by the dress that it was a woman. I did not disturb it. I went into the club, and asked where my missus was. I saw her in the front room on the ground floor.
What did you do with the pony in the meantime? - I left it in the yard by itself, just outside the club door. There were several members in the front room, where my wife was, and I told them all, "There is a woman lying in the yard, but I could not say whether she was drunk or dead." I then took a candle and went out at once, and by the candle light I could see that there was blood about before I reached the body. I did not touch the body, but went off at once
for the police. We passed several streets without meeting a policeman, and we returned without one. All the men who were with me halloaed as loud as they could for the police, but no one came. When I returned a man that we met in Grove-street, and who came back with us, took hold of the head, and as he lifted it up I first saw the wound in the throat. At the very same time Eagle and the constable arrived, I noticed nothing unusual on my approach to the club, and met
no one that looked at all suspicious. The doctor arrived about ten minutes after the constable arrived. The police afterwards took our names and addresses, and searched everybody.
Did you notice if her clothes were in order? - In perfect order, as far as I could see.
How was she lying? - She was lying on her side, with her face towards the wall of the club. I could not say whether the body was on its side, but her face was. As soon as the police came I ceased to take any interest in the matter. I did not notice in what position her hands were. I only noticed when the doctor came up he undid the first buttons of her dress next the neck, and put his hand in. He then told the constable that she was quite warm yet. He told the constable
to put his hand in and feel the body, and he did so. There appeared to me to have been about two quarts of blood on the ground, and it seemed to have run up the yard from her neck. The body was lying, I should say, about a foot from the club wall. The gutter of the yard passage is made of paving stones, the centre being of irregular boulders. The body was lying half on the paving stones.
Have you ever seen men and women in the yard? - Never.
Have you ever heard anyone say that they have found men and women there? - I have not.
By a Juror: Was there room for you to have passed the body with your cart? - Oh, yes. Mine is not a very wide cart; it only took up the centre of the passage. If my pony had not shied, perhaps I would not have noticed it at all. When I got down my cart passed the body. The barrow was past the body when I got down to see what it was.
Another Juror: Was anyone left in charge of the body while you went for the police? - I cannot say, but there were several about when I came back. I cannot say positively, but I do not believe anyone touched the body.
Detective Inspector Reid: All the people who came into the yard were detained and searched? - Yes, and their names and addresses were taken. The first question was whether they had any knives. They were then asked to account for their presence there.
By a Juror: It would have been possible for anyone to have escaped from the yard if he had been hiding there while you went into the club to inform the members? - Yes, it would have been possible; but as soon as I informed the members every one went out, and I do not think it would have been possible for anyone to get out then.
If anyone had run up the yard, you would have seen him? - Yes; because it is dark just in the gateway; but further up the road you could see anybody running or walking by the lights of the club.
Do you think that anyone could have come out of the gateway without you seeing them? - No, I think they could not.

Detective Inspector Reid stated that the body had not been identified yet.
The Coroner: It has been partially identified; but it is a mistake to say that she has been identified by one of her relatives. It is known, however, where she lived. The inquest was then adjourned until Tuesday afternoon.

Source: Aberdare Times, 6 October 1888, Page 2

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Re: Details of Stride's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Fri 23 Aug 2013 - 10:57

THE MYSTERIES OF LONDON.
TWO MORE WOMEN BUTCHERED.

STARTLING PERSONAL NARRATIVES.
THE BERNER-STREET MURDER.

The scene of the first of Saturday's outrages is a narrow court in Berner-street, a quiet thoroughfare running from Commercial road down to the London, Tilbury, and Southend Railway. At the entrance to the court are a pair of large wooden gates, in one of which is a small wicket for use when the gates are closed. At the hour when the murderer accomplished his purpose these gates were open - indeed, according to the testimony of those living near, the entrance to the court is seldom closed. For a distance of 18 or 20 feet from the street there is a dead wall on each side of the court, the effect of which is to enshroud the intervening space in absolute darkness after sunset. Farther back some light is thrown into the court from the windows of a workmen's club, which occupies the whole length of the court on the right, and from a number of cottages occupied mainly by tailors and cigarette makers on the left. At the time when the murder was committed, however, the lights in all of the dwelling-houses in question had been extinguished, whilst such illumination as came from the club, being from the upper storey would fall on the cottages opposite, and would only serve to intensify the gloom of the rest of the court. From the position in which the body was found it is believed that the moment the murderer had got his victim in the dark shadow near the entrance to the court, he threw her to the ground, and with one gash cut her throat from ear to ear. The hypothesis that the wound was inflicted after and not before the woman fell is supported by the fact that there are severe bruises on her left temple and left cheek, this showing that force must have been used to prostrate her, which would not have been necessary had her throat been already cut.

MUSIC AND SONG.

At the club already referred to - the International Workmen's Educational Club, which is an offshoot of the Socialist League and a rendezvous of a number of foreign residents, chiefly Russians, Poles, and continental Jews of various nationalities - it is customary on Saturday nights to have friendly discussions on topics of mutual interest, and to wind up the evening's entertainment with songs, etc. The proceedings commenced on Saturday, about 8:30, with a discussion on the necessity for Socialism amongst Jews. This was kept up until about 11 o'clock, when a considerable portion of the company left for their respective homes. Between 20 and 30 remained behind, and the usual concert which followed was not concluded when the intelligence was brought by the steward of the club that a woman had been done to death within a few yards of them, and within earshot of their jovial songs. The people residing in the cottages on the other side of the court were all indoors, and most of them in bed by midnight. Several of these persons remember lying awake and listening to the singing, and they also remember the concert coming to an abrupt termination, but during the whole of the time from retiring to rest until the body was discovered no one heard anything in the nature of a scream or a woman's cry of distress.

