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Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Wally on Mon 23 Sep 2013 - 15:23

Wow, Karen. That's fascinating. Other than personal assistant, what does P.A. mean?
Thank you very much for going to the trouble of posting all that. Very kind of you, Karen.
Tim. x

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Mon 23 Sep 2013 - 20:57

A P.A. is a police agent or informer - she would have been the equivalent of an amateur detective. lol!

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Wally on Mon 23 Sep 2013 - 22:21

In other words she was, what is called in the UK 'a grass', or 'a coppers nark'. Hmmmm. That implicates Sickert as well then?

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Mon 23 Sep 2013 - 22:23

Yes, Walter Sickert was giving information to Inspector Abberline about Prince Eddy and friends. Inspector Abberline was also surveilling Eddy, even prior to the Ripper case.

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Wally on Mon 23 Sep 2013 - 23:13

Oh I see. Was Abberline surveilling Eddy due to his gay tendencies or murderous suspicions?

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Thu 26 Sep 2013 - 19:19

Inspector Abberline was surveiling Prince Eddy and his friends as to the Cleveland Street affair and quite possibly the secret family aspect of the case.

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Wally on Tue 1 Oct 2013 - 5:10

Ah OK. There are so many mysteries and closed door affairs in theis Ripper connection it's baffling. Ha!

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Wed 2 Oct 2013 - 6:16

THE WHITECHAPEL MURDER.
[SUBJECT OF ILLUSTRATION.]

During Monday several arrests were made, but after a short examination in all cases the persons were set at liberty, as it was felt certain they had no connection with the crime. In the Holborn casual ward, on Tuesday, the police arrested a man who gave the name of Thomas Murphy. He was taken by the police to the station at Frederick-street, King's-cross-road, where, on being searched, he was found to have in his possession a somewhat formidable knife with a blade about ten inches long. He was therefore detained in custody on suspicion, and the police proceeded to make inquiries into the truth of his statements. The task was rendered very difficult by the confused and contradictory accounts which Murphy gave of himself. He was detained some time.
Two or three men were arrested during Tuesday night and on Wednesday under circumstances considered suspicious, but in no case did the detention last more than a few hours. Each arrest caused great local excitement, and in connection with one case the whole neighbourhood was in the wildest uproar for a considerable time. The tumult had the customary origin. A man stared into the face of a woman in the Whitechapel road, and she at once screamed out that he was "Jack the Ripper." The unfortunate man was immediately surrounded by an excited and threatening crowd, from which he was rescued with some difficulty by the police. He was taken under a strong escort to the Commercial-street Police-station, followed by an enormous mob of men and women shouting and screaming at him in the most extraordinary manner. At the police-station the man proved to be a German, unable to speak a word of English. He explained through an interpreter that he arrived in London from Germany only on Tuesday and was to leave for America immediately, and confirmation of this statement having been obtained he was set at liberty.
About half-past one on Thursday morning some young men watching some premises in Spital-square noticed a man talking to a young woman and overheard him ask her to accompany him. She consented. As they were walking away a constable stopped them and took the man to the Commercial-street Police-station. At a quarter-past three a man was arrested in the Mile-end-road and taken to the Leman-street Police-station. Both prisoners were later on set at liberty.
An arrest has been made at Dover in connection with the Whitechapel murders. A suspicious looking character was seen near the railway station, and as he answered the description given of the murderer he was taken into custody, but afterwards released.
The work of the police has been considerably hampered at times by the agents of private enquiry officers, who, to obtain the offered reward, take upon themselves to follow up what they consider "clues," many of which are in the highest degree absurd. Some of these people have even gone so far as deliberately to represent themselves as police officers - an offence rendering them liable to prosecution under the criminal law.
Several tradesmen in the Whitechapel district, especially those who, like M'Carthy, have been mentioned in the newspapers in connection with the last murder, have received anonymous threatening letters of the vilest character.

NOT HEARD AT THE INQUEST.

