Books




Face of Winifred May Davies
Latest topics
» Why Jesus Is Not God
Mon 17 Apr 2017 - 0:09 by Karen

» The Fourth Reich
Fri 14 Apr 2017 - 14:14 by Karen

» Allah, The Real Serpent of the Garden
Tue 7 Mar 2017 - 11:45 by Karen

» THE INNOCENCE OF JEWS
Sat 4 Mar 2017 - 12:06 by Karen

» Hillary Clinton (Hillroy Was Here)
Fri 28 Oct 2016 - 17:38 by Karen

» Alien on the Moon
Thu 20 Oct 2016 - 21:57 by Karen

» Martian Nonsense Repeats Itself
Thu 20 Oct 2016 - 18:43 by Karen

» Enlil and Enki
Fri 7 Oct 2016 - 17:11 by Karen

» Israel Shoots Down Drone - Peter Kucznir's Threat
Wed 24 Aug 2016 - 22:55 by Karen

» Rome is Babylon
Sun 24 Jul 2016 - 21:27 by Karen

Links












Gallery



Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Page 3 of 4 Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Wed 4 Jul 2012 - 10:11

ANOTHER MURDER.
The Whitechapel Fiend Adds One More to the List.

THIS IS THE NINTH VICTIM.
The Woman, It Is Said, Was Killed in Her Own Room, and Her Body Was Shockingly Mutilated. The Other Crimes.

LONDON, Nov. 10. - The city is again stirred to its very center by another Whitechapel murder - the ninth in the direful series.
A house in Dorset street, near Hanbury street, was the scene of the murder. A woman was the victim, as in the other cases and her body was shockingly mutilated. It was found not many hours after the violence had been done.
The murder had been committed in the woman's own room early in the morning. The name of the unfortunate woman was Mary Jane Lawrence, the last name being that of the man with whom she had recently lived.
News of the discovery spread rapidly after it was once given out, and in a short time the vicinity was thronged with excited and morbidly curious people. The police authorities took charge of the body and the house at once after the fact of the murder became known to them. They brought into use the bloodhounds which were lately tested for the purpose of hunting down the Whitechapel murderer in the hope that the brutes would catch the scent and follow up the trail of the assassin.

[img][/img]

So vigilant had the police been since the last previous murder that the criminal if indeed, the work has been all that of one man, had been forced to lie very quiet and the city was beginning to settle itself into the peaceful idea that the series of enormities was at an end. The Dorset street tragedy has broken up this peacefulness, and the excitement is even more intense than before. Safety, it now seems, is not to be found even indoors, and the women of the district infested by the murderer or murderers are nerveless in their terror.
The victim of this newest crime was one of the better class of the women which have been made way with in the other cases. Not all of the other murdered ones have been able to keep rooms.
The Lord Mayor's parade made an emergency which called a great portion of the police force to special duty in controlling the crowds in the streets. Hence the rigid patrol which has been kept up in the Whitechapel district was somewhat relaxed.
This gave the murderer his opportunity, which he was not slow to seize. He is evidently even more vigilant than the police, and has the advantage that he can study their movements without being himself subject to espionage.
The fourth one was found in Hanbury street, not far from the location of this one, and at the time she was discovered there was written on the wall near the body the legend:
"Fifteen Before I Surrender."
According to this, six more lives are yet to be taken, and from the success which has thus far attended the murderer's operations, it seems entirely possible, perhaps probable, that he will be able to fulfill his horrible intentions.
The first Whitechapel murder occurred a year ago last month in that section of London where the scum of the vile dens of vice are let loose upon the streets in the early morning, when the police close up the brothels infested by them. The victim was a fallen woman past middle age, and her body was found horribly and peculiarly mutilated. But it was supposed to be only a murder common among her class. No effort was made to discover the murderer, and the body was buried in Potter's field unidentified and the case forgotten.

[img][/img]

The second murder did not occur till Aug. 7 last, but it was unmistakably the work of the same hand. The victim was again a fallen and dissolute woman, Martha Turner, and her body was found on the first floor landing of the George yard buildings, Commercial street, Spitalfields, Whitechapel district. The previous day was a bank holiday.
The movements of the murdered woman were traced up to midnight of Aug. 7, when she was, together with another dissolute woman, in company with two soldiers from Wellington barracks, visiting drinking places in the neighborhood.
The horror and commotion created by this murder hardly began to subside when a third victim of the maniac's cruel knife was found in front of a stable yard in Buck's row. It was on the morning of Aug. 31, and the circumstances were exactly like those in the other two. The head nearly cut off; two fearful cuts in the abdomen extending up to the breast, and the same mutilations. But everything seemed to indicate that the murder had been done some distance from where the body was found. There was little blood about the spot and her clothing was not torn or cut. She was Mary Ann Nichols, a woman of the town, aged 42 years, and was seen alive late the night before.
Eight days later, at 5:30 in the morning, the fourth victim, Annie Chapman, was found weltering in her own blood in the backyard of 29 Hanbury street, not 100 yards from the spot where the body of Ann Nichols was found. On the wall near the body was written in chalk:
The police became slightly interested in the case, owing to the similarity to the other murder, and they decided that in both cases the murderer had seized the victim from behind by a powerful arm and cut her throat by a swift stroke from a razor edged knife, almost severing the head from the body and leaving the imprint of the knife's edge on the bone at the back of the neck.

[img][/img]

Thirty-nine stab wounds were found on the body. The underclothing had been thrown up over the shoulders, and a jagged wound across the bowels laid the intestines bare. Below that a portion of the body had been cut away with the skill and nicety of an experienced surgeon. The organ had been removed, as in the first case, and then it was that the detectives conceived the theory that the murders were done in behalf of some collector of anatomical specimens.
"Fifteen before I surrender."
The body was mutilated exactly like the other three. The victim was of the same character, and was 45 years old. Her murder must have been after 5 o'clock in the morning, for she was drinking with a strange man at that hour in a public house nearby. Armed with the description of this man, the police set to work, but after two weeks had got no nearer to a discovery of the butcher than before.
On Sept. 23, a young woman was found murdered and mutilated in the same manner at Gateshead, near Newcastle-on-Tyne. Although this is some miles from Whitechapel, the similarity of the murder and circumstances make it probable that the perpetrator was the Whitechapel fiend.
On Sept. 30, at about 1 o'clock in the morning, a sixth victim was found in Berner street. She was a Whitechapel strumpet, "Hippy Lip Annie," aged 40 years. Her body was warm when found, and although the throat was cut, as in the other cases, the murderer had been frightened away probably, for there was no mutilation.
Fifteen minutes later on this same night the body of another unfortunate was found in the southwest corner of Mitre square, mutilated as in five of the other cases.
And on the day following an eighth body was found on the site of the projected Metropolitan opera house, on the Thames embankment, in the Whitechapel district.
It will be remembered that when the body of Annie Chapman was found, Sept. 8, the murderer counted five victims in his writing on the wall over the body, but the police could account for but four.
The finding of the body on Oct. 1 cleared up the mystery, for it was badly decomposed and was undoubtedly that of the fourth victim.
In all but one case the butcher had exercised consummate skill with the knife, each slash cutting a vital part. Evidently he was an educated surgeon.
At this time several people of the neighborhood came forward and described a certain wild-eyed, shabby genteel man of middle age and refined mien, who had been seen in the neighborhood of late. The description tallied with parts of other descriptions given of the companions of the murdered women.
The papers were full of this description, and the murders ceased.

