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Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

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Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Mon 27 Sep 2010 - 3:13

THE EAST-END MURDERS.

MITRE SQUARE VERDICT.

Mr. S.F. Langham resumed the inquiry on Thursday at the Golden-lane mortuary, Barbican, respecting the death of Catherine Eddowes, alias Kelly, alias Conway, who was discovered murdered in Mitre Square, Aldgate, on Sunday morning, the 30th ult.
Mr. George William Sequeira, surgeon, of 34, Jewry-street, Aldgate, deposed: I was called on the morning of Sunday, the 30th of September, to Mitre Square. I was the first medical man to arrive. I was there at five minutes to two o'clock, and saw the position of the body.
And you agree with the evidence given by Dr. Brown as to that position? - Yes. I agree with Dr. Brown's evidence, which I heard on the last occasion.
From what you saw have you formed an opinion that the perpetrator of the deed had any particular design upon any portion of the body? - I formed an opinion that the perpetrator had no particular design upon any particular organ.
Judging from the injuries inflicted, do you think he was possessed of great anatomical skill? - (Emphatically) No, I do not.
Can you account in any way for the absence of noise? - The woman's death must have been so instantaneous after the severance of the windpipe.
Would you expect to find the clothes of the murderer bespattered with blood? - Not necessarily.
For how long did you think life had been extinct? - When I arrived, not more than a few minutes; probably not more than a quarter of an hour, from the condition of the blood.
Dr. W.S. Saunders, medical officer for the City of London, stated: I live at 13, Queen-street, Cheapside. I am public analyst for the City of London. I received the contents of the deceased's stomach from Dr. Gordon Brown. I carefully examined the stomach and its contents, more particularly for poisons of a narcotic class, with negative results. There was not the faintest trace of any of these or any other poison.
By Mr. Crawford: I was present at the post-mortem, and saw the wounds which had been inflicted.
Do you agree with Dr. Brown and Dr. Sequeira that the wounds were inflicted by a person not possessing great anatomical skill? - I do.
And do you equally agree that the perpetrator of the deed had no particular desire upon any organ? - I do - (pausing) - internal organ.
Annie Phillips, daughter of the deceased, said: I live at 14, Dilston-grove, Southwark-park-road. My husband, Lewis Phillips, is a lamp blacker. I am 23. My father's name was Thomas Conway. I have not seen him lately - not for the last 15 or 18 months. He was living for some time with me and my husband, at 15, Acre-street, Southwark-park-road. He was a hawker. I do not know what became of him. He left us suddenly without assigning any reason for it. He was a sober man - a teetotaller. They lived only on bad terms when she used to drink. I have not the least idea where he is living now.
Was it entirely on the ground of your mother's drunken habits that he ceased to live with her? - Yes.
When was the last time you saw her? - Two years and a month ago.
Did you see anything of her on Saturday, the day previous to her death? - No. I lived at King-street, Bermondsey, before, and when I left that I did not leave my address.
Were there any other family with your mother by Conway? - Yes; two brothers. My mother did not know where to find either of them.
They purposely kept from her? - Yes, for the purpose of preventing her from applying for money.
Detective-serjeant John Mitchell said: I have made every effort to find the father and also the brothers of the last witness, but without success.
Detective-constable Baxter Hunt said he had discovered a pensioner named Conway, belonging to the 18th Royal Irish, but he was not the one wanted.

THE DECEASED LOCKED UP ON THE FATAL NIGHT.

Constable Lewis Robinson said: About half-past eight on the evening of the 29th I was on duty in High-street, Aldgate. I saw there the woman since recognised as the deceased. She was drunk, lying on the footway. I turned round to the crowd, and asked if there was anyone who knew the deceased, but I got no answer. I then picked her up, and carried her to the side by the shutters. I raised her up against the shutters, and she fell down again. I did not do any more until I got assistance. Another policeman came, and she was taken to the station. When asked for her name, she replied, "Nothing." She was then put into the cell. No one appeared to be in her company when she was first found.
Serjeant James Byfield: I remember the deceased being brought to the police-station on the 29th of last month. She was very drunk. She was taken to the cell, and stayed there until one o'clock in the morning, when I discharged her, after she had given her name and address. She gave the name of Mary Ann Kelly, of 6, Fashion-street, Spitalfields.
Constable George Hutt, gaoler at the Bishopsgate police-station, said: On the 29th of last month, at a quarter to 10 o'clock at night, I took over prisoners, and among them the deceased woman. I visited her several times until five minutes to one on the following morning - Sunday - when she was brought from the cell and discharged as sober. When leaving, I asked her to pull the door to, and she replied, "All right, old cock." She pulled the door to, and then turned to the left, towards Houndsditch.
George J. Morris, watchman at the premises of Messrs. Kearley and Tonge, tea-warehousemen, Mitre-square, said: I went on duty at the premises at seven o'clock in the evening. I cleaned the offices and then looked about the warehouse. About a quarter to two o'clock Police-constable Watkins, who was on the Mitre-square beat, knocked at my door and said, "Come to my assistance." I asked him what was the matter, and he said, "Oh dear, there's another woman cut up." He showed me the body lying in the corner. I had my lamp and threw the light upon it. I agree with what has been said by previous witnesses as to the position of the body. I went up Mitre-street into Aldgate blowing my whistle, and got police assistance. I saw no suspicious person about. Two police-constables came. I followed with the constables, and took charge of my own premises again.
The Coroner: Had you heard any noise in the square before you were called by Constable Watkins? - No, sir.
The Coroner: If there had been any cry of distress would you have heard it where you were? - Yes.
Constable James Harvey was next examined. He deposed: On the night of the 29th ult. I went on duty at a quarter to 10, but I did not notice any suspicious person in the course of my beat. When I got into Aldgate I heard a whistle and saw the witness Morris with a lamp in his hand. I immediately went to him and asked what was the matter. He replied, "A woman has been ripped up in Mitre-square." I saw a constable on the other side of the street, and I said "Come with me." We went together to Mitre-square, where we saw Police-constable Watkins. The constable (Holland) who followed me went for a medical man, and private individuals were despatched for more police assistance.
George Clapp deposed: I live at 5, Mitre-street, Aldgate, and I am caretaker of these premises. The back part of the house, No. 5, looks out upon Mitre-square. On the night of the 29th ult. I went to bed at about 11. I slept in a back room on the second floor.
The Coroner: During the night did you hear any noise or disturbance? - No, sir.
Constable Pearce deposed: I live at 3, Mitre-square. On Sunday morning, Sept. 30, I heard no noise whatever. I went to bed at 12 o'clock. It was 20 minutes past two when I first heard of the murder. I was called by a constable. I could see the body plainly from the front windows of my house.

THE MAN LAST SEEN WITH EDDOWES.

Joseph Lawende deposed: I live at 45, Norfolk-road, Dalston, and am a commercial traveller. On the night of the 29 September I was at the Imperial club, in the company of Mr. Joseph Levy and Mr. Harry Harris. It was raining, and we could not leave the premises. We were sitting in the club chatting. As we approached the club we noticed a man and woman together in Church-passage. The woman was standing with her face towards the man, so that I only saw her back. I noticed that her hand was on his chest. I could not see the woman's face, but the man was taller than she was. The woman wore a black jacket and a black bonnet.
Mr. Crawford said it might save time if the witness was shown the articles which the deceased wore. - Witness replied that he had already seen them at the police-station, and as far as his belief went he thought they were the same clothes which the deceased wore on the night in question.
Examination continued: I cannot tell you the height of the woman; but she was about 5ft high.
The Coroner: Now, can you tell us what the man was like? - He had on a peaked cloth cap, the peak of the same material apparently as the cap.
Mr. Crawford said that, unless the jury wished it, he had a reason why further evidence should not be given on this point at present.
The coroner and the jury assented to the suggestion.
Would you remember the man again? - I doubt that.
Mr. Joseph Hyan Levy, butcher, of 1, Hutcheson-street, Aldgate, deposed: I was at the Imperial club on the night in question with the last witness. We left about three or four minutes past the half-hour (half-past one). I saw a man and woman standing at the corner of Church-passage, but I passed on, and did not take any further notice of them. I walked along as fast as I could. I cannot give any description of either the man or the woman, but all I can say is that the man was about three inches taller than the woman. Being a little deaf, I could not possibly have heard anything that was said.

THE WRITING ON THE WALL.

Constable Alfred Lock, of the Metropolitan police, said: I was in 15, Goulston-street, Whitechapel, on the 30th of last month, about 2:55 a.m., and found a portion of a woman's apron (produced). It had recent stains of blood on it, one corner being wet. It was lying in the passage leading to the staircase of 108 to 119 building - a model lodging-house. Above it on the wall was written in chalk, "The Jews are the men that will not be blamed for nothing." I at once searched the staircase, but found nothing else. I at once took the piece of apron to the Commercial-road police-station, and reported to the inspector on duty.
Mr. Crawford: Was not what was written above the apron, "The Jews are not the men that will be blamed for nothing?" - The words were as I have stated.
Is it not possible you put the "not" in the wrong place? - I believe the words were as I have stated.
Was the word spelt, not "Jews," but "Juwes?" - It may have been.
Did you make any inquiries in the dwelling-house itself? - No.
Daniel Halse, detective-officer, City police, stated: On Saturday, the 29th of last month, on instructions received from the Detective office, Old Jewry, I directed a number of officers to patrol the City all night. At about two minutes to two I was going round about Aldgate church, in company with Detectives Outram and Marriott. I heard a woman had been murdered in Mitre-square. We all three ran there. I had the light of Watkins turned on to the body, and saw that it was a murder. I immediately gave instructions to have the neighbourhood searched, and every man stopped and examined. I went by the way of Middlesex-street to the East-end of the City into Wentworth-street. There we stopped two men, whom, on giving a satisfactory account of themselves, we allowed to depart. I came through Goulston-street, where the apron was found, about 20 minutes past two. I then went to the mortuary, saw the deceased stripped, and noticed that a portion of the apron was missing. I accompanied Major Smith back to Mitre-square, and found that a portion of the apron had been found. Directions were given for photographing the writing on the wall, but before it could be done the Metropolitan police, thinking as it was Sunday morning, the words might cause a riot if seen by the Jews, or an outbreak against the Jews, had the writing washed out.
By Mr. Crawford: Before the writing on the wall was rubbed out I took a note of it. The exact words I wrote down are, "The Juwes are not the men that will be blamed for nothing." The writing had the appearance of having been written recently. It was in white chalk on black facia.
By the Jury: The writing was rubbed out at the suggestion of the Metropolitan police, in case it should cause a riot.
By Mr. Crawford: I protested against its being rubbed out.
Mr. Crawford said that, excepting a few questions he had to put to the witness Long, who had gone away for his book, that was the whole of the evidence he proposed to call; but if there was any point which they would like cleared up he should be happy to render what assistance he could.

A JUROR'S COMPLAINT.

A Juror: It seems surprising that a policeman should have found a piece of the apron in a passage leading into a building, and that no further inquiry should have been made in the building itself. You get a clue up to that point, and then it is lost entirely.
Mr. Crawford: Long will be back; you can ask him. I may say with regard to a remark which fell from a juror with reference to the finding of the apron, that I have several members of the City police here who made a careful search in every part of the tenement the moment the matter came to the knowledge of them.
The Juror: I think that is sufficient.
Mr. Crawford: Unfortunately, it did not come to their knowledge for two hours afterwards. I am afraid that will not answer the objection raised.
The Juror: I think it will.
Mr. Crawford: No, unfortunately there is a delay. The man who found this piece of apron is a member of the Metropolitan Police force, and he found it, I think he told us, at about twenty minutes to three.
The Juror: It is the man who found the piece of apron of whom I am complaining.
Mr. Crawford: He has gone to fetch his notebook, but he will be here directly.
Police-constable Long, recalled, produced the book in which he made his entry of the writing on the wall, from which it appeared the words of the entry were - "The Jews are the men that will not be blamed for nothing." In answer to Mr. Crawford, he said the inspector who took down the words had made the remark that the word Jews was spelt Juews - not Juwes. That was the only mistake the inspector put out.
What did you do when you found the piece of apron? - I at once searched the staircase leading to the building. I searched every one of the six or seven staircases, and found no trace whatever of blood or recent footmarks.
What o'clock was that? - About three.
What did you do next? - I at once proceeded to the station. I had heard before proceeding to the station that a murder had been committed in Mitre-square. When I left to go to the police-station I left another man, a member of the Metropolitan Police force, on the beat, and I told him to keep an observation on the building to see if anyone left or entered. I next returned to the building about five o'clock. The writing on the wall had not then been rubbed out. It was rubbed out in my presence at half-past five.
Did you hear anyone object to its being rubbed out? - No, I did not.
A juror repeated what he had already said as to his surprise that the clue furnished by the finding of the apron in the passage of the building in Goulston-street was not followed up by a search of the building itself. The evidence of Police-constable Long and that of all the constables that had been given, certainly redounded to their credit (hear, hear, from the jury); but it did seem strange that the clue was not followed up by searching the rest of the building, and not confining the search merely to the staircases. He asked the witness whether it did not occur to him that that should have been done.
Constable Long: I thought that the best thing I could do after searching the stairs, and instructing other constables to watch the building, was to proceed as soon as possible to the police-station to make my report. The inspector was better able to deal with the matter than I was.
This being all the evidence that was forthcoming. The coroner briefly summed up, noticing some of the leading features of the case, and commenting on the fiendish character of the murder. The murderer, not satisfied with taking the woman's life, had endeavoured so to mutilate the body as if possible to render it unrecognisable. After the evidence which had been taken, he presumed all that the jury could do now was to find a verdict of wilful murder against some person or persons unknown, and allow the police to pursue their inquiries and follow up any clue they might have obtained.
The jury accordingly returned a verdict of "Wilful murder against some person unknown."
The Coroner: On behalf of myself and the jury, I wish to thank you, Mr. Crawford, and the police for the able assistance you have rendered in this inquiry.
Mr. Crawford: The police have simply done their duty, sir. - The Coroner: I am quite sure of that.

THE WRITING ON THE WALL.

At the resumed inquest, on Thursday, on the body of the Mitre-square victim, Detective Halse, of the City police, stated, in reference to the writing on the wall in Goulston-street, that instructions were originally given for the inscription to be photographed, but at the instance of a member of the Metropolitan police, who feared a riot, the words were rubbed out, notwithstanding witness's protest. A contemporary states that the order for the removal of the writing was given personally by Sir Charles Warren, who visited the spot shortly after the discovery was made. A reporter who visited Whitehall-place to ascertain the truth of the story was told by Sir Charles Warren's private secretary that Sir Charles preferred to say nothing about the allegation.

FUNERAL OF CATHERINE EDDOWES.

The remains of Catherine Eddowes, the victim of the Mitre-square tragedy, were interred on Monday afternoon at Ilford cemetery, a vast crowd following in procession. The funeral cortege consisted of a hearse, a mourning coach, containing relatives and friends of the deceased, and a brougham conveying representatives of the Press. The coffin was of polished elm, with oak mouldings, and bore a plate with the inscription, in gold letters, "Catherine Eddowes, died Sept, 30, 1888, aged 43 years." One of the sisters of the deceased laid a beautiful wreath on the coffin as it was placed in the hearse, and at the graveside a wreath of marguerites was added by a sympathetic kinswoman. The mourners were the four sisters of the murdered woman, Harriet Jones, Emma Eddowes, Eliza Gold, and Elizabeth Fisher; her two nieces, Emma and Harriet Jones, and John Kelly, the man with whom she had lived. The procession left the mortuary in Golden-lane at half-past one, passing through Old-street, Great Eastern-street, Commercial-street, Whitechapel-road, Mile End-road, and Stratford to the City cemetery at Ilford. In the cemetery men and women of all ages, many of the latter carrying infants in their arms, gathered round the grave. The remains were interred in the Church of England portion of the cemetery, the service being conducted by the chaplain, the Rev. Mr. Dunscombe. Mr. G.C. Hawkes, a vestryman of St. Luke's, undertook the responsibility of carrying out the funeral at his own expense, and the City authorities, to whom the burial ground belongs, remitted the usual fees.

EXPERIMENTS WITH BLOODHOUNDS.

Sir Charles Warren witnessed a private trial of bloodhounds on Tuesday morning. The hounds are the property of Mr. Edwin Brough, of Wynyate, near Scarborough, who for years past has devoted himself to bloodhound breeding. Mr. Brough tried two magnificent animals named Barnaby and Burgho in Regent's Park at seven o'clock on Monday morning. The ground was thickly coated with hoar frost; but they did their work well, successfully tracking for nearly a mile a young man, who was given about 15 minutes' start. They were tried again in Hyde-park on Monday night. It was, of course, dark, and the dogs were hunted on a leash, as would be the case if they were employed in Whitechapel. They were again successful in performing their allotted task, and at seven o'clock on Tuesday morning a trial took place before Sir Charles Warren. To all appearances the morning was a much better one for scenting purposes than was Monday, but the contrary proved to be the fact. In all half-a-dozen runs were made, Sir Charles Warren in two instances acting as the hunted man. In every instance the dogs hunted persons who were perfect strangers to them, and occasionally the trail would be crossed. When this happened the hounds were temporarily checked, but either one or the other would pick up the trail again. In one of the longest courses the hounds were checked at half the distance. Burgho ran back, but Barnaby making a fresh cast forward recovered the trail and ran the quarry home. The hound did this entirely unaided by his master, who thought that he was on the wrong track, but left him to his own devices. The Chief commissioner seemed pleased with the result of the trials, though he did not express any definite opinion on the subject to those present.

THE HOME SECRETARY'S REPLIES.

Sir Alfred Kirby, colonel of the Tower Hamlets Fusiliers, recently made an offer to provide 30 or 50 men belonging to that regiment for service in connection with tracking the perpetrator of the Whitechapel and Aldgate tragedies. The Home Secretary has just written to Sir Alfred, saying that having consulted Sir Charles Warren he had come to the conclusion that it would not be advisable to put the men on for service.

The following letter has been received by Mr. Metcalfe, the vestry clerk of Whitechapel, from the Home office, in reply to a resolution of the vestry asking Mr. Matthews to give every possible facility for the speedy arrest of the murderer: -

"Whitehall, Oct. 10. - Sir. - I am directed by the Secretary of State to acknowledge your letter of the 4th inst., forwarding a copy of a resolution passed at a vestry meeting of the parish of St. Mary, Whitechapel, expressing sorrow at the recent murders in the East-end of London, and urging her Majesty's Government to use their utmost endeavours to discover the criminal. I am instructed to state that Mr. Matthews shares the feeling of the vestry with regard to these murders, and that he has given directions, and that the police have instructions, to exercise any and every power they possess, and even to use an amount of discretion with regard to suspected persons, in their efforts to discover the criminal. And I am further to state that the Secretary of State, after personal conference with the Commissioners of Police, at which the whole of the difficulties have been fully discussed, is satisfied that no means has been or will be spared in tracing the offender, and bringing him to justice. - I am, sir, your obediently, E. LEIGH PEMBERTON."

SIR CHARLES WARREN'S DEFENCE.

Sir Charles Warren has sent the following for publication: -

Several incorrect statements have recently been published relative to the enrolment of candidates for detective - that is to say, criminal investigation - work in the Metropolitan police which may tend to deter candidates from applying. The following is the actual state of the case: -
For some years past the standard height in the Metropolitan police has been 5ft. 81/2in., and in the beginning of 1887 it was raised to 5ft. 9in., but the commissioner has power from the Secretary of State to accept candidates as short as 5ft. 7in., and if the Criminal Investigation branch should require any particular man under 5ft. 7in. the commissioner has at all times been prepared to obtain the Secretary of State's sanction to his enrolment.
The limit of age is 35, but as a rule candidates are not taken over the age of 27, in order that the police service may not lose the better part of a man's life, and also to enable him to put in sufficient service to entitle him to his full pension.
There is no rule, and never has been any rule made by the commissioner, that candidates on joining must serve for two or three years as constables in divisions before being appointed to the Criminal Investigation branch.
The commissioner has always been prepared to consider favourably any proposal from the Criminal Investigation branch for a candidate to join the commissioner's office immediately on enrolment, or at any time after his enrolment, for duty in the Criminal Investigation branch.
But should a case occur that a candidate who wished to join the Criminal Investigation branch at once, and was reported favourably upon, was not physically or otherwise fit for ordinary police duties, it would be necessary, in the interests of the public, that on his enrolment a stipulation should be made that if he should subsequently be found unfit for criminal investigation work he would have to leave the police service without any compensation should his services not entitle him to a pension or gratuity.
As a general rule it has been ascertained by the Criminal Investigation branch that the candidates who have applied to be appointed direct to detective duties have not possessed any special qualifications which would justify their being so appointed.

A GERMAN SUPERSTITION.