DESCRIPTION OF THE SUPPOSED MURDERER.

The following description has been circulated by the police of a man said to have been seen in the company of the deceased during Saturday: "Age 28; slightly built; height, 5 feet 8 inches; complexion dark; no whiskers; black diagonal coat; hard felt hat; collar and tie; carried a newspaper parcel; respectable appearance."

PERSONAL STATEMENTS.

Lewis Diemshitz has made the following statement: - "I have been steward of the International Club for six or seven years. I am also a traveller in common jewellery. I went yesterday to Westow Hill Market, I place I usually visit on Saturday, and I got back about one o'clock this morning. My usual time for getting home from market is between one and two in the morning. I drove home in my own trap. My pony is rather shy, and as I turned into the yard it struck me that he bore too much to the left hand side, against the wall. I bent my head to see what it was that he was shying at, and I noticed that the ground was not level. I saw a little heap, which I thought might perhaps be some mud swept together. I touched the heap with the handle of my whip, and then I found that it was not mud. I jumped off the trap and struck a match, when I saw that it was the body of a woman. I did not wait to see whether she was drunk or dead, but ran indoors and asked whether my wife was there. I did this because I knew my wife had rather a weak constitution, and anything of that kind shocks her. I saw my wife was sitting downstairs, and I at once informed the members that something had happened in the yard. I did not tell them whether the woman was murdered or drunk, because I did not then know. A member named Isaacs went down into the yard with me, and we struck a match. We saw blood right from the gate up the yard, and then we both went for the police, but, unfortunately, it was several minutes before we could find a constable. A last another member of the club, named Eagle, who ran out after us and went in a different direction, found one somewhere in Commercial-road. This policeman blew his whistle, and several more policemen came up, and soon after the doctors arrived. The woman seemed to be about 27 or 28 years old. She was a little bit better dressed, I should say, than the woman who was last murdered. Her clothes were not disarranged. She had a flower in the bosom of her dress. In one hand she had some grapes, and in the other some sweets. She was grasping them tightly. I had never seen her before. She was removed about a quarter to five to Cable-street Mortuary. When I first saw her she was lying on her left side two yards from the entrance, her feet towards the street.

EAGLE'S NARRATIVE.

Morris Eagle states: I am a Russian, and am a traveller in the jewellery line. I am a member of the club, and was present last night at the discussion. I went away about twelve o'clock to take my young lady home. I was away with her about 40 minutes, and then I came back to the club with the intention of having supper. There were plenty of people about, both men and women. The front door of the club was closed when I returned, so I passed through the yard and entered at the back. I walked up the middle of the yard. I noticed nothing then. After I had been in the club 20 minutes, the steward came in and said there was a woman lying in the yard. I went down into the yard and saw the blood, and afterwards assisted to find the police.

NOTICED NOTHING WRONG.

Joseph Lave says: - "I am a Russian, and have recently arrived in England from the United States. I am residing temporarily at the club. About twenty minutes before the alarm I went down into the yard to get a breath of fresh air. I walked about for five minutes or more, and went as far as the street. Everything was very quiet at that time, and I noticed nothing wrong."

WAS IT THE MURDERER?

Mrs. Mortimer, living at 36, Berner-street, four doors from the scene of the tragedy, says: - "I was standing at the door of my house nearly the whole time between half-past twelve and one o'clock this (Sunday) morning, and I did not notice anything unusual. I had just gone indoors and was preparing to go to bed, when I heard a commotion outside, and I immediately ran out, thinking that there was another row at the Socialists' Club, close by. I went to see what was the matter, and was informed that another dreadful murder had been committed in the yard adjoining the club-house, and on going inside I saw the body of a woman lying huddled up just inside the gate with her throat cut from ear to ear. A man touched her face, and said it was quite warm, so that the deed must have been done while I was standing at the door of my house. There was certainly no noise made, and I did not observe any one enter the gates. It was just after one o'clock when I went out, and the only man whom I had seen pass through the street previously was a young man carrying a black shiny bag, who walked very fast down the street from the Commercial-road. He looked up at the club, and then went round the corner by the board school. I was told that the manager or steward of the club had discovered the woman on his return home in his pony cart. He drove through the gates, and my opinion is that he interrupted the murderer, who must have made his escape immediately, under cover of the cart. If a man had come out of the yard before one o'clock, I must have seen him. It was incredible to me that the thing could have been done without the steward's wife hearing a noise, for she was sitting in the kitchen, from which a window opens four yards from the spot where the woman was found. The body was lying slightly on one side, with the legs a little drawn up, as if in pain.

THE DOCTOR'S STATEMENT: THE MURDERER A MANIAC.