Source: The News, Frederick, Maryland, Saturday Evening, November 10, 1888

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Fri 18 Jan 2013 - 5:25

The following article mentions a Mr. Vander Hunt as being a representative of the Whitechapel Vigilance Committee, who was present at Mary Jane Kelly's inquest. I wonder if this gentleman is Solomon Van Der Wood/Hout.

ANOTHER AWFUL MURDER IN WHITECHAPEL.
HIDEOUS MUTILATIONS.

As stated in our second edition last week, on Friday morning in the midst of the popular demonstration connected with the Lord Mayor's Show, the tens of thousands of persons who had assembled along the line of route from the City to the West-end to watch the civic pageant pass were startled and horrified by the hoarse cries of the street newspaper hawkers announcing the perpetration of another terrible murder in Whitechapel. The news received speedy confirmation, and even the meager particulars immediately obtainable left no doubt that this, the latest of the series of crimes which has for months kept the East of London in a state of fear almost amounting to panic, exceeded in its cold-blooded, fiendish atrocity any that have preceded it. In the details of the murder itself there is, unhappily, little that can be described as novel, being the same story of want, immorality, and inhuman crime. But in one most important circumstance this murder differs in a startling manner from all that have gone before it. It was committed, not in the open air, but in a house into which the murderer had been taken by his too-willing victim.
The scene of the murder is Miller-court, Dorset-street, Commercial-street, a district composed of big warehouses, squalid streets, and, in a striking degree, of registered lodging houses. The murder was committed at No. 2 Millercourt, some time after midnight. The murdered woman was not particularly well-known even to her neighbours, and, as is customary amongst people of her class, she had several nicknames, including "Mary Jane," and "Fair Emma;" but the name by which she was known to her landlord, and which has been proved to be correct, was Mary Jane Kelly. She had been married for some years, or at any rate had lived regularly with a man named Kelly. But it is known that she went on the streets, irregularly at first, but after separating from her husband, chiefly on account of her drunken habits and quarrelsome disposition, she took to prostitution as a regular means of living. Almost the only friend she is known to have had was a woman named Harvey, who used to sleep with her occasionally. Kelly went out as usual on Friday evening, and was seen in the neighbourhood about ten o'clock, in company with a man, of whom, however, no description can be obtained. She was last seen, as far as can be ascertained, in Commercial-street about half-past eleven. She was then alone, and was probably making her way home. It is supposed that she met the murderer in Commercial-street, and he probably induced her to take him home without indulging in more drink; at any rate nothing was seen of the couple in the neighbouring public-houses nor in the beer-house at the corner of Dorset-street. The pair reached Miller-court about midnight, but they were not seen to enter the house. The street door was closed, but the woman had a latchkey, and as she must have been fairly sober, she and her companion would have been able to enter the house and reach the woman's room without making a noise. A light was seen shining through the window of the room for some time after the couple must have entered it, and one person asserts positively that the woman was heard singing the refrain of a popular song as late as one o'clock on Friday morning; but here again there is a conflict of testimony, which the police are even now engaged in endeavouring to reconcile. That which follows is beyond doubt. About ten o'clock Mr. M'Carthy sent a man who works for him to the house, with orders to see Kelly and obtain from her some money on account of the rent, of which she was largely in arrears. The man went and knocked at the door but received no answer. He had assumed the woman would be up, because not unfrequently she would make purchases in M'Carthy's shop before that hour. He listened but heard no sound, and then, becoming alarmed, tried the door. It was quite fast and seemed to have been locked from the outside. Determined to find out what was wrong, the man went to the window, commanding a view of the whole room, with the intention of entering if necessary. One glance into the room, however, was sufficient. He saw on the bed the body of a woman dead, and mutilated in such a ghastly manner that the observer nearly fainted from horror. He rushed affrighted out of the court into M'Carthy's shop, begging him, for God's sake, to come and look. M'Carthy, hardly less horrified, returned to the house with his man, and both looked into the room. The place seemed like a shambles. Blood was everywhere, and pieces of flesh were scattered about the floor, while on the little table, in full view of the window, was a hideous heap of flesh of flesh and intestines. M'Carthy sent his man for the police, and Inspector Beck, of Commercial-street Station, and Inspector Abberline, of the Criminal Investigation Department, stationed at Leman-street, arrived within ten minutes. A strong squad of police was also dispatched from Commercial-street Station to assist the regular patrol men in maintaining order. A large crowd had already assembled, and Inspector Beck's first care was to clear Dorset-street of idlers, to close the entrance to the court with two policemen, and then to draw a cordon across each end of Dorset-street. From that time forward only authorised persons were permitted to pass into or remain in Dorset Street. The constables in charge of the entrance to Miller Court allowed no one to pass in or out, not even the inhabitants of the place. Meanwhile no attempt had been made to force an entrance to the room. The two inspectors had looked through the window and had seen sufficient to prove that a most hideous crime had been committed, but neither officer seemed to care to undertake responsibility, and it was not until some 20 minutes after the first alarm had been given that Superintendent Arnold, the officer in charge of the division, arrived on the scene and at once took over charge. By his direction M'Carthy obtained a pickaxe. The door was forced open, and the police-officers entered the room. They did not care to remain longer than was necessary to note accurately the position of the body, the general appearance of the apartment, and the character of the principal mutilations. The sight, in truth, was enough to unnerve strong men - even so experienced an officer as Inspector Abberline, who has had immediate charge of the inquiries connected with most of the recent murders, and who is, so to speak, seasoned to horrors. The pieces of flesh which had been dimly seen through the grimy window proved inexpressibly more ghastly at a close view. Large pieces of the thighs had been cut off and thrown about with brutal carelessness. Both breasts of the unhappy victim had been removed, and one of them lay on the table alongside a confused and horrible mess of intestines. The throat had been cut with such ferocious and appalling thoroughness that the head was almost severed from the trunk. The body, which was almost naked, had been ripped up and literally disembowelled. The chief organs had been entirely removed; some were thrown upon the floor, and others placed on the table. It is stated upon authority which should be reliable that the uterus, as in the case of the Mitre-square victim, has been removed and taken away by the fiend, but upon this important point the police officers and surgeons refuse in the most emphatic manner to give the slightest information. It is almost self-evident, however, that had this particular organ not been removed the police would gladly have said so, if only to allay in some slight measure the panic which has again set in with painful intensity among the poor people in the crime-plagued district.
Dr. Forbes Winslow has favoured the Central News with the following opinion on this latest murder: - It is the work of the same homicidal lunatic who has committed the other crimes in Whitechapel. The whole harrowing details point to this conclusion. The way in which the murder was done, and the strange state in which the body was left, is not consistent with sanity. The theory I stated some time ago has come true to the letter. This was to the effect that the murderer was in a "lucid interval," and would recommence directly this state had passed away.
The latest Whitechapel murder has, as may be imagined, caused increased excitement in the East-end, which was intensified on Sunday by the report that another woman had been found murdered in Jubilee Street. The rumour, however, turned out to be untrue. An important arrest was made last night of a man who refused his name, but stated he was a surgeon of St. George's Hospital. He was bareheaded and had a blackened face, and shouted out that he was "Jack the Ripper." Great excitement ensued, and the man ran great risk of serious injury by the mob until the police arrived and arrested him. It took four constables and four other persons to remove him to the station. The police attach great importance to the arrest, as the man answers the description of the person wanted. The Home Secretary has advised her Majesty to grant a free pardon to any accomplice who shall give such evidence as it will lead to the conviction of the actual criminal.