A Vienna correspondent calls attention, in connection with the Whitechapel murders, to a strange superstition among German thieves, which survives in some quarters even to the present day. In various German criminal codes of the 17th and 18th centuries, as also in statutes of a more recent date, punishments are prescribed for the mutilation of female corpses, with the object of making from the uterus and other organs the so-called Diebslichter or Schlafslichter, respectively "thieves' candles" or "soporific candles." According to a still rife German superstition the light from such candles will throw those upon whom it falls into the deepest slumbers, and they may, consequently, become a valuable instrument to the thieving profession. Hence their name. At one time there was a regular manufactory of such candles. That this superstition has survived amongst German thieves to the present day was proved by a case tried at Biala, in Galicia, as recently as 1875. In this the body of a woman had been found mutilated in precisely the same way as were the victims of the Whitechapel murderer.

THE JEWS IN LONDON.

The contradiction to the astounding story told by the Vienna correspondent of the Times last week of a superstition that if a Jew be intimate with a Christian woman he can atone for his offence by her mutilation, is most emphatic. Mr. Hermann Adler, writing from the office of the Chief Rabbi, 16, Finsbury-square, exclaims: "Woe unto the ears that hear this; woe unto the eyes that see this!" I can assert, without hesitation, that in no Jewish book is such a barbarity even hinted at. Nor is there any record in the criminal annals of any country of a Jew having been convicted of such a terrible atrocity."

AN ARREST AT BELFAST.

John Foster was charged at Belfast, on Friday, on suspicion, with being concerned in the Whitechapel murders. - Constable Carland deposed: From information I received I proceeded to 11, Memel-street. The prisoner was not there when I went first. I went back about half an hour afterwards, when I found the prisoner in, and I went upstairs to the room occupied by the prisoner, and rapped at the door. The prisoner said, "Come in." I went in, and found the prisoner in bed. I asked him his name, where he had come from, and how long he had been in Belfast. He gave the name of William John Foster, and said he had no fixed address. He arrived in town on Sunday from Greenock, where he had spent two days, but he could not say where he stopped. Previous to that he was in Glasgow for four days, and before that he was in Edinburgh. He did not know how long he was there, nor did he know anyone living there. I found a clasp knife (produced) in his coat pocket, a purse containing 19l. 4s. 51/2d., and the chisel and handle (produced) were lying on the table in the bedroom. These, when separated, fit into the bag (produced). In the bag I found three razors, a table knife, a small knife, and a number of watchmaking appliances. He said that he was a watchmaker, but that he did nothing at the trade, as he had an income of his own, which he got from his father, who lived in London. He said his father was a brewer, but could not give the address. I found the silver watch and chain and locket (produced) in his pockets. He said the watch was his own. It bears the monogram "A.M.R." (The watch and chain were then handed to the Bench for examination). - Witness (continuing): There was a piece of broken necklet in his coat pocket. I got the keys (produced). The watch is a lever without the maker's name. I examined the clothes of the prisoner, and found he was wearing boots similar to those worn by military men. - Prisoner was remanded.

A DETECTIVE IN FEMALE ATTIRE.

James Phillips, aged 37, and William Jarvis, 40, cab-washers, of Hackney-road, were charged at Clerkenwell police-court, on Tuesday, with being concerned together in cutting and wounding Detective-serjeant Robinson, of the G Division, in Phoenix Park-place, St. Pancras. Jarvis was further charged with cutting and wounding Henry Doncaster on the same occasion. The heads of both prisoners were bound with blood-stained bandages, and the face of Serjeant Robinson had surgeon's straps upon wounds around the left eye. - Detective-serjeant Robinson said that between 12 and one o'clock that (Tuesday) morning he was on duty disguised in women's clothing, and in company with Detective-serjeant Mather (in ordinary dress), a man named Doncaster, and several Italians, was watching the action of a man, who was in company of a woman under circumstances of which he had suspicion. They were in Phoenix-place. About 20 minutes to one two men (not the prisoners) came up, and asked what he was doing there. He answered that he was a police-officer, and they went away. Shortly afterwards Jarvis came to him and asked, "What are you messing about here for?" Witness took off his woman's hat and answered, "I am a police-officer," and added that the other men were with him. Jarvis said, "Oh, you are cats and dogs, are you?" and struck him a violent blow with his fist. He seized Jarvis by the coat, but Jarvis pulled out a knife and stabbed him over the left eye. He fell to the ground, and Jarvis again stabbed him, as he lay, on the bridge of the nose. Lying on his back witness drew his truncheon, and struck at Jarvis's hand which held the knife, but the blow missed the hand and struck Jarvis on the head. The prisoner Phillips then kicked him (witness) on the arm, and again on the ribs. Both prisoners ran away, and directly afterwards he saw Jarvis strike Doncaster (who had been assisting witness) on the face, and Doncaster cried out, "I am stabbed." Jarvis then called out, "Come on George; cats and dogs," and several men came out of the cab-yard with pitchforks and other implements, but did not use them. Several constables had by this time arrived, and the prisoners were taken into custody. - Cross-examined by Mr. Ricketts, who appeared for the defence, Serjeant Robinson said it was dark, and he did not actually see the blade of the knife, but only what looked like the handle. He had information which he believed might be of importance in regard to the Whitechapel murders. He struck at Jarvis's hand, but after he was stabbed did not care whether he hit him on the hand or the head. A scare had been raised in the neighbourhood that "Jack the Ripper" was about. - Henry Doncaster, of 26, Warner-street, Clerkenwell, who appeared with his head and face bandaged, said he was with Serjeant Robinson on the occasion in question, watching a man and woman through the windows of a cab. They were accosted, and the struggle took place as described by the last witness. Witness was running for aid when Jarvis struck him on the face with something which cut him severely. - Dr. J.A. Miller said the wounds on Robinson's and Doncaster's faces were "star-shaped," and might have been caused by the metal end of a pocket-knife handle. Doncaster's jaw was dislocated. Jarvis was severely hurt. - Mr. Ricketts, in asking for bail, said he expected to be able to show that the struggle was caused by a misunderstanding owing to the failure to inform the prisoners that Robinson was a constable. - Mr. Bros remanded the prisoners, refusing to accept bail.

"LEATHER APRON" IN COURT.

At the Thames police-court, on Thursday, John Pizer, who claimed for himself over the fourth Whitechapel murder that he was "Leather Apron," and who was arrested on suspicion of being concerned in the Hanbury-street murder, but afterwards released, summoned Emily Patzwold for assaulting him. - Pizer stated that on the morning of the 27th ult. he went out to get some cheese for his breakfast, when he met defendant, who made use of an insulting expression and called him "Leather Apron." He took no notice and walked on. When he returned she struck him three blows in the face, and his hat was knocked off. While he was picking it up she again struck him. Some neighbours came to witness's assistance and got him away. - Mr. Lushington fined the woman 10s. and 2s. costs.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, October 14, 1888, Page 3

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Tue 25 Oct 2011 - 0:51

THE MURDER MANIA.

At Armagh, today, William Robinson, who gave his name as "Leather-apron" and in whose possession a knife and a bloodstained letter, addressed to the Catholic Private, were found, was sentenced to two months' imprisonment for assaulting the police.

EAST-END TRAGEDIES.

A CASUAL DETAINED IN KENT.

CLOTHES BLOODSTAINED - HIS MANNER UNEASY.

The Exchange Telegraph Company learns that a casual is detained at Elham Union, in Kent, on suspicion of being the Whitechapel murderer. He is dressed in a genteel style, but has blood smears on his shirt and trousers. His shirt cuffs are ripped off. A sponge was found on him. He has given contradictory statements of himself, and also several false names. The prisoner appears nervous and uneasy in his manner. The London police have been communicated with.
The Press Association's Hythe Correspondent telegraphs: - A suspicious looking individual, who applied for admission to the casual-ward for Elham Union, Kent, has been detained by the Master, as he answered the description of the man wanted in connection with the Whitechapel murders, published in a daily paper. Blood was found on his trousers and shirt. The cuffs of his shirt had been torn off, and a piece of sponge was found on him. He was dressed in a genteel style - black cloth coat, check waistcoat, and hard felt hat. He has given three or four different names and contradictory accounts of himself. Superintendent Masted, of the county police, has communicated with the Metropolitan police regarding the individual.

AN ARREST AT KILBURN.

Another man gave himself up at Kilburn, and was taken to Leman-street Police-station, but after being questioned there by Inspector Abberline, he was discharged.

SELF-ACCUSED OF THE CRIMES.

Inquiries made this morning by a reporter elicited the fact that no fresh arrests had been made in the Whitechapel district. The police precautions for the surveillance of the neighbourhood are in no wise relaxed, yet they are still without direct trace of the murderer. About ten o'clock last night a middle-aged man, of stout build, walked into the Leman-street Police-station, and accused himself of the murders. The man was obviously under the influence of drink; but it was thought desirable to detain him while inquiries were made at the address given. The police then found that his name was Geary, that he lived in the neighbourhood, and that it was impossible he could have committed the crimes of which he had accused himself. It was also ascertained that he had at one time been detained in a lunatic asylum. Under these circumstances, it was considered unadvisable to detain him, and he was released shortly after eleven o'clock. At all the police stations in the eastern district the night was reported to have been a quiet one, and from the deserted condition of the streets there is no doubt the state of panic into which the frequenters of the streets by night in this neighbourhood have been thrown continues undiminished.

THE MITRE-SQUARE VICTIM.

RESUMED INQUEST TODAY.

THE MURDERER'S DESIGN.

Mr. S.F. Langham, the City Coroner, resumed the inquiry, this morning, at the Golden-lane Mortuary, Barbican, respecting the death of Catherine Eddowes, alias Kelly, who was discovered murdered in Mitre-square, Aldgate, on Sunday morning, the 30th ult.
The police were represented by Major Henry Smith, Assistant Commissioner, Mr. Superintendent Foster, Inspector McWilliams, and Inspector Collard. Dr. Saunders, Medical Officer for the City of London, also attended, and Mr. Crawford, solicitor, represented the Corporation.

DR. BROWN'S EVIDENCE CORROBORATED.

Mr. George William Sequeira, surgeon, of 34, Jewry-street, Aldgate, deposed: I was called on the morning of Sunday, the 30th of September, to Mitre-square. I was the first medical man to arrive. I was there at five minutes to two o'clock.
And you saw the position of the body? - I did.
And you agree with the evidence given by Dr. Brown as to that position? - Yes. I agree with Dr. Brown's evidence, which I heard on the last occasion.
By Mr. Crawford - I am acquainted with the locality, and know the position of the lamps in the square. The deceased was found in the darkest corner, but there was sufficient light to enable the injuries to be inflicted without additional light.

MURDERER NOT POSSESSED OF ANATOMICAL SKILL.

From what you saw have you formed an opinion that the perpetrator of the deed had any particular design upon any portion of the body? - I formed an opinion that the perpetrator had no particular design upon any particular organ.
Judging from the injuries inflicted, do you think he was possessed of great anatomical skill? - (Emphatically) - No, I do not.
And can you account any way for the absence of noise? - The woman's death must have been so instantaneous after the severance of the windpipe.
Would you expect to find the clothes of the murderer bespattered with blood? - Not necessarily.
For how long did you think life had been extinct? - When I arrived, not more than a few minutes; probably not more than a quarter of an hour, from the condition of the blood.

NO TRACE OF POISONING.

Dr. W.S. Saunders, Medical Officer for the City of London, stated - I live at 13, Queen-street, Cheapside. I am public analyst for the City of London. I received the contents of the deceased's stomach from Dr. Gordon Brown.
Have you made an analysis? - I carefully examined the stomach and its contents, more particularly for poisons of a narcotic class, with negative results. There was not the faintest trace of any of these or any other poisons.
By Mr. Crawford - I was present at the post-mortem, and saw the wounds which had been inflicted.
Do you agree with Dr. Brown and Dr. Sequeira that the wounds were inflicted by a person not possessing great anatomical skill? - I do.
And do you equally agree that the perpetrator of the deed had no particular desire upon any organ? - I do - (pausing) - internal organ.

MURDERED WOMAN'S DAUGHTER.

Annie Phillips deposed: I live at 12, Dilston-road, Southwark-park-road. My husband is a lampblack packer. I am a daughter of the deceased. She lived with my father, and was married to him, but I have never seen the "marriage lines."
What was your father's Christian name? - Thomas Conway. I have not seen him for the last fifteen or eighteen months. He was then living with me and my husband. My father was a hawker.
Do you know what became of him? - No; I do not. He left us suddenly, without giving any reason.

THE VICTIM'S MARRIED LIFE.

Did he leave you on good terms? - No, Sir, we were not on very good terms. I have never seen or heard of him since.
Was he a sober man? - Yes, a teetotaller.
Did he live on bad terms with your mother? - Yes, because she used to drink.
Have you any idea where your father is living? - No, not the least.
Had he any ill-will, to your knowledge, against your mother? - No.
Can you tell us the reason why he ceased to live with your mother? Was it entirely on account of her drinking habits? - Yes.
Your father was in the 18th Royal Irish? - Yes. He had been a pensioner since I was eight years old.
And what is your age now? - Twenty-three.
And how long ago is it since he lived with your mother? - Seven or eight years ago.
Did she ever apply to him for money? - Yes; frequently.

LAST SAW HER ALIVE.

When did you last see her? - Two years and one month ago.
Did you see anything of her on Saturday, the day previous to her death? - No. When I last saw her she lived at King-street, Bermondsey, where I also lived. I did not leave my address when I left there. I have two brothers. They are living in London.
Did your mother know where her sons were living? - No, that was kept from her for the purpose of preventing her applying to them for money.
By the Jury - It was between fifteen and seventeen months ago that my father lived with me and my husband. I was then aware, and father was, too, that mother was then living with a man named Kelly.
Mr. Crawford - Are you sure it was the 18th Royal Irish in which your father was?
Witness - Not sure. It might have been the Connaught Rangers.
Mr. Crawford - It so happens that there is a person named Tom Conway, a pensioner in the 18th Royal Irish, but he does not happen to be the man.

LOST ALL TRACE OF HER FATHER.

Do you know anything of Kelly? - Yes, I have seen mother with him in a lodging-house in Flower and Dean-street. That was about three years ago. I knew they were living as man and wife.
Is it a fact that your father is living with your two brothers? - Yes.
Don't you know where they are living? - No.
Can't you assist the police? - No; I don't know where they are. Their ages - those of my brothers - are 15 and 20. I have lost all trace with my father, mother, and two brothers for fifteen or eighteen months, and cannot tell the police where they are.

A TOM CONWAY DISCOVERED - BUT NOT HER FATHER.

Detective-sergeant John Mitchell stated that he made every endeavour to find the husband and sons of the deceased, but without success.
Mr. Crawford: Have you found a pensioner named Conway belonging to the 18th Royal Irish? - Yes; but he is not identified as the Thomas Conway in question. I and other officers have (added the officer) used every endeavour with a view of tracing the murderer.
Detective Baxter Hunt said that he found the pensioner Conway, of the 18th Royal Irish, and confronted him with two of the deceased's sisters. They failed to recognise him as the man who used to live with the deceased. Every endeavour, but without result, had been made to trace the man Conway and the two sons of the deceased.
The Foreman of the Jury thought it advisable that the witness Phillips should see this man. The deceased's sisters, who had not seen Conway for years, might not be able to recall him.
By Mr. Crawford - The witness Phillips had not then been found; but she shall see the man Conway. This man received his pension last on the 1st of this month.
Dr. Brown (recalled) said he was quite sure the murder was committed at the spot where the deceased was discovered.

DRUNK ON THE FATAL NIGHT.

Police-constable Robinson, No. 931, stated that he was on duty in Aldgate on the evening of the 29th. He saw a crowd of persons outside No. 29, High-street. Witness saw a woman there whom he had since recognised as the deceased.
In what state was she? - Drunk - lying on the footway. I turned to the crowd and asked if anyone knew her, or where she lived, but received no answer. I then picked her up and carried her to the side, by some shutters. I leaned her against the shutters, and she fell down again, sideways. I got assistance, and took her to the Bishopsgate Police-station. When at the station she was asked her name. She replied with the word, "Nothing." She was put in a cell.
Did anyone appear to be in her company when you first saw her? - No, Sir, no one in particular.
By Mr. Crawford - Witness last saw the deceased alive in the cell at the station at ten minutes to nine on the evening before her death. To the best of his knowledge he believed the apron produced (dirty white, torn, and cut, and marked with blood) was worn by the deceased.
By the Jury - The deceased smelt very strongly of drink.

RELEASED BY THE POLICE AT ONE.

Police-serjeant James Byfield deposed that the deceased was brought to the Bishopsgate Station at a quarter to nine on the evening of the 29th.
In what condition was she? - Very drunk.
What was done with her? - She was placed in a cell and detained there until one o'clock in the morning, when she was sober. I discharged her then, after she gave her name and address.
What name and address? - Mary Ann Kelly, 6, Fashion-street, Spitalfields.
Did she say what she had been doing? - To the last of the questions I put to her, she said she had been hopping.
By the Jury - The deceased had no food given her in the cell. It was quite possible for a person to be very drunk at a quarter to nine and sober at one o'clock.
Police-constable George Henry Hutt, jailer at Bishopsgate Station, stated that at a quarter to ten on the night of the 29th ult. the deceased woman was placed under his charge. He visited her in the cell several times until five minutes to one o'clock on Sunday morning. When she was discharged witness pushed open a swing door, leading from a passage, and said, "This way, missus."
She passed the door, and witness remarked, "Please pull it to."
The Coroner - Yes.
Witness - She did so, and said, "All right. Good night, old cock." (Laughter.) She turned to the left, leading to Houndsditch, as she left the station.
By the Jury - It was usual for prisoners taken into custody for drunkenness to be discharged at all hours of the night. The inspector or acting-inspector was the person to judge whether a prisoner was sober or not. When witness went to deceased's cell at half-past twelve, she said, "Well, when am I going to get out?" Witness said, "When you are able to take care of yourself." She answered, "I am quite able to take care of myself." It was at one o'clock when the woman left the station.

THE DECEASED WOMAN'S ANTICIPATION.

By Mr. Crawford - In the station yard, a few minutes before one o'clock, the deceased said, "What time is it?" Witness replied, "Just upon one; too late for you to get any more drink." She exclaimed, with an oath, "I shall get a good hiding when I get home, then," and he answered, "Serve you right; you should not get drunk."
Can you tell me the distance from your station to Mitre-square? - I should say about 400 yards.
A Juryman - More than that.
Witness - With ordinary walking it would take about eight minutes to get to Mitre-square. I do not know anything of the lodging-house in Flower and Dean-street.

THE WATCHMAN'S ASSISTANCE SOUGHT.

George James Morris, watchman for Messrs. Kerley and Tong, tea merchants, Mitre-square, said he went on duty at seven o'clock on Saturday evening, the 29th ult.
What happened at about a quarter to two? - Police-constable Watkins, who is on the Mitre-square beat, knocked at my door, which was slightly ajar at the time. I was then sweeping the steps down, towards the door. I opened the door wide, and Watkins exclaimed, "For God's sake, mate, come to my assistance." I said, "Stop till I get my lamp," which was close at hand. The lamp was alight. I took it outside and asked him what was the matter. He answered, "Oh dear, there's another woman cut up in pieces." Witness, who had been a police-constable himself, went to the corner of the square, and saw the body. Witness immediately blew his whistle, and ran up Mitre-street into Aldgate. Two constables came.

OBSERVED NO SUSPICIOUS PERSONS.

Did you see any suspicious persons while you were running up Mitre-street to Aldgate? - No, Sir.
Had you heard any noise in the square before being called by Constable Watkins? - No, Sir. If there had been any cries of distress I should have heard them.
By the Jury - I have charge of two warehouses. I was in the counting-house of one, facing the entrance to the square, at the time.
By Mr. Crawford - Before I was called by Watkins I had not gone into the square. I did not go into the square between twelve and one. It was not unusual for me to be at work at a quarter to two on Sunday morning. I had not seen Watkins during the evening.
By the Jury - The door of the warehouse had only been ajar for two minutes before the constable came.
The Court then adjourned for luncheon.

NO CRIES HEARD.

