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Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Thu 22 Aug 2013 - 21:41

Mr. Hyde, fear not - the inquest is coming later tonight. It might take a while to transcribe it but I'll do my best.

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Fri 23 Aug 2013 - 10:58

THE ALDGATE MURDER.

Shortly before 2 o'clock on Sunday morning, or about three-quarters of an hour after the crime already described, it was discovered that a second woman had been horribly murdered and mutilated, this being in Mitre-square, Aldgate, within the city boundaries, but on the confines of the now notorious district. It appears that Police-constable Watkins (No. 881) of the City police, was going round his beat, when, turning his lantern upon the darkest corner of Mitre-square, he saw the body of a woman apparently lifeless, in a pool of blood. He at once blew his whistle, and several persons being attracted to the spot, he despatched messengers for medical and police aid. Inspector Collard, who was in command at the time at Bishopsgate police-station, but a short distance off, quickly arrived, followed a few moments after by Mr. G.W. Sequeira, surgeon, of 34, Jewry-street, and Dr. Gordon Brown, the divisional police doctor of Finsbury-circus.

A SICKENING DISCOVERY.

The scene then disclosed was a most horrible one. The woman, who was apparently about 40 years of age, was lying on her back quite dead, although the body was still warm. Her heart had ceased to beat. The body was inclined to the left side, the left leg being extended, whilst the right was flex. Both arms were extended. The throat was cut half way round, revealing a dreadful wound, from which blood had flowed in great quantitites, staining the pavement for some distance round. Across the right cheek to the nose was another gash, and a part of the right ear had been cut off. Following the plan in the Whitechapel murders, the miscreant was not content with merely killing his victim. The poor woman's clothes had been pulled up over her chest, and abdomen ripped completely open, and part of the intestines laid on her neck.

A PANIC.

When the news of this additional murder became known, the excitement in the crowded district of Aldgate was intense. Usually a busy place on a Sunday morning, Houndsditch and the connecting thoroughfares presented a particularly animated appearance, men with barrows vending fruit and eatables doing a brisk trade. Crowds flocked to the entrances to the square where the body had been discovered, but the police refused admittance to all but a privileged few.

THE SCENE OF THE MURDER.

Before proceeding further it may be convenient to describe the scene of the murder. Mitre-square is an enclosed place in the rear of St. Katherine's Church, Leadenhall-street. It has three entrances. The principal one, and the only one having a carriage way, is at the southern end leading to Mitre-street, a turning out of Aldgate High-street. There is a narrow court in the north-east corner leading into Duke-street, and another at the north-west by which foot passengers can reach St. James-square, otherwise known as Orange Market. Mitre-square contains but two dwelling-houses, in one of which, singularly enough, a city policeman lives, whilst the other is unhabited. The other buildings, of which there are only three, are large warehouses. In the south-east corner, and near to the entrance from Mitre-street, is the backyard of some premises, but the railings are closely boarded. It was just under these that the woman was found, quite hidden from sight by the shadow cast by the corner of the adjoining house. The officer who found the body is positive that it could not have been there more than a quarter of an hour before he discovered it. He is timed to "work his beat" - as it is called - in from 10 to 15 minutes, and is spoken of by his superior as a most trustworthy man.

THE POLICE THEORY

is that the man and woman who had met in Aldgate, watched the policeman pass round this square, and then they entered it for an immoral purpose. Whilst the woman lay on the ground her throat was cut, as described above, causing instant death. The murderer then hurriedly proceeded to mutilate the body, for the wounds, though so ghastly, do not appear to have been caused so skifully and deliberately as in the case of the murder of Annie Chapman in Hanbury-street. Five minutes some of the doctors think would have sufficed for the completion of the murderer's work, and he was thus enabled to leave the ground before the return of the policeman on duty.

EXTRAORDINARY INCIDENTS.

None of the police on duty on Sunday morning appear to have had particular attention drawn to the man and woman together, and this appears strange at first, when it is remarked that within the last few weeks the police have been keeping a particularly keen watch upon suspicious couples. The murderer probably avoided much blood staining on account of the woman being on her back at the time of the outrage, and leaving the square by either of the courts, he would be able to pass quickly away through the many narrow thoroughfares without exciting observation. But one of the most extraordinary incidents in connection with the crime is that not the slightest scream or noise was heard. A watchman is employed at one of the warehouses in the square, and in a direct line. But a few yards away, on the other side of the square, a city policeman was sleeping. Many people would be about in the immediate neighbourhood even at this early hour, making preparations for the market, which takes place every Sunday in Middlesex-street (formerly Petticoat-lane), and the adjacent thoroughfares. Taking everything into account, therefore, the murder must be pronounced one of extraordinary daring brutality. The effect it has had among the residents in the east of London is extraordinary. All day crowds thronged the streets leading to Mitre-square discussing the crime, and the police in the neighbourhood of the square, under Inspector Izzard and Sergeants Dudman and Phelps, and other officers, were fully occupied in keeping back the excited and horror-stricken people. The woman, up to the time of writing, had not been identified, and the police admit that they have no information which can possibly be termed a clue.

STARTLING PERSONAL NARRATIVES.

A man named Albert Barker has made the following statement: - "I was in the Three Nuns Hotel, Aldgate, on Saturday night, when a man got into conversation with me. He asked me questions which now appear to me to have some bearing upon the recent murders. He wanted to know whether I knew what sort of loose women used the public bar at the house, when they usually left the street outside, and where they were in the habit of going. He asked further questions, and from his manner seemed up to no good purpose. He appeared to be a "shabby genteel" sort of man, and was dressed in black clothes. He wore a black felt hat, and carried a black bag. We came out together at closing time (twelve o'clock), and I left him outside Aldgate railway-station."

THE NIGHT WATCHMAN'S STORY.

Morris, the night watchman in Mitre-street, has made a statement in which he says that, about a quarter to two o'clock, the policeman upon the beat knocked at the door of the warehouse. When he replied, the constable said, "For God's sake, man, come out and assist me. Another woman has been ripped open." He said, "All right, keep yourself cool while I light a lamp." Having done so, he accompanied the constable to the south-west corner of the square, where he saw a woman lying stretched upon the pavement with her throat cut, and her body horribly mutilated. He then left the constable, and proceeded into Aldgate, where he blew his whistle, and other police officers soon made their appearance. The whole shape of the woman was marked out in blood upon the pavement. In addition to her throat being cut, there were two slashes across the face, one of the cuts almost completely severing the nose. The woman's face was so mutilated that he could not describe what she was like. She wore a dark skirt and a black bonnet, and her appearance was exceedingly shabby. The strangest part of the whole thing was that he did not hear the slightest sound. As a rule he could hear the footsteps of the policeman as he passed on his beat every quarter of an hour, so that it appeared impossible that the woman could have uttered any sound without his detecting it. It was only on the previous night that he remarked to some policeman that he wished the "butcher" would come round Mitre-square, and he would "give him a doing." Yet the "butcher" had come, and he was perfectly ignorant of it.