In an interview with a representative of the press, Dr. Blackwell made a statement, in which he said that about ten minutes past one he was called by a policeman to 40, Berner-street, where he found the body of the murdered woman. Her head had been almost severed from her body. The body was perfectly warm, and life could not have been extinct for more than twenty minutes. It did not appear to him that the woman was a Jewess. She was more like an Irish woman. He roughly examined her and found no other injuries, but this he could not definitely state until he had made a further examination. The deceased had on a black velvet jacket and a black dress. In her hand she held a box of cachous, whilst pinned in her dress was a flower. Altogether, judging from her appearance, he considered that she belonged to an immoral class. He had no doubt that the same man committed both the murders. In his opinion the man is a maniac, but one at least who is accustomed to use a heavy knife. His belief was that as the woman held the sweets in her left hand her head was dragged back by means of a silk handkerchief which she wore round her neck, and that her throat was then cut. One of the woman's hands was saturated with blood, and this was evidently done in the struggle. He had, however, no doubt that the woman's windpipe being completely cut through, she was then rendered unable to make any sound. Dr. Blackwell added that it did not follow that the murderer would be bespattered with blood, as he was sufficiently engaged in other things, he could contrive to avoid coming in contact with the blood by reaching well forward.

THE VICTIM IDENTIFIED.

The authorities at Leman-street police-station are very reticent, and stated, in reply to an inquiry late this evening, that they had no further information to impart. The Press Association has ascertained from inquiries that the woman murdered in Berner-street has been identified. A woman who is known as "One-armed Liz," living in a common lodging-house in Flower and Dean-street, stated to our representative that she had accompanied Sergeant Thicke to St. George's Mortuary, and identified the body as that of Annie Morris, an unfortunate, living in a common lodging-house in the neighbourhood of Flower and Dean-street. "One-armed Liz" refused to give further information, as she said she had been instructed to keep the matter to herself. - Another rumour was to the effect that the deceased was a Swede, and had evidently lived in this country for some years, judging by the fluency with which she spoke the English language.
A Central News telegram, dated midnight, says: - The woman murdered in Berner-street has been identified as Elizabeth Stride, who, it seems, had been leading a gay life, and had resided lately in Flower and Dean-street. She was identified by a sister living in Holborn. Her husband, who resides at Bath, has lived apart from her for nearly five years. Up to the hour of telegraphing, Stride's murderer had not been discovered. Stride is believed to be a Swedish woman from Stockholm. According to her associates she was of calm temperament, rarely quarrelling with anyone. In fact, she was so good-natured that she would "do a good turn for anyone." Her occupation was that of a charwoman. She had the misfortune to lose her husband in the Princess Alice disaster on the Thames some years ago. She had lost her teeth, and suffered from a throat affection.

Source: Cardiff Times, 6 October, 1888, Page 6

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Re: Details of Stride's Murder and Inquest

Post by Mr Hyde on Fri 23 Aug 2013 - 15:24

Here we have Diemshitz finding Liz with grapes in one hand and sweets in the other.Thanks Karen.

There was a lot of pressure put on Packer to change his story about selling the grapes and probably the sweets.

Pretty much the opposite to that received by Hutchinson after Mary Kelly's demise.Button boots under spats....GRRR!

I suspect that having a witness to Liz Stride in the company of Frank Carter, loitering from 11 PM until 12.30 AM ,just before her murder would have been more than a little inconvenient for some people.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DeerstalkerĀ  There's one forĀ  the Ripperologist Fashion Police.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Study_in_Scarlet

The parcel....most up to date service pistol was

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Webley_Revolver

Frank Carter probably had something a bit smaller holstered, in the newspaper package.


Last edited by Mr Hyde on Fri 23 Aug 2013 - 23:30; edited 2 times in total (Reason for editing : Clean up of 5am Australian time post.)

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Re: Details of Stride's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Thu 5 Sep 2013 - 21:01

THE MYSTERIES OF LONDON.
The Berner-street Murder.

RESUMPTION OF THE INQUEST.

The inquest on the victim of the Berner-street murder was resumed on Friday afternoon by Mr. Wynne Baxter. Notwithstanding a positive statement by Mrs. Malcolm that deceased was her sister, Elizabeth Watt, it was stated before the commencement of the proceedings that deceased was named Gustafsdoller. She was born in November, 1843, at Forslander, in Gothenburg, Sweden, and married Thomas Stride, a carpenter.
Dr. Phillips stated that since the last inquiry, in accordance with the coroner's request, he had carefully re-examined the body of the deceased, particularly with regard to her mouth. He could not find any injury to or absence of any part of the hard or soft palate. He had also been requested to examine some handkerchiefs, and had done so. He could not find any blood upon them, and he believed the stains upon the larger handkerchief were fruit stains. He was convinced that the deceased had not swallowed the skin or the seed of a grape for many hours before her death. He had examined the knife picked up in the street by a boy. The knife had been recently blunted and its edge turned, apparently by being rubbed on a kerbstone. It was evidently a sharp knife before. The injuries on the deceased's neck could have been inflicted by such a weapon, but in his opinion the knife in question was not the one used. From the position of the body he thought that the deceased was seized by the shoulder and placed on the ground, and the perpetrator of the deed was on her right side when he inflicted the cut. He seemed to have possessed some knowledge as where to inflict a deadly wound in the throat. There was a great dissimilarity between Chapman's case and this. In the former the neck was severed all round down to the vertebral column. The perpetrator of the deed, assuming that he was to the right of deceased, might have kept clear of bloodstains. The chief injury to the neck was away from him, and the stream of blood would not flow in his direction. The deed would only take a few seconds to commit. He could not find any traces of an anaesthetic. If deceased did not utter any cry he could not account for it.
Dr. Blackwell corroborated, and added that the case could not be one of suicide.
Sven Olsson said he was clerk to the Swedish Church in Princess-square. He had known deceased for about 17 years. She was a Swede. Her maiden name was Gustafsdoller, and she was born near Gothenburg in 1843. She was the wife of a carpenter named John Thomas Stride. He got these particulars from the church register. He thought deceased married Stride in 1869. She told him that her husband was drowned in the Princess Alice disaster.
Inspector Reid stated that a Swedish bill was found at deceased's place, and this was given her by the last witness.
Olsson said it was a hymn book, and he gave it to her last winter.
William Marshall, labourer, 64, Berner-street, said he saw deceased in Berner-street about a quarter to twelve on Saturday night. She was standing on the pavement talking quietly to a man. Witness did not see the face distinctly. He wore a short black coat, dark trousers, and a peaked cap. He should say he was a middle-aged man, about five feet six inches in height, and inclined to be stout. He looked like a clerk. Witness heard the man say to deceased, "You would say anything but your prayers." The woman laughed at the man's remark, and they then went away together.
James Brown stated that he saw deceased in company with a man standing near the board school in Berner-street at a quarter to one on Sunday morning. The man was wearing a long overcoat, which reached almost down to his heels. He heard the woman say, "No, not tonight; some other night." Deceased's companion was about 5ft 7in in height, and of average build. He wore a cap with a small peak. He was more like a clerk than a sailor or butcher. Deceased walked away with the stranger. After he got home he heard cries of murder. That was 20 minutes later.
P.C. William Smith, the constable on the beat, deposed that he passed by deceased in Berner-street at 12:30 on Sunday morning. She was talking to a man and standing a few yards away from where her body was found. Deceased's companion was carrying a parcel wrapped in a newspaper. It was about 18 inches long and five or six broad. The man was about five feet seven inches in height, and wore dark clothes.
The man Kidney, who lived with the deceased, identified the hymn book produced.
Detective-inspector Reid gave an account of the steps taken by the police on the discovery of the body, and said enquiries were still proceeding, but up to the present without success.
The inquest was then adjourned till October 23rd.