The following statement has been made by George Hutchinson, a labourer: -
"At two o'clock on Friday morning I came down Whitechapel-road into Commercial-street. As I passed Thrawl-street I passed a man standing at the corner of the street, and as I went towards Flower and Dean-street I met the woman Kelly, whom I knew very well, having been in her company a number of times. She said, "Mr. Hutchinson, can you lend me sixpence?" I said I could not. She then walked on towards Thrawl-street, saying she must go and look for some money. The man who was standing at the corner of Thrawl-street then came towards her and put his hand on her shoulder and said something to her, the purport of which I did not hear, and they both burst out laughing. He put his hand again on her shoulder and they both walked slowly towards me. I walked on to the corner of Fashion-street, near the public-house. As they came by me his arm was still on her shoulder. He had a soft felt hat on and this was drawn down somewhat over his eyes. I put down my head to look him in the face and he turned and looked at me very sternly, and they walked across the road to Dorset-street. I followed them across and stood at the corner of Dorset-street. They stood at the corner of Miller's-court for about three minutes. Kelly spoke to the man in a loud voice, saying, "I have lost my handkerchief." He pulled a red handkerchief out of his pocket and gave it to Kelly, and they both went up the court together. I went to look up the court to see if I could see them, but could not. I stood there for three-quarters of an hour to see if they came down again, but they did not, and so I went away. My suspicions were aroused by seeing the man so well dressed, but I had no suspicion that he was the murderer. The man was about 5ft. 6in. in height and thirty-four or thirty-five years of age, with dark complexion and dark moustache turned up at the ends. He was wearing a long dark coat trimmed with astrachan, a white collar with black necktie, in which was affixed a horseshoe pin. He wore a pair of dark spats with light buttons over buttoned boots, and displayed from his waistcoat a massive gold chain. His watch-chain had a big seal with a red stone hanging from it. He had a heavy moustache curled up and dark eyes and bushy eyebrows. He had no side whiskers and his chin was clean shaven. He looked like a foreigner. I went up the court and stayed there a couple of minutes, but did not see any light in the house or hear any noise. I was out on Monday night until three o'clock looking for him. I could swear to the man anywhere. The man I saw carried a small parcel in his hand about eight inches long, and it had a strap round it. He had it tightly grasped in his left hand. It looked as though it was covered with dark American cloth. He carried in his right hand, which he laid upon the woman's shoulder, a pair of brown kid gloves. He walked very softly. I believe that he lives in the neighbourhood, and I fancied that I saw him in Petticoat-lane on Sunday morning, but I was not certain. I went down to the Shoreditch mortuary today (Tuesday) and recognised the body as being that of the woman Kelly whom I saw at two o'clock on Friday morning. Kelly did not seem to me to be drunk, but was a little bit spreeish. After I left the court I walked about all night, as the place where I usually sleep was closed. I am able to fix the time, as it was between ten and five minutes to two o'clock as I came by Whitechapel Church. When I left the corner of Miller's-court the clock struck three. One policeman went by the Commercial-street end of Dorset-street while I was standing there, but no one came down Dorset-street. I saw one man go into a lodging-house in Dorset-street and no one else. I have been looking for the man all day."
In some quarters Hutchinson's statement has been thought to throw discredit upon the evidence given at the inquest by the woman Cox, but it is now believed that the murderer was the second man whom the victim took home upon the eve of her murder. It is probably that the man with the "carroty" moustache seen in Kelly's company shortly before midnight will soon be found, and it is possible that he may come forward voluntarily now that he has been to a great extent relieved of the suspicion which rested upon him.

EXTRAORDINARY STATEMENT.

Mr. Matthew Packer, the fruiterer who sold some grapes to a man in company with the murdered woman just before the Berner-street murder, has made the following extraordinary statement: -
"On Tuesday evening two men came to my house and bought 12s. worth of rabbits of me. They then asked me if I could give an exact description of the man to whom I sold the grapes and who was supposed to have committed the Berner-street and Mitre-square murders, as they were convinced they knew him and where to find him. In reply to some questions one of the men then said, "Well, I am sorry to say that I firmly believe it is my own cousin. He is an Englishman by birth, but some time ago he went to America, stayed there a few years, and then came back to London about seven or eight months ago. On his return he came to see me, and his first words were, "Well, boss, how are you?" He asked me to have some walks out with him, and I did round Commercial-street and Whitechapel. I found that he was very much altered on his return, for he was thorough harem-scarem. We met a lot of Whitechapel women, and when we passed them he used to say to me, "Did you see those -------? How do you think we used to serve them where I came from? Why, we used to cut their throats and rip them up. I could rip one of them up and get her inside out in no time." He said, "We Jack Rippers killed lots of women over there. You will hear of some of it being done over here soon, for I am going to turn a London Jack Ripper." The man added, "I did not take much notice then of what he said, as he had had a drop of drink, and I thought it was only his swagger and bounce of what he had been doing in America at some place which he mentioned, but I forget the name; but," continued the man, "when I heard of the first woman being murdered and stabbed all over I then began to be very uneasy, and to wonder whether he really was carrying out his threats. I did not, however, like to say anything about him, as he is my own cousin.
Then, as one murder followed another, I felt that I could scarcely rest. He is a perfect monster towards women, especially when he has had a drop of drink. But, in addition to what he said to me about these murders in America and what was going to be done here, I feel certain it is him, because of the way those Jack the Ripper letters which have appeared in the papers begin. They all begin "Dear Boss," and that is just the way he begins his letters. He calls everybody "Boss" when he speaks to them. I did not want to say anything about him if I could help it, so I wrote to him, but he did not answer my letter. Since this last murder I have felt that I could not remain silent any longer, for at least something ought to be done to put him under restraint."
Packer states he feels sure the men are speaking the truth, as they seemed very much concerned and hardly knew what to do in the matter. He knows where to find the men. One is employed at some Ironworks and the other at the West India Docks, and the man they allude to lives somewhere in the neighbourhood of Whitechapel.
The statement was investigated by the police. A reporter was courteously received on Thursday by Detective-inspector M'Williams, who said there was no foundation in fact for it, and he believed that nothing would come of it.