THE POST-MORTEM EXAMINATION

of the woman found in Mitre-square was made this afternoon at the City Mortuary, Golden-lane. The proceedings lasted from 2:30 until six o'clock. Dr. Brown, of 17, Finsbury-circus, surgeon to the city police force, conducted the operations, and was assisted by Dr. Sequeira, 34, Jewry-street, and Dr. G.B. Phillips, of 2, Spital-square. Dr. Sedgwick Saunders was also present. The Central News understands that as the result of the post-mortem, it is shown that the details of the mutilation are almost exactly the same as in the case of Annie Chapman, a certain portion of whose body, it will be remembered, was missing.

To be continued.......................

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sat 24 Aug 2013 - 1:48

WHAT WILL HAPPEN NEXT?

Great indignation is expressed in all parts of the metropolis this evening at the inability of the police to prevent the recurrence of the outrages. With each fresh murder in the Whitechapel series public alarm has been accentuated, and unless something can soon be done to restore confidence in the detective powers of the police, a panic will be the result. Nothing but the murders is talked of, and the question is being frequently asked, "Why do not the police resort to more drastic measures?" Attention is drawn to the success which attended the use of bloodhounds in connection with the Blackburn murder, and it is seriously suggested that similar methods should be adopted in the East-end of London. That both the metropolitan and city police recognise the gravity of the present crisis is proved by the fact that Major Smith, of the latter force, has had long interviews with Sir Charles Warren at Scotland Yard today. Amongst the force there is a strong feeling that the old practice of offering Government rewards should be revived, and a large section of the public endorse this view. In view of the mystery which surrounds the whereabouts of the murderer or murderers, it might be suggested that the police authorities should take the constables into their confidence, and for the time being, considering the exceptional circumstances attending the murders, to put aside a very stringent rule of the service, the enforcement of which, under ordinary conditions, is absolutely necessary. For instance, it is by no means unusual for a constable doing duty in the streets to have suspicious incidents come under his observation of which he took no notice until after he learns of a crime such as has just rekindled public indignation. Under existing circumstances an officer who made known such "negligence" would undoubtedly be dismissed from the service, and in view of this it cannot be expected that an officer would knowingly bring about his own discharge. The information which he might be able to give would possibly be of the greatest importance as regards a case such as the present, but it is withheld for the very reason that unless the authorities relax their severity, the man would be bringing about his own downfall. It seems as though exception must be made to several existing rules in order to bring justice to the East-end murderer or murderers, therefore, it will not be inopportune to suggest that the police will be ably assisted if a Government reward is at once offered, the terms of which should apply both to the police and the public. The Press Association understands that certain instructions have been telegraphed today by the metropolitan police authorities to the different seaport towns where there is communication with the continent concerning the two murders. The police have no clue to the murderer in either case, nor do they profess any hope of discovering one. He has disappeared without leaving a trace of the faintest kind, and there is nothing whatever upon which the detectives can work. A woman's apron was yesterday found in Goulston-street which is believed to have belonged to the deceased woman. It is suggested, therefore, that the murderer travelled to Mitre-square, the scene of the second murder, by way of Goulston-street, and took away the apron for the purpose of cleaning his weapon upon it. In the case of both of the murders, the assassin had a very narrow escape from detection. The evidence that is forthcoming establishes the fact that the murderer commenced operations first in Berner-street. Here the crime was committed as nearly as possible at one o'clock, and it is very probable that the man was proceeding to the commission of further outrages when he was disturbed by the arrival of Diemshitz. Having failed in his purpose - which, as in the other cases, appears to have been to secure certain portions of the body - he betook himself towards the city, and in Mitre-court his second victim was done to death. Berner-street, it may be mentioned, is within a stone's throw of Hanbury-street, where Annie Chapman was recently murdered, and adjacent also to Buck's-row, when Mary Ann Nicholls met her death, and to Osborne-street, wherein still another of these unfortunates was shamefully mutilated. It lies to the right of Commercial-road, going east, and is about eight minutes' walk from Mitre-square, so that the murderer has confined his operations to a radius of about a quarter of a mile, and it is within that area that the police expect to find him - if, indeed, he be ever found.

AN EXTRAORDINARY LETTER.
The Murder Foreshadowed.

The Central News says: On Thursday last the following letter, bearing the E.C. post mark and directed in red ink, was delivered to this agency:

"25th Sept., 1888

"Dear Boss, - I keep on hearing the police have caught me, but they won't fix me just yet. I have laughed when they work so clever, and talk about being on the right track. The joke about Leather Apron gave me real fits. I am down on whores; I shan't quit ripping them till I do get buckled. Grand work the last job was. I gave the lady no time to squeal. How can they catch me now? I love my work, and want to start again. You will soon hear of me with my funny little games. I saved some of the proper red stuff in a ginger beer bottle over the last job to write with, but it went thick and I can't use it. Red ink is fit enough, I hope. Ha! ha! The next job I do I shall clip the ladies' ears off and send to the police officers just for folly, wouldn't you? Keep this letter back till I do a bit more work, then give it out straight. My knife's so nice and sharp, I want to get a chance. Good luck.

"Yours truly, "JACK T. RIPPER.

"Don't mind me giving the trade name. Wasn't good enough to post this before I got all the red ink off my hands, curse it. No luck yet. They say I am a doctor. Now ha! laugh ha! laugh."

The whole of this extraordinary epistle is written in red ink in a free, bold, clerkly hand. It was, of course, treated as the work of a practical joker, but it is singular to note that the latest murders have been committed within a few days of the receipt of the letter, and that apparently, in the case of his last victim, the murderer made an attempt to cut off the ears, and that he actually did mutilate the face in a manner which he has never before attempted. The letter is now in the hands of the Scotland yard authorities.

1,150 POUND REWARD OFFERED.

LONDON, Monday.