No further arrests were made by the police on Monday in connection with the Millers Court Murder, but every clue is being vigorously followed up by the police officials.
One noteworthy incident during the day was the receipt by Mrs. M'Carthy, wife of the landlord of the house where the murder was committed, of a post-card bearing the Folkstone post-mark and signed "Jack Sheridan, the Ripper." In bad spelling, and equally bad calligraphy, the writing said, "Don't be alarmed, I am going to do another, but this time it will be a mother and daughter." The card which, unlike many of the previous communications of a similar character, was written in black ink, was at once handed over to the detectives. The handwriting was of a different character from that of the former letters on the subject.
The following letter was received by the police at Harrow Road Police Station on Monday morning: -

"Dear Boss, - I am now in the Queen's Park, in Third Avenue. I am now out of red ink at present, but it won't matter for once. I will give you a chance now to catch me. I shall have check trousers, black coat and vest, so look out. I have done one not yet found out, so keep your eyes open.
- Yours, JACK THE RIPPER."

The rumour that the bloodhounds which were recently tested by Sir Charles Warren had been lost proves to be untrue. The hounds are the property of Mr. Brough, of Scarborough; and when that gentleman, after bringing them to London, had to return home, he left the dogs in the charge of Mr. Taunton, of Doughty-street. Negotiations were opened for the purchase of the animals by the police; but, as Sir C. Warren delayed giving any definite assurance on this point, Mr. Brough insisted on resuming possession of his dogs, and they were sent back to Scarborough some days since.
A man, apparently of the labouring class, with a military appearance, who knew the deceased, last evening gave the police a detailed statement of an incident which attracted his attention on Friday. He states that, on the morning of the 9th inst., he saw the deceased woman in Commercial-street, Spitalfields, in company with a man of respectable appearance. The man was about five feet six inches in height, and 34 or 35 years of age, with dark complexion and dark moustache, curled up at the ends. He was wearing a long, dark coat, trimmed with astrachan, a white collar with black necktie, in which was affixed a horse-shoe pin. He wore a pair of dark gaiters with light buttons, over button boots, and displayed from his waistcoat a massive gold chain. The highly-respectable appearance of this individual was in such great contrast to that of the woman, that few people could have failed to remark them at that hour of the morning. The police attach some importance to this information, which is much fuller in detail than that hitherto received by them.
The detective police, who were despatched to inquire into the movements of the various employees on board the several cattle-carrying boats then in the port of London, completed their inquiries by six o'clock on Saturday afternoon, when the last of their reports were received at Scotland-yard. These reports show that no person employed on any of the cattle boats can have had anything to do with the murder, as the times of nearly all have been accounted for, and those not accounted for are practically beyond suspicion.

THE INQUEST AND VERDICT.

Dr. Macdonald, M.P., Coroner for North-east Middlesex opened the inquest at Shoreditch Town Hall, on Monday, on the body of Mary Jeanette Kelly, murdered in Miller's Court, Dorset-street, Spitalfields, during Thursday night or Friday morning last. The jury having been sworn, proceeded to view the body, and afterwards visited the scene of the murder. On their return, evidence was taken. The crowd in the adjoining streets were much smaller than at the inquest on the previous victims.
Mr. Vander Hunt represented the Whitechapel Vigilance Committee, and Inspector Abberline was present on behalf of the police.
The Coroner complained of the unfounded statements in the Press as to alleged communication between himself and Mr. Wynn Baxter with regard to jurisdiction.
Joseph Barnett, labourer, deposed: I identify the body of the deceased as that of a young woman with whom I have lived for eight months. I separated from her on the 30th of last month. I left her because she brought a prostitute to live in our room. I saw deceased last between half-past seven and a quarter to eight on Thursday night. We were on friendly terms. Before leaving I said I had no money. Deceased was sober. Deceased told me her father's name was John Kelly, gaffer of ironworks in Carnarvonshire. She was born in Limerick, and was married in Wales to a man named Davis, who was killed in a colliery explosion. After leading an immoral life in Cardiff, deceased came to a house in the East End of London. A gentleman induced her to go to France. She returned, lived at Ratcliffe Highway, then at Pennington-street. Witness first met her in Commercial-street, and arranged to live with her. At deceased's request, he read to her the newspaper reports of the previous Whitechapel murders. He did not hear her express fear of any person.
The jury expressed the wish that Dr. Phillips, police surgeon, not present, should attend, so that some medical evidence might be taken.
Thomas Bowyer, Dorset-street, Spitalfields, said: On Friday morning, I went to the house of the deceased to collect rent for Mr. McCarthy. I knocked but got no answer. I found a window broken. I put the curtain aside. Looking in I saw two lumps of flesh on the table. Looking a second time, I saw a body on the bed, and a pool of blood on the floor. I reported the discovery to the police.
John McCarthy, grocer, lodging-house keeper, Dorset-street, deposed: I sent the last witness to Miller's-court for the rent. Within five minutes he came back, saying he had seen blood in No. 13 room of Miller's-court. I went and saw the body. I could say nothing for a little time, but when I recovered I accompanied my man to the police. An Inspector came with me to the house. I do not know that Barnett and deceased had any serious quarrel. I let the room at 4s. 6d. a week. Deceased was 29s. in arrears. I often saw deceased the worse for drink. When drunk she became noisy and sang.
Mary Ann Cox deposed: I live at 5, Miller's-court opposite deceased. About midnight on Thursday I saw deceased in Dorset-street. She was very much the worse for drink. I saw her go up the court with a short stout man, shabbily dressed. He carried a pot of ale. He wore a black coat and hat, had a clean shaved chin, sandy whiskers and moustache. Deceased wished me good night and went into her room. I heard her singing the song, "A violet I plucked from mother's grave." I afterwards went out of my room. Coming back at one o'clock she was still singing. I again went out. Coming back I saw the light in deceased's room had been put out. All was silent. I heard footsteps in the court about six o'clock. I did not sleep after going to bed. If there had been a cry of murder during the night I must have heard it.
Elizabeth Prater, Miller's Court, said I live in the same house. I went into my own room at one o'clock on Friday morning. I then saw no glimmer in deceased's room. I woke about four and heard a suppressed cry of "Murder," appearing to come from the Court. I did not take particular notice, as I frequently hear such cries.
Caroline Maxwell, wife of the lodging house deputy in Dorset Street, was next sworn.
The Coroner cautioned her to be careful, as her evidence differed from the other statements made.
Mrs. Maxwell then deposed: I saw deceased at the corner of Miller's Court shortly after eight o'clock on Friday morning. Deceased told me she felt ill, and vomited. I went with my husband's breakfast. On my return, I saw deceased speaking with a man outside the Britannia public-house. I cannot give a particular description of the man. He wore dark clothes, and a sort of plaid coat. Deceased wore a dark skirt, with velvet body and shawl, and no hat. The man was short and stout.
Sarah Lewis, Great Powell Street, stated: - I visited my friend at Miller's Court on Friday morning at half-past two o'clock. I saw a man standing on the pavement. He was short, stout, and wore a wideawake hat. I stopped with my friend Mrs. Keyler. I fell asleep in a chair, and woke at half-past three. I sat awake till a little before four. I heard a female voice scream "Murder" loudly. I though the sound came from the direction of deceased's house. I did not take much notice. Such cries are often heard. At eight o'clock on Wednesday night when with a female friend, I was accosted in Bethnal Green-road by a gentleman who carried a bag. He invited one of us to accompany him. Disliking his appearance we left him, the bag was about nine inches long. The man had a pale face, dark moustache, wore dark clothes, an overcoat, and a high felt hat. On Friday morning when coming to Miller's-court about half-past two, I met that man with a female in Commercial-street. As I went into Miller's Court they stood at the corner of Dorset-street.
Dr. George Baxter Phillips deposed: - I am surgeon to the H Division of the Metropolitan police. I cannot give the whole of my evidence today. On Friday morning, about 11 o'clock, I proceeded to Miller's Court. In a room there found the mutilated remains of a woman lying two-thirds over towards the edge of the bed nearest the door. Subsequent to the injury which caused death the body had been removed from the opposite side of the bed, which was nearest the wooden partition. The presence of a quantity of blood on and under the bed leads me to the conclusion that the severance of the carotid artery, which was the immediate cause of death, was inflicted while the deceased was lying at the right side of the bedstead, and her head and neck in the right hand corner. That is as far as I propose to carry my evidence today.
The Coroner said he proposed to continue taking evidence for another hour.
The jury expressed a wish to adjourn for some time.
The Coroner said he would resume in a quarter of an hour.
On resuming, Julia Venturney said: I am a charwoman, and live at Miller's Court. Deceased told me she liked another man other than Joe Barnett, and he often came to see her. I was at home during Thursday night. Had there been any noises I should have heard them.
Maria Harvey, laundress, said: I have slept with deceased on several occasions, and never heard her express fear of anyone.
Inspector Beck, H Division, said: I accompanied Dr. Phillips to the house. I do not know that deceased was known to the police.
Inspector Abberline, Scotland Yard, deposed: I went to Miller's Court at 11:30 a.m. on Friday. When there I received an intimation that the bloodhounds were on the way. I waited till 1:30, when Supt. Arnold arrived and said the order for the bloodhounds had been countermanded. The door was then forced. In the grate were traces of woman's clothing having been burnt. My opinion is they were burnt to give sufficient light for the murderer to do his work.
The Coroner said this concluded the evidence offered today. The question was whether the jury had not already heard sufficient testimony to enable them to determine the cause of death. His own opinion was they might conclude, and leave the case to the police.
The jury, after a moment's consultation, returned a verdict of "Wilful murder against some person or persons unknown."