Police-constable James Harvey stated the various streets comprised in his beat on the night of the 29th ult. He heard no cries during the time he was patrolling. When he got to Mitre-street he heard a whistle blown, and saw the witness Morris with a lamp. Morris exclaimed, "A woman's been ripped up in Mitre-square." Witness and another constable proceeded to the square, and saw the deceased lying dead.
What time were you previously in Aldgate? - Between one and two minutes to the half-past one as I passed the post-office clock.
George Clapp, living at 5, Mitre-street, Aldgate, stated that he was caretaker of the premises at that address. The back of the house looked into Mitre-square. He went to bed (himself and wife) at about eleven o'clock on Saturday night. Witness slept in a back room on the second floor. He heard no noise at all.
By the Coroner - The first time that witness heard the murder had been committed was between five and six o'clock on Sunday morning.
Police-constable Richard Pearce, who resides in Mitre-square, deposed that he went to bed at twenty minutes past twelve on the morning of the murder. He heard no noise whatever.
When did you first hear of the murder? - At twenty minutes past two. I was then called by a constable.
The Coroner: I suppose from your window you could look into the spot where the murder occurred? - Directly into the place.
By Mr. Crawford - Where I live is No. 3, Mitre-square - the only house used as a residence, the other places being warehouses. Only my wife and family - four "little ones" - live in the house.

WHAT THE COMMERCIAL TRAVELLER SAW.

Joseph Lawene, a foreigner, residing at 45, Norfolk-road, Dalston, deposed that he was a commercial traveller. On the night of the 29th he was in the Imperial Club with Mr. Joseph Levi and Mr. Harry Harris. They left the club about twenty-five minutes to two.
Did you see anyone? - We saw a man and woman at the corner of Church-passage, in Duke-street, which leads to Mitre-square.
Were they talking? - She was standing with her face towards him. I only saw the back of her. She had her hand on his chest. I could not see her face. The man was taller than she was.
How was she dressed? - Black jacket and black bonnet. I have seen the deceased's clothing at the police-station, and I believe it was the same as worn by the woman I saw.
What sort of a man was he? - He had a cloth cap on with a cloth peak.
Mr. Crawford: Unless the Jury and yourself wish it, Mr. Coroner, we have a reason for not desiring any further evidence to be given as to the appearance of the man.
The Jury - Certainly; we don't wish to have it.
By Mr. Crawford - The Imperial Club is at 16 and 17, Duke-street - about nine or ten yards from where the woman and man were standing.
Mr. Joseph H. Levi, sworn as a Jew, with his hat on, said he was a butcher, living at Hutchinson-street, Aldgate, and corroborated the last witness as to leaving the club with him at a little after half-past one. Witness saw the man and woman described.
What were they doing? - Seeing a man and woman standing there at that hour, in a suspicious manner, we passed on. We left them talking.
The Foreman: Was there not a good light where you saw the man and woman - light from the Imperial Club, too? I should have thought you could almost have seen the colour of the woman's dress.
Witness - There was not much light there then. There is a good deal more now, since the murder.
By the Jury - Witness had said to his companions, "I am off. I don't like those people over there."
By Mr. Crawford - There was nothing about the man or woman which caused witness to fear them.

THE WRITING ON THE WALL.

Police-constable Alfred Long, of the Metropolitan Police, deposed to finding a portion of the murdered woman's apron in Goulston-street - in a passage leading to 118 and 119, a model block of dwellings. On the wall above where the apron was found was written in chalk, "The Jews are the men that will not be blamed for nothing." Witness took the piece of apron to the Commercial-road Station, and reported the matter to the inspector on duty. Witness had passed the spot at 2:20. It was not there then. He discovered it at 2:55 on the morning of the murder.
By Mr. Crawford - Witness did not know that the word "Jews" on the wall was misspelt. He did not know if it was spelt "Juws."

(The inquiry is proceeding.)

THE "INVINCIBLE" AT MERTHYR.

Mr. William Abraham, M.P., has, says the Manchester Examiner, received a letter threatening him with violence if he appears at any public meeting in the Merthyr boroughs to support the candidature of Mr. F. Ffoulkes Griffiths, in opposition to Mr. Pritchard Morgan, the Welsh gold prospector. The missive bears the Mountain Ash postmark, is besmeared with red ink, and the writer, who signs himself "Penrhiwceiber," warns the hon. Member that he had better not come into the constituency, else the "Invincible" of the district will make him regret it.

Source: The Echo, Thursday October 11, 1888, Page 3

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Tue 25 Oct 2011 - 0:53

THE EAST-END MURDERS.

MITRE-SQUARE VERDICT.

Mr. S.F. Langham resumed the inquiry on Thursday at the Golden-lane mortuary, Barbican, respecting the death of Catherine Eddowes, alias Kelly, alias Conway, who was discovered murdered in Mitre-square, Aldgate, on Sunday morning, the 30th ult.
Mr. George William Sequeira, surgeon, of 34, Jewry-street, Aldgate, deposed: I was called on the morning of Sunday, the 30th of September, to Mitre-square. I was the first medical man to arrive. I was there at five minutes to two o'clock, and saw the position of the body.
And you agree with the evidence given by Dr. Brown as to that position? - Yes. I agree with Dr. Brown's evidence, which I heard on the last occasion.
From what you saw have you formed an opinion that the perpetrator of the deed had any particular design upon any portion of the body? - I formed an opinion that the perpetrator had no particular design upon any particular organ.
Judging from the injuries inflicted, do you think he was possessed of great anatomical skill? - (Emphatically) No, I do not.
Can you account in any way for the absence of noise? - The woman's death must have been so instantaneous after the severance of the windpipe.
Would you expect to find the clothes of the murderer bespattered with blood? - Not necessarily.
For how long did you think life had been extinct? - When I arrived, not more than a few minutes; probably not more than a quarter of an hour, from the condition of the blood.
Dr. W.S. Saunders, medical officer for the City of London, stated: I live at 13, Queen-street, Cheapside. I am public analyst for the City of London. I received the contents of the deceased's stomach from Dr. Gordon Brown. I carefully examined the stomach and its contents, more particularly for poisons of a narcotic class, with negative results. There was not the faintest trace of any of these or any other poison.
By Mr. Crawford: I was present at the post-mortem, and saw the wounds which had been inflicted.
Do you agree with Dr. Brown and Dr. Sequeira that the wounds were inflicted by a person not possessing great anatomical skill? - I do.
And do you equally agree that the perpetrator of the deed had no particular desire upon any organ? - I do - (pausing) - internal organ.
Annie Phillips, daughter of the deceased, said: I live at 14, Dilston-grove, Southwark-park-road. My husband, Lewis Phillips, is a lamp blacker. I am 23. My father's name was Thomas Conway. I have not seen him lately - not for the last 15 or 18 months. He was living for some time with me and my husband, at 15, Acre-street, Southwark-park-road. He was a hawker. I do not know what became of him. He left us suddenly without assigning any reason for it. He was a sober man - a teetotaller. They lived only on bad terms when she used to drink. I have not the least idea where he is living now.
Was it entirely on the ground of your mother's drunken habits that he ceased to live with her? - Yes.
When was the last time you saw her? - Two years and a month ago.
Did you see anything of her on Saturday, the day previous to her death? - No. I lived at King-street, Bermondsey, before, and when I left that I did not leave my address.
Were there any other family with your mother by Conway? - Yes; two brothers. My mother did not know where to find either of them.
They purposely kept from her? - Yes, for the purpose of preventing her from applying for money.
Detective-serjeant John Mitchell said; I have made every effort to find the father and also the brothers of the last witness, but without success.
Detective-constable Baxter Hunt said he had discovered a pensioner named Conway, belonging to the 18th Royal Irish, but he was not the one wanted.

THE DECEASED LOCKED UP ON THE FATAL NIGHT.

Constable Lewis Robinson said: About half-past eight on the evening of the 29th I was on duty in High-street, Aldgate. I saw there the woman since recognised as the deceased. She was drunk, lying of the footway. I turned round to the crowd, and asked if there was anyone who knew the deceased, but I got no answer. I then picked her up, and carried her to the side by the shutters. I raised her up against the shutters, and she fell down again. I did not do any more until I got assistance. Another policeman came, and she was taken to the station. When asked for her name, she replied, "Nothing." She was then put into the cell. No one appeared to be in her company when she was first found.
Serjeant James Byfield: I remember the deceased being brought to the police-station on the 29th of last month. She was very drunk. She was taken to the cell, and stayed there until one o'clock in the morning, when I discharged her, after she had given her name and address. She gave the name of Mary Ann Kelly, of 6, Fashion-street, Spitalfields.
Constable George Hutt, gaoler at the Bishopsgate police-station, said: On the 29th of last month, at a quarter to ten o'clock at night, I took over prisoners, and among them the deceased woman. I visited her several times until five minutes to one on the following morning - Sunday - when she was brought from the cell and discharged as sober. When leaving, I asked her to pull the door to, and she replied, "All right, old cock." She pulled the door to, and then turned to the left, towards Houndsditch.
George J. Morris, watchman at the premises of Messrs. Kearley and Tonge, tea-warehousemen, Mitre-square, said: I went on duty at the premises at seven o'clock in the evening. I cleaned the offices and then looked about the warehouse. About a quarter to two o'clock Police-constable Watkins, who was on the Mitre-square beat, knocked at my door and said, "Come to my assistance." I asked him what was the matter, and he said, "Oh dear, there's another woman cut up." He showed me the body lying in the corner. I had my lamp and threw the light upon it. I agree with what has been said by previous witnesses as to the position of the body. I went up Mitre-street into Aldgate blowing my whistle, and got police assistance. I saw no suspicious person about. Two police-constables came. I followed with the constables, and took charge of my own premises again.
The Coroner: Had you heard any noise in the square before you were called by Constable Watkins? - No, sir.
The Coroner: If there had been any cry of distress would you have heard it where you were? - Yes.
Constable James Harvey was next examined. He deposed: On the night of the 29th ult. I went on duty at a quarter to 10, but I did not notice any suspicious person in the course of my beat. When I got into Aldgate I heard a whistle and saw the witness Morris with a lamp in his hand. I immediately went to him and asked what was the matter. He replied, "A woman has been ripped up in Mitre-square." I saw a constable on the other side of the street, and I said "Come with me." We went together to Mitre-square, where we saw Police-constable Watkins. The constable (Holland) who followed me went for a medical man, and private individuals were despatched for more police assistance.
George Clapp deposed: I live at 5, Mitre-street, Aldgate, and I am caretaker of these premises. The back part of the house, No. 5, looks out upon Mitre-square. On the night of the 29th ult. I went to bed at about 11. I slept in a back room on the second floor.
The Coroner: During the night did you hear any noise or disturbance? - No, sir.
Constable Pearce deposed: I live at 3, Mitre-square. On Sunday morning, Sept. 30, I heard no noise whatever. I went to bed at 12 o'clock. It was 20 minutes past two when I first heard of the murder. I was called by a constable. I could see the body plainly from the front windows of my house.

THE MAN LAST SEEN WITH EDDOWES.

Joseph Lawende deposed: I live at 45, Norfolk-road, Dalston, and am a commercial traveller. On the night of the 29th September I was at the Imperial club, in the company of Mr. Joseph Levy and Mr. Harry Harris. It was raining, and we could not leave the premises. We were sitting in the club chatting. As we approached the club we noticed a man and woman together in Church-passage. The woman was standing with her face towards the man, so that I only saw her back. I noticed that her hand was on his chest. I could not see the woman's face, but the man was taller than she was. The woman wore a black jacket and a black bonnet.
Mr. Crawford said it might save time if the witness was shown the articles which the deceased wore.
- Witness replied that he had already seen them at the police-station, and as far as his belief went he thought they were the same clothes which the deceased wore on the night in question.
Examination continued: I cannot tell you the height of the woman; but she was about 5ft. high.
The Coroner: Now, can you tell us what the man was like? - He had on a peaked cloth cap, the peak of the same material apparently as the cap.
Mr. Crawford said that, unless the jury wished it, he had a reason why further evidence should not be given on this point at present.
The coroner and the jury assented to the suggestion.
Would you remember the man again? - I doubt that.
My Joseph Hyan Levy, butcher, of 1, Hutcheson-street, Aldgate, deposed: I was at the Imperial club on the night in question with the last witness. We left about three or four minutes past the half-hour (half-past one). I saw a man and woman standing at the corner of Church-passage, but I passed on, and did not take any further notice of them. I walked along as fast as I could. I cannot give any description of either the man or the woman, but all I can say is that the man was about three inches taller than the woman. Being a little deaf, I could not possibly have heard anything that was said.

THE WRITING ON THE WALL.

Constable Alfred Lock, of the Metropolitan police, said: I was in 15, Goulston-street, Whitechapel, on the 30th of last month, about 2:55 a.m., and found a portion of a woman's apron (produced). It had recent stains of blood on it, one corner being wet. It was lying in the passage leading to the staircase of 108 to 119 building - a model lodging-house. Above it on the wall was written in chalk, "The Jews are the men that will not be blamed for nothing." I at once searched the staircase, but found nothing else. I at once took the piece of apron to the Commercial-road police-station, and reported to the inspector on duty.
Mr. Crawford: Was not what was written above the apron, "The Jews are not the men that will be blamed for nothing?" - The words were as I have stated.
Is it not possible you put the "not" in the wrong place? - I believe the words were as I have stated.
Was the word spelt, not "Jews," but "Juwes?" - It may have been.
Did you make any inquiries in the dwelling-house itself? - No.
Daniel Halse, the detective-officer, City police, stated:
On Saturday, the 29th of last month, on instructions received from the Detective office, Old Jewry, I directed a number of officers to patrol the City all night. At about two minutes to two I was going round about Aldgate church, in company with Detectives Outram and Marriott. I heard a woman had been murdered in Mitre-square. We all three ran there. I had the light of Watkins turned on to the body, and saw that it was a murder. I immediately gave instructions to have the neighbourhood searched, and every man stopped and examined. I went by the way of Middlesex-street to the East-end of the City into Wentworth-street. There we stopped two men, whom, on giving a satisfactory account of themselves, we allowed to depart. I came through Goulston-street, where the apron was found, about 20 minutes past two. I then went to the mortuary, saw the deceased stripped, and noticed that a portion of the apron was missing. I accompanied Major Smith back to Mitre-square, and found that a portion of the apron had been found. Directions were given for photographing the writing on the wall, but before it could be done the Metropolitan police, thinking as it was Sunday morning, the words might cause a riot if seen by the Jews, or an outbreak against the Jews, had the writing washed out.
By Mr. Crawford: Before the writing on the wall was rubbed out I took a note of it. The exact words I wrote down are, "The Juwes are not the men that will be blamed for nothing. The writing had the appearance of having been written recently. It was in white chalk on black facia.
By the jury: The writing was rubbed out at the suggestion of the Metropolitan police, in case it should cause a riot.
By Mr. Crawford: I protested against its being rubbed out.
Mr. Crawford said that, excepting a few questions he had to put to the witness Long, who had gone away for his book, that was the whole of the evidence he proposed to call; but if there was any point which they would like cleared up he should be happy to render what assistance he could.

A JUROR'S COMPLAINT.

A Juror: It seems surprising that a policeman should have found a piece of the apron in a passage leading into a building, and that no further inquiry should have been made in the building itself. You get a clue up to that point, and then it is lost entirely.
Mr. Crawford: Long will be back; you can ask him. I may say with regard to a remark which fell from a juror with reference to the finding of the apron, that I have several members of the City police here who made a careful search in every part of the tenement the moment the matter came to the knowledge of them.
The Juror: I think that is sufficient.
Mr. Crawford: Unfortunately, it did not come to their knowledge for two hours afterwards. I am afraid that will not answer the objection raised.
The Juror: I think it will.
Mr. Crawford: No, unfortunately there is a delay. The man who found this piece of apron is a member of the Metropolitan Police force, and he found it, I think he told us, at about 20 minutes to three.
The Juror: It is the man who found the piece of apron of whom I am complaining.
Mr. Crawford: He has gone to fetch his notebook, but he will be here directly.
Police-constable Long, recalled, produced the book in which he made his entry of the writing on the wall, from which it appeared the words of the entry were - "The Jews are the men that will not be blamed for nothing." In answer to Mr. Crawford, he said the inspector who took down the words had made the remark that the word Jews was spelt Juews - not Juwes. That was the only mistake the inspector put out.
What did you do when you found the piece of apron? - I at once searched the staircase leading to the building. I searched every one of the six or seven staircases, and found no trace whatever of blood or recent footmarks.
What o'clock was that? - About three.
What did you do next? - I at once proceeded to the station. I had heard before proceeding to the station that a murder had been committed in Mitre-square. When I left to go to the police-station I left another man, a member of the Metropolitan Police force, on the beat, and I told him to keep an observation on the building to see if anyone left or entered. I next returned to the building about five o'clock. The writing on the wall had not then been rubbed out. It was rubbed out in my presence at half-past five.
Did you hear anyone object to its being rubbed out? - No, I did not.
A juror repeated what he had already said as to his surprise that the clue furnished by the finding of the apron in the passage of the building in Goulston-street was not followed up by a search of the building itself. The evidence of Police-constable Long and that of all the constables that had been given, certainly redounded to their credit (hear, hear, from the jury); but it deed seem strange that the clue was not followed up by searching the rest of the building, and not confining the search merely to the staircases. He asked the witness whether it did not occur to him that that should have been done.
Constable Long: I thought that the best thing I could do after searching the stairs, and instructing other constables to watch the building, was to proceed as soon as possible to the police-station to make my report. The inspector was better able to deal with the matter than I was.
This being all the evidence that was forthcoming,
The coroner briefly summed up, noticing some of the leading features of the case, and commenting on the fiendish character of the murder. The murderer, not satisfied with taking the woman's life, had endeavoured so to mutilate the body as if possible to render it unrecognisable. After the evidence which had been taken, he presumed all that the jury could do now was to find a verdict of wilful murder against some person or persons unknown, and allow the police to pursue their inquiries and follow up any clue they might have obtained.
The jury accordingly returned a verdict of "Wilful murder against some person unknown."
The Coroner: On behalf of myself and the jury, I wish to thank you, Mr. Crawford, and the police for the able assistance you have rendered in this inquiry.
Mr. Crawford: The police have simply done their duty, sir.
The Coroner: I am quite sure of that.

THE WRITING ON THE WALL.

At the resumed inquest, on Thursday, on the body of the Mitre-square victim, Detective Halse, of the City police, stated, in reference to the writing on the wall in Goulston-street, that instructions were originally given for the inscription to be photographed, but at the instance of a member of the Metropolitan police, who feared a riot, the words were rubbed out, notwithstanding witness's protest. A contemporary states that the order for the removal of the writing was given personally by Sir Charles Warren, who visited the spot shortly after the discovery was made. A reporter who visited Whitehall-place to ascertain the truth of the story was told by Sir Charles Warren's private secretary that Sir Charles preferred to say nothing about the allegation.

FUNERAL OF CATHERINE EDDOWES.

The remains of Catherine Eddowes, the victim of the Mitre-square tragedy, were interred on Monday afternoon at Ilford cemetery, a vast crowd following in procession. The funeral cortege consisted of a hearse, a mourning coach, containing relatives and friends of the deceased, and a brougham conveying representatives of the Press. The coffin was of polished elm, with oak mouldings, and bore a plate with the inscription, in gold letters, "Catherine Eddowes, died Sept. 30, 1888, aged 43 years." One of the sisters of the deceased laid a beautiful wreath on the coffin as it was placed in the hearse, and at the graveside a wreath of marguerites was added by a sympathetic kinswoman. The mourners were the four sisters of the murdered woman, Harriet Jones, Emma Eddowes, Eliza Gold, and Elizabeth Fisher; her two nieces, Emma and Harriet Jones, and John Kelly, the man with whom she had lived. The procession left the mortuary in Golden-lane at half-past one, passing through Old-street, Great Eastern-street, Commercial-street, Whitechapel-road, Mile-end-road, and Stratford to the City cemetery at Ilford. In the cemetery men and women of all ages, many of the latter carrying infants in their arms, gathered round the grave. The remains were interred in the Church of England portion of the cemetery, the service being conducted by the chaplain, the Rev. Mr. Dunscombe. Mr. G.C. Hawkes, a vestryman of St. Luke's, undertook the responsibility of carrying out the funeral at his own expense, and the City authorities, to whom the burial ground belongs, remitted the usual fees.

EXPERIMENTS WITH BLOODHOUNDS.

Sir Charles Warren witnessed a private trial of bloodhounds on Tuesday morning. The hounds are the property of Mr. Edward Brough, of Wynyate, near Scarborough, who for years past has devoted himself to bloodhound breeding. Mr. Brough tried two magnificent animals named Barnaby and Burgho in Regent's park at seven o'clock on Monday morning. The ground was thickly coated with hoar frost; but they did their work well, successfully tracking for nearly a mile a young man, who was given about 15 minutes' start. They were tried again in Hyde-park on Monday night. It was, of course, dark, and the dogs were hunted on a leash, as would be the case if they were employed in Whitechapel. They were again successful in performing their allotted task, and at seven o'clock on Tuesday morning a trial took place before Sir Charles Warren. To all appearances the morning was a much better one for scenting purposes than was Monday, but the contrary proved to be the fact. In all half-a-dozen runs were made, Sir Charles Warren in two instances acting as the hunted man. In every instance the dogs hunted persons who were perfect strangers to them, and occasionally the trail would be crossed. When this happened the hounds were temporarily checked, but either one or the other would pick up the trail again. In one of the longest courses the hounds were checked at half the distance. Burgho ran back, but Barnaby making a fresh cast forward recovered the trail and ran the quarry home. The hound did this entirely unaided by his master, who thought that he was on the wrong track, but left him to his own devices. The Chief commissioner seemed pleased with the result of the trials, though he did not express any definite opinion on the subject to those present.