FUNERAL OF MARY JANET KELLY.

The remains of Mary Janet Kelly were carried on Monday morning from Shoreditch mortuary to the Roman Catholic Cemetery at Leytonstone for interment amidst a scene of turbulent excitement scarcely ever paralleled even in the annals of that densely-populated district where she met her death. On the afternoon of the murder the body of the unfortunate woman was conveyed to the mortuary attached to St. Leonard's Church, Shoreditch, and there it remained until Monday. Since the inquest a great amount of sympathy for the fate of the deceased has been created, but it remained for Mr. H. Wilton, the sexton attached to Shoreditch Church, to put sympathy into a practical form, and as no relatives have appeared he incurred the total cost of the funeral himself. Mr. Wilton has been sexton for over fifty years, and he provided the funeral as a mark of sympathy with the poor people of the neighbourhood. The body was enclosed in a polished elm and oak coffin with metal mounts. On the coffin plate was engraved the words: - "Marie Jeanette Kelly, died 9th November, 1888, aged twenty-five years." Upon the coffin were two crowns of artificial flowers and a cross made up of heartsease. The coffin was carried in an open car drawn by two horses, and two coaches followed. An enormous crowd of people assembled at an early hour, completely blocking the thoroughfare, and a large number of police were engaged in keeping order. The bell of St. Leonard's began tolling at noon, and the signal appeared to draw all the residents in the neighbourhood together. There was an enormous preponderance of women in the crowd. Scarcely any had any covering to their heads, and their tattered dresses indicated too surely that they belonged to the very class to which the murdered woman belonged. The wreaths upon the coffin bore cards inscribed with remembrances from friends using certain public-houses in common with the deceased. As the coffin appeared, borne on the shoulders of four men, at the principal gate of the church, the crowd appeared to be moved greatly. Round the open car in which it was to be placed men and women struggled desperately to touch the coffin. Women with faces streaming with tears cried out "God forgive her!" and every man's head was bared in token of sympathy. The sight was quite remarkable and the emotion natural and unconstrained. Two mourning coaches followed, one containing three and the other five persons. Joe Barnett was amongst them, with someone from M'Carthy's, the landlord, and the others were women who had given evidence at the inquest. After a tremendous struggle the car, with the coffin fully exposed to view, set out at a very slow pace, all the crowd appearing to move off simultaneously in attendance. The traffic was blocked, of course, and the constables had great difficulty in obtaining free passage for the small procession through the mass of carts and vans and tramcars which blocked the road. The distance from Shoreditch Church to the cemetery at Leytonstone by road is about six miles, and the route traversed was Hackney-road, Cambridge-heath, Whitechapel-road, and Stratford. In the Whitechapel-road the crowd on each side of the roadway were very great, and there was a considerable amount of emotion manifested. The appearance of the roadway throughout the whole journey was remarkable owing to the hundreds of men and women who escorted the coffin on each side, and who had to keep up a sharp trot in many places. But the crowd rapily thinned way when, getting into the suburbs, the car and coaches broke into a trot. Still the number of those who kept up was sufficient to spread the news in advance, and everywhere people stood in groups or crowded windows to see the cortege pass. The cemetery was reached at two o'clock. The Rev. Father Columban, O.S.F., with two acolytes and a cross-bearer, met the body at the door of the little chapel of St. Patrick, and the coffin was carried at once to a grave in the north-eastern corner. Barnett and the poor women who had accompanied the funeral, knelt on the cold clay by the side of the grave while the service was read by Father Columban. The coffin was incensed, lowered, and then sprinkled with holy water, and the simple ceremony ended. The floral ornaments were afterwards raised to be placed upon the grave, and the filling up was completed in a few moments and was watched by a small crowd of people.