On Monday night the police made a thorough search of the casual wards in the East-end, but no discovery of importance was made. In the course of the night, however, a message was received from the Holborn Casual Ward that one of the temporary inmates was behaving suspiciously. Constables were sent to the place, and arrested a rough-looking fellow, who gave the name of Thomas Murphy. He was taken to the police-station at Frederick-street, King's-cross-road, where on being searched, he was found to have in his possession a formidable-looking knife, with a blade about 10 inches long. He was detained in custody. No further arrests were made yesterday. Some of the best men in the detective force have been instructed to watch individuals upon whom suspicion rests, but not so seriously as to justify their immediate arrest. Inquiries are again being made at Lunatic Asylums and Workhouse Infirmaries, with the object of obtaining a list as complete as possible of men discharged as cured within the last few months, who had previously been afflicted with dangerous mania.
The police have received from Mr. Samuel Osborne, wire worker, 20, Garden-row, London-road, a statement to the effect that he was walking along St. Paul's Churchyard on Tuesday, behind a respectably-dressed man, when a parcel, wrapped in a newspaper, fell from the man's coat. Osborne told him that he had dropped something; but the man denied that the parcel belonged to him. Osborne picked up the parcel, and found that it contained a knife, having a peculiarly-shaped handle and a thick blade, six or seven inches long, with stains upon it resembling blood. The parcel also contained a brown kid glove, smeared with similar stains on both sides. Osborne found a constable, and together they searched for the mysterious individual, but without success. The parcel was handed to the City Police authorities, who, however, attach no importance to the matter.
On Tuesday a remarkable statement was made by a man who professes to have been talking with Kelly at two o'clock on Friday morning, when she was addressed by the "gentleman" who accompanied her to her room. The man has given a detailed description of the "gentleman."

Source: The Derbyshire Times, Wednesday November 14, 1888, Page 3

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 17 Mar 2013 - 12:45

LONDON MURDER HORRORS.
ANOTHER HIDEOUS CRIME.