Another Extraordinary Scare.

The police at Arbour-street Station, Mile-end, have received circumstantial information of an occurrence which may or may not be of importance in connection with the Whitechapel murders. Mrs. Sewell, of 2, Pole-street, Stepney-green, states that at half-past nine on Thursday night she was on her way to attend a temperance meeting at the Assembly Hall. As she was passing along Redman's-road, a very dark thoroughfare, a man suddenly sprang out in front of her. She was greatly alarmed, especially when she observed that he was holding in his hand up against his sleeve something which glittered. The man noticed her alarm, and as if to ingratiate himself he said, "I did not hurt you, missus, did I?" Just then a young man came by, and the mysterious stranger made his conduct all the more suspicious by taking to his heels. The young man, in a tone of alarm, said to Mrs. Sewell, "Did you see what he had in his hand?" and the woman replied, "I saw he had something glittering." "Why," said the young man, "it was a huge knife, a foot long." The two followed the man, but failed to track him, and in the pursuit they lost sight of each other. Mrs. Sewell says the mysterious man was rather tall, with red, bushy whiskers. He was wearing a brown overcoat, and he had with him a white dog.

A DOCTOR'S MAD ASSISTANT.
STRANGE SCENE AT CARDIFF.

Startling Statement by a Spiritualist.



Throughout Saturday the inhabitants of Whitechapel were kept in a state of feverish excitement by the knowledge that threatening letters were constantly being received by the police authorities at the various stations intimating that the assassin would shortly recommence his ghastly work. Towards the evening the dismay became remarkably intensified, as reports of further threats were circulated, many of them appearing to be the pure inventions of cruel triflers. But whether true or false, they at least served as an incentive not only to the police to adopt extra precautions, but even stimulated the residents to alertness, if possible, to prevent a repetition of the horrible murders for last night at least. The police were nervously apprehensive that the night would not



pass without some startling occurrence. The most extraordinary precautions were taken in consequence, and so complete were the measures adopted, both by the city and metropolitan police authorities, that it seemed impossible for the murderer to make his appearance in the East End without detection. Large bodies of plain-clothes men were drafted by Sir Charles Warren to the Whitechapel district from other parts of London, and these, together with the detectives, were so numerous that in the more deserted thoroughfares almost every man met with was a policeman.
The City police, far from being outdone in their exertions to ensure the protection of the public, more than doubled the patrols, so that almost every nook and corner of the various beats came under police supervision every five minutes. In addition to this measure, men were stationed at fixed distances to watch for any suspicious looking person, and when thought at all necessary, to follow them. Most of the men were on duty all Friday night in the East End; the extra work, therefore, was particularly harassing, but every man entered heartily into the work, and not a murmur was heard. All were upon their mettle, and if collective and individual zeal were all that was required, the murderer would soon be hunted down.

To be continued.............

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Re: Details of Stride's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Fri 6 Sep 2013 - 13:02

Interesting details in this portion of the article:

An Extraordinary Arrest.

A respectably dressed young man, who said he came from Chelsea, was taken to Commercial-street police station on Sunday night by a vigilance committee's detective, as bearing a resemblance to one of the sketches reproduced in Saturday's South Wales Echo, the one representing a man with a hard felt hat. He complained bitterly of his detention, and stated that he had been attending a place of worship close by. He carried a bag containing a razor. He is retained in custody pending inquiries.

A Doctor's Strange Clue.