Source: The Illustrated Police News, November 24, 1888

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Mon 9 Dec 2013 - 17:06

THE LONDON MURDERS.
(BY ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH - COPYRIGHT.)

Received November 12, at 1:20 p.m.
LONDON, November 11.

A free pardon has been offered to anyone concerned in the Whitechapel murders excepting the actual murderer, or such information as will lead to a conviction. A sailor, lately returned from Sydney, has been arrested on suspicion.

(PER UNITED PRESS ASSOCIATION.)
Received November 11 at 10:35 a.m.
LONDON, November 9.

Another murder has been committed in the neighbourhood of Whitechapel. A woman occupying a house of ill-fame on the previous night took to her house a male friend. Next morning her nude body was found in bed, with the head completely severed from the body.
The bowels and breasts were removed, and the limbs terribly hacked about. Although the limbs were so terribly hacked, the cuts were done in a professional manner, and leaves but little doubt that a surgeon has been at work. This murder is the most atrocious of the series
which have taken place lately, and tremendous excitement prevails in Whitechapel. The police are using bloodhounds to track the murderer.

(Per Zealandia at Auckland.)

A special from London of October 9th said an arrest which the police thought important had been made on the night previous. On Wednesday a stranger called at a shop in Grey's Inn Road, with an overcoat to be cleaned. The garment was stained with blood, especially the pockets,
which were dyed red. The shopman notified Scotland Yard. Detectives were secreted on the premises, and when the man called for the coat he was arrested. He refused to give an account of himself or explain the stains, and was made a prisoner and a searching investigation was entered on.
The Evening News of October 3rd printed in red ink a facsimile of a letter and postal card received a few days before at the office of the Central News, purporting to have been written by the murderer, in which he gloats over the crimes and threatens to commit others, in defiance of the police, of whose
efficiency he expressed a very poor opinion. The police are inclined to the belief that the letter and card are genuine.
The police have adopted the theory that the postal card and letter, which were signed "Jack the Ripper," sent to the Central News Agency on September 27, emanated from the actual murderer. Facsimiles of the letter and card are posted in every police station, and upon every dead wall, accompanied by a
paragraph begging any person recognising the writing to communicate with the head of the police.
A second communication was received at the Agency on the evening of October 5th from "Jack the Ripper." It announced his intention to commit more murders on the night of the 6th, and upon the strength of this every policeman was ordered on duty, assisted by hundreds of amateur detectives. A reign of terror
prevailed in Whitechapel, and daylight on the 7th was hailed with joy.
George Lusk, a builder, who is head of a Whitechapel Vigilance Committee, received by the parcel post on Tuesday, the 16th of October, a box containing a meaty substance, with a note reading as follows: - "I send you half of a kidney I took from one of the women. I preserved it for you; t'other piece I fried and ate it.
It was very nice. I may send on the bloody knife that took it out if you only wait a while longer." The box was taken to the London Hospital, and Dr. Openshaw said the contents certainly came from a full-grown woman. The ghastly package is now at Scotland yard. It is supposed that the matter was cut from the Mitre-street
victim. The handwriting of the note is not at all like that of "Jack the Ripper's" letter.
George M. Dodge, a sailor, came forward on October 4th and described a Malay cook called Alsaca, whom he knew as having received 50 dollars for two years' wages about August 13th, and which was stolen from him by a Whitechapel street walker. Dodge heard the Malay threaten that unless he recovered the money,
he would murder and mutilate every Whitechapel woman he met.

Source: Oamaru Mail, Volume X, Issue 4264, 12 November 1888, Page 3

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Mon 9 Dec 2013 - 17:10

THE WHITECHAPEL MURDERS.
ANOTHER HORRIBLE TRAGEDY.

(Per Mail Steamer at Auckland.)