In the forenoon of Friday of last week, the inhabitants of the East-end of London were again thrown into a state of consternation by the discovery that another horrible murder had been perpetrated in their midst, the revolting character of which far exceeded any of the five others which have been committed in the neighbourhood since August last year.
The victim is again a woman, and her assailant committed his demoniacal work under woman's own roof, in, it is believed, broad daylight. Notwithstanding the comparative publicity which must have attended his movements, the murderer managed to effect his escape without leaving behind him trace more tangible that he did six weeks ago, when Elizabeth Stride and Catherine Eddowes
were butchered in Berner-street and Mitre-square respectively. Dorset-street, Spitalfields, the scene of the latest outrage, is the heart of a somewhat notorious neighbourhood. It is composed largely of lodging-houses, which are frequented by persons of the lowest station in life, amongst them being thieves and some of the most degraded women. It was here that Annie Chapman, who was murdered in Hanbury-street,
on the 8th of September, lived, the scene of the present crime being a court directly opposite the house to which that unfortunate woman was in the habit of resorting. From Mitre-square, the scene of one of the murders of September 30, Hanbury-street is scarcely a stone's throw. The victim of Friday's crime is a young woman named Mary Jane Kelly, aged 26, who had for some time lived with a man called Barnet, known also
as Danny. Barnet worked sometimes at Billingsgate as a porter, and sometimes as a drover or a hawker of oranges in the streets. They occupied a room in a house in Miller-court, Dorset-street, a turning out of Commercial-street, Spitalfields. There are eight or ten small houses in the court, which is entered by a low archway and a narrow passage from Dorset-street, and forms a cul-de-sac. A small general shop in Dorset-street
adjoins the entrance to the court, tenanted by Mrs. M'Carthy, who also owns the houses in the court. Kelly appears to have tenanted a top room in one of Mrs. M'Carthy's houses. She had a little boy, aged about six or seven years, living with her, and latterly her circumstances had been so reduced that she is reported to have stated to a companion that she would make away with herself, as she could not bear to see her boy starving.
There are conflicting statements as to when the woman was last seen alive, but that upon which most reliance appears to be placed is that of a young woman, an associate of the deceased, who states that at about half-past ten o'clock on the Thursday night she met the murdered woman at the corner of Dorset-street. Kelly informed her that she had no money, and it was then she said that if she could not get any she would never go out any more,
but would do away with herself. Soon after they parted, and a man who is described as respectably dressed came up and spoke to the murdered woman Kelly and offered her some money. The man accompanied the woman to her lodgings, which are on the second floor, the little boy being sent to a neighbour's house.
Nothing more was seen of the woman. On Friday morning, it is stated, the little boy was sent back into the house, and the report goes that he was sent out subsequently on an errand by the man who was in the house with his mother. Confirmation of this statement is, it is true, difficult to obtain, and it remains in doubt whether anyone really saw the unfortunate woman on the morning of the horrible discovery, although a tailor named Lewis says he saw
Kelly come out about eight o'clock, and go back. Another statement is to the effect that Kelly was seen in a public-house at the corner of Dorset-street and Commercial-street about ten o'clock on Friday morning, and that she there met Barnet, and had a glass of beer with him. Just before eleven Mrs. M'Carthy with her son went to pay her customary visit for the purpose of collecting the day's rent. Young M'Carthy appears to have first sent a man named Bower
to the house, which, though entered from the court, is really a part of No. 26, Dorset-street. Bower failed to obtain an answer to his knocking, and looking through the window saw to his horror the woman lying on the bed in a state of nudity, horribly mutilated. He called M'Carthy, who also looked through the window, and seeing that the body was cut about almost beyond recognition he hurried away with Bower and ran to Commercial-street Police-station, where they informed
the police. Inspector Beck and Sergeant Betham, 31 H, who were in charge of about forty constables who had been held in readiness in anticipation of a possible Socialist disturbance attending the Lord Mayor's Show, at once proceeded to the scene of the murder, running to the house as quickly as they could. By this time the news had spread so rapidly that over a thousand persons were gathered in the street, and these were rapidly cleared away from the court and the side of Dorset-street
adjoining, while the inspector entered the house.
The house in which the murder was committed is entered by two doors situated on the right-hand side of the passage, and has several rooms. The door first reached from the street leads to the upper rooms; the second opens directly into one room, which is situated on the ground floor. It was in this room that the murder was committed. The fireplace faces the door, and a bed stands behind the door when it is placed open. When an entrance had been effected a terrible sight presented itself to the police
officers. The body of the woman, perfectly nude, was stretched out on the little bed, the clothes on which were saturated with blood. The unfortunate woman had been cut and hacked by the assassin's knife in a manner which was revolting beyond all description. The fiendish assailant was not content with taking the life of his victim by severing the head from the body, but he had exercised an infernal ingenuity in despoiling the corpse of its human semblance. Both ears and the nose had been cut off, and the flesh
of the cheeks and forehead peeled off; the breasts were cut away, evidently with a sharp knife, and placed on the table near the bed. (exactly as I stated in my book, "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders", Authorhouse, 2006). The abdomen had been ripped open and disembowelled, portions of the entrails lying about the bed, the liver being placed between the legs. Both thighs had been denuded of flesh, laying bare the bones, and the excised portions laid on the table. Some of the internal parts of the body had been taken away, while, in addition, one arm was almost severed from the trunk, and one hand thrust inside
the empy cavity of the abdomen. Medical assistance was immediately summoned, and a description of the discovery telegraphed to all the metropolitan police-stations in the terse sentence: "The woman is simply cut to pieces." Within a very short time half a dozen cabs arrived in Dorset-street from Whitehall, conveying detectives from the Criminal Investigation Department, among them being Inspectors Abberline and Reid. Never before had so many men been despatched to the scene of a murder from Whitehall. The scene in the narrow courtway,
leading to the house was one of extraordinary excitement. The whole space was closely packed with detective officers, and quite a small army of plain-clothes constables was located in Dorset-street within an astonishingly short space of time. Dr. Phillips, the divisional surgeon of police, soon arrived, and was followed by Dr. Bond, of Westminster, divisional surgeon, of the A Division, and Dr. J.R. Gabe, of Mecklenburg-square, and two or three other surgeons. They made a preliminary examination of the body, and sent for a photographer,
who took several photographs of the remains. Meanwhile the excitement in the neighbourhood was spreading, until the dwellers in the immediate locality became worked up into a perfect frenzy. Women rushed about the streets telling their neighbours the news, and giving utterance in angry voices to expressions of rage and indignation. Notwithstanding the stolid reticence of all the police engaged at the scene, the main facts of the crime soon became common knowledge, and, spreading far and wide, drew a great concourse of people to the thoroughfare
from which the court runs. Great efforts were made at first to keep the side of Dorset-street clear in the vicinity of Miller-court, in the expectation that bloodhounds might have to be employed; but though it is understood that a telegram asking for them was sent to Sir Charles Warren, they were not sent. Barnet was sent for, and he at once identified the body as that of Kelly, or "Ginger," as she was called owing to the colour of her hair. Barnet made a statement to the police, the purport of which did not come out. Sir Charles Warren did not visit
the scene of the murder, but during the afternoon Colonel Monsell, chief constable of the district, and Chief-constables Howard and Roberts went down and inspected the interior of the house. All the constables and detectives available were distributed throughout the district, and a house-to-house visitation was commenced. All who knew the deceased woman were interrogated as to the persons last seen in her company, without, however, eliciting any immediate clue.
At four o'clock in the afternoon the body was removed from Dorset-street to Shoreditch Mortuary, which stands at the back of Shoreditch Church. The mutilated remains were placed in a coarse coffin, which had apparently been used on many previous occasions for the conveyance of the dead, and which was partially covered with a coarse canvas cloth. The straps of the coffin were sealed. The coffin was conveyed in a one-horse ordinary furniture van, and was escorted by several constables under Sergeant Betham. A large crowd followed. At the mortuary another throng
was waiting to see the coffin transferred to the building. The photographer who had been called in to photograph the room and the body removed his camera from the premises at half-past four, and shortly afterwards a detective officer carried from the house a pail, with which he left in a four-wheel cab. The pail was covered with a newspaper, and was stated to contain portions of the woman's body. (or could the pail have contained the Atlantean and Templar goat-idol, named "Baphomet?") It was taken to the house of Dr. Phillips, 2, Spital-square. The windows of the room where the crime was committed were boarded up and a padlock put on the door. The streets
were patrolled by the police all the evening, and no one was allowed to loiter near the place. At night the neighbourhood was a scene of restless excitement and activity, the streets being filled with thousands of idlers, attracted doubtless by morbid curiosity.
What is believed to be an important fact has transpired, which, if true, puts a fresh complexion on the theory of the murders. It appears that the cattle boats being live freights to London are in the habit of coming into the Thames on Thursdays or Fridays, and leave again for the Continent on Sundays or Mondays. It has already been a matter of comment that the recent revolting crimes have been committed at the end of the week, and an opinion has been formed among some of the detectives that the murderer is a drover or a butcher employed on one of these boats,
of which there are many, and that he periodically appears and disappears with one of the steamers. This theory is held to be of much importance by those engaged in this investigation, who believe that the murderer does not reside in the locality, or even in this country at all. It is pointed out that at the inquests on the previous victims, the coroners had expressed the opinion that the knowledge of physiology possessed by a butcher would have been sufficient to enable him to find and cut out the parts of the body which in several cases were abstracted.
The non-appearance of the bloodhounds on the scene of the latest murder is accounted for by the fact that during recent trials in Surrey the animals bolted, and, it is understood, have not been recovered. The excitement in the neighbourhood of Dorset-street on Friday night was intense. The police experienced great difficulty in preserving order, and one constable, who is alleged to have struck an onlooker, was so mobbed and hooted that he had to beat a retreat to Commercial-street Police-station, whither he was followed by a large crowd who were only kept at bay
by the presence of about half-a-dozen stalwart constables who stood at the door, and prevented anyone from entering.

POLICE PROCLAMATIONS. - PARDON OFFERED TO ACCOMPLICES.