Prominence is given in Saturday's Star to a communication made with reference to the mad medical assistant theory. "A medical gentleman called at the Star Office yesterday," says our contemporary," to give us some important information regarding a suspicion which he entertains as to the murderer. His first words were of protest against the manner he was received at Scotland-yard. Having extricated himself from Scotland Yard red tape and Warrenism, the gentleman came with his story to the Star office, not because he sympathises with the paper politically, for he is a "rank Conservative," but because of the importance he attaches to the news. It has been more than once suggested that the murderer is a monomaniac with medical knowledge. The doctor had an assistant who had gone mad recently, and who is exactly the sort of man Mr. Archibald Forbes had in his mind in his diagnosis of the murders. "Clearly," said Mr. Forbes, "the murderer is a man familiar with the geography of the Whitechapel purlieus. Clearly he is a man not unaccustomed to the manner of accosting these poor women as they are wont to be accosted. Clearly he is a man to whom the methods of the policeman are not unknown." Now this exactly describes the man whom the doctor suspects. He is a man of about 35. He was not a fully qualified surgeon, but had a certain amount of anatomical knowledge, and had assisted at operations, including ovariotomy. He was the assistant to a doctor in Whitechapel, and knows every alley and court in the neighbourhood of the places where the murders were committed. He has been the victim of "a specific contagion," and since then has been animated by feelings of hate, not to say revenge, against the lower class of women who haunt the streets. When seen about eight months ago he was mad.

Match Girls Threatened.

Intimation was given to the city police on Saturday that Messrs. Bryant and May had received a letter from a person signing himself J. Ripper, couched in the following terms: - "I hereby notify that I am going to pay your girls a visit. I hear that they are beginning to say what they will do with me. I am going to see what a few of them have in their stomachs, and I will take it out of them, so that they can have no more to do on the quiet. - (Signed) - John Ripper.
P.S.: I am in Poplar today."

A Startling Incident.

On the day following the Buck's-row tragedy information was tendered at the King David's-lane Police-station at about that time by a dairyman who has a place of business in Little Turner-street, Commercial-road. It will be recollected that on Saturday, September 1, a desperate assault was reported to have been committed near to the music-hall in Cambridge-heath-road, a man having seized a woman by the throat and dragged her down a court, where he was joined by a gang, one of whom laid a knife across the woman's throat, remarking, "we will serve you as we did the others." Late that night a man corresponding with the description given by Packer of the individual who purchased the grapes in Berner-street, called at the shop, and asking permission to go into the yard or shed, he went there, but the dairyman caught a glimpse of something white, and, having suspicions, he rejoined the man in the shed, and was surprised to observe that he had covered up his trousers with a pair of white over-alls, such as engineers wear. The man had a staring look, and appeared greatly agitated. In a hurried manner the stranger took out of a black shiny bag, which was on the ground, a white jacket and rapidly put it on, completely hiding his cutaway black coat, remarking meanwhile, "It's a dreadful murder, isn't it?" although the subject had not been previously mentioned. Without making a pause the suspicious person caught up his bag, which was still open, and rushed into the street, towards Shadwell, saying, "I think I've got a clue!" The matter was reported to the police, and although strict watch has been maintained for the reappearance of the man he has not been seen in the street since.

Remarkable Scene at Cardiff.

On Sunday considerable excitement was caused in that usually calm retreat known at Cardiff as "Tiger Bay" by the report that "Jack the Ripper" was in the neighbourhood, and that he was prowling about for prey. Imagination seized upon the statement, and wove around it a vast amount of corroborative detail. The assumed fiend was invested with a long glittering blade concealed beneath his coat, and his face was said to be possessed of a diabolical glare. Tiger Bay was in a state of great excitement, and the unfortunate man was swooped down upon. In a few moments a crowd of about 200 men, women, and boys were on the war-path, and proceeded to hunt the unhappy wayfarer. He was raced around the "bay," hit, thumped, stoned, and in other ways maltreated, and (according to his own statement) was thrown several times into the canal. His story may be exaggerated; facit indignatio versum; but there can be no doubt that when the excitement was allayed, and the pursuers returned to their peaceful abodes, he was left in a pitiable condition. His clothes were wet through and covered with mud, and he presented numerous marks of delicate attention upon his person. He was obliged finally to have recourse to the police-station for shelter, where he poured his woes into the sympathetic ears of the constable in charge. The police gave him their protection, and promised him immunity from a similar assault.

SPIRITUALISTS AND THE MURDERER.
An Astounding Story at Cardiff.

For the nonce the centre of the interest which is attached to the terrible London tragedies of the past few weeks has been transferred from Whitechapel to Cardiff. To accomplish this remarkable state of affairs some occult agency was evidently required - unless, indeed, the murderer himself had turned up in our midst - and this motive power has been supplied by the believers in spiritualism. On Saturday afternoon a respectably dressed middle-aged woman entered the Cardiff Central Police-station and addressed herself to the officer who happened to be in charge for the moment. She informed him very seriously that she believed she had discovered the personality and whereabouts of the Whitechapel murderer, but to his skeptical mind the value of the information was considerable discounted by the fact that she avowed herself to be a Spiritualist, indicating that it was by this means that the momentous disclosure had been made. However, here is the pith of her story, which we give for what it is worth. The previous evening, at the witching hour of night, when churchyards yawn and graves give up their dead, the informant, together with five friends, assembled in a house in Godfrey-street, Newtown, and gathered round the mystic table. They placed their twelve hands with the fingers outstretched on the table, each of the six persons joining his thumbs and completing the magnetic circuit by touching with his little fingers those of his neighbours on either side. In solemn silence they sat, and the leader of the party invoked the spirit of Elizabeth Stride, who was foully done to death in Whitechapel last Sunday morning. For a time there was no response. Pale with determination, yet feeling somewhat creepy in their spinal cords, the company persevered, waiting awe-stricken for they knew not what. At last the table gave evident signs of disturbance, and after a few violent jumps in erratic directions the magic wood gave forth the weird knocks which announced the presence of the dead among the living.
"Who art thou?" queried the spokesman of the spiritualists in mechanical, yet trembling tones.
Knock, knock, went the table, as it unerringly spelled out the words, "Elizabeth Stride!"
"By whom were thou murdered?" was the next question.
Again did the table oscillate and rap out the necessary letters, "B-y a m-a-n n-a-m-e-d J-o-h-n-n-y D-o-n-n-e-l-l-e-y," and then warming vindictively to the congenial task of giving up to justice the foul slaughterer, "He lives at number thirteen Commercial-road," or "street" - which of the two thoroughfares it was the listeners in their excitement could not positively determine.
"Did he commit all the Whitechapel murders?"
"No," rapped the spirit, "He is one of a gang of twelve who have sworn to commit these crimes, and different members of the gang have done the various murders."