THE HOME SECRETARY'S REPLIES.

Sir Alfred Kirby, colonel of the Tower Hamlets Fusiliers, recently made an offer to provide 30 or 50 men belonging to that regiment for service in connection with tracking the perpetrator of the Whitechapel and Aldgate tragedies. The Home Secretary has just written to Sir Alfred, saying that having consulted Sir Charles Warren he had come to the conclusion that it would not be advisable to put the men on for service.

The following letter has been received by Mr. Metcalfe, the vestry clerk of Whitechapel, from the Home office, in reply to a resolution of the vestry asking Mr. Matthews to give every possible facility for the speedy arrest of the murderer: -

Whitehall, Oct. 10. - Sir, - I am directed by the Secretary of State to acknowledge your letter of the 4th inst., forwarding a copy of a resolution passed at a vestry meeting of the parish of St. Mary, Whitechapel, expressing sorrow at the recent murders in the East-end of London, and urging her Majesty's Government to use their utmost endeavours to discover the criminal. I am instructed to state that Mr. Matthews shares the feeling of the vestry with regard to these murders, and that he has given directions, and that the police have instructions, to exercise any and every power they possess, and even to use an amount of discretion with regard to suspected persons, in their efforts to discover the criminal. And I am further to state that the Secretary of State, after personal conference with the Commissioners of Police, at which the whole of the difficulties have been fully discussed, is satisfied that no means has been or will be spared in tracing the offender, and bringing him to justice. - I am, sir, your obediently, E. LEIGH PEMBERTON."

SIR CHARLES WARREN'S DEFENCE.

Sir Charles Warren has sent the following for publication: -
Several incorrect statements have recently been published relative to the enrolment of candidates for detective - that is to say, criminal investigation - work in the Metropolitan police which may tend to deter candidates from applying. The following is the actual state of the case: -
For some years past the standard height in the Metropolitan police has been 5ft. 81/2in., and in the beginning of 1887 it was raised to 5ft. 9in., but the commissioner has power from the Secretary of State to accept candidates as short as 5ft. 7in., and if the Criminal Investigation branch should require any particular man under 5ft. 7in. the commissioner has at all times been prepared to obtain the Secretary of State's sanction to his enrolment.
The limit of age is 35, but as a rule candidates are not taken over the age of 27, in order that the police service may not lose the better part of a man's life, and also to enable him to put in sufficient service to entitle him to his full pension.
There is no rule, and never has been any rule made by the commissioner, that candidates on joining must serve for two or three years as constables in divisions before being appointed to the Criminal Investigation branch.
The commissioner has always been prepared to consider favourably any proposal from the Criminal Investigation branch for a candidate to join the commissioner's office immediately on enrolment, or at any time after his enrolment, for duty in the Criminal Investigation branch.
But should a case occur that a candidate who wished to join the Criminal Investigation branch at once, and was reported favourably upon, was not physically or otherwise fit for ordinary police duties, it would be necessary, in the interests of the public, that on his enrolment a stipulation should be made that if he should subsequently be found unfit for criminal investigation work he would have to leave the police service without any compensation should his services not entitle him to a pension or gratuity.
As a general rule it has been ascertained by the Criminal Investigation branch that the candidates who have applied to be appointed direct to detective duties have not possessed any special qualification which would justify their being so appointed.

A GERMAN SUPERSTITION.

A Vienna correspondent calls attention, in connection with the Whitechapel murders, to a strange superstition among German thieves, which survives in some quarters even to the present day. In various German criminal codes of the 17th and 18th centuries, as also in statutes of a more recent date, punishments are prescribed for the mutilation of female corpses, with the object of making from the uterus and other organs the so-called Diebslichter or Schlafslichter, respectively "thieves' candles" or "soporific candles." According to a still rife German superstition the light from such candles will throw those upon whom it falls into the deepest slumbers, and they may, consequently, become a valuable instrument to the thieving profession. Hence their name. At one time there was a regular manufactory of such candles. That this superstition has survived amongst German thieves to the present day was proved by a case tried at Biala, in Galicia, as recently as 1875. In this the body of a woman had been found mutilated in precisely the same way as were the victims of the Whitechapel murderer.

THE JEWS IN LONDON.

The contradiction to the astounding story told by the Vienna correspondent of the Times last week of a superstition that if a Jew be intimate with a Christian woman he can atone for his offence by her mutilation, is most emphatic. Mr. Hermann Adler, writing from the office of the Chief Rabbi, 16, Finsbury-square, exclaims: "Woe unto the ears that hear this; woe unto the eyes that see this! I can assert, without hesitation, that in no Jewish book is such a barbarity even hinted at. Nor is there any record in the criminal annals of any country of a Jew having been convicted of such a terrible atrocity."

AN ARREST AT BELFAST.

John Foster was charged at Belfast, on Friday, on suspicion, with being concerned in the Whitechapel murders. - Constable Carland deposed: From information I received I proceeded to 11, Memel-street. The prisoner was not there when I went first. I went back about half an hour afterwards, when I found the prisoner in, and I went upstairs to the room occupied by the prisoner, and rapped at the door. The prisoner said, "Come in." I went in, and found the prisoner in bed. I asked him his name, where he had come from, and how long he had been in Belfast. He gave the name of William John Foster, and said he had no fixed address. He arrived in town on Sunday from Greenock, where he had spent two days, but he could not say where he stopped. Previous to that he was in Glasgow for four days, and before that he was in Edinburgh. He did not know how long he was there, nor did he know anyone living there. I found a clasp knife (produced) in his coat pocket, a purse containing 19 pounds 4s. 51/2d., and the chisel and handle (produced) were lying on the table in the bedroom. These, when separated, fit into the bag (produced). In the bag I found three razors, a table knife, a small knife, and a number of watchmaking appliances. He said that he was a watchmaker, but that he did nothing at the trade, as he had an income of his own, which he got from his father, who lived in London. He said his father was a brewer, but could not give the address. I found the silver watch and chain and locket (produced) in his pockets. He said the watch was his own. It bears the monogram "A.M.R." (The watch and chain were then handed to the Bench for examination). - Witness (continuing): There was a piece of broken necklet in his coat pocket. I got the keys (produced). The watch is a lever without the maker's name. I examined the clothes of the prisoner, and found he was wearing boots similar to those worn by military men. - Prisoner was remanded.

A DETECTIVE IN FEMALE ATTIRE.

James Phillips, aged 37, and William Jarvis, 40, cab-washers, of Hackney-road, were charged at Clerkenwell police-court, on Tuesday, with being concerned together in cutting and wounding Detective-serjeant Robinson, of the G division, in Phoenix-place, St. Pancras. Jarvis was further charged with cutting and wounding Henry Doncaster on the same occasion. The heads of both prisoners were bound with blood-stained bandages, and the face of Serjeant Robinson had surgeon's straps upon wounds around the left eye. - Detective-serjeant Robinson said that between 12 and one o'clock that (Tuesday) morning he was on duty disguised in women's clothing, and in company with Detective-serjeant Mather (in ordinary dress), a man named Doncaster, and several Italians, was watching the action of a man, who was in company of a woman under circumstances of which he had suspicion. They were in Phoenix-place. About 20 minutes to one two men (not the prisoners) came up, and asked what he was doing there. He answered that he was a police-officer, and they went away. Shortly afterwards Jarvis came to him and asked, "What are you messing about here for?" Witness took off his woman's hat and answered, "I am a police-officer," and added that the other men were with him. Jarvis said, "Oh, you are cats and dogs, are you?" and struck him a violent blow with his fist. He seized Jarvis by the coat, but Jarvis pulled out a knife and stabbed him over the left eye. He fell to the ground, and Jarvis again stabbed him, as he lay, on the bridge of the nose. Lying on his back witness drew his truncheon, and struck at Jarvis' hand which held the knife, but the blow missed the hand and struck Jarvis on the head. The prisoner Phillips then kicked him (witness) on the arm, and again on the ribs. Both prisoners ran away, and directly afterwards he saw Jarvis strike Doncaster (who had been assisting witness) on the face, and Doncaster cried out, "I am stabbed." Jarvis then called out, "Come on, George; cats and dogs," and several men came out of the cab-yard with pitch-forks and other implements, but did not use them. Several constables had by this time arrived, and the prisoners were taken into custody. - Cross-examined by Mr. Ricketts, who appeared for the defence, Serjeant Robinson said it was dark, and he did not actually see the blade of the knife, but only what looked like the handle. He had information which he believed might be of importance in regard to the Whitechapel murders. He struck at Jarvis's hand, but after he was stabbed did not care whether he hit him on the hand or the head. A scare had been raised in the neighbourhood that "Jack the Ripper" was about. - Henry Doncaster, of 26, Warner-street, Clerkenwell, who appeared with his head and face bandaged, said he was with Serjeant Robinson on the occasion in question, watching a man and woman through the windows of a cab. They were accosted, and the struggle took place as described by the last witness. Witness was running for aid when Jarvis struck him on the face with something which cut him severely. - Dr. J.A. Miller said the wounds on Robinson's and Doncaster's faces were "star-shaped," and might have been caused by the metal end of a pocket-knife handle. Doncaster's jaw was dislocated. Jarvis was severely hurt. - Mr. Ricketts, in asking for bail, said he expected to be able to show that the struggle was caused by a misunderstanding owing to the failure to inform the prisoners that Robinson was a constable. - Mr. Bros remanded the prisoners, refusing to accept bail.

"LEATHER APRON" IN COURT.

At the Thames police-court, on Thursday, John Pizer, who claimed for himself over the fourth Whitechapel murder that he was "Leather Apron," and who was arrested on suspicion of being concerned in the Hanbury-street murder, but afterwards released, summoned Emily Patzwold for assaulting him - Pizer stated that on the morning of the 27th ult. he went out to get some cheese for his breakfast, when he met defendant, who made use of an insulting expression and called him "Leather Apron." He took no notice and walked on. When he returned she struck him three blows in the face, and his hat was knocked off. While he was picking it up she again struck him. Some neighbours came to witness's assistance and got him away. - Mr. Lushington fined the woman 10s. and 2s. costs.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, October 14, 1888, Page 3

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Tue 25 Oct 2011 - 1:00

THE EAST-END MURDERS.

At an early hour on Sunday morning last (as was reported in a large portion of our Special Edition) two more women were murdered in a most shocking and barbarous manner at the East End of London. The first crime was discovered shortly before one o'clock in Whitechapel, and the second an hour later in Aldgate. In both cases the murderer escaped without leaving any trace whatever, but the police have no doubt that the crimes were committed by the same monster. We were enabled to give the first intelligence of the atrocities to the public, as the following letter will show: -
TO THE EDITOR. - SIR, - As an old admirer of Lloyd's, I must congratulate you on keeping up your policy of giving LATER NEWS THAN ANY OTHER PAPER. On Sunday last I was at Hastings, and called in at the shop of Mrs. Hart, newsagent, Bourne-street, to await the arrival of the London parcels at eleven o'clock. I bought a copy of each of the London Sunday penny papers, and subsequently the one high-priced paper, for which I had to pay sixpence. While Lloyd's gave reports of the two horrible murders in Whitechapel and Aldgate on Sunday morning, no other journal had the slightest mention of them. Hastings, therefore, was only made aware of these atrocities through the enterprise of your journal. - I am, sir, yours, &c., A SEASIDE VISITOR.

[In reference to the above our readers may be interested to learn that intelligence of the two murders reached Lloyd's office simultaneously, from two entirely different sources, at 10 minutes past two on Sunday morning. Confirmatory evidence was received five minutes later, but as particulars were wanting of the Aldgate tragedy, it was necessary to despatch a reporter to Mitre-square. He returned in time for us to have an account written, composed, stereotyped, and printing by four o'clock. Although over a hundred thousand of our Special Edition had been published, we were enabled, by means of our five double Hoe machines - each of which prints twenty thousand complete copies per hour - to send out a Quarter of a Million of Lloyd's News containing reports of the East-end atrocities. Many thousands of these were distributed throughout London, and in places as far distant as Hastings, long before any other paper appeared with an account. - ED. L.N.]

Reports have been circulated this week of a man having been seen in the streets with a black bag about the time of the murders; but suspicion was

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removed by a young traveller named Goldstein coming forward and stating that he was in Berner-street. A very singular circumstance, however, has been brought to our notice by the young man who gave us the first intimation of the murder in Mitre-square. He was walking from Poplar (having missed the last conveyance), and when opposite Aldgate East station a gentlemanly man came up and asked, "Did you hear a whistle, sir?" This was exactly at twelve minutes to two - four minutes after Police-constable Watkins says he discovered the murder. On our informant saying that he had not heard any whistle, the stranger remarked, "Perhaps it's a fire." Both then moved some little distance towards a bright light, but found that it came from a blaze of gas where some works were in progress. Here the two bade each other "Good night" and parted, the stranger walking in the direction of Houndsditch. Almost simultaneously a whistle was distinctly heard, and our informant hurried on with several policemen towards the spot from which it proceeded - Mitre-street. On reaching there he was surprised to find that the stranger who had addressed him had not followed, particularly after the inquiries respecting the whistling. He describes him as of gentlemanly appearance, good address, about 30 years of age, and about 5ft. 7in. in height; moreover, he carried a black shiny bag.
Three men, William Marshall, James Brown (both labourers), and Police-constable Smith have stated before the coroner that a man and woman did stand, in Fairclough-street, at the corner of Berner-street for some time - that is, from a quarter to 12 o'clock, as stated by Marshall, to a quarter before one a.m., the hour mentioned by Brown. The policeman appears to have seen the same pair in Berner-street at half-past 12, and he says the man carried a parcel. The evidence of another witness has yet to be taken, and this man seems to have had a better opportunity of observing the appearance of the stranger than any other individual, for it was at his shop that the grapes which other witnesses saw near the body were bought. This witness, Mathew Packer, has furnished information to the Scotland-yard authorities, and it was considered so important that he was examined in the presence of Sir Charles Warren himself. He has also identified the body of Elizabeth Stride as that of the woman who accompanied the man who came to his shop, not long before midnight on Saturday. The murderer is supposed to be a man without moustache, and who wore, on the morning of the latest tragedies at any rate, a soft felt hat or American hat. He is about 30; his height is about 5 feet 6 or 5 feet 7 inches; is decently dressed; speaks in a sharp, clear manner; and has an intelligent face.
Part of a woman's apron was on Monday found in Goulston-street, which there is little doubt belonged to the Aldgate victim. It is suggested, therefore, that the murderer travelled from Mitre-square, the scene of the second murder, by way of Goulston-street, and took away the apron for the purpose of cleansing his weapon upon it.

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The above sketch shows the City Coroner's court in Golden-lane during the examination of Mrs. Eliza Gold, the first witness on Thursday, and a sister of the murdered woman. In the top corner of the left Mr. Coroner Langham is depicted in one of his reflective moments, when, having raised his spectacles, he is deliberating some knotty point previous to asking another question of a witness or replying to Mr. Crawford, the City solicitor, who assists in the inquiry. On the opposite side appears the serious face of Watkins (881), the policeman who discovered the body in Mitre-square at 16 minutes to two on Sunday morning. John Kelly, the "gentleman" who lived with the dead woman, is a peculiar looking man, as will be seen by his picture. He is a man of perhaps 40 years, with a fresh coloured face, bronzed by a recent hop-picking excursion, a head of thick black hair, a somewhat low forehead, and moustache and imperial. He wore the fustian clothes of a market labourer, with a deep blue scarf round his neck, and spoke with a clear, deep, sonorous voice. Another type of character associated with the East-end is the deputy of the lodging-house in Flower and Dean-street, Frederick Wilkinson, who appeared very ill at ease in the coroner's court, and longing for his box at home. Both forcibly contrast with the handsome face of Dr. Gordon Brown, the surgeon to the City of London police force, who was called to see the body in the square and afterwards conducted the post-mortem examination. While waiting to be called he was preparing himself a pictorial memento of the tragedy, being occupied in making sketches of other witnesses. It took the doctor two hours to tell the horrible story of the injuries inflicted upon the deceased. According to Dr. Brown, the person who inflicted the wounds possessed a good deal of knowledge of the position of the organs of the body and the way of removing them. "Did you say possessed some medical knowledge?" suggested the coroner. "No, not necessarily," replied Dr. Gordon Brown, and he afterwards added that it was such knowledge as would most likely be possessed by one accustomed to cutting up animals.
The City has departed from the old custom of holding an inquest at the nearest public-house, and provided a lofty and fairly commodious room over the Mortuary. Its arched roof is depicted in the sketch, and also the arrangement of the court - the jury being seated in a double row on the left, and the legal gentlemen and leading police officers on the right. It may be as well to state that the jugs and glasses shown on the centre table, devoted to the use of reporters, contained the harmless beverage, good "honest water." At the outset the coroner was momentarily puzzled by finding one juryman in the box over and above the number who answered to their names. Some little excitement, more especially amongst the relatives and friends of the deceased woman, was occasioned by the passing of a Metropolitan policeman with a bag which contained the blood-stained apron and other evidences of the tragedy; but on the whole the day's proceedings were productive of few incidents. The room is a fairly large one, but accommodation was at a premium, so great was the interest which centred in this attempt to ascertain by what means and at whose hands the deceased came by her death. Only a favoured few of the general public, however, managed to get in. Before proceeding to the mortuary, Mr. S.F. Langham made a personal inspection of the scene of the crime, with a view to the better appreciation of the evidence bearing on the position of the body. The zealous interest of the Corporation in the proceedings was very manifest. Mr. Crawford, the City solicitor, started many theories, and the Commissioner, Colonel Sir James Fraser, the Assistant-Commissioner, and Supt. Foster were present, noting any possible clue.

[img][/img]

The figures in the above chart show the places where the six unfortunate women have been murdered within the past six months. The following is the tragic list: -

1. Emma Elizabeth Smith, 45, had a walking-stick or iron-tipped stake thrust into her body, near Osborn-street, Whitechapel, April 3.
2. Martha Tabram, 35, stabbed in 39 places, at George-yard-buildings, Commercial-street, Spitalfields, August 7.
3. Mary Ann Nicholls, 47, had her throat cut and body mutilated, in Buck's-row, Whitechapel, August 31.
4. Annie Chapman, 47, her throat cut and body mutilated, in Hanbury-street, Spitalfields, September 8.
5. Elizabeth Watts, or Stride, discovered with her throat cut in Berner-street, Whitechapel, on Sunday morning last, September 30.
6. Catherine Eddowes, alias Conway, alias Kelly, found with her throat cut and body mutilated in Mitre-square, Aldgate, also on Sunday morning last, September 30.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, October 7, 1888, Page 7

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Tue 25 Oct 2011 - 1:02

EAST-END ATROCITIES.

MITRE-SQUARE VICTIM IDENTIFIED.

The woman who was murdered in Mitre-square was identified late last night as Catherine Kelly, who used to reside in a common lodging-house at 55, Flower and Dean-street. Last night a man named John Kelly called at Bishopsgate-street Without Police Station, and was then taken to the Golden-lane Mortuary, where he identified the deceased. He stated that he had lived with her for seven years, and was positive she was the woman.

KELLY'S STORY - HIS SORROW.

Kelly is a man of about 40 years of age. He is of medium height, and, judging from his appearance, is a hard-working fellow. He was, it is said, considerably affected when he saw the body. He frankly and unreservedly told the story of their association to the authorities. The last time he saw her - and he spoke of the unfortunate woman as "Kate" - was on Saturday afternoon. The last meal she had with him was a breakfast which had been obtained by the pledging of his boots for 2s. 6d. But how, it was asked by the police, was it that she was out so late on Saturday night? That he could not explain. He left her (he said) in the afternoon, believing that she would return to him at the lodging-house in Flower and Dean-street. He had told her to go and see her daughter, and try and get "the price of a bed for the night." "Who is her daughter?" he was asked. "A married woman," he replied. "She is married to a gunmaker, and they live somewhere in Bermondsey - in King-street, I think it is called; but I never went there." "But why didn't you make inquiries as to her absence on Saturday?" "Well," he said, "I thought she had got into some trouble, and had been locked up, and I considered I had better wait. She was given to drinking. I had, indeed, cautioned her not to stay out late at night on account of the previous murders." "The initials "T.C.," what did they mean?" was the next question. Thomas Conway, he said, was the name of her husband. He could not state whether Conway was dead or alive. The murdered woman, he added, was, like himself, a Londoner. She was born at Bermondsey. They had just returned from hopping at a place which he was understood to call Hunton. "This," he said, "is about two miles from Coxheath, in Kent." "Kate and me," he at once added, "have gone through many hardships together; but while she was with me I would not let her do anything bad." "Has she any relatives besides the daughter?" asked an official. "Yes, she had a sister living in Thrawl-street, Spitalfields, with a man who sells farthing books in Liverpool-street."