The Scotland-yard authorities have issued the following proclamation: -
"Murder. - Pardon. - Whereas, on November 8th or 9th, in Miller-court, Dorset-street, Spitalfields, Mary Janet Kelly was murdered by some person or persons unknown, the Secretary of State will advise the grant of her Majesty's gracious pardon to any accomplice not being a person who contrived or actually committed the murder, who shall give such information and evidence as shall lead to the discovery
and conviction of the person or persons who committed the murder. - (Signed) CHARLES WARREN, the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis, Metropolitan Police Office, 4, Whitehall-place, Nov. 10th, 1888."
A correspondent forwards copies of descriptions of certain men who were last seen in the company of the woman who was murdered in Berner-street and of the woman who was mutilated in Mitre-square. These authentic descriptions, we have reason to know, have been secretly circulated by the authorities of Scotland-yard since Oct. 26, but the complete details have never been made public. This reticence is one of the mysteries
of police administration, and it is difficult to find an explanation to account for the fact that this important information has been "confidentially communicated" to police-officers throughout the kingdom, but has been withheld from the people who have had the best opportunities of seeing and of, therefore, recognising the assassin. The point where the police appear to have been at most pains to suppress is the significant one
that the unknown murderer has the "appearance of a sailor." The notice is headed: "Apprehensions sought. Murder. Metropolitan Police District"; and it proceeds:
"The woodcut sketches, purporting to resemble the persons last seen with the murdered woman, which have appeared in various newspapers, were not authorised by police. The following are the descriptions of the persons seen:
"At 12:35 a.m., 30th Sept., with Elizabeth Stride, found murdered at one a.m., same date, in Berner-street - A man, aged 28, height 5ft. 8in., complexion dark, small dark moustache; dress, black diagonal coat, hard felt hat, collar and tie; respectable appearance; carried a parcel wrapped up in a newspaper.
"At 12:45 a.m., 30th, with same woman, in Berner-street, a man, age about 30, height 5ft. 5in., complexion fair, dark hair, small brown moustache, full face, broad shoulders; dress, dark jacket and trousers, black cap with peak.
"Information to be forwarded to the Metropolitan Police Office, Great Scotland-yard, London, S.W.
"At 1:35 a.m., 30th Sept., with Catherine Eddows, in Church-passage, leading to Mitre-square, where she was found murdered at 1:45 a.m., same date, a man, age 30, height 5ft. 7 or 8in., complexion fair, moustache fair, medium build; dress, pepper-and-salt colour loose jacket, grey cloth cap, with peak of the same material, reddish neckerchief tied in knot; appearance of a sailor.
"Information respecting this man to be forwarded to Inspector M'William, 26, Old Jewry, London, E.C."

INQUEST AND VERDICT.