A despatch from London of November 9th says: - "There has been another horrible murder in the East End, in a Dorset-street lodging-house, where a woman's body was found cut into pieces. The head was severed from the body and placed beneath one of the arms, the ears and nose cut off, and the trunk disembowelled. The flesh was torn from from the thighs, and parts
of the body were missing, the skin was torn off the forehead and cheeks, and one hand had been thrust into the stomach. The murdered woman was married and her husband is a porter. They lived together at spasmodic intervals. Her name is believed to have been Lizzie Fisher, but to most of the habitues of the haunts she frequented she was known as Mary Jane. It has been
ascertained that she told a companion that she was without money, and would commit suicide if she did not obtain a supply. It has been learned that a man accosted her and offered her money. They went to her lodgings, and she was heard to enter her room with a person who was judged to be a man by the sound of his footsteps, between 10 and 11 o'clock on the night of the 8th.
No one saw her companion depart, and there was no sound of a struggle during the night. She entered the house with a latch key, and no one saw her companion, who is supposed to be the murderer. The victim was found next morning, in the condition described, by a neighbor. This murder is the ninth of the series. The rigid patrol of the district had been somewhat relaxed owing to
the demand for extra police to keep order during the Lord Mayor's parade."
Three bloodhounds, belonging to private citizens were taken to the place where the body was and placed on the scent, but were unable to keep it for any distance. The commissioner of the Metropolitan Police offered a free pardon to any accomplice of the murderer who will give information. One arrest on suspicion was made on Saturday. Considerable importance was attached to an arrest
made. On Saturday evening, November 11th, at 10 o'clock, the inquisitive Whitechapel crowd had its attention attracted to the extraordinary behaviour of a man who had for some time been officially making inquiries and generally conducting himself in an unusual manner, which led to remark. At last the cry was raised, "The murderer!" In the prevailing state of the public mind this was quite enough
to inflame to an anger those standing by, and a roar of "Lynch him!" was heard. He was immediately seized by infuriated persons, principally women, hustled about and hurled to the ground with a badly fractured right arm. Fortunately there were plenty of policemen about, who interfered, and took him to the station pending inquiry. He is stated to be a medical student. Up to November 12 not the faintest
clue to the murderer had been obtained.
A woman's body was found floating in the Thames on the morning of the 12th November, and another murder is suspected. The body was not mutilated, and was well-dressed. Some marks indicated foul play, but it is probably a case of suicide. The police arrested one man who had a bowie knife in his possession, but there is no reason to believe that he was instrumental in the death of the woman.
Le Temps of Paris professes to believe that a lunatic Russian, named Nicholas Wassiley, released from the asylum at Sebastopol in the early part of this year is the Whitechapel murderer. That journal says he killed and mutilated eight women in 1882, after having been jilted by a Parisian grisette, and was finally arrested while trying to kill a woman. He was committed to an insane asylum, where he was
confined until discharged as cured.
Sir Charles Warren, Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, resigned on November 12. This was mainly supposed to be due to the popular outcry at his failure to capture the murderer. But a letter to Mr. Mathews, Home Secretary, stated that Sir C. Warren's resignation was solely due to his refusal to submit to the rule which forbids public criticism of the Government he served.
On the 13th the police were confident of being on the right track of the Whitechapel murderer. Two persons had been found who saw the man who accompanied the last victim to her home on the night of her murder. Their description of the man tallied in every respect. The Birmingham police have lately shadowed a man whom they suspected, because he was in the habit of travelling to London on Sundays.
They arrested him in London on November 17, and at once took him to Scotland Yard for examination. He is a doctor, formerly holding a good position, with a good practice. Prisoner greatly resembled the individual seen in company with the latest victim on the evening of the last murder.
A despatch from New York, dated November 17, says a well-dressed stranger accosted a policeman in the street that afternoon, asking "if this was London." He was taken to the station, and on the way he said, "I feel very strangely. I guess I have been insane. The last time I remember being away I was in London." At the police headquarters he gave the name of Henry Johnston, and said that he lived in the best
district in the West End. Several photos of stylish ladies were found in his pockets, also a card bearing the address "Mary Johnston, Whitechapel, London." He mentioned the Whitechapel murders.

Source: Oamaru Mail, Volume X, Issue 4288, 10 December 1888, Page 2

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sat 12 Jul 2014 - 0:28

The following article, found in a Carnarvon newspaper details a few interesting facts, such as:

- the article states that John McCarthy is a young man, not a middle-aged man.
- a man named Joseph Kelly visited her (in my book, "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team," I showed a marriage between a Mary Jane Kelly/O'Brien and a Joseph Kelly which took place in Dublin, Ireland, and the two had a son named, Michael.)

ANOTHER EAST-END MURDER.
A WOMAN CUT TO PIECES.