The public indignation at the inability of the police by their existing methods to bring to justice the murderers of the six unfortunate women who have been so foully done to death in the East End of London, during the past two months, found a practical shape today. The barrier of reticence which has been set up on all occasions when the representatives of the newspaper press have been brought into contact with police authorities for the purpose of obtaining information for the use of the public has been suddenly withdrawn; and instead of the customary stereotyped negatives and disclaimers of the officials, there has ensued a marked disposition to afford all necessary facilities for the publication of details, and an increased courtesy towards the members of the press concerned. Another direction in which the officials have been aroused to a sense of their public responsibility has been by the spontaneous offers of substantial rewards by public bodies and private individuals towards the detection of the criminal or criminals guilty of these desperate crimes. Following upon the refusal of the Home Secretary to place Government funds at the disposal of the police for this purpose, there was much dissatisfaction expressed, and the feeling which this refusal provoked, though not finding public expression at the time, has been stimulated by the more recent crimes to outward manifestation. A meeting of the vigilance committee which has for some time been formed in Whitechapel was held today at Mile End, and a resolution passed calling upon the Home Office to issue a substantial Government reward for the capture and conviction of the murderer, and a letter embodying this was at once sent to the Home Secretary. One of the murders of Sunday morning took place within the precincts of the city of London, and this fact led one of the common councilmen today to give notice that at the next meeting he would move that a reward of 250 pounds should be offered by the corporation for the detection of the Mitre-square murderer, but the necessity for this step was removed when, later in the day, the Lord Mayor (Mr. Polydore de Keyser), after consulting with Col. Sir James Fraser, K.C.B., chief commander of police of the city of London, announced that a reward of 500 pounds would be given by the corporation for the detection of the miscreant. The proprietors of the Financial News, a monetary organ, also came forward, on behalf of several readers of that journal, with a cheque for 300 pounds, which was forwarded by their request to the Home Secretary, accompanied by the following letter: -

The Financial News, London, Oct., 1st, 1888.

The Right Hon. Henry Matthews, Q.C., M.P.,
Secretary of State for the Home Department.

Sir, - In view of your refusal to offer a reward out of Government funds for the discovery of the perpetrator or perpetrators of the recent murders in the East End of London, I am instructed on behalf of several readers of the Financial News, whose names and addresses I enclose, to foward you the accompanying cheque for 300 pounds, and to request you to offer the sum for this purpose in the name of the Government. Awaiting the favour of your reply, I have the honour to be, your obedient servant,

(Signed) HARRY H. MARKS.

In reply to this communication, the following letter was received tonight by the editor of the Financial News: -

October 1st, 1888.

My dear Sir, - I am directed by Mr. Matthews to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of this date containing a cheque for 300 pounds which you say has been contributed on behalf of several readers of the Financial News and which you are desirous should be offered as a reward for the discovery of the recent murders in the East End of London. If Mr. Matthews had been of opinion that the offer of a reward in these cases would have been attended by any useful result, he would himself have at once made such an offer, but he is not of that opinion. Under these circumstances I am directed to return you the cheque (which I enclose), and to thank you, and the gentlemen whose names you have forwarded, for the liberality of their offer, which Mr. Matthews much regrets he is unable to accept. - I am, Sir, your very obedient servant,

HARRY H. MARKS, Esq.                     E. LEIGH PEMBERTON.

The proprietor of the Evening Post, which is also chiefly devoted to the interests of the financial world, has commenced a subscription list with a sum of 50 guineas, and has invited other contributions towards a reward fund. The total sum available for the purpose of a reward, including the amount promised by private subscription among residents in the East End, is now 1,150 pounds, made up as follows: -

Corporation of the City of London....................500 pounds
The "Financial News"........................................300 pounds
Mr. Montagu, M.P...............................................100 pounds
Private Residents in Whitechapel....................200 pounds
The "Evening Post"............................................50 pounds
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total...................................................................1,150 pounds



A STARTLING DISCOVERY

was made during this afternoon. Sergeant Dudman had his attention drawn to 36, Mitre-street, a house a short distance from the spot where the murdered woman was found, and there he found what appeared to be bloodstains upon the doorway and underneath the window, as if a person had wiped his fingers on the window-ledge and drawn a bloodstained knife down part of the doorway. M. Hurting, who lives on the premises, said he had only just before noticed the stains, and then quite by accident. Almost immediately afterwards the same police-officer had his attention drawn to similar marks on the plate-glass window of Mr. William Smith, at the corner of Mitre-square, but Mr. Smith scouted the idea that they could have anything to do with the murders, as the windows were covered at night by shutters. The discovery, notwithstanding, caused increased excitement for a time in the locality. The only other trace left by the murderer was a portion of an apron picked up in Goulston-street, which corresponded with a piece left on the body of the victim, and this seemed to show that the murderer had escaped in the direction of Whitechapel.

SOME STARTLING STORIES.

The young man, Albert Backert, of 13, Newnham-street, Whitechapel, made a further statement this morning to a representative of the Press Association as follows: - "On Saturday night, at about seven minutes to 12, I entered the Three Nuns Hotel, Aldgate. While in there, an elderly woman, very shabbily dressed, came in and asked me to buy some matches. I refused, and she went out. A man who had been standing by me remarked that those persons were a nuisance, to which I responded "Yes." He then asked me to have a glass with him, but I refused, as I had just called for one myself. He then asked me if I knew how old some of the women were who were in the habit of soliciting outside. I replied that I knew, or thought, that some of them who looked about 25 were over 35; the reason they looked younger being on account of the powder and paint. He then asked me if I could tell him where they usually went with men, and I replied that I had heard that some went to places in Oxford-street, Whitechapel, others to some houses in Whitechapel-road, and others to Bishopsgate-street. He then asked whether I thought they would go with him down Northumberland-alley - a dark and lonely court in Fenchurch-street. I said I did not know, but supposed they would. He then went outside, and spoke to the woman who was selling matches, and gave her something. I believe he returned to me, and I bade him good night at about ten minutes past twelve. I believe the woman was waiting for him. I do not think I could identify the woman, as I did not take particular notice of her, but I should know the man again. He was a dark man, about 38 years of age, height about five feet six or seven inches; he wore a black felt hat, dark clothes (morning coat), black tie, and carried a black shining bag." Early this morning a police constable found in Whitechapel-road, a black-handled knife, sharp and pointed, like a carving knife. The blade was 10 inches long.

A SINGULAR DISCOVERY

which is supposed to afford an important clue to the murderer, is being investigated this evening by the police at Kentish Town. It appears that about nine o'clock this morning, the proprietor of the Nelson Tavern, Victoria-road, Kentish Town, entered a place of convenience adjoining his premises for the purpose of pointing out to a builder some alterations which he desired to be executed, when a paper parcel was noticed behind the door. No particular importance was attached to the discovery until an hour later, when Mr. Chinn, the publican, while reading the newspaper, was struck with the similarity of this bundle with the one of which the police have issued a description as having been seen in the possession of the man last seen in the company of the woman Stride. The police at the Kentish Town-road police-station were acquainted with the discovery, and a detective officer was at once sent to prosecute enquiries. It was then discovered that the parcel was not picked up, but had been kicked into the roadway, where the paper burst and revealed a pair of dark trousers. The description of the man wanted for the murders gives the colour of the trousers he wore to be dark. The fragments of paper were collected and found to be stained with blood, and it is stated that some hair was found also amongst some congealed blood attached to the paper. It was subsequently ascertained from some lads who had been dragging the trousers through the Castle-road that a poor man picked up the article of clothing and carried it of. Detectives are investigating this strange discovery.