THE MITRE-SQUARE VICTIM.

HER IDENTIFICATION.

The second victim in the double murder of Saturday night has now been identified. It is a singular fact that the man with whom for the past seven years she has lived, within a quarter of a mile of where she met her death, was not at all disconcerted at her not returning to him on Saturday or subsequent nights. Until yesterday he had not the slightest idea that the woman with whom he had lived was the person whose mangled body was found in Mitre-square on Sunday morning. Reading the papers, however, in a lodging-house in Flower and Dean-street, yesterday afternoon, he says that "something came over him" which convinced him that "his old woman" was the victim. He is a man of between thirty-six and forty. He is of medium height, rather dark complexion, and of a very pleasant demeanour. He gives the name of John Kelly, and, according to the deputy of the lodging-house at which he lives, is familiarly known as "Jack Kelly."

ALL HE KNOWS.

"Yes, I'll tell you all I know," he said to an Echo reporter, who accosted him in the kitchen of the lodging-house this afternoon. This apartment is about twenty feet long and fifteen in width. The ceiling is smoke-begrimed and low, but the floor is clean. The tables, ranged on either side, are crowded all day long with the occupants of the houses, some of whom discuss, at odd intervals, dubious-looking edibles, while their neighbours repose at arm's length across the white deal in a blissful state of slumber. There were about twenty people in the apartment when the reporter entered. Kelly took a seat at one of the deal tables, and proceeded to tell a tale of a particularly sad nature. "I have lived in the Deans" - by which the street is familiarly known - "for about ten years. About seven years ago the woman whose body I saw yesterday came here. Oh! she was such a good soul, was my Kate! I made up to her, and we got on well together, and so we decided that we'd live together. We were never married, and I don't want to make out that we were, but we never had a quarrel, and, as far as I know, Kate was always true to me. I used to get any odd job about in the market, and Kate was very often out charing. So we managed to get on very well, and at one time she never went outside the door without me. In the summertime we always went down into Kent hopping. We used sometimes to get on very well, but this year there was a bad crop, and it didn't pay us. We had to walk home after we finished. About three weeks ago, on the road, we picked up with another couple. They used to live in London, and the woman made Kate take a pawnticket she had for a flannel shirt that had been "popped" at Jones's, in Church-street. It was only for ninepence, but Kate took it, and we got the money. The other couple didn't come on to London, but went North.

OUT OF WORK.

"When we got back here Kate could not get any work, nor could I. Some days we did not have anything to eat at all, and many a day we've only earned enough to pay for our bed at night. Saturday we didn't know what to do. We had got nothing. I went into the Spitalfields-market early in the morning, and earned 4d. but that's all I could get. Towards the afternoon I told Kate to take my boots and pawn them. She wouldn't for a long time, and offered to pawn something of hers, if I'd let her. I wouldn't hear of that, so Kate took my boots and got 2s. 6d. for them. Well, we sat here just by this very table, and my old woman had the very same seat as you're in now, Sir. We had our tea, and then she said she thought she'd go and see a daughter of hers - a married daughter, I think she is. She used sometimes to go there, for her daughter only lived across in Bermondsey, and is very well off. I didn't want her to go that night, somehow. I was a bit afraid because of the Hanbury-street affair. However, she said she'd go, because she could get some help there, and the last words I said to her as she went out of the door were, "Don't be late, Kate, because of the knife!"
"What did that mean?" - "Well, that's how we talk about the man who's done all these murders, Sir. She turned round just before she went out and said, "Don't you trouble, Jack; I won't be late, and I shall be all right." Then she left the house, and I saw her next in the mortuary."

IDENTIFICATION.

"Are you certain it is her?" - "Yes, as sure as I am that I'm here. She had on her arm the letters "T.C." They were tattooed there by her husband, Tom Conway, who, she told me, used to be a soldier, and is now a pensioner. She never spoke to me about him much; but she once told me they didn't get on together well, and so they parted. We lived very well together, and we never had a quarrel all the seven years we knew each other."
Kelly seems to feel his loss very keenly. When taken to the mortuary last night he was very much affected; indeed, the appearance of the poor mangled form is such as would touch the hardest heart. It still lies just as it was found. Upon the breast are two withered chrysanthemums. They are very small, and when pinned there on Saturday night were pure white. They are faded now, and well-nigh shrivelled beyond recognition. In spite of the ghastly nature of the wounds in the face, Kelly at once recognised the woman as "his Kate," and was completely broken down.

POLICE RESEARCHES.

This morning the large force of police and detectives drafted into Whitechapel are making a house-to-house visitation, and leaving a handbill as follows: - "Police Notices - To the Occupier. - On the mornings of Friday, 31st August, Saturday, 8th, and Sunday, 30th September, 1888, two women were murdered in Whitechapel, it is supposed by someone residing in the immediate neighbourhood. Should you know of any person to whom suspicion is attached, you are earnestly requested to communicate at once with the nearest police-station. Metropolitan Police Office, 30th Sept., 1888."
The officers are also, in some instances, leaving it for the occupier of each tenement. It will be observed that the offer of any reward is carefully ignored, that the walls are placarded with large bills offering rewards through the aid of private subscription.

ONE OTHER EXPLANATION.

There is a story floating about the East-end which is thought by many to contain a possible explanation of the murders. A year or so since a Colonist came and settled near Wentworth-street. He had some money, and, as soon as the rumour of this got abroad, he was seized upon one night by loose women, rifled of all he had on him, and stripped naked in the streets. This so angered him that he went away swearing due vengeance on his assailants. Now, the supposition that this man is the murderer is not at all probable, but the story, about which there seems no doubt, is none the less a grim comment upon the kind of order that prevails in the streets at the back of Commercial-road. Where were the police when this unhappy stranger was robbed and stripped?

VOLUNTEERS AND THE MURDERS.

Colonel Sir Alfred Kirby, J.P., the Officer Commanding to the Tower Hamlets Battalion, Royal Engineers, has offered, on behalf of his officers, a reward of 100 pounds, to be paid to anyone who will give information that would lead to the discovery and conviction of the perpetrator or perpetrators of the recent diabolical murders committed in the district in which his regiment is situated. Sir Alfred Kirby is also willing to place the services of not more than fifty members of his corps at the disposal of the authorities, to be utilised in assisting them in any way they may consider desirable at his juncture, either for the protection of the public or finding out the criminals. Of course the Volunteers will have to be made use of as citizens, and not in a quasi-military capacity.

MR. MATTHEWS CRITICISED.

Commenting upon the East-end murders, the Dublin Express says: - It is unfortunate that the Home Office should be in the hands of a Minister without ragacity or sympathy, who looks with cold indifference on the excitement caused by the murders, and doggedly resists all pressure to offer a reward.

A MEDICAL STUDENT'S CONFESSION.

PRISONER BEFORE THE MAGISTRATE.
HE WITHDRAWS HIS STATEMENT.

This morning at the Guildhall Police-court, before Mr. Alderman Stone, William Bull, describing himself as a medical student of the London Hospital, and giving an address at Stannard-road Dalston, was placed in the dock, charged, on his own confession, with having committed the Aldgate murder. The prisoner appeared to have been drinking heavily.

HIS STATEMENT AT THE STATION.

Inspector Izzard said: - Last night at twenty minutes to eleven, the prisoner came into the room at Bishopsgate-street Station and made the following statement, which I took down after cautioning him. He said: - "My name is William Bull, and I live at Dalston. I am a medical student at the London Hospital, and I wish to give myself up for the murder in Aldgate. On Saturday night or Sunday morning, about two o'clock I think, I met the woman in Aldgate. I went with her up a narrow street not far from the main road. I promised to give her half-a-crown. While walking along together there was a second man, who came up and took the half-crown from her. I cannot endure this longer. My poor head! (He put his hands to his head and cried, or pretended to cry) I shall go mad. I have done it, and I must put up with it." The Inspector asked what had become of the clothes he had on when the murder was committed. The prisoner said, "If you wish to know, they are in the Lea, and the knife I threw away."

HAD BEEN DRINKING HEAVILY.

At this point (said the witness) the prisoner declined to say any more. He was drunk, and apparently had been drinking heavily. Part of the statement was made in the presence of Major Smith. The prisoner gave a correct address, but is not known at the London Hospital. His parents are very respectable, and the prisoner has been out of employ. The Inspector (in conclusion) asked for a remand for a few days to make inquiries.
The prisoner, in answer to the Alderman, said he was mad drunk when he made the statement. As for the murder said to have been committed by him, it was impossible.
Inspector Izzard said that when searched the prisoner had on him a very small knife, a half-penny, and a wheel from a watch.
Prisoner was remanded, the Alderman refusing to grant bail.

Source: The Echo, Wednesday October 3, 1888, Page 3

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Tue 25 Oct 2011 - 1:04

THIS DAY'S NEWS.
EAST-END ATROCITIES.

LATEST DETAILS.
A CANARD FROM SHADWELL.

"MURDERER'S LAST VICTIM."
PURSUING AN AMERICAN.

CAPTURED IN A CAB.
EXCITING NIGHT SCENES IN WHITECHAPEL.

SEVERAL ARRESTS MADE.

There was an exciting story current this evening. High-street, Shadwell, was its locale. There had been a terrible struggle with a man - that man the East-end murderer. Driven to extremity, he had used a knife - some said a pistol - on his assailant. He, poor fellow, was killed; but a prompt Nemesis immediately laid the murderer by the heels, and he was soon enjoying the security of a police cell.
The inspector at the Shadwell Police-station laughed heartily when the story was told him. "Why," said he, "I was talking to the man said to be killed - a watchman - several hours after the time he met his terrible death." "A false alarm," added he with another laugh and a good-natured joke at the ubiquitous journalist. And the people in the neighbourhood had heard nothing of the affair. The policemen laughed, the post-office official added at the excellence of the canard. And as this disproving evidence was being gathered the papers containing the latest details of the murderer's last fight were being invoked in the streets.

The reign of terror that has held undisrupted away in the East-end since Sunday still continues with unabated force. The popular excitement and indignation, as time passes on, seems, if anything, to be intensifying, and public and police alike are becoming more and more determined to leave no stone unturned to unearth and bring to justice the miscreant who, doubtless, still haunts the scene of his fiendish deeds. A widespread feeling of exasperation pervades all classes of society in the East-end, and should the murderer fall into the clutches of a Whitechapel crowd, the exasperation will, it is declared, find escape in an outburst which it would be difficult for even the police to control.

A FLEET-STREET STORY.

Late last night the wildest rumours were about, and the region east of Aldgate witnessed a series of scenes unprecedented, perhaps in the history of London crime. Again and again reports came to hand that the murderer had been captured in this and that district. These rumours, of course, only tended to increase the excitement which had seized on the community. Shortly before midnight, a story was circulating in Fleet-street to the effect that the unknown murderer had been surprised in the act of attempting one of his now too familiar outrages on a female in Union-street. The woman, so the tale went, was lured by "the monster" into a side street, but the gleam of a steel blade at once warned her to a sense of the danger she was in, and her loud screams immediately brought to the spot a man and some two or three women, who were said to have been watching the movements of the couple. The would-be murderer, on hearing the rapid pattering of approaching footsteps, at once - as the story goes - took to his heels, followed down the street by his male pursuer, who overtook him and knocked the knife which he held out of his hand. The unknown man, however, darted into the road, jumped into a passing cab, and told the cabman, who seemed perplexed by the suddenness of the affair, to drive wherever he liked. Off went the cab, followed by the howling crowd that had, like magic, swarmed into the street. The police joined in the pursuit, and the vehicle was speedily surrounded and stopped, and its occupant captured in gallant fashion and taken to Leman-street Police-station.

WHAT GAVE RISE TO IT.

For a time this astounding rumour caused quite a stir. At last the inevitable inquiries were made at Leman-street. There it was established that the report possessed only the barest substance of truth. What really gave rise to the extraordinary narrative was this. Just after ten o'clock a well-dressed man rushed out of the Three Nuns public-house in Aldgate, followed by a woman who in a loud voice declared to the loungers and passers-by that he had molested and threatened her. While he was thus being denounced the stranger hailed a cab, jumped in, and proceeded to drive off. A hue and cry was at once raised, and the vehicle was followed by an excited and hooting mob, which rapidly grew in numbers and increased in excitement. It was the universal belief that the murderer was the occupant, and a hot pursuit was given. In a moment or two the cab was stopped, and a police-constable got in, secured the man, and directed the cabman to drive to the Leman-street police-station. Here the prisoner was formally charged on suspicion.

THE PRISONER AT THE STATION.

The cab was followed to the station by the girl who had raised the outcry. She stated to the police in the most emphatic manner that the prisoner had first accosted and molested her in the street, and that when she refused to accede to his proposals he threatened physical violence. This occurred in the Whitechapel High-street. While the woman was making her statement the prisoner held down his head and looked at the ground, and he never once attempted a denial. When, however, a man stepped forward to corroborate the girl's story, he looked up angrily and denied the truth of the allegation with considerable emphasis. The woman was then asked if she desired to make any charge, but declined to do so, and shortly after left the station.

IN CUSTODY ALL NIGHT.

It was, however, deemed prudent by the officer in charge to detain the man pending inquiries. He is an athletically-built determined-looking fellow, apparently about forty years of age, with a dark moustache and clearly-cut features. On his pockets being searched no weapons of any kind were found upon him. He gave his name but refused to state his address. When removed to the cell his attitude became defiant. In the course of the conversation which he carried on with a slightly American accent while pacing up and down his place of confinement, the frequency with which he used the word "Boss" was particularly noticed. The man is stated to have been slightly under the influence of drink when brought to the station. Throughout the night he maintained the attitude of defiance, and little or no information regarding his identity, and the nature of his movements, could be extracted from him. He remained in custody all night, being discharged at half-past nine this morning, inquiries having satisfied the police that he was not the man "wanted."

SECOND ARREST - IN RATCLIFF-HIGHWAY.

Between nine and ten o'clock last night another arrest was effected in the Ratcliff-Highway, by Sergeant Adams, of the H Division. The officer in question, hearing a woman screaming for help in an adjacent court, proceeded in the direction of the cries, and met a man, who was evidently a foreigner, leaving the place. He took the fellow into custody, more especially as it occurred to him that he bore a striking resemblance to the published police description of the man who is said to have been seen with "Long Liz" on the Saturday night preceding her murder. The captive, who went quietly to the Leman-street police-station, told the sergeant he was sailing from this country for America today. At the police-station, the man told the inspector that he was a Maltese, and willingly furnished his name and address. No weapons were found upon him. The inquiries that were instituted proving to be quite satisfactory, the unlucky foreigner was released in the course of the morning. This capture gave rise in the course of the night to some wild and grossly exaggerated rumours. Not only was it currently reported that the murderer had been captured, but it was asserted that the police officer in securing him had been stabbed. This report even reached, the headquarters of the City Police at Old Jewry.

A THIRD ARREST - IN SHADWELL.

A third arrest was also made in Shadwell at a late hour last night in the neighbourhood of Cable-street, and the man brought to Leman-street. Here again the man was able to give a very straightforward and satisfactory explanation as to his identity and other particulars, and there was no other course open to the police than to at once discharge him.

NO CLUE - NO PRISONER.

The Shadwell story is by no means the only canard in currency. The air is full of wild rumours, the majority of them being without the slightest foundation. A Press representative has, however, been assured this afternoon, at Old Jewry, and also at Leman-street, that absolutely nothing bearing on the murders has occurred, and that up to the present no actual clue to the perpetrator has been obtained. Matters stand now, so far as the murderer is concerned, just where they did on Sunday last, and it is safe to state that not the faintest evidence likely to lead to detection and arrest has been forthcoming as yet. At the present moment there is not one person under detention.

THE CORPORATION REWARD.

At the meeting of the Corporation of London, today, the decision of the Lord Mayor to offer a reward of 500 pounds for the capture of the Mitre-square murderer was unanimously confirmed.

UPPER NORWOOD EXCITED.

The Whitechapel craze has extended to the genteel neighbourhood lying between Upper Norwood and Croydon, and a belief is held by many persons that the murderer, whoever he may be, finds concealment in a dense wood which skirts Leather Bottle-lane and leads on to Croydon. The police of the district have been acquainted with the supposition, but the foundation for it appears to be very slight. It appears, however, that the gardeners in the employ of Mr. Horne, to whom the wood belongs, have seen a person dressed as a woman, but whom they assert is a man, lurking about the wood at night. Not much attention would be paid to the reports in an ordinary way, but it is said that on each of the nights that the murders have been committed since August the person has been seen to enter the wood. The police are inquiring into the matter. The gardeners who have charge of the woods by night have armed themselves with guns.

THE MITRE SQUARE VICTIM.

OPENING OF THE INQUEST.

Mr. S.F. Langham, the City Coroner, opened the inquest at the City Coroner's Court, Golden-lane, this morning, on the body of the woman who was found murdered and mutilated in Mitre-square on Sunday morning last. The body has been identified as that of Catherine Eddowes; but the deceased has also been known by the names of Conway and Kelly.
Superintendent Forster attended on behalf of the City Police; while Mr. Crawford, the City Solicitor, watched the case on behalf of the Corporation.
Seventeen Jurymen were empanelled, and they, together with the witnesses and reporters, occupied nearly all the available space in the Coroner's Court. There was, however, a small space behind the barrier at the end of the Court, which was set apart for the general public, but it only contained a few occupants.

A SISTER'S IDENTIFICATION.

Eliza Gould, a widow, was the first witness examined. She said - I live at 6, Thrall-street, Spitalfields. I recognise the body of the deceased as that of my poor sister. Her name was Catherine Eddowes.
The Coroner - Where has she been living? - I do not know.
Was she married? - Well, Sir, she had been living with a gentleman.
Was she married? - No
Who has she been living with? - With a Mr. Kelly. She has lived with him for some years.
What was her age? - About 42 years.
When did you see her last? - About four or five months ago.
How did she get her living? - She used to go out hawking. She was a woman of sober habits.
Before she went to live with Kelly had she lived with anyone else? - Yes, she had lived with a man named Conway. She had lived with him for some years, and had two children by him. I do not know whether Conway is still living.
"What was Conway?" asked the Coroner.
"He had been in the Army," replied witness.
"He had been pensioned off, and went out hawking. I believe they parted on good terms."
I suppose you have no doubt that the body you have seen is that of your sister? - I am quite sure.
By Mr. Crawford - I have not seen Conway for six or seven years. I saw the deceased with Kelly about four or five weeks ago. They were then living at a common lodging-house in Flower and Dean-street. I have not seen my sister since.

KELLY'S EVIDENCE.

John Kelly then entered the witness-box. He said: I live at 55, Flower and Dean-street, and am a labourer in Spitalfields Market. I have seen the body of the deceased, and identify it as that of a woman whom I knew as Catherine Conway. She had been living with me for the past seven years.
The Coroner - When were you last in her company? - At about two o'clock on Saturday afternoon.
"Where?" asked the Coroner.
"In Houndsditch, Sir," replied the witness. "I left her there, and we parted on very good terms. She told me that she was going over to Bermondsey to try and find her daughter Annie.
Was Conway the father of Annie? - I believe so, Sir. "She promised me (continued the witness) to be back by four o'clock, and no later. She, however, did not return. I heard that she had been locked up at the Bishopsgate-street Police-station on Saturday night."
How did you hear that? - An old woman told me that she saw her being taken to the station.
Did you make any inquiries? - I did not, because I thought she would be let out on the Sunday morning. I was told that she had been locked up for being intoxicated.
Did you ever know that she went out for any immoral purposes?
"No!" answered the witness, with emphasis; "I never suffered her to do so."
Was she in the habit of drinking to excess? - No, Sir; only slightly.
When you left her had she any money about her? - No, Sir.
In answer to other questions, witness continued: - The deceased went to look for a daughter with a view to getting a little money to prevent her from walking the streets.
"What do you mean by that?" asked the Coroner.
"I mean that there have been times when we have had no money, and we have had to walk about the streets together all night.

KNEW NO ONE WHO WOULD INJURE HER.