In the forenoon of Friday the inhabitants of the East-end of London were again thrown into a state of consternation by the discovery that another horrible murder had been perpetrated in their midst, the revolting character of which far exceeded any of the five others which have been committed in the
neighbourhood since August last year. The victim is again a woman, and her assailant committed his demoniacal work under the woman's own roof, in, it is believed, broad daylight. Notwithstanding the comparative publicity which must have attended his movements, the murderer has managed to effect
his escape without leaving behind him trace more tangible than he did six weeks ago, when Elizabeth Stride and Catherine Eddowes were butchered in Berner Street and Mitre Square respectively. Dorset Street, Spitalfields, the scene of the latest outrage, is the heart of a somewhat notorious neighbourhood. It
is composed largely of lodging houses, which are frequented by persons of the lowest station in life, amongst them being thieves and some of the most degraded women. It was here that Annie Chapman, who was murdered in Hanbury Street, on the 8th of September, lived, the scene of the present crime being a court
directly opposite the house to which that unfortunate woman was in the habit of resorting. From Mitre Square, the scene of one of the murders of September 30th, Hanbury Street is scarcely a stone's throw. The victim of Friday's crime is a young woman named Mary Jane Kelly, aged twenty-six, who had for some time lived
with a man called Barnet, known also as Danny. They are eight or ten small houses in the court, which is entered by a low archway and a narrow passage from Dorset Street, and forms a cul-de-sac. A small general shop in Dorset Street adjoins the entrance to the court, tenanted by Mrs. M'Carthy, who also owns the houses in the court.
Kelly appears to have tenanted a top room in one of Mrs. M'Carthy's houses. She had a little boy, aged about six or seven years, living with her, and lately her circumstances had been so reduced that she is reported to have stated to a companion that she would make away with herself, as she could not bear to see her boy starving.
There are conflicting statements as to when the woman was last seen alive, but that upon which most reliance appears to be placed is that of a young woman, an associate of the deceased, who states that at about half-past ten o'clock on Thursday night she met the murdered woman at the corner of Dorset Street. Kelly informed her that she
had no money, and it was then she said that if she could not get any more, she would do away with herself. Soon after they parted, and a man who is described as respectably dressed came up and spoke to the murdered woman Kelly and offered her some money. The man accompanied the woman to her lodgings.
Just before eleven Mrs. M'Carthy with her son went to pay her customary visit for the purpose of collecting the day's rent. Young M'Carthy appears to have first sent a man named Bower to the house, which, though entered from the court, is really a part of No. 26, Dorset Street. Bower failed to obtain an answer to his knocking, and, looking through the
window, saw to his horror the woman lying on the bed in a state of nudity, horribly mutilated. He called M'Carthy, who also looked through the window, and seeing that the body was cut about almost beyond recognition he hurried away with Bower and ran to Commercial Street Police Station, where they informed the police. Inspector Beck and Sergeant Betham, 31 H, who
were in charge of about forty constables who had been held in readiness in anticipation of a possible Socialist disturbance attending the Lord Mayor's Show, at once proceeded to the scene of the murder, running to the house as quickly as they could. By this time the news had spread so rapidly that over a thousand persons were gathered in the street, and these were rapidly
cleared away from the court and the side of Dorset Street adjoining, while the inspector entered the house. When an entrance had been effected a terrible sight presented itself to the police officers. The body of the woman, perfectly nude, was stretched out on the little bed, the clothes on which, were saturated with blood. The unfortunate woman had been cut and hacked by the
assassin's knife in a manner which was revolting beyond all description. The fiendish assailant was not content with taking the life of his victim by severing the head from the body, but he had exercised an infernal ingenuity in despoiling the corpse of its human semblance. Medical assistance was immediately summoned, and a description of the discovery telegraphed to all the metropolitan
police-stations in the terse sentence: "The woman is simply cut to pieces." Within a very short time half a dozen cabs arrived in Dorset Street from Whitehall, conveying detectives from the Criminal Investigation Department among them being Inspectors Abberline and Reid. Never before had so many men been despatched to the scene of a murder from Whitehall. The scene in the narrow
courtway leading to the house was one of extraordinary excitement. The whole space was closely packed with detective officers, and quite a small army of plain-clothes constables was located in Dorset Street within an astonishing short space of time. Dr. Phillips, the divisional surgeon of police, soon arrived, and was followed by Dr. Bond, of Westminster, divisional surgeon of the A Division, and
Dr. J.R. Gabe, of Mecklenburgh Square; and two or three other surgeons. They made a preliminary examination of the body, and sent for a photographer, who took several photographs of the remains. Meanwhile the excitement in the neighbourhood was spreading, until the dwellers in the immediate locality became worked up into a perfect frenzy. Women rushed about the streets telling their
neighbours the news, and giving utterance in angry voices to expressions of rage and indignation. Notwithstanding the stolid reticence of all the police engaged at the scene, the main facts of the crime soon became common knowledge, and, spreading far and wide, drew a great concourse of people to the thoroughfare from which the court runs. Great efforts were made at first to keep the side of
Dorset Street clear in the vicinity of Miller Court, in the expectation that bloodhounds might have to be employed; but though it is understood that a telegram asking for them was sent to Sir Charles Warren, they were not sent. Barnet was sent for, and he at once identified the body as that of Kelly, or "Ginger," as she was called owing to the colour of her hair. Barnet made a statement to the police, the purport
of which did not come out. Sir Charles Warren did not visit the scene of the murder, but during the afternoon Colonel Monsell, chief constable of the district, and Chief-constables Howard and Roberts went down and inspected the interior of the house. All the constables and detectives available were distributed throughout the district, and a house-to-house visitation was commenced. All who knew the deceased
woman were interrogated, as to the persons last seen in her company, without, however, eliciting any immediate clue.
At four o'clock in the afternoon the body was removed from Dorset Street to Shoreditch Mortuary, which stands at the back of Shoreditch Church. The mutilated remains were placed in a coarse coffin, which had apparently been used on many previous occasions for the conveyance of the dead, and which was partially covered with a coarse canvas cloth. The straps of the coffin were sealed. The coffin was conveyed
in a one-horse ordinary furniture van, and was escorted by several constables under Sergeant Betham.  A large crowd followed. At the mortuary another throng was waiting to see the coffin transferred to the building. The photographer who had been called in to photograph the room and the body removed his camera from the premises at half-past four, and shortly afterwards a detective officer carried from the house a pail,
with which he left in a four-wheel cab. The pail was covered with a newspaper, and was stated to contain portions of the woman's body. It was taken to the house of Dr. Phillips, 2, Spital Square. The windows of the room where the crime was committed were boarded up and a padlock put on the door. The streets were patrolled by the police all the evening, and no one was allowed to loiter near the place. At night the neighbourhood
was a scene of restless excitement and activity, the streets being filled with thousands of idlers, attracted doubtless by morbid curiosity.