To be continued........................................

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 25 Aug 2013 - 23:44

THE ARRESTS.

During last night and today no fewer than five men were arrested in the East End of London in connection with the murders. Three were at different times conveyed to Leman-street police-station. One was immediately liberated. Another was detained until noon today, when he was set at liberty after giving a statement of his movements. He was found to have been in straitened circumstances, and to have passed much of his time in the common lodging-houses in Whitechapel, but there was nothing to show that he had anything to do with the murders. The third man was detained until the afternoon, when he, after due inquiry, was also liberated. Of the two men detained at Commercial-street, one was liberated soon after his arrest, but the other, named Frank Raper, was kept in custody. It appears that he was arrested late on Saturday night at a public-house known as "Dirty Dick's," near Liverpool-street. He was standing in the bar while under the influence of liquor, and made a number of extravagant statements about the murder of Mrs. Chapman and Mrs. Nicholls. The bystanders sent out and obtained a constable, and when the policeman entered he was openly boasting of being the murderer, and complimenting himself on the means he had adopted to destroy all trace of his identity. He was removed to the police station, followed by a large and excited crowd. On being charged, Raper said he had no settled address, and inquiries have satisfied the police that he is not the man wanted, so he was set free later in the day. There was a rumour early this morning that a man had been arrested in Southwark, but no intelligence of the fact was communicated to the city or Whitechapel police. The Dublin Evening Mail's London correspondent telegraphs today that among the persons arrested on suspicion of being concerned in the murder is a reporter who imagined that he might confront the murderer if he walked about at night dressed as a woman. He donned female attire and shaved. The experiment, however, failed, for his eccentric appearance caused his sex to be discovered, and he was arrested.

POLICE-CONSTABLE WATKINS' STORY.

The body of the victim of the Mitre-court murder is so dreadfully mutilated that it is feared she cannot be recognised, except by her clothes and the two pawntickets found lying by her, and the initials "D.C." or "T.C." in blue ink on her left forearm. It was in the south-east corner of the square, on the right of the entrance from Mitre-street, that the body was found by P.C. Watkins. He says: - I passed the spot at half-past one, and there was nothing in the corner then. I came round at a quarter to two, and, entering the square from Mitre-street on the right hand side, I turned sharp round to the right, and flashing my light I saw the body in front of me. Her clothes were pushed right up to her breast, and the stomach was laid bare with a dreadful gash up to the breast. The throat had an awful gash from ear to ear, the head being nearly severed from the body. It was difficult to ascertain the injuries to the face owing to the quantity of blood which covered it. I could not say whether one of the ears was cut off. The murderer had inserted the knife in the eye, and also cut the nose completely off, inflicting a frightful gash down the right cheek to the angle of the jawbone. I went and asked for the assistance of the watchman Morris at Hazetine, Kearney, and Tonge's, and he went for other officers while I sent for Dr. Sequeira, of 34, Old Jewry, and Dr. Brown, and the body was removed to the mortuary." The exact locality of the murder is indicated in the sketch given herewith, which is reproduced from the Star of this evening.

POPULAR INDIGNATION.

A meeting of the Whitechapel District Board of Works was held this evening, Mr. Robert Gladding presiding. Mr. Catmur said he thought that the board, as the local authority, should express their horror and abhorrence of the crimes which had been perpetrated in the district. The result of these tragedies had been loss of trade to the district, and the stoppage of certain trades by reason of the women being afraid to pass through the streets without an escort. The inefficiency of the police was shown by the fact that but an hour or two after the tragedies in Berner-street and Mitre-square took place, the post office in the vicinity had been broken into, and much property stolen. - The Rev. Daniel Greatorex said the emigrants' houses of call were feeling the panic to such an extent that emigrants refused to locate themselves in Whitechapel, even temporarily. He ascribed the inefficiency of the police to the frequent changes of the police from one district to another, whereby the men were kept ignorant of their beats. - Mr. Telfer said he hoped that these recent crimes might result in a reversion to the old system, by which constables were acquainted with every corner of their beats. - Mr. G.T. Brown suggested that the Government should be communicated with rather than the Home Secretary or the Chief Commissioner of Police, who were themselves really only on their trial. Mr. Caramelli said the change in the condition of Whitechapel in recent years would suggest an entire revision of the police arrangements. Whitechapel was now a place for the residuum of the whole country and the Continent, but it was not so a century ago. - After further discussion, the following resolution was carried on the motion of Mr. Catmur, seconded by Mr. Bonham: - "That this board regards with horror and alarm the several atrocious murders recently perpetrated within the district of Whitechapel and its vicinity, and calls upon Sir Charles Warren so to locate and strengthen the police force in the neighbourhood as to guard against any repetition of such atrocities, and that the Home Secretary be addressed in the same terms."

OPENING OF THE INQUEST.