At this juncture the current of magnetism was suddenly broken, nor could it be restored. Elizabeth Stride had wandered off into the chilly night, and the party separated. The conversation above given is a verbatim record of the occurrence which was tendered to the police in all seriousness. There the matter stands.

"JACK THE RIPPER" AGAIN.

Considerable excitement was caused on Monday afternoon by the report that a man had been arrested at Baker's-row, Whitechapel, after a desperate struggle, and that he had been at once conveyed to Bethnal Green police-station, and there charged on suspicion with being concerned in the recent murders. It was ascertained on enquiry, however, that the man was arrested simply charged with stealing an oil cask, and that the struggle which ensued gave rise to a report in the locality that he was suspected of complicity in the murders. During the day two singular circumstances came to light. Last Wednesday, it seems, a middle-aged man, of good physique and respectably dressed, left an overcoat, and pair of trousers, both blood-stained, at the central branch of the London Clothing Repairing Company, Gray's Inn Road, to be cleaned, and he promised to call for them on Friday or Saturday. He did not, however, return until Monday, when he was arrested by the detectives who had been awaiting his arrival for several days. He accounted for the blood stains by the assertion that he had cut his hand, but is stated to have contradicted himself. He was conveyed to Leman-street police station, where he remains. The second matter which yesterday came under the notice of the police is as follows: - Some days ago a man entered a public-house in Whitechapel, and left behind the bar a parcel to be given to the manager. On moving the parcel, it fell, disclosing three large new knives, one 20, one 14, and one 10 inches in length, with sheath and belt to be worn round the waist. The knives were very sharp. Information was given to the police, and when the man called for the knives he was told to call again on Monday. Detectives watched the house throughout the day with the intention of detaining the man until he accounted for the possession of the weapons, and the purpose to which they would be put, but he did not put in an appearance.
The Press Association is officially informed that Sir Charles Warren has made arrangements for the employment of bloodhounds to track the criminal in the event of any further persons being found murdered under circumstances similar to those in the cases which have recently occurred in Whitechapel. An instruction has been issued to the police that they are not to remove the body of the victim, but to send notice immediately to a veterinary surgeon in the South West district, who has several trained bloodhounds in readiness to be taken to the spot where the body may be found, and to be at once put on the scent. No details as to the plan which will be followed are given. The plan of operations will, to a great extent, depend upon the circumstances of any particular case in which the aid of the bloodhounds may be called into requisition.

FUNERAL OF KATE EDDOWES.

The funeral of Katherine Eddowes, the victim of the latest of the Whitechapel tragedies, took place on Monday at Ilford. The funeral cortege started at 1:30 from the city mortuary in Golden-lane, outside which a great crowd had congregated, the traffic in the thoroughfare being almost stopped. The body was enclosed in an elm coffin, and was borne in a glass car drawn by a pair of horses, and was followed by a mourning coach, in which were deceased's sisters - Mrs. Eliza Gold, Mrs. Elizabeth Fisher, Mrs. Harriet Jones, and the man Kelly, with whom Eddowes lived. The mourning coaches had some difficulty in penetrating the large crowd outside, among whom threats against "Jack the Ripper" were loud and frequent.

FALSE ALARM AT NEWPORT.

On Saturday evening a man named Bennett presented himself at the Newport police office and asserted that a fellow answering the description of the Whitechapel murderer was drinking in a public-house in another part of the town. The head constable questioned Bennett, who was in liquor, to find out that the motive which principally actuated him was the hope of getting the 1,200 pounds which had been offered for the true murderer's apprehension, and which, as Bennett pointed out, would make him comfortable for the remainder of his days. The cross-questioning showed that Bennett had known the man for some time, and for that and other reasons the police attached no importance to his statement.

"JACK THE RIPPER" WRITES UPON THE WALL.