Do you know any one who would be likely to injure her? - No, Sir; neither do I know whether she had seen Conway lately. She generally returned home at about eight or nine o'clock at night.
By Mr. Crawford - The deceased left me a few months ago, in consequence of a few words. She, however, only remained away a few hours. She never went out at night time. I understand (continued witness) that her daughter lives in King-street, Bermondsey.

WITHOUT MONEY AND WITHOUT FOOD.

After further questions, the witness stated that he had not slept at the lodging-house in Flower and Dean-street this week. He and the deceased had been hop-picking in Kent. We returned (he said) on Thursday. We had no money, so we went to the casual ward in Shoe-lane. We walked about all day on Friday. I earned sixpence by doing a "job," and told her to come to the lodging-house with me and we would buy a bit of food. She, however, told me to go and pay for my lodgings and she would go to the Mile-end casual ward. She accordingly went to that place to sleep. On Saturday morning we pawned a pair of boots for 2s. 6d. The greater part of the money was expended in drink and food. She at the time bought the tea and sugar which has been found in her pockets.
Mr. Crawford - During the past seven years has the deceased ever brought money to you as having earned it at night? - No, never.
In answer to further questions, witness said - It may have been Friday when the boots were pawned. I know that the deceased pawned them while I stood outside the shop in my bare feet.

KATE AND KELLY AT THE LODGING-HOUSE.

Frederick William Wilkinson, the deputy of the lodging-house at 55, Flower and Dean-street, said the deceased and Kelly lived at the lodging-house as man and wife. They seldom quarrelled, but had a few words "when Kate was in drink." She was not often intoxicated, however. He (witness) had never seen Kelly the worse for drink. He saw the deceased on Friday afternoon. She left the lodging-house on the evening of that day. He, however, saw her again on Saturday morning between ten and eleven. She was then with Kelly. "I did not see Kate again," added the deputy.
The Coroner - Was she in the habit of walking the streets? - Not to my knowledge. She was generally in the house by nine or ten o'clock at night. She told me that she had been married, and that her name was Kate Conway, but I never saw the man Conway. The deceased used to say, "My name is bought and paid for," meaning, of course, that she had been married." When Kelly (continued the witness) came to the lodging-house at about half-past seven on Saturday night to pay for a bed, I asked him, "Where's Kate?" He replied that he had heard she had been locked up, and he took a single bed.
"I suppose there is a difference in the price," said the Coroner.
Yes; a single bed is 4d., and a double bed 8d.
By Mr. Crawford - The last time the deceased and Kelly slept at the lodging-house was about five or six weeks ago, before they went hopping. Kelly went to bed at about ten o'clock on Saturday night, and he was in the lodging-house at dinner time on Sunday. When I saw the deceased on Saturday she was, I believe, wearing an apron.

NO STRANGE LODGERS.

Mr. Crawford - Did anyone come into your lodging-house between one and two o'clock on Sunday morning; any strangers, for instance? - There were no strangers at the lodging-house that night.
Did anyone else come in at that time? - I cannot recollect.
By a Juror - On the Friday night the deceased and Kelly had sixpence between them. I would, however, have let them into the house. I always trust my regular lodgers, and give them beds.

POLICE-CONSTABLE WATKINS'S BEAT.

Police-constable Edward Watkins, of the City police, gave evidence as to the finding of the body of the deceased. He said: - I have been in the City police force for seventeen years. I was on duty in Mitre-square on Saturday night. My beat extended from the corner of Duke-street, Aldgate, through Heneage-lane, a portion of Berry-street, through Creechurch-lane, into Leadenhall-street, along Leadenhall-street, Eastward, into Mitre-street, thence into Mitre-square, round the square, and then again into Mitre-street, into King-street, along King-street to St. James'-place, round St. James'-place, and thence into Duke-street - the starting place. The beat takes twelve or fourteen minutes. I had been continually patrolling the beat from 10 o'clock p.m. to 1 a.m. on Sunday. Nothing (said the witness) attracted my attention during those hours. I passed through Mitre-square at 1:30 on Sunday morning. I had my lantern fixed in my belt alight, and turned on. I then examined the different corners and warehouses, but saw nothing to attract my attention. No one could have been in any portion of the square without my seeing them.

DISCOVERING THE BODY.

I next went into Mitre-square at about 1:44 a.m. As I entered the square from Mitre-street I turned to the right and saw the body of a woman lying in the corner. She was lying on her back. Her throat was cut. The stomach had been ripped up, and the intestines were protruding. She was lying in a pool of blood. I did not touch the body. I first ran across to Messrs. Kearley and Tong's warehouse. The door was ajar. I pushed it open, and called to Morris, the watchman, who was inside. He came out, and I sent him for assistance. I remained by the side of the body until Police-constable Holland arrived. There was no one about at that time. Dr. Sequeira and Dr. Brown, surgeon of Police, shortly afterwards arrived

SAW NO ONE RUNNING AWAY.

Mr. Crawford: As you entered the square did you see anyone running away? - No, Sir.
The Coroner: How was it that the door was left open at the warehouse? - Because the watchman was at work inside. It is nothing unusual for the door to be left open during the night.
Mr. Frederick William Forster, architect and surveyor, put in plans of the scene of the murder. He had, he said, also marked on the Ordnance Map produced the routs from Berner-street and Mitre-square. It was a distance of about three quarters of a mile. It would take about twelve minutes to walk the distance. It was the nearest route that anyone unaccustomed to the neighbourhood would have taken.

FOUND IN GOULSTON-STREET.

Mr. Crawford - Is not Goulston-street in the direct route from Mitre-street to Flower and Dean-street? - Yes.
Mr. Crawford mentioned that a portion of the murdered woman's apron was found in Goulston-street.
Frederick William Wilkinson, who had been to Flower and Dean-street to fetch the lodging-house book, was called.
Mr. Crawford - Can you tell me by that book if Kelly slept at the lodging-house on Saturday night? - Yes. He occupied No. 52 bed on Friday and Saturday nights.

STRANGERS WERE IN THE HOUSE.

Now can you tell me if anyone came in between one and two o'clock on Sunday morning? - My book does not show the time.
Can you tell me whether there were any strangers in the house that night? - Yes, there were six men. But I cannot say whether they entered the lodging-house between one and two o'clock that morning.
Do you remember any stranger going out shortly after midnight? - I cannot say. We are so busy just about that time.

THE MURDER DISCOVERED.

Inspector Edward Collard, of the City of London Police, was next examined. He said - At five minutes before two on Sunday last I received information at Bishopsgate Police-station that a woman had been murdered in Mitre-square. After dispatching the intelligence to headquarters and to Dr. Gordon Brown, I proceeded to the Square. I there found Dr. Sequeira, several police officers, and the body of a woman lying in the south-west corner of the Square. The body was not touched until the arrival of Dr. Gordon Brown. He, however, arrived shortly after I got there. The medical gentleman examined the body, and Sergeant Jones afterwards picked up, on the left side of the deceased, three small black boot buttons, a small metal button, a metal thimble, and a small mustard tin containing two pawn-tickets. The body was afterwards removed to the mortuary. There was no money in her pockets. There was some tea and sugar, a piece of flannel, some soap, a cigarette case, and an empty match-box in her pocket. The portion of an apron (produced) was what deceased was wearing, and corresponds with the piece of apron which has been found in Goulston-street. Chief Detective McWilliams arrived at Mitre-square soon after the murder was discovered. He was accompanied by a number of detectives, and they made inquiries at the various lodging-houses in Spitalfields, and several men were stopped and searched in the street, but without any satisfactory result. I have had a house-to-house inquiry made in the vicinity of Mitre Square (continued witness) to see if we could find any person who heard or saw anything unusual in the square that night.
By Mr. Crawford - There was no sign of any struggle having occurred in the square. We could find no trace of footsteps. A search was made at the back of the empty houses in the square, but without result.

MEDICAL EVIDENCE.

Dr. Gordon Brown, surgeon of the City of London Police Force, then gave evidence. He said - I was called shortly after two o'clock on Sunday morning. I consequently went to Mitre-square, and my attention was there called to the body of a woman. The body was on its back, the head turned to the left shoulder, the arms by the side of the body - as if they had fallen there. Both palms were turned upwards, and the fingers slightly bent. The bonnet was at the back of the head, and there was great disfigurement of the face. The throat was cut across, and below the cut was a neckerchief. The upper part of the dress was open - it had been pulled open. The abdomen had been ripped up and the intestines drawn out to a large extent, and placed over the right shoulder. A piece of intestine, about two feet in length, was quite detached from the body, and placed between the left arm and body. The lobe of the right ear was cut obliquely through; there was a quantity of clotted blood on the left side of the body on the pavement. There was also a large quantity of liquid blood, which had flowed out of the neck on to the right shoulder. The body was quite warm, and no death-stiffness had set in. The woman had probably only been dead within thirty or forty minutes. There was no spurt of blood on the bricks or pavement near the body; neither were there any marks of blood below the middle of the body. I made a post-mortem examination (continued Dr. Brown) at the mortuary, on Sunday afternoon. The hands and arms were bronzed, as if with the sun. The injuries to the face were as follows: - There was a cut a quarter of an inch in length through the lower left eyelid, dividing the structures completely through. On the upper eye-lid on that side there was a scratch through the skin, near to the angle of the nose. The right eye-lid was also cut through to the extent of half-an-inch. There was a deep cut over the bridge of the nose, extending from the left border of the nasal bone, across the cheek, down to near the angle of the jaw on the right side. The tip of the nose was quite detached by an oblique cut. A cut from this divided the upper lip, and extended through the substance of the gum. About half an inch from the tip of the nose was another oblique cut. There was also a cut at the right angle of the mouth, as if by the point of a knife, and extended an inch and a half parallel with the mouth and the lower lip.

PARTS OF THE BODY MISSING.

In a subsequent part of his statement, Dr. Brown said - The left kidney had been carefully taken away, and the artery cut through.
Mr. Crawford - Do you draw any special conclusion from that?
I think that someone who knew the position of the kidney, and how to take it out, must have done it. The womb was cut through leaving a stump of about three-quarters of an inch, (the rest of the womb was absent, and had been taken away with some of the ligaments.
Mr. Crawford - When you speak of the left kidney being taken away, do you think it was taken away altogether? - Yes; it could not be found anywhere.
The inquest was shortly afterwards adjourned.

CATHERINE EDDOWES' CAREER.

A Wolverhampton Correspondent telegraphs: -
Additional interest has been given in Wolverhampton to the London horrors, owing to the discovery that the victim of the Mitre-square tragedy is a native of that town, where several relatives still reside. A married woman named Croote, wife of Jesse Croote, a horse-dealer, and an aunt of the woman named Eddowes, who lives in Bilston-street, Wolverhampton, have been interviewed. They state that the deceased woman, Kate Eddowes, was the daughter of a tin-plate worker, who for some years was employed at the Old Hall Works, Wolverhampton, as a tinplate stamper. Her mother was a cook at the Peacock Hotel in that town, and the family went to London some years ago, where the father and mother died, leaving a family of twelve children. How many of them are living the relatives in Wolverhampton are unable to say. Mrs. Croote states that the murdered woman would be about forty-three years of age.

ELOPING WITH A PENSIONER.

When she was about twenty years of age she ran away to Birmingham, where she became acquainted with an old pensioner, who gained a living by selling pamphlets relating to his own history, and with whom she lived. She travelled with him and assisted him to sell his pamphlets. Four or five years afterwards she suddenly appeared at the residence of her aunt, by whom she was reared as a child, in a destitute and dirty condition. An uncle of the deceased lives in Birmingham. - William Eddowes, a respectable working-man, living at Wolverhampton, states that the deceased, when young, was given to keeping late hours, and that she was of a "jolly" disposition.

Source: The Echo, Thursday October 4, 1888, Page 5

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Tue 25 Oct 2011 - 1:07

THE WHITECHAPEL HORRORS.

LONDON, Oct. 1 - The Daily Telegraph commenting on the Whitechapel murders, says: "If the Home Secretary fails to wake up and do his duty, Lord Salisbury will have do dismiss a minister who has not good sense enough to resign."

Source: The Montreal Daily Witness, Monday October 1, 1888, Page 1

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Tue 25 Oct 2011 - 1:08

TELEGRAPHIC NEWS.
CABLE.

THE LONDON MURDERS.

LONDON, Oct. 2 - The inquest of the Mitre square victim will be held on Thursday. The medical evidence will show that the uterus and one kidney were missing.

Source: The Montreal Daily Witness, Tuesday October 2, 1888, Page 1

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Tue 25 Oct 2011 - 1:09

TELEGRAPHIC NEWS.
CABLE.

THE WHITECHAPEL MURDERER.

LONDON, Oct. 3 - Mr. Forbes, the noted war correspondent, writes to the Daily News that he is convinced that the Whitechapel assassin got disease from one of his victims, lost his situation and is suffering from specific madness. He suggests that the murderer is a medical student.

LONDON, Oct. 3 - Prof. Axe, principal of the Royal Veterinary College, has expressed himself very decidedly in favor of the proposal to place bloodhounds at the eastern and western police stations in the east end, and have them trained daily and kept in readiness for immediate use in running the Whitechapel murderer down. The professor's belief in the utility of the ferocious animals is strengthened by his conviction that the murderer will soon resume his butcheries in view of his success in eluding detection. The general dread of the appearance of the murderer in other districts of London has greatly stimulated subscriptions to the various funds raised for a reward for his capture and the aggregate sum now available is upwards of 1,500 pounds. The friction between the municipal and metropolitan police increases and Gen. Sir Charles Warren's fussy military methods are roundly denounced on all sides. The St. James's Gazette closes an article savagely criticizing Gen. Warren's administration with a prayer for a squad of New York detectives to give to the London police a few lessons in the profession they have apparently unwisely chosen.

Source: The Montreal Daily Witness, Wednesday October 3, 1888, Page 1

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Tue 25 Oct 2011 - 1:11

ENGLISH MAIL NEWS.
PER R.M.S. IONIC.

THE WHITECHAPEL TRAGEDIES.
WHAT THE INQUEST REVEALED.

LONDON, October 6.

The Press Association states that the excitement and indignation which are apparent in East London was increased yesterday by the startling announcement by Dr. Brown, at the inquest, that a similar organ to that missing from the body of Annie Chapman had been cut away from the body of Kate Eddowes found in Mitre-square. There had been suspicions of this fact, which now renders the murderer's object the more mysterious, since the doctor is so emphatic in his assertion that the obtaining of these portions of the woman's body could be of no use of medical research. Dr. Brown stated that the clever manner in which the left kidney and other organs were removed betokened that the murderer was well versed in anatomy, but not necessarily human anatomy, for he could have gained a certain amount of skill by reason of his being a slaughterer of animals. These remarks conclusively show that the same hand which caused the death of previous victims is also reponsible for killing Kate Eddowes and, in all probability, Elizabeth Stride in Berner-street, although in the latter case he may have been disturbed before he had time to complete the mutilation, in the peculiarly horrible manner which characterises his fiendish work.
The Central News says: - The surgical evidence given at the inquest yesterday has caused a profound sensation. It had been supposed that the murderer did not have time to do more than take his victim's life, and then roughly mutilate her body, but it now appears that he completed his horrible work with reckless deliberation, and removed certain organs. The additional mutilation of the face is believed to be due to fears on the murderer's part that he may have been seen in the woman's company by someone, and therefore determined to make her identification as difficult as possible. The announcement of Dr. Brown of the disappearance of the uterus revived for a time the theory put forward by Mr. Wynne Baxter, the coroner, in the Hanbury-street case.
The British Medical Journal, however, states that the foreign physician who sought to purchase specimens was a gentleman of the highest respectability, that he did not offer a large price, and that he left London 18 months ago.

Source: The Mercury, Friday 16 November 1888, page 4

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Tue 25 Oct 2011 - 1:30

EAST END TRAGEDIES.

FOLLOWING UP "CLUES."

In reply to inquiries made at the East-end police stations this morning a reporter was informed that no arrests had been made during the night. The search is still being rigorously prosecuted by the vigilants as well as by the police. Evidence of this is afforded by the fact that during the night the detectives were kept busy following up clues communicated to the authorities. In every case, however, the suspected persons were able to give a satisfactory account of themselves, and were not formally arrested.

TOM CONWAY FOUND.

A "MYSTERIOUS LODGER."
A SUSPICIOUS INCIDENT EXPLAINED.

Tom Conway has been found, or rather, he has discovered himself. Conway is the man who lived with Catherine Eddowes, the woman murdered in Mitre-square. Up to yesterday the efforts of the detectives had been at fault, owing, as was suggested by the City Solicitor at the inquest, to the fact that Conway has drawn his pension from the 18th Royal Irish Regiment under a false name, that of Thomas Quinn. Apparently he has not read the papers, for he was ignorant till the last few days that he was being sought for. Then, however, he learned that the City detectives were inquiring after him, and yesterday afternoon he and his two sons went to the detective office of the City police in Old Jewry, and explained who they were. Conway was at once taken to see Mrs. Annie Phillips, Eddowes's daughter, who recognised him as her father. He states that he left Eddowes in 1880, in consequence of her intemperate habits, which prevented them from living comfortably together. He knew that she had since been living with Kelly, and has once or twice seen her in the streets, but has, as far as possible, kept out of her way, as he did not wish to have any further communication with her. Conway had followed the occupation of a hawker. The police describe him as evidently a man of very exemplary character. He alluded to his wife's misconduct before their separation with evident pain.

"THE MATTER MAY BE DISMISSED."

On making inquiries of the City Police, this morning, a reporter found that the investigations made by Superintendent Farmer, of the River Tyne Police, respecting a man who sailed for a French port, and whose description is stated to have corresponded with that of the Whitechapel murderer, have not resulted in any satisfactory communication to them. The matter may accordingly be dismissed as of no importance.

A GERMAN'S ARREST.

A strange and suspicious incident in connection with the Whitechapel murders has just been explained by the arrest, late on Saturday, of a German whom the police had every reason to suspect as being connected with the murder of Elizabeth Stride, at Berner-street. The affair has until now been kept a profound secret; but the matter was, it is asserted, regarded at first as of such importance that Inspector Reid, Inspector Abberline, and the other officers engaged in the case, believed that a clue of a highly important character had been obtained. It appears that Detective-sergeants W. Thicke and S. White, of the Criminal Investigation Department, made a house-to-house inquiry in the locality of the Berner-street murder. They then discovered that on the day after that crime a German left a blood-stained shirt with a laundress at 22 Batty-street - a few yards from the seat of the tragedy - and remarking, "I shall call in two or three days," departed in a hurried manner. His conduct was deemed highly suspicious. Detectives Thicke and White, who probably know more of the East-end criminals than any other officers, arrested the man suspected on Saturday night. He was conveyed to Leman-street Station, and inquiries were immediately set on foot. These resulted in the man's release yesterday. Our representative made an inquiry respecting the above incident in the afternoon, and ascertained that the shirt had a quantity of blood on the front and on both sleeves. This is, of course, the sequel to the exciting story concerning the bloodstained shirt which was current yesterday.

MORE CONSTABLES FOR WHITECHAPEL.

The Whitechapel tradesmen are by no means satisfied with the assurances of the Home Secretary. They know that winter is coming, and they fear the danger which may then exist in their insufficiently protected district. They, to the number of 200, have thus signed a petition to Mr. Matthews asking for additional constables. This petition will be presented by Mr. S. Montagu, M.P.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday October 16, 1888, Page 3

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Tue 25 Oct 2011 - 1:32

THIS DAY'S NEWS.

ARM FOUND AT PECKHAM.
THOUGHT TO BE A STUDENT'S FREAK.

The particulars transpired this morning of a discovery of human bones, which may or may not be of some importance. It appears that on Thursday evening a boy named Alfred Tomlinson, living at 102, Cator-street, Peckham, was walking along an adjoining thoroughfare - Sumner-road - when he noticed a parcel lying in the gutter. His curiosity led him to examine it, and he was, of course, rather alarmed to find that it contained some bones. He took the parcel to his employer - Mr. Brown, a hairdresser, of the Sumner-road - who at once called in a police-constable. Then all three went to the police-station in High-street, Peckham. The divisional surgeon, Dr. Phelps, was fetched; and it is understood that as a result of his examination the conclusion was arrived at that the bones were those of a woman's arm. Mr. Woodman, the Coroner's officer, was communicated with, and then the bones were removed to the Camberwell mortuary. Mr. Wyatt, the Coroner, has been informed of the discovery, but as yet no further action has been taken in the matter. The bones have either been boiled or are decaying. There is a supposition in the locality that the discovery may have some connection with the discoveries at Pimlico and Whitehall; but this is not encouraged by the authorities, who appear to hold the belief that the present "find" is due to a senseless freak on the part of a medical student.

WHITEHALL MYSTERY.

THE SEARCH STILL FRUITLESS.