The inquest on the body of Elizabeth Stride was opened at eleven o'clock this morning by Mr. Wynne Baxter, at the Vestry Hall, Cable-street, Commercial-road. The body, on being viewed by the jury, presented a dreadful sight, the head being almost severed from the body by one awful gash.
William West was the first witness examined. He said he lived at the International Working Men's Institute and Club, Berner-street, at the side of which is a passage leading to a yard. Two large wooden gates protected the entrance to the yard, and these were sometimes open at night. In the yard there are two or three small tenements. The club was a Socialist club, and persons of all nationalities were eligible for membership. Witness was at the club on Saturday night from half-past 10 or 11, when the members were discussing Socialism. The bulk of the members left the club by the front door before 12 o'clock. Witness's business address was 40, Berner-street, but he lived at 2, William-street, Commercial-road, whither he went at half-past 12. Before leaving he noticed that the gates were open, but there was nothing on the ground.
Morris Eagle, travelling jeweller and member of the club, said he was at the club on Saturday, and left about a quarter to 12. He returned about twenty minutes to one, and as the front door of the club was closed, he went in through the gateway and side door. He saw nothing in the yard, but about twenty minutes later another member announced the discovery of the body.
Louis Diemstritz, steward of the club, deposed that he returned to his home at the club at one o'clock, riding in a kind of barrow drawn by a pony. He drove through the open gates of the yard, when his pony shied at something on the ground. He felt it with his whip handle, and tried to move it, but failed, and jumping down at once he struck a light. He then saw it was a woman. He called his wife, and got a candle. When he saw blood he sent for the police, and just before they arrived a man whom he did not know took hold of deceased's head and showed the wound in the throat. All the people in the club were searched before they left, and their names and addresses taken.
In reply to the coroner, Inspector Reid said the body had not yet been identified.
The Foreman of the Jury: But we have been told her name is Stride. How is that?
The Coroner: Something is known of her; she has been partially identified.
Inspector Reid said he would be prepared with further evidence tomorrow, and the inquiry was accordingly adjourned.
Mr. Wynne Baxter on Tuesday resumed the inquiry on the body of Elizabeth Stride, who was found murdered in Berner-street, Whitechapel, on Sunday morning last. The proceedings did not commence until 2:25, all the jury not being present at two o'clock, the time fixed. The first witness called was P.C. Henry Lamb, 252 H, who said that about one o'clock on Sunday morning last he was on duty in Commercial-road, when two men came to him. They were shouting "Come on; there's been another murder." As they got to the corner of Berner-street they pointed down it. He ran down Berner-street, followed by another constable. He went into the gateway of 40, Berner-street and saw something lying on the right hand side close to the gate. He turned a light on it, and found it was a woman with her throat cut. He went the other constable for a doctor, and a man to the station for the inspector. There were about 30 people in the yard when he arrived. He put his hand on the face which was warm. The woman was lying on her left side with her right arm across her breast. The clothes were not disturbed. Some of the blood was liquid, and some congealed. Dr. Blackwell arrived a few minutes after, and examined the body. The gates were closed while the examination was going on, and no person was allowed to enter or go out. He examined the club premises and also the hands of the people present, but found no traces of blood. He then went into the yard and examined the cottages and closets. All the cottagers were in bed. He had passed Commercial-road end of Berner's-street about six minutes before he was called to the yard, but noticed nothing suspicious.
Edward Spooner, Fairclough-street, horsekeeper, said about 12:30 on Sunday morning he was standing outside the Beehive public-house, at the corner of Christian-street, when an alarm was given. He went into the yard at Berner-street. A man struck a light, and witness lifted up the woman's chin, which was quite warm. Blood was coming from the throat. He could not say if anyone left the yard. He thought it was about 12:35 when he arrived at the yard. Witness was searched, and gave his name and address before he left the place.

To be continued....................

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Mon 26 Aug 2013 - 22:30

Odd indeed, I am not able to finish transcribing this article as the Library of Wales newspaper website is down and I cannot access the server.

As I was doing some further research on the Ripper case and looking for information on various pipes from the 19th Century (a la Pipeman), I came across a website called "Touch of Wood," and found the following information:

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Touch of Wood
Tactile and Functional Designs in Wood

    Home
    Pieces For Sale »
    Portfolio »
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Briar pipes
February 13, 2013

Been making and repairing some briar pipes for “Brotherhood of the Briar” Bob Hinton from Kidwelly who is an expert on all things pipes and smoking them.  Picture of some below.

Take a look at Bobs website www.bobsbriars.com

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Interesting!! Here is Bob Hinton claiming to be an expert on ALL things!! LMAO No No No No No Basketball Basketball Basketball

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Wed 28 Aug 2013 - 13:22

Mary Malcolm, Eagle-street, stated that she had seen the body in the mortuary and recognised it as that of her sister, Elizabeth Watts. She was satisfied it was her sister. She last saw her alive on the previous Thursday. She came to witness to ask for assistance. Witness gave her a shilling and a jacket. She did not know where deceased lived, but thought it was somewhere in the East End. Deceased was given to drink. Her age was 38; her husband was alive and his father was a wine and spirit merchant at Bath. Deceased left her husband about eight years ago. She had two children - a boy and a girl. Her husband left her because he caught her with a porter and sent her home to her mother, who died five years ago. Witness believed the deceased had been charged with drunkenness, and let off on the ground of having epileptic fits. Deceased had lived with a man who kept a coffee house at Poplar. He went to sea, and was wrecked at the Isle of St. Paul about three years ago. Since then witness did not think deceased had lived with anyone. Witness never visited deceased, whose nickname was "Long Liz." Witness had never heard the name of Stride before. Deceased used to come to witness every Saturday for 2s. which she allowed her, but she did not come last Saturday. She used to meet witness at the corner of Chancery-lane. Witness did not recognise deceased at first, but did so afterwards. Witness had a presentiment that deceased had come to harm on Sunday morning. At 1:20 she was in bed; she woke up and heard a noise like a fall, and also a sound as of kisses. Her husband also heard a noise. She was much depressed, and when she read the paper on Sunday morning she went over to Whitechapel. On seeing the body in the mortuary, she did not at first recognise her by gaslight, but had done so since. One proof of deceased's identity was a mark on the leg caused by the bite of an adder when she was a child.
Dr. Blackwell, of Commercial-road, deposed that when he first saw the body the neck and chest were quite warm. The silk neck scarf was tightly drawn and the throat was cut about two inches below the angle of the jaw. The windpipe was completely severed. There was no blood on the clothing. The dress was undone at the top. The injuries were beyond the possibility of self-infliction. Witness had come to the conclusion that the silk scarf was pulled backwards, but he could not say whether the throat was cut while she was lying on the ground or while she was standing. It might have been done while she was in the act of falling.
The inquiry was at this point adjourned.