On Monday morning, at the Shoreditch Town Hall, Dr. Macdonald, coroner for North-East Middlesex, opened the inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of Mary Jeanette Kelly, aged 24, who was murdered and mutilated early on Friday morning in the room which she rented in Miller-court, Dorset-street, Spitalfields.
Considerable excitement was manifested in the neighbourhood of the Town Hall; large crowds assembled, and watched with interest the arrival of the coroner and the jurymen.
A jury having been sworn,
Joseph Barnett said he had been a fish porter, and was now a labourer. He had been living in Lewes-street, Bishopsgate, but since Saturday at his sister's house at 21, Portpool-street, Gray's-inn-road. He had lived with Marie Jeanette Kelly - Kelly was her maiden name - one year and eight months. He had seen the body, and identified her by the ears and eyes. They had lived in 13 room, Miller-court, for over eight months. He left her on the 30th
of last month because she had a woman staying in their room, whom she had taken in out of compassion. That was the only reason for leaving her, and being out of work had nothing to do with it. He left her on the Tuesday between five and six p.m. He last saw her alive between 7:30 and 7:45 on the night she was supposed to have been murdered. He called on her to see how she was. The witness stayed a quarter of an hour. They parted on friendly terms. He told her that having
no work he had no money to give her, and was sorry he had not. He had found Mary Kelly to be generally sober, but she had been drunk several times. On many occasions he talked with Kelly about her relations. She told him she was born in Limerick, and when very young went to Wales. About four years ago she came to London. Her father was John Kelly, a "gaffer" at some ironworks in Carnarvonshire or Carmarthenshire. She had one sister who travelled with materials from one market-place to another.
She said she had six brothers at home, and one in the army. She stated that she was married, when about 16, in Wales, to a collier of the name of Davies. Her husband afterwards was killed in a colliery explosion. After her husband's death she went to Cardiff with, or to see, a cousin, and lived a bad life there for a long time. When she came to London she lived with a "madame" in the West-end. A gentleman asked her to go to France; she went, but soon returned, and lived in Ratcliff-highway with a man opposite
the Commercial Gasworks. She then lived in Pennington-street with Joseph Flemming, a mason's plasterer, who afterwards resided in the Bethnal-green-road. The witness first met Kelly in Commercial-street, and they had drink together. They afterwards took lodgings at a place in George-street, Commercial-street, not far from where the George-yard murder was committed. On several occasions Kelly used to ask the witness to read everything in the newspapers about the murders, and seemed interested to know whether the culprit
was apprehended. She never expressed fear of any particular man.
Thomas Bowyer, 27, Dorset-street, Spitalfields, stated that he was a servant to Mr. M'Carthy, and served in his chandler's shop. At a quarter to eleven on Friday morning he was ordered by his employer to go to "Mary Jane's" room, No. 13, to get the rent which was in arrears. He knocked at the door, but received no answer. He knocked again, and, as there was still no reply, went round the corner of the house, where there was a broken window. He put his hand through the aperture, pulled the curtain aside, looked in and saw two lumps of flesh
lying on a table close by the bed. The second time he looked he saw a body on the bed and blood on the floor. Very quietly the witness then went back to his employer and told him what he had seen. They immediately went to the police-station, but on the way Mr. M'Carthy looked in at the window of No. 13. The witness had often seen Mary Kelly and also the last witness. He saw the woman drunk only once. Mr. M'Carthy's shop is at the corner of the court.
John M'Carthy, grocer and lodging-house keeper, residing at 27, Dorset-street, deposed to sending the last witness to call for the rent. He came back in five minutes and stated what he had seen on looking in at the window. The witness satisfied himself that his man's statement was correct, and then went for the police. Inspector Beck, who was on duty, came at once to the court. Mary Kelly had lived in the court with Barnett for 10 months. The witness did not concern himself to know whether they were man and wife. The two had a row occasionally, and that
is how the window was broken. Everything in the room was the witness's property. The rent of the room 4s. 6d., and the deceased was about 29s. in arrears. The witness frequently saw the woman the worse for drink. When sober she was an exceptionally quiet woman, and he could tell when she had been drinking, because she became noisy and sang songs.
Mary Ann Cox said she lived at No. 5 room in the court. She had known Mary Kelly about nine months. On Thursday night, about a quarter to twelve, the witness met her in the court very intoxicated. A short, stout man, shabbily dressed, was with her. He had a "longish" dark coat on, and carried a pot of ale in his hand. He wore a round hat, had a blotchy face, and full, carroty moustache, with a shaven chin. She followed them into the court, and when Kelly was going into her house witness said, "Good night, Mary," but the man slammed the door in her face. However,
she heard Mary Kelly say "Good night; I'm going to have a song," and then sing, "A violet I plucked from Mother's Grave." At one a.m. the witness came home to warm her hands, and Kelly was still singing. At three o'clock the witness came home again, and then all was still, the light being out in Kelly's room. The witness was worried about her rent, and did not go to sleep. She heard someone go down the court at a quarter-past six, but that would be too late for the men in the court who worked in the market. She did not know who it was, but she heard a man's footsteps.
The man the witness saw with Kelly was about 35 years of age. The man's boots must have been old, for although the place was very silent at that time he made no noise when walking up the court with the woman.
By the jury: The witness would not know the man again if she saw him.
Elizabeth Prater, a married woman who had been deserted by her husband five years since, stated that she lived in No. 20 room, just above the gateway in Miller-court. Mary Kelly lived below her. The witness returned to her room close upon one a.m. on Friday. From the stairs on the way to her own room witness did not notice a light in Kelly's apartments, although through the beading of the wall she had often seen a glimmer. The witness slept in her clothes all night, but previously barricaded her door. She slept very soundly the whole night. At about four a.m. her kitten,
which often got on to the bed when the room was cold, came and rubbed her face and woke her. As the witness, who had been drinking, turned over to slap the cat, she heard a faint cry like someone waking out of a nightmare, saying, "Oh, murder." About 5:30 a.m. the witness got up and went to the public-house to get some rum. Men were then harnessing horses in Dorset-street, which was the usual practice. There was no singing in Kelly's room at 1:30 a.m.
Caroline Maxwell, of 14, Dorset-street, wife of a lodging-house deputy, said she knew Kelly as a young woman who never associated with anyone. She saw her standing at the entrance to the court on Friday morning about eight o'clock. The witness had just come out of the lodging-house, which was immediately opposite Miller-court. It being an unusual thing to see her up at that time, the witness said, "Why, what brings you up so early?" Kelly replied, "Oh, Carry, I do feel so bad." The witness asked her if she would have a drink, but she declined, saying that she had just had half a pint
of ale, but could not retain it. By the motion of her head it must have been the Britannia beershop at the corner, where she had had the drink. The witness then left her, went into Bishopsgate to get her husband's breakfast, and on returning saw Kelly standing outside the Britannia talking to a man. That was about 8:45 a.m. The witness was standing at her door about 25 yards off, and so could give no definite description of the man. He was a short man, dressed in dark clothes, and wearing a sort of plaid coat.
Sarah Lewis, of 24, Great Pearl-street, a laundress, said she knew Mrs. Keyler, in Miller-court. On Friday morning at half-past two o'clock she was at the room of her friend at No. 2, immediately opposite the room of the murdered woman. When she went into the court she saw a man standing near the lodging-house door opposite. He was wearing a wideawake hat, and was not very tall, but was a stout-looking man. He was looking up the court, and seemed to be waiting for someone. She also saw another man and woman coming along, the latter having her hat off, and being the worse for drink. When the witness
got to Mrs. Keyler's she fell asleep in a chair, and awoke in about an hour. She sat awake until shortly before four o'clock, when she heard a female shout or scream in a loud voice. The sound came from the direction of Mary Kelly's room, but the witness took no notice of it. On Wednesday night last, at eight o'clock, the witness and another woman were going along the Bethnal-green-road, when a gentleman passed them and then turned round and followed them. He asked them to follow him; he did not care which one. He had a black shiny bag, and the witness's friend, not liking the look of him, said, "Come on; let's go."
The man, who was short and pale-faced, then put down his bag, and said, "What are you frightened of? Do you think I have got anything in my bag?" He afterwards unbuttoned his coat as if to get something from his pocket. The two women then ran away. The man, who was about 40 years of age, wore a high, round hat and a long coat. On Friday morning, while on the way to Miller-court, about 2:30, the witness met the same man with a woman in Commercial-street, near the Britannia beershop. He had not his overcoat on then, but still carried the black bag. The witness recognised the man at one, and he looked at her. The witness would
know the man again.
Dr. George Phillips, surgeon to the H Division of the Metropolitan Police, residing at 2, Spital-square, stated that he was called by the police on Friday morning about eleven o'clock to Miller-court. He found room 13 locked and so looked through the broken pane of glass, and satisfied himself that the mutilated corpse lying on the bed was not in need of any attention from him. He also came to the conclusion that there was no one else in the room. Having ascertained that it was advisable that no entrance should be effected at that time, he remained until about 1:30 p.m., when the door was burst open. On the door being opened it knocked
against a table which was by the side of the bedstead. The latter was close against the wooden partition. The mutilated remains of a female were lying two-thirds over towards the edge of the bedstead nearest the door. The body had been removed subsequent to the injury which caused death from the side of the bed nearest the partition. The large quantity of blood under the bedstead, and the saturated condition of the palliase, pillow, and sheet at the top corner of the bedstead nearest the partition, led witness to the conclusion that the severance of the right carotid artery, which was the immediate cause of death, was inflicted while the deceased
was lying on the right side of the bedstead, with her head and neck in the top right-hand corner before alluded to.
Julia Venturney, No. 1 room, Miller-court, stated that she had known Mrs. Kelly for some time. She had told the witness that she was very fond of another man besides the one she lived with. He used to come and see her and give her money. The witness heard no noises on Thursday night.
Maria Harvey, who lives in Dorset-street, stated that she knew Kelly, and slept with her on Monday and Tuesday nights last. She was in the house on Thursday when Barnett came in. The witness left some clothes with Kelly, including a man's black overcoat, some under-linen, and a black satin bonnet. The witness was a great friend of Kelly; she had never heard her say she was afraid of any man.
Inspector Beck, H Division, deposed to being summoned by M'Carthy and Boyer to the room in Miller-court. He did not know whether the woman was known to the police.
Inspector Abberline, from Scotland-yard, stated that he reached the court about 11:30 a.m. on Friday last. He did not force the door, as he had received an intimation that some bloodhounds which had been sent for were coming, and Dr. Phillips said that if the door was not opened it would be a better test of their scent. Later on Superintendent Arnold arrived and informed the witness that the order for the bloodhounds had been countermanded. Then the door was forced. The witness corroborated the evidence of Dr. Phillips as to the position in which the body was found. In the room there were traces of a large fire having been kept up in the grate, so much so
that the spout of the kettle was melted off. The ashes had been examined, but nothing of importance was found. A quantity of women's clothes had been burned, and the only reason the witness could ascribe for this was that it was done to afford the murderer sufficient light to perform his ghastly work. It was not true, as supposed, that the key of the door was taken by the murderer. That had been missing for some time according to the man Barnett, who also stated that a clay pipe found in the room belonged to him.
The Coroner then said if a coroner's jury found out the cause of death that was all they had to do. They had nothing to do with arresting any culprit. If the jury were satisfied that the woman met her death as described by the doctor then there was an end to the matter.
The foreman said the jury were of opinion that they had heard sufficient evidence to bring in a verdict of wilful murder against some person or persons unknown.
A verdict to that effect was accordingly returned, and the inquiry terminated.

Source: Aberdare Times, 17 November 1888, Page 3

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Thu 28 Mar 2013 - 9:04

ANOTHER WHITECHAPEL MURDER.
THE VICTIM A WELSH WOMAN.