THE INQUEST ON MARY JANE KELLY.

The inquest on the body of Mary Jane Kelly, the victim of the Dorset Street tragedy, was opened on Monday at the Shoreditch Town Hall, before Dr. Macdonald, M.P., coroner for North East Middlesex. Great interest was taken in the proceedings, but the room in which the enquiry was held barely sufficed to accommodate the jury and the many representatives of the Press who attended. The first witness called was Joseph Barnett, who said:
I am a labourer. I lived a year and eight months with the deceased. She told me her name was Marie Jeanette Kelly. I have seen the body, and from the hair and eyes recognise it to be her. I lived with her in Miller Court about eight months. I separated from her on the 30th of this month, because she took in another woman out of compassion on her, and I objected to it. I saw her last alive between half-past seven and a quarter to eight on the night
before she was murdered. I called on her and stayed for a quarter of an hour. We were on friendly terms. She has been drunk several times in my presence. She told me she was born in Limerick, but went to Wales very young. She said her father's name was John Kelly, and that he was gaffer in an ironworks in Carnarvonshire or Carmarthenshire. She said she had been married in Wales to a collier named Davies, who was killed in an explosion. She
lived a bad life in Cardiff, and afterwards in the West End of London. She went to France for a short time, and she then came to the East End. She lived with a man named Morganstone, near the Stepney Gasworks, and afterwards stayed at another house, where she was visited by a man named Joseph Kelly, who lived in Bethnal Green Road. She used to ask me to read to her about the Whitechapel murders, and I did so. - At this point the Coroner said
Dr. Phillips had written asking whether his attendance would be required. He (the Coroner) thought Dr. Phillips should attend to give formal evidence as to cause of death.
- John Bowyer said: About a quarter to 11 on Friday morning I was sent by my master, Mr. McCarthy, to ask Mary Jane Kelly for the rent. I knocked and got no answer, so I put my hand through the broken window, moved the curtain, and saw flesh on the table and the body on the bed. I told Mr. McCarthy, and we fetched the police.
- John McCarthy said: I am a grocer and lodging-house keeper, in Dorset Street. About a quarter to 11 I sent the last witness to the deceased for the rent. He came back and said he knocked at the door, and, getting no answer, looked through the window and saw the blood. I went and looked myself, and saw the body of a woman and went to the police station and reported to Inspector Beck. I often saw the deceased drunk. When sober she was a very quiet woman.
- Mary Ann Cox, residing in Miller's Court, said: I last saw deceased on Thursday night. She was very drunk. She was going up the court with a short, stout man, shabbily dressed. He wore a long dark coat and a billy-cock hat, and had a pot of ale in his hand. He had a blotchy face, and a full, carotty moustache. I heard deceased singing "A violet I plucked from my mother's grave." I went out again at one o'clock, and she was still singing. At three I returned, the light was out,
and all was quiet. I did not sleep a wink that night. I heard someone go out at a quarter past six, but I do not know from what house. I should think the man I saw with Kelly was about five or six and thirty. If there had been a cry of murder I should have heard it.
- Elizabeth Jones said: I live in a room over deceased. I went home about half-past one on Friday morning. About half-past three my kitten came across my face, and just as I pushed it away I heard a suppressed cry, "Oh, murder." Being accustomed to such cries I took no notice of it.
- Caroline Maxwell, who was cautioned by the Coroner as to her evidence, said: I saw the deceased standing at the entrance to the court on Friday morning about half-past eight o'clock. I asked her why she was up so early. She said she was so bad. I asked her to have a drink, and she said, "I have just had half a pint of ale and brought it up again." I went to Bishopsgate, and on returning, saw her standing outside the Britannia public-house talking to a man. He seemed to be a short,
stout man, and I believe he wore a plaid coat.
- Lewis Laundress said, I saw a man waiting outside Miller's Court, about half-past two on Friday morning. I remained in the Court all night, and about four heard a woman cry murder. On Wednesday night I was with a female, when a well-dressed man carrying a black bag asked us to come down a passage. We were afraid and ran away. He had a black moustache and was very pale. On Friday morning as I was going to Miller's Court I met the same man with a female in Commercial street.