With reference to the evidence of the woman Malcolm, stating that the Berner-street victim was her sister, there is reason to believe that she has made a mistake. A Central News representative had an interview this evening with a man who has positively identified the murdered woman as a woman with whom he had cohabited for over three years. He is most positive in his assertion, while Mrs. Malcolm at first hesitated a good deal before declaring that the victim was her sister.
Mr. W.E. Baxter resumed his enquiry on Wednesday at the Vestry-hall, Cable-street, on the body of the Berner street victim, recognised up to the present as Elizabeth Watts. The interest in the proceedings has in no way abated, and on account of the discovery at Westminster last night, public feeling has become greatly excited. Large crowds of people have assembled outside the vestry-hall, and eagerly scan the police officials, doctors, reporters, and the coroner as they enter the building.
Elizabeth Tanner, living at 32, Flower and Dean-street, Whitechapel, said she recognised the deceased as "Long Liz." Did not know her nationality. Deceased told the witness that her husband and children were lost in the Princess Alice disaster. She last saw her alive on Saturday afternoon, in the Queen's Head public-house, Commercial-street. Did not see her again until that afternoon in the mortuary. Witness was quite certain as to the identity. The deceased left a male acquaintance on Thursday to live with witness. Never knew that deceased had a relative in Holborn, and never heard the name of Stride mentioned. Deceased who was a Swede, worked among the Jews.
Catherine Lane, living with the last witness, said she recognised the body as that of "Long Liz." Deceased told witness on Saturday she had had a quarrel with a man she left on Thursday. Witness had heard deceased speak to people in her own language.
Charles Preston, a barber, living at the same address, also identified the body as that of "Long Liz," and said he last saw her alive on Saturday. He understood she was born at Stockholm, and came to England in a foreign gentleman's service. Deceased also gave witness to understand that her name was Elizabeth Stride.
Michael Kidney, living at 38, Dorset-street, waterside labourer, said deceased was Elizabeth Stride. He had lived with her nearly three years. She was a Swede, and born three miles from Stockholm. Her husband was a ship carpenter at Sheerness, and once kept a coffee-house at Crisp-street, Poplar. He was drowned in the Princess Alice disaster. He did not see deceased on Thursday. He saw her last on Tuesday when they parted friendly. He never saw her again, and could not account for her disappearance. She had been away from witness five months. Since he had known her he never neglected her, but treated her as a wife. Witness further stated voluntarily that he asked at Leman-street station for the assistance of a young strange detective, as he had important information. He could not get that assistance.
The Coroner pressed the witness to divulge his information, but witness only reiterated that he had the information.
Replying to Inspector Reid he said if the police were under his own control he could catch the murderer redhanded. Witness admitted he was intoxicated when he applied at the police-station.
Edward Johnston, assistant to Drs. Kay and Blackwell, deposed to being called to see the body.
Thomas Coram, a lad of about 18, produced a knife which he found on the doorstep of No. 253, Whitechapel-road, 24 hours after the murder. [The knife produced was about 12 inches long, and the handle was neatly folded in a silk handkerchief, which had stains like blood upon it.]
Joseph Drage, H 282, said he saw the boy find the knife; the handle and blade were covered with blood, which had dried on. The knife was not on the step an hour previously.
Dr. Phillips next gave the result of the post-mortem examination. He said the cut in the throat severed the principal arteries. There was a deformity in the bones of the right leg, but no recent external injuries except to the throat. The cause of death was loss of blood and division of the windpipe. Several small arteries were found on the clothes of the deceased after examination. The inquiry was adjourned till Friday.

A SEQUEL TO THE "MURDERER'S LETTER."

The Central News says: A postcard, bearing the stamp "London, October 1," was received on Monday morning addressed to the Central News office, the address and subject matter being written in red and undoubtedly by the same person from whom the sensational letter already published was received on Thursday last. Like the previous missive, this also has reference to the horrible tragedies in East London, forming, indeed, a sequel to the first letter. It runs as follows: -

I was not codding, dear old boss, when I gave you the tip. You'll hear about Saucy Jacky's work tomorrow. Double event this time. Number one squealed a bit; couldn't finish straight off. Had not time to get ears for the police. Thanks for keeping last letter back till I got to work again. - JACK THE RIPPER.

The card is smeared on both sides with blood, which has evidently been impressed thereon by the thumb or finger of the writer, the corrugated surface of the skin being plainly shown upon the back of the card. Some words are nearly obliterated by a bloody smear. The idea that naturally occurs is that the whole thing is a practical joke. At the same time the writing of the previous letter immediately before the commission of the murders of yesterday was so singular a coincidence that it does not seem unreasonable to suppose that the cool, calculating villain who is responsible for the crimes has chosen to make the post a medium through which to convey to the press his grimly diabolical humour.

DISTINGUISHED PHYSICIANS INTERVIEWED.

A representative of the Central News has interviewed two eminent London physicians for the purpose of ascertaining whether they could throw any scientific light on the East End murders.

SIR JAMES RISDON BENNETT,

of Cavendish-square, West, in the course of a conversation with the reporter, said: - I cannot believe for a moment that any commission had been given out for the collection of uteruses. It would be extremely easy here, or in America either, for a physiologist to secure this portion of the intestines. All he would have to do would be to apply to the public hospitals, where there are always many paupers or unclaimed persons who are made the subjects of experiments and his demands would be easily met. The notion that the uteruses were wanted in order that they might be sent out along with copies of a medical publication is ridiculous - not only ridiculous, indeed, but absolutely impossible of realisation. My impression is that the miscreant is a homicidal maniac. He has a specific delusion, and that delusion is erotic. But it may be that he is a religious fanatic. It is possible that he is labouring under the delusion that he has a mandate from the Almighty to purge the world of prostitutes, and in the prosecution of his mad theory he has determined upon a crusade against the unfortunates of London, whom he seeks to mutilate by deprivation of the uterus. Even if it should transpire that in the case of the Mitre-square victim the uterus is missing, I should not be disposed to favour what I may call the American theory in the slightest degree, and I must confess that it was with considerable surprise that I noticed in certain newspapers a disposition to readily accept the theory, which the coroner, who investigated the circumstances attending the murder of the woman Chapman, first suggested. In my view, the extraordinary cunning which is evinced by the homicide is a convincing proof of his insanity. No sane man could have escaped in just the same fashion as this man seems to have done. He must almost necessarily have betrayed himself. It is a matter of common knowledge, however, amongst "mad doctors" that lunatics display a wonderful intelligence, if it may be called so, in their criminal operations; and I have little doubt that if the murderer were other than a madman, he would ere this have been captured by the police. Dr. Phillips has stated that the injuries inflicted upon these women have been apparently performed by a person possessing some anatomical knowledge. That is likely enough; but would not a butcher be quite capable of treating the body in this way?

STATEMENT BY DR. FORBES WINSLOW.

Dr. Forbes Winslow, the eminent specialist in lunacy cases, said to our representative: - I am more certain than ever that these murders are committed by a homicidal maniac, and there is no moral doubt in my mind that the assassin in each case is the same man. I have carefully read the reports in the morning papers, and they confirm me in the opinion which I had previously formed.

DR. GEORGE FOY, OF DUBLIN,

the well-known anatomist, says: - "The fact that the womb was removed from the body of each victim is taken to imply that the organ was the sole object of the murder, and that the crime was committed to obtain it. Every anatomist must know that a large percentage of the dead bodies brought to the anatomy rooms are those of the unfortunate class, and that human wombs are plentiful in the rooms, and from considerable experience as an anatomy lecturer I can say I never knew of any demand for them as pathological specimens that was not easily met. To excise the womb in its entirety does require some anatomical knowledge, but not more than any anatomy porter possesses. As for the present crime, we find it carried out with a reckless devilry worthy of a monomaniac, but not to be found associated with the cool villainy that characterises the criminal for pecuniary gain. The Whitechapel murderer silenced his victim by a method of choking, or pressing the lower jaw up against the upper one - the method of a bully, but not such as a skillful anatomist would adopt, who, of necessity, should know that a fine slit with a small knife would deprive the person of all power of sound. The victims' throats were cut, allowing the large vessels of the neck to pour out blood to the risk of besmearing the criminal, a danger which he need not have incurred had he known, as an anatomist would have known, how to destroy life; but is not the fact important in pointing out the ruthless determination and blind rage of the deep-dyed ruffian who has thus dared to carry on his crimes with an apparent contempt for all law, human and divine?"