There have been no further remains discovered at Whitehall, notwithstanding the continued use of the bloodhounds and the zealous efforts of the police. The officers yesterday devoted their attention principally to excavating the ground in the basement facers, Sir Charles Warren himself being present during a portion of the operation. Though the search was fruitless it is their intention to persevere in it both at this particular spot and elsewhere. Meanwhile, the authorities are continuing their application for all particulars of missing young women from places at home or abroad, who answer the supposed description of the deceased person - namely, about 5ft. 8in., plump, not used to manual labour, well formed, with fair skin and somewhat dark hair, and who had suffered from pleurisy. It is regarded as important that this description should be before the public.

EAST-END ATROCITIES.
THE "KIDNEY INCIDENT."

INQUIRING FOR THE MAN WHO SENT IT.
POLICE FOLLOWING UP A CLUE.

The "kidney incident" is still the chief topic of conversation in connection with the atrocities. There are a large number who regard it - as Dr. Sedgwick Saunders regards it - as "the disgusting trick of some practical joker"; but there are elements connected with the affair which induce some among the authorities to attach value to it. That it is a human organ is generally accepted. Of course, that in itself does not go for much, remembering that medical students can obtain such an organ without any great difficulty. A small portion of the renal artery is, however, attached to it. This is at least singular. It will be remembered that a large portion of the renal artery adhered to the body of the Mitre-square victim. The Curator of the Pathological Museum of the London Hospital generally agrees with Dr. Sedgwick Saunders' opinion of the affair. The article - which was the anterior of the left kidney - had been, according to him in spirit for ten days. The Curator believes it to be a human organ, but he says until it has undergone a more minute examination it is almost impossible to say whether it has been extracted from the body of a male or female.

A MYSTERIOUS VISITOR TO MILE-END.

A statement which apparently gives a clue to the sender of the strange package received by Mr. Lusk was made last night by Miss Emily Marsh, whose father carries on business in the leather trade at 218, Jubilee-street, Mile-end-road. In Mr. Marsh's absence Miss Marsh was in the front shop, shortly after one o'clock on Monday last, when a stranger, dressed in clerical costume, entered, and, referring to the reward bill in the window, asked for the address of Mr. Lusk, described therein as the president of the Vigilance Committee. Miss Marsh at once referred the man to Mr. J. Aarons, the treasurer of the committee, who resides at the corner of Jubilee-street and Mile-end-road, a distance of about thirty yards. The man, however, said he did not wish to go there, and Miss Marsh thereupon produced a newspaper in which Mr. Lusk's address was given as Alderney-road, Globe-road, no number being mentioned. She requested the stranger to read the address, but he declined, saying, "Read it out," and proceeded to write something in his pocket-book, keeping his head down meanwhile. He subsequently left the shop, after thanking the young lady for the information, but not before Miss Marsh, alarmed by the man's appearance, had sent the shopboy, John Cormack, to see that all was right. This lad, as well as Miss Marsh, give a full description of the man, while Mr. Marsh, who happened to come along at the time, also encountered him on the pavement outside.

HIS DESCRIPTION - SINGULAR FACTS.

The stranger is described as a man of some forty-five years of age, fully six feet in height, and slimly built. He wore a soft felt black hat, drawn over his forehead, a stand-up collar, and a very long black single-breasted overcoat, with a Prussian or clerical collar partly turned up. His face was of a sallow type, and he had a dark beard and moustache. The man spoke with what was taken to be an Irish accent. No importance was attached to the incident until Miss Marsh read of the receipt by Mr. Lusk of a strange parcel, and then it occurred to her that the stranger might be the person who had despatched it. His inquiry was made at one o'clock on Monday afternoon, and Mr. Lusk received the package at eight p.m. the next day. The address on the package, curiously enough, gives no number in Alderney-road, a piece of information which Miss Marsh could not supply. It appears that on leaving the shop the man went right by Mr. Aaron's house, but did not call. Mr. Lusk has been informed of the circumstances, and states that no person answering the description has called on him, nor does he know anyone at all like the man in question. Meantime, while the City police are having a careful examination made of the contents, the authorities at Scotland-yard are giving attention to the wrapper of the parcel, with a view of ascertaining where it was posted.

HOW THE EXCITEMENT IS CREATED.

The police complain that their work is increased, and morbid excitement created, by the statements made as to alleged arrests of an important character. Both the Metropolitan and City police deny that there was an American or any other man suspected at Bermondsey, whose apprehension was reported to have taken place. There is a clue upon which the authorities have been zealously working for some time. This is in Whitechapel, not far from the scene of the Berner-street tragedy, and the man is, indeed, himself aware that he is being watched; so much so, that, as far as observation has gone at present, he has scarcely ventured out of doors. The police called on Mr. Packer, of 44, Berner-street, yesterday morning; and later on an Echo reporter also saw him as to what had transpired. Mr. Packer was rather reticent; but, when asked his opinion as to where the murderer lodged - for he had seen him several times before the fatal night - remarked, "In the next street." It is considered he is not far wrong in his conjecture; but the police do not deem it prudent to say what steps are being taken in the matter.

A JOKER "WANTED."

Late yesterday afternoon, the City and Metropolitan police received an intimation that a man had written "I am Jack the Ripper" on a wall at Islington. He was pursued, but escaped. It was thought he was not in any way connected with the crimes, but his description has, nevertheless, been circulated by the authorities, who state that any persons found in the act of perpetrating such hoaxes will be immediately arrested.

Source: The Echo, Saturday October 20, 1888, Page 9


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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Tue 25 Oct 2011 - 2:12

THIS DAY'S NEWS.
THE EAST-END MURDERS.

MR. LUSK'S GRUESOME PARCEL.
DR. SEDGWICK SAUNDERS' OPINION.

THINKS IT A STUDENT'S FREAK.

The "kidney incident" is regarded by Dr. Gordon Brown and the police as a hoax. Even if the kidney forwarded to Mr. Lusk, the chairman of the Vigilance Committee, should prove to be the half of a human organ - and there is medical discrepancy on this point - it could not have been the one extracted from the body of the murdered woman Eddowes. A medical man is said to have ventured to assert - relying upon a microscopic examination - that the organ showed indications of disease from drink. Dr. Sedgwick Saunders - Medical Officer of the City of London - accepting this at once disproves the theory that the organ could have belonged to Eddowes by stating that the right kidney of the woman was perfectly healthy and presumably the left would be in a similar condition.

DR. SAUNDERS' OPINION.

An Echo representative called this morning upon Dr. Sedgwick Saunders, who, alluding at first to the report that a medical man declared the half kidney had belonged to a female, remarked: - "It is a pity some people have not the courage to say they don't know. You may take it that there is no difference whatever between the male and female kidney. As for those in animals, they similar. The cortical substance is the same, and the structure only differs in shape. I think it would be quite possible to mistake it for a pig's. You may take it that the right kidney of the woman Eddowes was perfectly normal in its structure and healthy, and, by parity of reasoning, you would not get much disease in the left. The liver was healthy, and gave no indications that the woman drank. Taking the discovery of the half of a kidney, and supposing it to be human, my opinion is that it was a student's antic. It is quite possible for any student to obtain a kidney for the purpose."

HOW THE PARCEL WAS RECEIVED.

The circumstances under which Mr. Lusk received the gruesome parcel were as follow: - A few days ago a postman delivered at Mr. Lusk's residence in Alderney-road, Globe-road, Mile-end, a postcard, which read as follows: -

Say Boss -
You seem rare frightened, guess I'd like to give you fits, but can't stop time enough to let you box of toys play copper games with me, but hope to see you when I don't hurry too much.
Bye-bye, Boss.

The card was addressed "Mr. Lusk, Head Vigilance Committee, Alderney-street, Mile-end." As Mr. Lusk has received other communications of the same kind since he has been connected with the Whitechapel Vigilance Committee he paid no attention to the communication; but on Tuesday evening there reached him through the post a small parcel, similarly addressed, which on examination proved to contain some meaty substance that gave off a very offensive odour. A closer inspection showed that the article was a portion of a kidney. Enclosed in a box with it was a letter worded in revolting terms. It was in the following terms: -

From Hell. - Mr. Lusk, - Sir, I send you half the kidne I took from one woman. Prasarved it for you. Tother piece I fried and ate; it was very nise. I may send you the bloody knife that took it out, if you only wate whil longer. - (Signed) CATCH ME WHEN YOU CAN, MR. LUSK.

The cardboard box which Mr. Lusk received is about 3 1/2 in. square, and was wrapped in paper. The cover bears a London post-mark, but the stamping is not sufficiently clear to enable it to be stated from what postal district of the metropolis the article was sent. On this point it is expected that the assistance of the Post Office officials will be invoked. The portion of the kidney which it enclosed has, according to the medical experts, been preserved for some time in spirits of wine. The handwriting of the post-card and letter differs altogether from that of "Jack the Ripper" specimens of whose calligraphy were recently published. The writing is of an inferior character, evidently disguised, while the spelling, as will be seen, is indifferent.

THE HOUSE-TO-HOUSE SEARCH.

The force of police, dressed in private clothes, who have been told off to make a house-to-house search in Whitechapel and Spitalfields, were busily engaged yesterday. At every house or tenement visited they left a copy of the subjoined police notice: - "To the Occupier. - On the mornings of Friday, Aug. 31, Saturday, 8th, and Sunday, Sept. 30, 1888, women were murdered in or near Whitechapel, supposed by some one residing in the immediate neighbourhood. Should you know of any person to whom suspicion is attached, you are earnestly requested to communicate at once with the nearest police-station." The police have everywhere been received with the greatest good-feeling, even in the poorest districts, and have had no difficulty in obtaining information.

THE BERMONDSEY STORY.

The City Police have informed a Press Association reporter, today, that there is no truth whatever in the story that a man, supposed to be an American, had been arrested or was being followed in Bermondsey; and that no such statement as reported had been made at the City Detective Office.

THE BELFAST ARREST.

At Belfast, today, John Foster was charged on remand with being connected with the Whitechapel murders. Evidence was given that the chain and locket in his possession had been stolen from a house in the vicinity of Bootle. Prisoner, who is wanted for housebreaking, was remanded another week for further inquiries.

The Press Association learns that the forthcoming number of Murray's Magazine will contain an article on "The Police of the Metropolis," by Sir Charles Warren.

Source: The Echo, Friday October 19, 1888, Page 3

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Wed 26 Oct 2011 - 0:28

THE EAST-END MURDERS.
A HOUSE-TO-HOUSE SEARCH.

The following official notification has been issued:
"Sir Charles Warren wishes to say that the marked desire evinced by the inhabitants of the Whitechapel district to aid the police in the pursuit of the author of the recent crimes has enabled him to direct that, subject to the consent of the occupiers, a thorough house-to-house search should be made within a defined area. With few exceptions, the inhabitants of all classes and creeds have freely fallen in with the proposal, and have materially assisted the officers engaged in carrying it out.
"Sir Charles Warren feels that some acknowledgment is due on all sides for the cordial co-operation of the inhabitants, and is much gratified that the police-officers have carried out so delicate a duty with the marked goodwill of all those with whom they have come in contact.
"Sir Charles Warren takes this opportunity of acknowledging the receipt of an immense volume of correspondence of a semi-private character on the subject of the Whitechapel murders, which he has been quite unable to respond to in a great number of instances, and he trusts that the writers will accept this acknowledgment in lieu of individual replies. They may be assured that their letters have received every consideration."
In accordance with the decision of Sir Charles Warren the house-to-house search was vigorously conducted this week, a large number of detectives being engaged. Nothing was discovered.
Sir Charles Warren's bloodhounds were out for practice at Tooting on Thursday morning, where a sheep had been stolen, and were lost. Telegrams were dispatched to all the Metropolitan police stations, stating that if the dogs were seen anywhere, information was to be sent to Scotland-yard.
A number of arrests have been made during the week, but all the persons were discharged.
Thomas Conway, who some years ago lived with Catherine Eddowes, the woman murdered in Mitre-square, on Monday went with his two sons to the detective office of the City police in Old Jewry, and explained who they were. He stated that he was unaware till Sunday that the police were seeking him. Conway was at once taken to see Mrs. Annie Phillips, Eddowes's daughter, who recognised him as her father. He stated that he left Eddowes in 1880, in consequence of her intemperate habits, which prevented them from living comfortably together. He knew that she had since been living with Kelly, and has once or twice seen her in the streets, but has, as far as possible, kept out of her way, as he did not wish to have any further communication with her.
At the Guildhall police-court, on Thursday, Benjamin Graham, a glass-blower, of Fletcher-row, Clerkenwell, was charged on his own confession with having committed the murders in Whitechapel. On Wednesday afternoon the prisoner, who was drunk, was taken into Snow-hill police-station by a man, who said that Graham had told him that he had murdered the women in Whitechapel. He repeated his statement at the station, adding, "and I shall have to suffer for it with a bit of rope." - He was remanded for inquiries.

A GHASTLY INCIDENT.

Mr. George Lusk, builder, of 1, 2, and 3, Alderney-road, Globe-road, Mile-end, E., who is chairman of the Whitechapel Vigilance committee, on Tuesday evening was the recipient, by Parcels post, of a small cardboard box, which, on being opened, was found to contain half a human kidney. The box was delivered about eight o'clock in the evening. Enclosed in the box was a letter. At first Mr. Lusk regarded the affair as a practical joke, in the nature of a hoax; but afterwards submitted the parcel to Mr. F.S. Reed, assistant to Dr. F.W. Wiles, of 56, Mile-end-road, to help them to form a conclusion. Mr. F.S. Reed stated that the contents appeared to him to be half of a human kidney, which had been divided longitudinally; but in order to make sure he at once conveyed it to Dr. Openshaw, pathological curator at the London hospital museum. Dr. Openshaw examined it, and pronounced it to be the half of the left kidney of a full-grown human being. Remembering the circumstances that it was the left kidney which was missing from the body of the woman Eddowes, who was murdered and mutilated in Mitre-square, Mr. Reed thinks it probable that the ghastly relic is genuine. The handwriting of the letter accompanying the parcel and a post-card received previously are the same. They bear no resemblance to the letters received by the Central News, signed "Jack the Ripper."
The post-card, which was received a day or two before the box, was as follows: -

Say Boss, - You seem rare frightened, guess I'd like to give you fits, but can't stop time enough to let you box of toys play copper games with me, but hope to see you when I don't hurry too much. Bye-bye, Boss.

The letter, which was enclosed in the box, was as follows: -

From Hell.
Mr. Lusk. - Sir, I send you half the kidne I took from one woman prasarved it for you tother piece I fried and ate it was very nice I may send you the bloody knif that took it out if you only wate whil longer. Signed Catch me when you can Mishter Lusk.

Dr. Sedgwick Saunders has given it as his opinion that the sending of the parcel was a student's antic. He further states it is quite possible for any student to obtain a kidney for the purpose.

THE DISGUISED DETECTIVE.

James Phillips, 37, and William Jarvis, 40, both cab washers, were charged on remand at Clerkenwell police-court, on Tuesday, with cutting and wounding Detective-serjeant Robinson, G division, in Phoenix-place, St. Pancras, early in the morning of Tuesday, the 9th inst. - Jarvis was further charged with assaulting and wounding Henry Doncaster, a private person, on the same occasion. - The evidence given at the first hearing was to the effect that at the time of the occurrence Detective-serjeant Robinson was on duty disguised in woman's clothing, watching, in company with Detective-serjeant Mather, Mr. Doncaster, and others, a man whose actions laid him open to suspicion in connection with the East-end murders. While so engaged they were attacked by the two prisoners; Robinson received two stabs in the face from Jarvis, and kicks in the arm and ribs from Phillips, while Doncaster received a stab in the face, and had his jaw dislocated. - Frank Mew, police-constable 301 G, arrested Phillips, who said, when he was told he would be taken to the police station, "All right, governor, it is not the first time I have been there." - The prisoners, who reserved their defence, were committed for trial, Jarvis on the charge of unlawfully wounding, and Phillips for assaulting the police. Mr. Bros consented to allow bail, two sureties in 20 pounds.

MAD THROUGH THE MURDERS.

At the Thames police-court, on Wednesday, the divisional surgeon of police, and the relieving officer asked the magistrate to sign the necessary papers for the removal to an asylum of a woman whose mind appeared to have been affected by the recent murders. The doctor's certificate stated that the woman, whose name is Sarah Goody, aged 40, a needlewoman, living at Wild-street, Stepney, had told him (the doctor) that she was being followed about by a man who watched her movements, and intended to do her harm. She was in such a terrified condition that she could neither eat nor sleep. The lunatic-attendant stated that the woman declared that she was followed about by murderers, who intended catching her. On one occasion she asked her landlady to see if there was any writing on the shutters. Mr. Lushington signed the necessary papers.

CONFESSION OF A LONDON MURDER.

A man giving the name of William Russell, and stating that he was recently discharged from an American ship, the National Eagle, at the Victoria docks, Liverpool, has given himself up to the police at Maidenhead, accusing himself of having committed a murder in London on Friday week. He says that on the night mentioned he had been drinking with a woman, whom he calls "Annie." They subsequently quarrelled, and he threw the woman over the parapet of Westminster-bridge into the Thames. He was remanded.

THE GATESHEAD MURDER.

William Waddell was charged, on remand, at Durham, on Wednesday, with the murder of Jane Beadmore, or Savage, on Birtley Fell. Superintendent Dunn, on behalf of Inspector Harrison, of Jarrow, applied for a week's remand, which was granted. Little change appears to have taken place in the appearance of the accused since his arrest, but the prison attendants are of opinion that he is quite sane.

ATTEMPTED MURDER AT PECKHAM.

Thomas Onley, 62, traveller, and Frank Hall, 20, seaman, both living at 66, Hornby-road, Peckham, were charged at Lambeth police-court, on Tuesday, with being concerned together in attempting to murder Sarah Brett by cutting her throat with a carving knife at that address. - Inspector Taylor, P division, informed his worship that the injured woman was unable to attend. Whilst he was on duty on Monday night at Peckham police-station he received information which induced him to go, in company with Detective Barton and Constable Bennett, to Hornby-road. In the middle of the roadway, opposite the door of No. 66, he found Sarah Brett, aged about 53, lying on the ground. She was bleeding very much from a wound about four inches long, commencing from the left side of the neck, and reaching the centre of the throat. He at once sent off for a surgeon. He asked the woman who had done it, and she said, "Frank, the sailor." - Dr. J.G. Munyard, of Southampton-street, soon arrived, and he left her in his care, and with the other officer passed through No. 68, and from thence obtained admission by the back of No. 66. In a back bedroom he found the prisoner Hall lying on a bed with his trowsers on, and endeavoured to arouse him. He appeared to be drunk. Witness then proceeded to the front bedroom and found the other officer. The prisoner Onley was sitting on the side of the bed. The constable, Bennett, said, "I have found this knife in the bed," and produced a large carving-knife with wet blood upon the blade. Witness had the prisoner detained until he had removed the injured woman to Newington infirmary. There she became more sensible, and from what she said both prisoners were taken into custody and charged.
Mr. Biron: What had the prisoners to do with the woman?
Inspector Taylor: She was living with Onley as his wife, and Hall lodged in the same house. - It was further stated that there was a deal of blood in the kitchen. Chairs and other articles had been overturned and a lamp smoked. - Mr. Biron said the prisoners would be remanded. - Mr. Sydney asked that they might be admitted to bail.
Mr. Biron: Most decidedly not.
The prisoners were then remanded.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, October 21, 1888, Page 3


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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Wed 26 Oct 2011 - 1:27