The Central News says a startling fact has just come to light in reference to the recent Whitechapel murders, which goes somewhat towards clearing up the mystery with which the crimes have been surrounded. After killing Katherine Eddowes in Mitre-square the murderer, it is now known, walked to Goulston-street, where he threw away the piece of the deceased woman's apron upon which he had wiped his bloody hands and the knife. Within a few feet of this spot he had written upon the wall - "The Jews shall not be blamed for nothing." Most unfortunately one of the police officers gave orders for this writing to be immediately sponged out, probably with a view of stilling the morbid curiosity which it would certainly have aroused, but in so doing a very important link was destroyed, for had the writing been photographed a certain clue would have been in the hands of the authorities. The witnesses who saw the writing, however, state that it was similar in character to the letters sent to the Central News, and signed "Jack the Ripper,"! and though it would have been far better to have clearly demonstrated this by photography, there is now every reason to believe that the writer of the letter and post-card sent to the Central News (facsimiles of which are now to be seen outside every police-station) is the actual murderer. The police consequently are very anxious that any citizen who can identify the handwriting should without delay communicate with the authorities. The Central News, since the original letter and postcard of "Jack the Ripper" was published, has received from thirty to forty communications daily signed "Jack the Ripper," evidently the concoction of silly notoriety hunters. A third communication, however, has been received from the writer of the original "Jack the Ripper" letter and postcard, which, acting upon official advice, it has been deemed prudent to withhold for the present. It may be stated, however, that although the miscreant avows his intention of committing further crimes shortly, it is only against prostitutes that his threats are directed, his desire being to respect and protect honest women.
The man arrested on suspicion of being the Whitechapel murderer, in consequence of his leaving some blood-stained clothes to be cleaned, has been released, it being shown that he recently cut his hand severely with some broken glass.
The man who left three knives at the Bull's Head tavern, Oxford-street, called for them on Monday night, and a detective being in waiting he was arrested. He was taken to Bow-street, but, after satisfactorily accounting for himself was discharged. On Tuesday a well-dressed man was seen walking about Covent-garden Market carrying a small black bag. He was taken to Bow-street, and after explaining his business was discharged.

To be continued.............................

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Re: Details of Stride's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Fri 6 Sep 2013 - 18:19

AN EX-CONVICT'S THEORY.

"Ex-Convict" writes to the Pall Mall Gazette: - I have had several years' intercourse with the most desperate of London criminals, and you may, possibly, on that account consent to add the following in the many suggested theories put forward in your admirable paper to explain the motive of, and thereby start a clue to, the Whitechapel murders.
(1) The murderer is of the "old-fake" criminal type.
(2) He belongs to or is very familiar with Whitechapel.
(3) He has served a long term, perhaps many terms, of imprisonment, some or all of which punishment he attributes to the class to which the murdered women belong.
(4) His previous criminal career makes him familiar with the beat system of the London police.
(5) He has been an infirmary orderly in some convict prison, and he has recently terminated his last sentence.

PRIVATE TRIAL OF BLOODHOUNDS.

Sir Charles Warren witnessed a private trial of bloodhounds in one of the London Parks early on Tuesday morning. The hounds are the property of Mr. Edwin Brough, of Wynyate, near Scarborough, who for years past has devoted himself to bloodhound breeding, contrary proved to be the case. In all half a dozen runs were made, Sir Charles Warren in two instances acting as the hunted man. In every instance the dogs hunted persons who were complete strangers to them, and occasionally the trail would be crossed. When this happened, the hounds were temporarily checked, but either one or the other would pick up the trail again. In one of the longer courses the hounds were checked at half the distance. Burgho ran back, but Barnaby moving a fresh cast forward recovered the trail, and ran the quarry home. The hound did this entirely unaided by his master, who thought that he was on the wrong track, but left him to his own devices. In consequence of the coldness of the scent the hounds worked very slowly, but they demonstrated the possibility of tracking complete strangers on to whose trail they had been laid. The Chief Commissioner seemed pleased with the result of the trials, though he did not express any definite opinion on the subject to those present.
"Jack the Ripper's" letter to the Dublin police contains a curious statement not appearing in other productions. The writer states that a murder of a woman would be committed either in the east or
west of Dublin, and that the writer was determined to do away with unfortunates, and his reason was because his sister had joined them. He defied Mr. Mallon and all his detectives to discover him.
The Central News says the police have made an important arrest at Chingford in connection with the Whitechapel murders. All is quiet in Whitechapel district, and, though the police precautions remain unaltered, the excitement in the public mind is undoubtedly diminished.
A respectably dressed man, named Stephen Rorke, was charged at Manchester on Wednesday with annoying and threatening a woman at 12 o'clock on the previous night. The woman was accosted by the prisoner on the road home, and on refusing to comply with his wishes he said he was "Jack the Ripper," and threatened her. The man was given into custody. The police stated that great terror existed among women, and the streets were almost cleared at nine o'clock. The prisoner was remanded.
Late on Tuesday night a stoutly built man, short, 40 years of age, took a woman to a dark place on the Dublin quays, where he drew a knife and stabbed her about the face. Her cries attracted the attention of the police, who arrested the man without resistance. A number of people also ran to the spot, and much excitement was caused. The man was detained.

A BLOODHOUND STORY FIFTY YEARS AGO.

Captain Norway was murdered on the turnpike road between Bodmin and Wadebridge one night nearly fifty years ago. Next morning two bloodhounds belonging to Sir William Molesworth were brought from Pencarrow to the scene of the murder, and they followed on the scent of the murderers to the estuary of the River Camel, where they were checked by the high tide. The tide had been low when the murderers waded across. The dogs were ferried over the river and recovered the scent, which they stuck to, until it brought them and the constables to a cottage in which were found two brothers named Lightfoot. These men were tried for the murder at Bodmin Assizes, and duly hung.

The Westminster Mystery.
THE CORONER'S INQUEST.

Startling Disclosures.