To be continued...................

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Tue 3 Sep 2013 - 15:39

In the following portion of the lengthy article that I have been transcribing, there is mention of a letter sent from Liverpool with the initials "K.T." - I was thinking that K.T. could be an anagram for Knights Templar.

BOTH VICTIMS IDENTIFIED.
Extraordinary Statements.

Mr. Matthews was engaged for several hours on Wednesday at the Home Office with reference to the murders at the East End, and had prolonged interviews with Sir Charles Warren and others on the subject, during which the course of action already taken by the police was fully considered, as well as the steps to be taken in the future, with a view to the discovery of the criminals. Mr. Matthews is understood to have directed that no power in the hands of the police should be left untried, and that no clue, however apparently unpromising, should be neglected. The understanding between the metropolitan and city police is most cordial. It was conclusively established by Wednesday's evidence at the inquiry on the Berner-street victim, that the woman murdered is Elizabeth Stride, and that Mrs. Malcolm was mistaken in stating that the deceased was her sister. The clue afforded by the discovery of the blood-stained knife on a doorstep will be followed up, although it seems certain that the knife was not in the place an hour before it was picked up, and the object of the person who put it there is unknown. Michael Kidney will probably be examined again respecting his pretended special information in connection with the Mitre-square murder. The principal incident has been the positive identification of the woman by John Kelly, with whom she had cohabited for seven years. This man says he first met the deceased in Flower and Dean-street. Her married name was Conway, and she had the initials "T.C." tattooed on her arm. She went out on Saturday night with the intention of seeing a married daughter in Bermondsey, and, as she did not return, he thought she was staying the night there. Kelly is assisting the police in finding the relatives of the deceased. Kelly is a man who does odd jobs in Spitalfields Market, and he states that last week they were both unable to earn any money. On Saturday morning the deceased pawned Kelly's boots and with the proceeds bought breakfast for him. That was their last meal together. A Bath correspondent says that from further inquiries made there it appears that the conflicting evidence in the Berner-street case could be decided if witnesses were called from Bath. The woman Watts could be identified by several Bath persons and also by members of the police force, as she had been charged by the Bath police with drunkenness, and was well-known to some members of the force. A house to house visitation was commenced on Wednesday in Whitechapel by police and detectives, who left a handbill worded as follows: -

POLICE NOTICE TO THE OCCUPIER.

On the mornings of Friday, August 31st, Saturday 8th, and Sunday, 13th September, 1888, women were murdered in Whitechapel, it is supposed by someone residing in the immediate neighbourhood. Should you know of any person to whom suspicion is attached, you are earnestly requested to communicate at once with the nearest police-station,

METROPOLITAN POLICE-OFFICE,
30th September, 1888.

No mention of a reward is made.
An American, who refuses to give his name or any account of himself, was arrested tonight on suspicion of being the Whitechapel murderer. He accosted a woman in Cable-street, asked her to go with him, and threatened that if she refused he would "rip her up." The woman screamed, and the man rushed to a cab. The police gave chase, got upon the cab, seized the man, and took him to Leman-street, where he exclaimed to the inspector, "Are you the boss?" He is detained there, as well as two others arrested tonight.
There is a general belief among local detectives that the murderer or murderers are lurking in some of the dangerous dens and low slums which abound in close proximity to the scene of the murders. Houses supposed to be bolted for the night have been found to possess secret entrances. The house in which Annie Chapman was found is said to have this secret means of entrance. The police are stated to be contemplating a series of raids on dens known to contain most dangerous and desperate characters.
A Liverpool correspondent states that the letter dated from Pitt-street in that town, and signed "K.T.," forwarded to Mr. Richardson, 29, Hanbury-street, where Annie Chapman was found murdered, is a hoax. The premises in Pitt street, Liverpool, are occupied by a very respectable smallware dealer, who is a widow with four children. She has never had a lodger answering to the initials "K.T.," and is very much distressed. She cannot account for her address being chosen, except that some malicious or foolish person has pitched at random upon her house.

AN EXCITING SCENE.

About six o'clock on Wednesday evening a man, whose name was subsequently ascertained to be John Lock, a seaman, was rescued by the police from an excited crowd in the neighbourhood of Ratcliffe-highway, who were following him, and shouting "Leather Apron" and "Jack the Ripper." The cause was not readily explained. When, however, he was examined at the police station, his light tweed suit was seen to bear stains, which were found to be paint, but which the crowd had mistaken for blood. His explanation was perfectly satisfactory, but it was some considerable time before the crowd dispersed and the man was able to depart.

To be continued..............................

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Wed 4 Sep 2013 - 10:28

LETTER FROM SIR C. WARREN.

Sir Charles Warren, replying to a letter from the Whitechapel District Board of Works complaining of the inefficiency of the police, writes that the police force cannot possibly do more than guard or take precautions against any repetition of the recent atrocities so long as the victims actually, but unwittingly, connive at their own destruction. In this particular class of murders the unfortunate victims appear to take the murderer to some retired spot, and place themselves in such a position that they can be slaughtered without sound being heard. Sir Charles requests the board to do all in their power to dissuade the unfortunate women about Whitechapel from going into lonely places in the dark with any persons, whether acquaintances or strangers. He assures the board that every nerve is being strained to detect the criminal, and to render more difficult further atrocities, and he emphatically denies that any changes affecting the efficiency of the police have been made.

NEW THEORIES OF THE CRIME.

Mr. Forbes has written a letter to the Daily News upon the motive of the Whitechapel murders, in which, after dismissing many other theories, he leans to the opinion that the murders are the work of a medical student who has suffered from women of the class from which the victims are taken, and who, insane from anguish of body and distress of mind, is punishing that class for the wrong he has received from an individual. There is also a story floating about the East-end which is thought by many to contain a possible explanation of the murders. A year or so since a colonist came and settled near Wentworth-street. He had some money, and as soon as the rumour of this got abroad he was seized upon one night by loose women, rifled of all he had on him, and stripped naked in the streets. This so angered him that he went away swearing dire vengeance on his assailants. Now, the supposition that this man is the murderer is not at all probable; but the story, about which there seems no doubt, is none the less a grim comment upon the kind of order that prevails in the streets at the back of Commercial-road. Where were the police when this unhappy stranger was robbed and stripped?