- Dr. George Baxter Phillips deposed: I am surgeon to the H Division of the Metropolitan Police. I cannot give the whole of my evidence now. On Friday morning, about 11 o'clock, I proceeded to Miller's Court, and in a room there found the mutilated remains of a woman lying two-thirds over towards the edge of the bed nearest the door. Subsequent to the injury which caused death, the body had been removed from the opposite side of the bed which was nearest the wooden partition. The
presence of a quantity of blood on and under the bed lead me to the conclusion that the severance of the carotid artery, which was the immediate cause of death, was inflicted while deceased was lying at the right side of the bedstead, and her head and neck in the right hand corner.
That is as far as I propose to carry with the evidence now.
- The coroner said he proposed to continue taking evidence for another hour. The jury expressed a wish to adjourn for some time. The coroner replied he would resume in a quarter of an hour.
- On resuming, Julia Venturney said: I am a charwoman, and live at Miller's Court. Deceased told me she liked another man other than Joe Barnett, and he often came to see her. I was at home during Thursday night, and had there been any noises should have heard them.
- Maria Harvey, laundress, said: I have slept with the deceased on several occasions, and never heard her express a fear of anyone.
- Inspector Beck, H Division, said: I accompanied Dr. Phillips to the house. Do not know that deceased was known to the police.
- Inspector Abberline, Scotland Yard, deposed: I went to Miller's Court at 11:30 on Friday. When there I received intimation that bloodhounds were on the way. I waited till 1:30 when Superintendent Arnold arrived, and said the order for bloodhounds had been countermanded. The door was then forced. In the grate were traces of the woman's clothing having been burnt. The opinion is they were burnt to give sufficient light for the murderer to do his work.
- The Coroner said this concluded the evidence offered at present. The question was whether the jury had not already heard sufficient testimony to enable them to determine the cause of death. His own opinion was that they might conclude and leave the case to the police.
- The jury, after a few moments' consultation, returned a verdict of "Wilful murder against some person or persons unknown."

SUPPOSED CLUE.

The Press Association states that the police have received information which not only establishes a clue to the perpetrator of the Dorset Street murder, but places the authorities in possession of an accurate description of the person seen in company of the murdered woman shortly before her death. It appears that a man, apparently of the labouring class, with a military appearance, who knew the deceased woman, Monday evening lodged with the police a detailed account of the appearance of the
incident which attracted his attention on the morning of the murder, and although his story has been sifted and the narrator cross-examined, he adheres to it rigidly. For this reason the police believe the clue a new and important one. The informant stated that on the morning of the 9th he saw the deceased woman, Mary Jeanette Kelly, in Commercial Street, Spitalfields, in the vicinity of where the murder was committed, in the company of a man of respectable appearance. The man was about five feet six
inches in height, and thirty-four or five years of age, with dark complexion and dark moustache curled upwards at the ends. He wore a long dark coat trimmed with astrachan, a white collar, with black necktie, in which was affixed a horse-shoe. He wore a pair of dark gaiters over button boots, and displayed from his waistcoat a massive gold chain. The highly respectable appearance of the man was in such contrast to the appearance of the woman that few could have failed to notice them at that hour of the morning.
This description, which agrees with that given of the person seen with the deceased by others, is much fuller in detail than has yet been in the possession of the police, and the importance which they attach to it may be estimated from the fact that immediately it was taken a special messenger was sent to the headquarters of H Division, where Detectives Aberline, Nairn, and Moore started an investigation.

Source: Carnarvon and Denbigh Herald and North and South Wales Independent, 16 November 1888, Page 3

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