On Monday, Mr. John Troutbeck, coroner for Westminster, opened an inquest on the remains found a week ago under the new police offices on the Thames Embankment. The greatest interest was manifested in the proceedings, and a large number of people gathered outside the mortuary at Millbank, and the Session House, Westminster. The jury were summoned to meet at the mortuary at two o'clock, and they did not return to the Session House until half-past three. The body in the mortuary presented an awful spectacle. It was locked in a room, and was viewed by the jury through a window for fear of contagion. It was on a table, propped up, and the arm recently found was placed in the socket. The body was of a dark brown colour. The first witness called was
Frederick Wildborn, carpenter, employed on the works. He said he first saw what he thought was an old coat on Monday morning. He took no notice of the matter then, and saw the parcel again the same evening. On the following day he called the assistant-foreman's attention to the parcel. It was then found to contain the body of a woman. He did not notice any smell. Witness pointed out the spot where the body was found on a plan of the vaults, and said it would be very difficult for any one unacquainted with the place to find his way there. The workmen's tools had been placed there for 10 weeks, up to two weeks before the body was found.
George Budgen, bricklayers' labourer, engaged on the works, said he was told by another workman to go and see what the parcel was. He untied the parcel and produced the cord which had served that purpose. The body was then seen and the police were sent for.
Detective Thomas Hawkins, A Division, deposed to being called, and to seeing the body. It was wrapped in some dress material (produced). The wrapper was very black, and the body was in a very advanced state of decomposition. The vaults were very dark, and no stranger could have found his way in without a light. A person would have to cross a trench, which could not be seen in the dark.
Frederick Moore deposed to finding the arm lying in the mortuary. The arm was not wrapped up, but a piece of string was tied tightly round the top of the arm.
William James, 127 B, said he was called to where the arm was found. He took it to the police station, and called Dr. Neville. The arm was subsequently taken to Ebury Bridge Mortuary.
Charles William Brown, assistant foreman to Messrs. Grover, the contractors for the works, said the vaults had been completed three months ago. There was no watchman at night, but the three doors were locked. Strangers would not know that such a place existed. Witness did not notice on the Monday that the locks of the gates had been tampered with.
George Chin, the foreman, deposed to being called to see the body.
Ernest Head said he was in the vault on the Saturday before the Tuesday when the body was found. He had a paraffin lamp, but saw no parcel. He was in the vault alone, it being his duty to lock up. The gates were opened by a latch string which any stranger could see.
Thomas Ralph, 634 A, deposed to taking charge of the body.
Dr. Bond said he was called on October 2nd to see what he found was the decomposed body of a woman. The wall of the vault was stained black, and he considered the body had been there several days. The trunk was that of a woman well nourished. The head had been sawn from the body. The lower part of the body and the pelvis were also sawn off. The chest measured 35 1/2 inches, and the waist 28 1/2 inches. The breasts were well formed. The arms had been removed by several incisions. The body was wrapped up in a very skilful manner. He did not find any evidence of the woman having had children. She had at one time had pleurisy. She did not die from suffocation or drowning; the parts missing from the Whitechapel victims were also missing from the trunk. The skin was fair and the hair dark. The woman might possibly have borne a child, but the breasts were against that supposition. The body had been dead about two months, and had not been kept in water, but had decomposed in the air. The arm found exactly fitted the trunk. It was a fleshly, rounded arm. The hand was long, the fingers tapering, and the nails were well kept. It was, in fact, the hand of a person not used to manual labour. The woman was about five feet eight inches high. There was nothing to show the cause of death.
Dr. Hibbert said he examined the arm. It had been separated from the body after death, and was full of blood. The cuts in the arm precisely corresponded with those on the trunk. A certain amount of skill was shown by the amputation. The woman was over 25.
Inspector Marshall, who has charge of the case, said the piece of dress in which the body was wrapped was of broche satin cloth, of Bradford manufacture, but of an old pattern - probably three years old. It was rather common material, costing about 6 1/2d. a yard when new. There was a six-inch flounce round the bottom of the dress.
At this point the inquiry was adjourned for a fortnight.

The Birtley Tragedy.



The inquest on the body of Jane Beetmoor, who was murdered at Birtley on the 22nd ultimo, was resumed at Birtley on Tuesday, the accused man, Waddle, being present in custody. The medical evidence showed that the deceased had been stabbed in various parts of the body, but the fatal wound was in the abdomen. There had been no attempt to mutilate the body as had been reported. Susannah Robinson deposed to leaving the deceased in Waddle's company on the night of the murder. Other witnesses having been called with the object of proving that the deceased woman and Waddle were together on the night of the murder, the enquiry was adjourned until the 24th inst.
William Waddle, suspected of murdering his sweetheart, at Birtley, near Gateshead, was brought before the magistrates at Chester-le-street on Wednesday. An application to remand the prisoner till the conclusion of the adjourned inquest was granted. The trial will probably be resumed on the 25th inst.

A "WHITECHAPEL" MURDER IN PARIS.

A determined attempt to murder an "unfortunate" was made on Monday night in the Avenue Wagram (says the Paris correspondent of the Daily Telegraph). A young man went to a place of bad repute with a woman about 11 o'clock, and after the two had been together in a room for about a quarter of an hour loud cries of "Murder" rang through the house. Shortly afterwards the woman rushed downstairs holding her hands up to her throat, from which blood was spurting in streams. The owner of the house immediately ran out for the police, locking his door after him, and the would-be murderer was captured as he endeavoured to escape through a window. The woman had, it appears, robbed her companion, who took out a large knife and gashed her throat. The "unfortunate" was conveyed to a hospital, where a cannula had to be put in her windpipe in order to enable her to breathe. Her condition is considered precarious.

Source: Cardiff Times, 13 October 1888, Page 7

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Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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