No advance seems to have been made as yet towards the discovery of the Whitechapel murderer. Several arrests have been made from time to time, but to no purpose; and, as is usual in the case of very notorious murders, several drunken men have given themselves up to the police as being guilty. At the inquests which have been commenced some more details have been given as to the circumstances under which the bodies were found, but nothing appears to have been discovered that suggests a clue. At the commencement on Thursday of the inquest, before the City Coroner, on the woman who was murdered in Mitre-square, Dr. Gordon Brown, police surgeon, stated, what had not previously been divulged, that the mutilation in this case was much the same as in two previous cases, but somewhat more roughly effected. It has been stated by the man with whom the woman murdered in Berner-street lived that she was a Swede, and that she and her husband Stride were on board the Princess Alice when it went down in the Thames, and that her husband was then drowned. It appears that there were a man and woman of the name of Stride in that disaster. It seems, therefore, to be pretty certain that the woman murdered was, as was at first suggested, Elizabeth Stride. It will be remembered that last week a Mrs. May Malcolm said she was quite sure the woman was her sister, Elizabeth Watts, wife of a former wine merchant of Bath. The Central News states that it has succeeded in finding this Elizabeth Watts alive and well in the person of Mrs. Stokes, the hard-working wife of a brickyard labourer living at Tottenham. The police authorities have reproduced in facsimile, and published on the walls of London, a letter and a postcard received by the Central News Agency, and purporting to be written by the murderer. The language is of a brutal character, and is full of Americanisms. The postcard bears a tolerably clear imprint of a bloody thumbmark, which, together with the red colour of the ink and smears of blood, is reproduced in the placard. From the police asking for identification of the handwriting, it would appear that they think that the missives are genuine. After killing Katherine Eddowes in Mitre-square, the murderer appears to have gone to Goulston-street, near by, where he threw away a piece of the woman's apron, on which he had wiped his hands and knife. Within a few feet of this spot there was found written on a wall the words, "The Jews shall not be blamed for nothing." These words were on the following morning sponged out by a policeman. But some persons state that the handwriting was similar to that of the letter and postcard received by the Central News. Some have thought that the circumstances of the murders are in some respects suggestive of a Malay "running amuck;" and that the scene is not far from the Docks, where Malay sailors are to be found. A petition has been sent by a local vigilance committee to the Queen asking for a reward to be offered by the Government for the discovery of the murderer. This has been laid before her Majesty; but the Home Secretary once more repeats that he has not been able to advise her Majesty that in his belief the ends of justice would be promoted by any departure from the decision already announced with regard to the proposal that a reward should be offered by Government. A precaution taken by Sir Charles Warren is to make arrangements for the employment of bloodhounds to track the murder in the event of any further similar crime being perpetrated. An instruction has been issued to the police that they are not to remove the body, but to send notice immediately to a veterinary surgeon in the south-west district, who holds several trained bloodhounds in readiness to be taken to the spot where the body may be found, and to be at once put on the scent. As the double murder took place on the previous Saturday night, fears were entertained by the police that last Saturday night would not pass without some startling occurrence. Accordingly the greatest precautions were taken on that night. Besides the additional police there were large numbers of volunteer patrols throughout the Whitechapel district. Several arrests were made without any foundation, and it seemed at times as if every person in the streets was suspicious of every person he met, and as if it were a race who should first inform against his neighbour.
A sadly remarkable feature in connection with the mutilated trunk of a woman's body that was recently found in a building that is being erected on the Thames Embankment is the number of missing women brought under the notice of the authorities by persons making inquiries about the remains. Apparently very many women leave their friends without communicating with them, and pass entirely out of the cognisance of those nearest to them. Nothing further has as yet been discovered to show who the woman was who appears to have been murdered. At first it was supposed that the bones found at Guildford in August belonged to this trunk. These bones of a right foot and part of a left leg were found on the railway near Guildford station, and were declared by a local doctor to be human. On Saturday they were exhumed, and on being further examined in London they were found to be the bones of a bear. At the inquest, commenced on Monday, it was stated by the doctors that the arms found in the Thames about a month ago, fitted exactly to the body found in the building. The hands indicated that the woman had not been accustomed to do much work. While the vault in which the body was found was being searched by the police on Friday, they had a narrow escape of being killed by a curious accident. As a piece of heavy machinery was being raised by a steam derrick, which stood at the top of scaffolding 65 ft. from the ground, one of the "stays" of the derrick broke, and the new machinery fell to the ground. The recoil overset the engine and boiler on the top, and this, a weight of about seven tons, fell also to the ground. There was a great fall of broken staging, and stone work was cast into the vaults beneath just where the body was found. Fortunately no one was materially injured.

The Bishop of Bedford writes to yesterday's papers to reply to may correspondents who had desired to be informed of the best way to befriend the poor women in Whitechapel, Spitalfields, and the neighbourhood, whose miserable condition had been brought before the public so prominently by the late murders. The Bishop says a night refuge has been proposed, but it would serve no good end, and he earnestly hopes nothing of the kind will be attempted, as it would but aggravate the evil. "Another night refuge is not required. It would attract more of these miserable women into the neighbourhood and increase the difficulties of the situation. But what is needed is a home where washing and other work could be done and where poor women who are really anxious to lead a better life could find employment. If intrusted with means to provide such a home I would gladly undertake the responsibility of conducting it in conjunction with the clergy and others, who are only too anxious to see it established. It has oftentimes saddened my heart to be unable to assist the older women and to save those who were hopelessly falling into a life of sin. Such a home would be a fitting addition to the "Court House," the home for younger penitents at Walthamstow, which bears the name of Mrs. Walsham How, and was founded by her in the time of my predecessor, the present Bishop of Wakefield. If anything is to be done it should be done at once. 2,000 pounds would enable the experiment to be tried, and I have no doubt at all of its being a success. Pray allow me space to say to ladies who have been moved to devote themselves for work in these parts that I shall be delighted to hear from such and to advise them where their services are most required, and how they can best give effect to their charitable intentions. It is my bounden duty to use my position and experience to turn to the best account the painful interest that has been excited by late events in the East-end."

Source: The Guardian, October 10, 1888, Page 1498

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Fri 30 Mar 2012 - 5:48

THE LONDON MURDER FIEND.
Inquest on the Body of the Last Victim Found.

LONDON, Oct. 6. - An inquest was held today over the body of the Whitechapel fiend's last victim, the body which was found last Sunday evening in Mitre square. The evidence shows that the murderer met the woman at some distance from the square, and walked with her along the main street that led to it. It was probably this fact which caused the murderer to mutilate the face of this victim, as he feared that they had been seen together, and that the woman's identification would lead to his capture. The faces of the other Whitechapel victims were untouched, while this one's was hacked beyond recognition.
Various measures have been adopted by the people of the East End for their protection, as little confidence is felt in the police. Last night fifty workingmen, all armed and ready to attack even a bloodthirsty insane man, patrolled the vicinity frequented by the murderer. The papers print columns of letters on the subject every day, and suggestions are numerous. The latest is that public prayers shall be said as a means of gaining relief from the epidemic of murder.

Source: The Daily Leader, Gloversville, New York, Saturday October 6, 1888

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 1 Apr 2012 - 5:57

THE EAST END ATROCITIES.

The inquest on the body of Catherine Eddowes, alias Conway and Kelly, was concluded on Tuesday. A daughter of the deceased stated that Conway ceased to live with her mother seven or eight years ago on account of her drinking habits, and it appears on the Saturday night before the murder she was locked up at Bishopsgate police-station for drunkenness, and released at one o'clock in the morning - only about half an hour before her tragic death. Witnesses were called who stated that they saw a man and woman talking near Mitre-square shortly after half-past one in the morning, and one of them was about to give a description of the man, but, at the suggestion of the City solicitor, did not proceed. Some important evidence was given as to the "writing on the wall" alleged to have been done by the murderer, and its obliteration. The jury returned a verdict of wilful murder against some person unknown. No person is at present under arrest in connection with the Whitechapel atrocities.

Source: The Mercury, Saturday October 13, 1888, Page 3

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Mr Hyde on Thu 5 Apr 2012 - 9:27

Thomas Conway was baptized "Thomam Conway" 08 Jan 1835 as a Roman Catholic,Strokestown,Roscommon,Ireland.
Roscommon is considered the homeland of the O Ceallaigh's...Kelly's.Ironic.

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Fri 15 Mar 2013 - 14:37

THE EAST-END MURDERS.

A story was calculated on Monday as to a man having decamped from his lodgings at the East end on the morning of the last murder in Whitechapel, leaving behind a shirt, the sleeves of which were blood-stained. The police however, deny that there is any ground for suspicion in this matter, the incident being satisfactorily accounted for some days ago.
Inquiries at the police-stations in the Eastern district on Monday showed at the present that there is no one in custody in connection with the Whitechapel murders. Shortly before midnight a man was arrested in suspicion of being the murderer in a lodging-house in Brick-Lane by Serjeant Cook and other officers. The inmates regarded his conduct as suspicious, and informed the police.
He was conveyed to the Commercial-street Station, amid some excitement; but in course of half an hour he was set at liberty, as he was able to convince the authorities that he was not the man for whom they are searching.
Superintendent Farmer of the River Tyne Police, has received information which, it is considered, may form a clue to the Whitechapel murders. An Australian seaman signed articles on board a Faversham vessel in the Tyne on Saturday, and sailed for a French port. Afterwards it was found that his signature corresponded with the facsimile letters signed "Jack the Ripper," and that the description
of the man also corresponded with that of the Whitechapel murderer circulated by the Metropolitan Police.
A man wearing a slouch hat, carrying a black leather bag, speaking with a slightly American accent was arrested at Limavady, near Londonderry, on Monday morning, by Constable Walsh, on suspicion of being the man who committed the murders in the East-end of London. The arrest was made as a result of the police description of the man wanted. The Prisoner refused to give his name or any information about himself.
A woman and child, who were with him, were also taken into custody.
Thomas Conway, who some years ago lived with Catherine Eddowes, the woman murdered in Mitre-square, on Monday afternoon went with his two sons to the detective office of the City police, in Old Jewry, and was at once taken to see Mrs. Annie Phillips, Eddowes's daughter, who recognised him as her father. He states that he left Eddowes in 1880, in consequence of her intemperate habits, which prevented them from living
comfortably together. He knew that she had since been living with Kelly, and has once or twice seen her in the streets, but he has, as far as possible, kept out of her way, as he did not wish to have any further communication with her.

Source: Pembrokeshire Herald and General Advertiser, 19 October 1888, Page 3

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Mr Hyde on Mon 15 Jul 2013 - 3:58

Amongst Eddowe's possessions was a printed handbill or card.

 Frank Carter was an ex member of the Corps of Royal Engineers and in his early 30s.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Engineers#The_Royal_School_of_Military_Engineering.

 No doubt one of the characters guarding Stride outside the IWMEC and awaiting Eddowes appearance.

 Handy sort of person to have around.No doubt annoyed with the absence of both Eddowes and "Jack".

 Doubting he would be paid,he left after a brief fracas with Stride.

 The rest is history.

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Mr Hyde on Mon 15 Jul 2013 - 17:23

Anyone else reckon that Abberline would have turned up at 305 Bethnal Green Road to have a bit of a "tete a tete" with Frank Carter!

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Mr Hyde on Mon 15 Jul 2013 - 18:06

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Henry_Reynolds

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Engineers 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rorke's_Drift

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zulu_(1964_film)

Funny how things turn up on that other site,after they've been noted here.

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Wed 21 Aug 2013 - 9:44

The Aldgate Murder.
OPENING OF THE INQUEST.

On Thursday Mr. Langham, the city coroner, opened the inquest upon the body of a woman murdered in Mitre-square on Sunday morning, and whose name has been variously given as Eddowes, Conway, and Kelly. Mr. Crawford, city solicitor, represented the police, Major Smith, acting commissioner, and Mr. Superintendent Forster also being present.
Eliza Gold, the first witness, living at 6, Thrawl-street, identified the body as that of her sister, Catherine Eddowes, who was a single old woman, who had lived with John Kelly for some years. Witness last saw her sister alive about four or five months ago. Deceased was a hawker and of sober habits, and before living with Kelly, deceased lived with the man Conway for some years, and had children by him. Witness did not know whether Conway, who was an army pensioner, was still alive.
In reply to Mr. Crawford, witness said she had not seen Conway for some years.
John Kelly, living at a lodging-house in Flower and Dean-street, a market labourer, said deceased had lived with him for seven years. Her name was Conway, and he last saw her on Saturday last at two o'clock in the afternoon. They parted on very good terms in Houndsditch, deceased saying she was going to Bermondsey to find her daughter. She promised to return by four o'clock. He heard she had been locked up in Bishopsgate for drunkenness, but made no enquiries, believing she would return on Sunday. Deceased never went out for an immoral purpose. When they parted, deceased had no money, and she left with the intention of getting some from her daughter. She was on bad terms with nobody, and usually returned home about eight o'clock at night. Witness did not know where the deceased had got the drink on Saturday, considering she had no money. Deceased last year got money from her daughter. On Friday last deceased went to Mile-end, and stopped in the casual ward. Early in the week witness and deceased were in Kent together, and on Thursday arrived in London, spending the night together at Shoe-lane casual ward as they had no money. On Friday they arranged that deceased should go to Mile-end Workhouse and witness stay at a lodging-house. They pawned a pair of boots on Saturday and spent the greater portion of half-a-crown in food and drink. Witness stood outside with bare feet whilst deceased pawned her boots. It might have been Friday and not Saturday.
Frederick Williamson, deputy of the lodging-house in Flower and Dean-street, corroborated the last witness as to Kelly and deceased living there on good terms. Deceased did not walk the streets. She said the name of Conway was bought and paid for, meaning that she was married. Deceased on Saturday was wearing an apron.
Police-constable Watkins deposed to finding the murdered woman in Mitre-square on Sunday morning, as already reported, with her throat cut, the body ripped open, and in a pool of blood. Witness had not heard any footsteps or cry whilst near the square.
Mr. Frederick Foster produced plans and maps of the locality.
Wilkinson, a lodging-house deputy, recalled, said he could not tell whether any strangers came there between two and three on Sunday morning. Over a hundred lodged in the house.
After luncheon Inspector Collett was examined. He deposed to being called to the scene of the murder immediately after the discovery. Three black buttons generally used for women's boots, a small metal button, metal thimble, and a mustard tin containing two pawn-tickets, were picked up near the body. There was also the piece of apron on the body corresponding with another piece picked up in Goulston-street some little way off.
Dr. Gordon Brown, surgeon to the city police, described the position of the body when he saw it a few minutes after two o'clock on Sunday morning. The way in which the body was mutilated was horrible in the extreme. There was no blood on the front of the clothes. A piece of the ear cut off dropped from the clothes when the body was stripped at the mortuary. In describing the injuries to the abdomen, witness said the left kidney was carefully taken out, and in his opinion this must have been done by someone who knew where to find it. The womb was cut through, leaving a stump of about three-quarters of an inch. The rest of it was missing. The wounds were inflicted with a sharp knife, which must have been pointed for the wounds in the face, and about six inches long judging by the cuts in the abdomen. A good deal of knowledge with the position of the organs in abdominal cavity was displayed. The parts removed would be no use for professional purposes. The removal of the left kidney was especially difficult. Such knowledge would be likely to be possessed by a slaughterer of animals. Witness thought the infliction of all the injuries could be done in five minutes. Witness could assign no reason for the parts being taken away. He felt sure there was no struggle. He believed the act was that of one man only. He should not expect much blood on the person inflicting the wounds described.
The inquiry was then adjourned.

Source: Cardiff Times, 6 October 1888, Page 4

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Wed 21 Aug 2013 - 9:45

THE MITRE-SQUARE TRAGEDY.
INQUEST AND VERDICT.

The inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of Catherine Eddowes, aged 43, the Mitre-square victim, was resumed on Thursday morning at the city mortuary, Golden Lane, by Mr. Langham, city coroner. The interest in the proceedings is in no way abated, and the usual crowds congregated round the doors of the buildings. Colonel Sir James Fraser and Superintendent Foster represented the city police, and Mr. Crawford was the solicitor on behalf of the corporation of the city of London.
Dr. Sequeira, who was the first medical man to arrive at the scene of the murder, corroborated the previous medical testimony. Replying to the city solicitor, witness said there was sufficient light in the square to enable the murderer to do his work without extra light. He was of opinion that the murderer had no design on any particular organ of the body, and further that no anatomical skill was displayed. He accounted for the absence of noise by death being instantaneous.
Dr. Saunders, medical officer of health of the City of London, said he examined the stomach of the deceased, more particulary for poisons of a narcotic class, with a negative result. He agreed with the other doctors that the murderer had no design on any particular organ, and that the murderer had no great anatomical skill.
Annie Phillips said she identified the deceased as her mother. Witness's father, whose name was Thomas Eddowes, was a hawker. She did not know where he was. Her father was in the 18th Royal Irish, and subsequently a pensioner. He left his wife eight or nine years ago because she took to drink.
By the City Solicitor: Her father might have been a pensioner of the Connaught Rangers, she was not certain. She knew her father lived with her two brothers. She could not say whether her father ever threatened her mother, but they were not on good terms.
The Coroner said it would be desirable to show that every effort was being made to clear the matter up.
Detective-sergeant Mitchell stated that he had endeavoured to trace the deceased's husband and sons, but without success. He had ascertained that a man named Conway, which was the name of deceased's husband, and not Eddowes, belonged to the 18th Royal Irish, but he was satisfied that the man was not the person who lived with the deceased.
Detective Baxter Hunt said he had confronted the man Conway with two of deceased's sisters, but they did not recognise him.
A juror asked why the daughter had not seen Conway?
The City Solicitor replied that the daughter had not then been found, but she should see Conway.
Dr. Brown was recalled, and said he was certain the murder was committed on the spot, as the blood shewed the deceased did not move.
Constable Roberts said he took deceased into custody on the day of her death for being drunk.
Police-sergeant Byfield said he kept deceased in the cell until one o'clock in the morning, and then discharged her. She gave the name of Mary Ann Kelly, and said she had been hopping.
By the jury: The acting-inspector was responsible for discharging prisoners. It was the custom to discharge prisoners at all hours of the night. Deceased was sober when she left.
George Morris, watchman to Messrs. Tierney and Tonge, tea merchants, Mitre-square, deposed to being called by a constable to fetch assistance. He did not see any suspicious person about, and heard no noise or cry of distress. The court adjourned for lunch.
After the adjournment Constable Harvey explained his beat, and deposed to being called to the deceased.
George Clapp, caretaker, said he lived on the second floor of the building overlooking Mitre-square. He heard no noise during the night, and was not aware of the murder until the morning.
Constable Pearce, living in the square, also said he heard no noise.
Mr. Lawende, a foreigner, said he saw a man and woman near the scene of the murder, and was about to describe the dress of the man, when the city solicitor suggested that unless the jury desired it he would rather that the evidence were not given, for particular reasons.  The description of the man was accordingly withheld from the public, although the police have full details.
Joseph Levy, butcher, said he saw a man and woman talking just before the discovery of the murder. This man was about three inches taller than the woman.
Police-constable Lock deposed to finding a portion of the apron worn by the woman in the passage of No. 118, Goulston-street. Near the scene of the murder he saw the following writing on the wall, written in chalk, "Jews are the men that will not be blamed for nothing."
Detective Halse said he also saw the writing, and instructions were given for it to be photographed. Fearing a riot among the Jews if that were done, it being Sunday, the writing was at once rubbed out.
At the request of the jury, the constable went for his pocket-book. During his absence Detective-inspector Halse, of the City Police, proved that when the writing on the wall was reported to him he sent off an officer to make arrangements for having it photographed. Definite directions to this effect were given, but before a photographer could arrive, the metropolitan police authorities, fearing that the words might lead to an outbreak against the Jews, had them rubbed out.
Mr. Burrows: Did not one suggest that it would be possible to rub out the word "Jews" only? - I suggested that the top line alone need be rubbed out, and the rest photographed. The words seemed to have been recently written in white chalk on the black bricks, and were, "The Juees (sic) are not the men that will be blamed for nothing."
By the City Solicitor: Fear of riot was suggested by the metropolitan policemen, and that was one reason why the writing was not photographed. He protested against the writing being rubbed out, but as it was on metropolitan ground he had no authority.
This closed the evidence offered at present on behalf of the police.
A juror complained that no search was made in the house outside which the apron was found. The clue up to that point had consequently been lost.
The constable who found the apron was recalled, and said he made a search of the passages of the building, but not the rooms.
The Coroner then briefly summed up the evidence, stating that there could be no doubt that the woman was fiendishly murdered. It would be better to leave the police to trace the clues in their possession, and to return a verdict of "Murder against some persons unknown." This was accordingly done.

A SAD SEQUEL.

Mrs. Sodeaux, the wife of a Spitalfields weaver, living in Hanbury-street, near the scene of the murder of Annie Chapman, was found on Thursday to have hanged herself to the banisters of her house. She had been much excited and affected by circumstances attending the recent murders.

Source: Cardiff Times, 13 October 1888, Page 4

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Re: Details of Eddowes' Murder and Inquest

Post by Mr Hyde on Thu 22 Aug 2013 - 4:02

The Cardiff Times did a rather good job of reporting.
Hope the actual Inquest transcript turns up one day.

Points of possibly interest.

Major Henry Smith was there.A newcomer to the job three years earlier.

Kate and John headed straight to the Shoe Lane Casual Ward on the Thursday.
This was Nichols old area before Spitalfields and supports the statement that she had returned to claim the (non existent) reward for Jack the Ripper.

Kate's left kidney would have been of interest to the researcher who had been treating both her and Nichols for over twenty years.

The anatomical skill is quickly disputed on day two.
One of the doctors is easily identified as one of Jack's lackeys.

Eddowes may have been operated on after death,however she may have been "strangled" close by.

Anyone consider that the Goulston Street writing was erased as the hand was easily traceable?
Jack was a lecturer.Monday was the start of term.

I'll leave the apron waffle to the Ripperologists on that other site.ROFL!

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