THE REIGN OF TERROR IN THE EAST END.

From Commercial-road to Aldgate a marked difference is observable in the state of the streets, especially from eleven o'clock in the evening until one in the morning, clearly evidencing that the minds of the people are thoroughly alarmed. Not only are tradesmen complaining that their business is suffering through the reluctance of residents to leave their houses after dark, but there exists, in addition, a widespread fear of further outrage. The central streets still maintain their busy appearance but the dark thoroughfares and alleys on either side are deserted at an early hour. Among the class to whom the victims belonged the misery of intense fear is augmented by hunger and want of shelter. In the darkness and cold of last night there could be seen at street corners, or trying to screen themselves in doorways from the wind, groups of these ill-clad and fallen creatures, looking very miserable and forlorn, and afraid to venture away from the most frequented thoroughfares, where only they felt safe. Many of them lingered as long as they could - until moved on by a constable - about the railing around a church or a chapel, as if in the belief that within the shadow of a temple of worship there was some protection even for them. The spectacle was a very sad one.

AN EXTRAORDINARY CONFESSION.

At the Guildhall, London, on Wednesday, Wm. Bull, describing himself as a medical student at a London Hospital, and living at Stannard-road, Dalston, was charged, on his own confession, with having committed murder at Mitre-square. Inspector Izzard said that at twenty minutes to eleven last night the accused came to his room at Bishopsgate-street police-station, and made the following statement: - My name is William Bull, and I live at Dalston. I am a medical student at a London hospital, and wish to give myself up for the murder in Aldgate. On Saturday night or Sunday morning, about 2 o'clock I think, I met the woman in Aldgate. I went with her up a narrow street not far from the main road, for an immoral purpose. I promised to give her half a crown, which I did. While walking along together there was a second man, who came up and took the half-crown from her. I cannot endure this any longer; my poor head (here he put his hand to his head and cried, or pretended to cry), I shall go mad; I have done it, and I must put up with it." The inspector asked what had become of the clothing he had on when the murder was committed. The accused said, "If you wish to know, they are in the Lea, and the knife I threw away. At this point the prisoner declined to say any more. He was drunk. Part of the statement was made in the presence of Major Smith. The prisoner gave his correct address, but is not known at the London hospital. His parents were respectable. The inspector asked for a remand to make inquiries, and this was granted. Prisoner now said he was drunk when he made the statement. He was remanded.

ANOTHER FRIGHTFUL MURDER IN LONDON.

A pensioner named Brown, employed as a labourer in St. James's Park, residing in Regent Gardens, Westminster, murdered his wife about midnight on Saturday, nearly cutting off her head with a knife. The woman had that day applied at Westminster police-court for protection, the parties having been living unhappily for some time. The woman is stated to have been enceinte, Brown's mind is believed to have been affected for some time recently, and he is said to have thought his wife was unfaithful. Deceased was a laundress. Shortly before the murder the pair were heard by the neighbours quarrelling. Suddenly the sound ceased. A minute or two afterwards Brown went out, and, proceeding to the nearest police-station, informed the police of what he had done. On the police proceeding to the house the woman was found dead, with her throat horribly gashed. Her two little children were crying in the passage, and were taken care of by neighbours.
John Brown, 45, was charged at Westminster police-court, on Monday, with the wilful murder of his wife, at Regent-gardens, Westminster. It appears that the prisoner returned home on Saturday night, quarrelled with his wife, and cut her throat with a knife, almost severing her head from her body. He then gave himself up to the police. It was stated that the woman had previously sought police protection, the prisoner having been strange in his behaviour. Prisoner made no remark, and was remanded.

ARREST OF THE BIRTLEY FELL MURDERER.

A Kelso correspondent telegraphs: - The man Waddell, suspected of being the murderer of the young woman Beetmore, at Birtley, near Gateshead, was arrested on Monday at the village of Yetholm, about seven miles from Kelso. During the past week he had been seen in the locality, and his movements excited some suspicion. He pretended to be in search of work, but when anyone offered him work he generally disappeared. It is believed he had been wandering from place to place within a limited distance of the borders of Northumberland, and considerable excitement has prevailed all along the borders of Northumberland and Roxburghshire owing to the frequent rumours current that Waddell was in the neighbourhood. The police were all on the alert, but though the man wanted was reported as having been seen first at one place and then at another, he managed to keep out of their hands. A man answering the description of Waddell was supplied with food at various places, but sometimes he decamped before his wants could be supplied. The suspected murderer called at a second-hand clothes shop at Berwick, and made a bargain with the woman in charge for exchanging his clothes for an old suit and five shillings. The police have obtained the original suit, and there are suspicious stains on the waistcoat. It is believed that he has made a complete confession of the crime. The arrest was made by Mr. William Stenhouse, a wool-dealer, of Yetholm, who encountered the man on a lonely road on the hills. On being questioned, he admitted that his name was Waddell, and that he came from Birtley, and he stated that the woman Savage was his wife. Mr. Stenhouse conveyed him directly, and without resistance, to the police-station.

Prisoner Before the Magistrates.

The prisoner Waddell, who is charged with the murder at Birtley which created so great a sensation a week ago on account of its similarity to the Whitechapel murders, arrived in Gateshead at ten o'clock on Tuesday morning. Throughout the night crowds had collected at the railway stations and other places to catch a glimpse of the man, but very few succeeded, as the police got him out at the Manors, a suburban station, and conveyed him by cab to Gateshead. Shortly before twelve he was brought before the magistrates, and Superintendent Harrison gave notice of his arrest, adding to this that when charged with wilful murder the prisoner merely answered "Yes." As he appeared in court he was really a pitiable object. Of intelligence or spirit his features hardly revealed
a spark. The magistrates remanded him for eight days, and ordered that he should be next brought up at Chester-le-street.

THE ASTON MURDER.
"Doing a Whitechapel Job."

At Aston, near Birmingham, on Tuesday, George Nicholson (53), baker, was charged with the wilful murder of his wife, Mary Ann Nicholson. Late on a recent Saturday evening the pair were left together by two younger members of the family. The husband became incensed against the wife for no apparent cause, and when the son of the deceased returned shortly after, he found that his mother's brains had been battered out with a hatchet, and the prisoner had disappeared. The prisoner, who has frequently threatened to "do a Whitechapel job," pawned a watch and chain which had been removed from the body of the deceased, and made off, but he was captured in a neighbouring town. He was committed for trial.

Source: Cardiff Times, 6 October 1888, Page 6

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Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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Karen
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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

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