London was startled on Friday by the discovery of another in the vicinity of Whitechapel. The victim of the latest atrocity, more horrible in its details than any that have preceded it, belonged to the same class as the other; but the circumstances of the murder differ in that the deed was committed in a house.
The exact locality is Dorset-street, Spitalfields, and the discovery was made between ten and eleven o'clock on Friday morning. The body was horribly mutilated, and evidence goes to show that the crime was committed between eight o'clock and the time mentioned above. The murderer, as in the former instances, escaped.
There is good reason to believe that the victim, whose maiden name was Marie Jeannette Kelly (aged about 24), was brought up in Carmarthenshire, and that her family, who, according to her statement, are well-to-do, are now residing at Cardiff. At the inquest, on Monday, Joseph Barnett, a fish porter, the man who had lived
with deceased as her husband from Easter, 1887, until Oct. 30th, said he left her because she took in a woman of bad character out of compassion. He had frequent conversations with her about her parents. She said she was born in Limerick, went when very young to Wales, and about four years ago got to London. Her father's name
was John Kelly, a "gaffer" at an iron works in Carmarthen. She had one sister, who was very fond of her, while six of her brothers were in London, and one was in the army. She was married, she said, when she was very young, about 16, to a collier named Davies, who was killed in an explosion, after whose death she went to Cardiff
to a cousin. She followed a bad life with her cousin, who, as he (Barnett) reckoned, and as he had often told her, was the cause of her downfall. She left Cardiff for a gay house in the West End of London, where a gentleman asked her if she would like to go to France. She went, but did not remain more than a fortnight, as she did not
like it there. On returning to England she went to Ratcliffe-highway, where she resided for some time, afterwards living with a man named Morganstone opposite the Commercial Gas Works, Stepney, and then with witness, finally at 13 room, Miller's-court, Dorset-street, where he last saw her alive between 7:30 and 7:45 p.m. on Thursday.
Lizzie Albrook, a young woman of 20, who was with Kelly at about 8 p.m. on Thursday, told a reporter that the last thing deceased said to her was, "Whatever you do, don't you do wrong and turn out as I have." She had often spoken to her in that way, and warned her against going on the streets as she had done. She was heartily sick of the life
she was living, and wished she had money enough to go back where her people lived.

Source: Llangollen Advertiser, Denbighshire, Merionethshire, and North Wales Journal, 16 November 1888, Page 3

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Fri 16 Aug 2013 - 1:16

LONDON MYSTERIES.
Another Whitechapel Murder.

THE VICTIM A WELSHWOMAN.
Murdered in Her Own House.

On Friday the inhabitants of the East End of London were thrown into a fresh state of horror and consternation by the discovery in their midst of another atrocious and revolting crime, far excelling in its devilish butchery any of the previous murders which have shocked and alarmed the Metropolis during the past five months. The victim is again a woman of the "unfortunate" class, and her murderer committed the demoniacal work under the woman's own roof in broad daylight; but notwithstanding the daring and semi-publicity of his movements, the murderer has vanished as completely as if he had sunk into the earth. Dorset-street, Spitalfields, is a notorious neighbourhood. It is filled with low lodging-houses, tenanted chiefly by the lowest classes, amongst them some the most degraded thieves and women of the streets. It was here that Annie Chapman, who was murdered in Hanbury-street on the 7th of September, lived, and by a strange fatality the scene of the present crime is a court directly opposite the house to which that unfortunate woman was in the habit of resorting. Close by is Mitre-square, the scene of one of the murders of September 30th, and Hanbury-street is scarcely a stone's throw away.

THE VICTIM.

The victim of the crime is a young woman named Mary Jane Kelly, a Welsh-woman, aged 26, the paramour of a man called Barnet, and known also as "Danny," who worked sometimes at Billingsgate as a porter, and sometimes as a drover or a hawker of oranges in the streets.  She lived in Miller-court, Dorset-street, a turning out of Commercial-street, Spitalfields. There are eight or ten small houses in the court, which is entered by a large archway and a narrow passage from Dorset-street, and forms a cul de sac. There is a small general shop in Dorset-street adjoining the entrance to the court, tenanted by Mrs. McCarthy; who also owns the houses in the court. Kelly appears to have tenanted a top room in one of Mrs. McCarthy's houses. She had a little boy, aged about six or seven years, living with her, and latterly she had been in narrow straits - so much so that she is reported to have stated to a companion that she would make away with herself, as she could not bear to see her boy starving.

THE DISCOVERY.

About eleven o'clock Mrs. McCarthy, with her son, went to pay her customary visit for the day's rent. Young McCarthy appears to have first sent a man named Bower to the house, which, though entered from the court, is really a part of No. 26, Dorset-street. Bower failed to obtain an answer to his knock, and, looking through the window, he saw to his horror the woman lying on the bed, horribly mutilated and stark naked. He called McCarthy, who also looked through the window, and, seeing that the body was cut up almost beyond recognition, he turned away with Bower and ran to Commercial-street police-station, where they informed the police. Inspector Beck and Sergeant Betham, 31 H, who were in charge of about 40 constables - who had been held in readiness in anticipation of a possible Socialist disturbance attending the Lord Mayor's Show - at once proceeded to the scene, running as fast as they could. Even then the news had spread so rapidly that over a thousand persons were gathered in the street, and these were rapidly cleared away from the court and the side of Dorset-street adjoining, while the inspector entered the house. The house in which the murder was committed is entered by two doors situated on the right-hand side of the passage, and has several rooms. The first door up the court from the street leads to the upper rooms, but the second door opens only into one room, which is situated on the ground floor. It was in this room that the murder was committed. The fireplace faces the door, and the bed stands behind the door. When the door was forced open,

A SICKENING AND HORRIBLE SIGHT

presented itself to the police officers. The body of the woman, perfectly naked, was stretched out on the little bedstead, the clothing of which was saturated with her blood. The unfortunate woman had been cut and mangled by the assassin's knife in a manner which was revolting beyond all description. Not alone was the fiend content with taking the life of his victim by severing the head from the body, but he had exercised an infernal ingenuity in spoiling the human semblance of the corpse. Both ears and the nose had been cut off, and the flesh of the cheeks and forehead peeled off. The breasts were cut off, evidently with a sharp knife, and placed on a table near the bed. The abdomen had been ripped up and disembowelled, and portions of the entrails were lying about the bed, the liver being placed between the legs. Both thighs had been denuded of flesh, laying bare the bone, and the excised portions laid on the table. As in the case of three of the previous crimes, the womb had been taken away, together with other parts of the intestines and genital organs; while, in addition, one arm was almost severed from the trunk, and one hand thrust inside the empty cavity of the abdomen. Medical assistance was immediately sent for, and a description of the discovery telegraphed to all the metropolitan police-stations in the terse sentence, "the woman is simply cut to pieces." Within a very short time half-a-dozen cabs arrived in Dorset-street from Whitehall, conveying detectives from the Criminal Investigation Department, among them being Inspectors Abberline and Reid. Never before had so many men been despatched to the scene of a murder from Whitehall.

THE NEIGHBOURHOOD OF THE CRIME.

The district in which the crime took place is composed of big warehouses, squalid streets, and in a striking degree of registered lodging-houses. Dorset-street is a fairly wide thoroughfare, and at night, owing to the lamps in the windows and over the doors of the numerous lodging-houses, it may be described as well lighted at night. Miller-court is approached by an arched passage not more than three feet wide, which is unlighted, and from this passage open two doors leading into the houses on either side. The house on the left hand is kept as a chandler's shop by McCarthy, to whom also belongs the house in the court in which the crime was committed. The court is a very small one, about 30 feet long by 10 feet broad. On both sides are three or four small houses, cleanly white-washed up to the first floor windows. The ground floor of the house to the right of the court is used as a store with a gate entrance, and the upper floors are let off in tenements, as is the case also with McCarthy's house. Opposite the court is a very large lodging-house of somewhat inferior character. This house is well lighted, and people hang about it nearly all night. There is another well-frequented lodging-house next door to McCarthy's, and within a yard or two of the entrance to the court is a wall lamp, the light from which is thrown nearly on to the passage. But, perhaps, the most curious item in the entire surroundings is a large placard posted on the wall of the next house, but one from the right hand side, offering, in the name of an illustrated weekly paper, a reward of 100 pounds for the discovery of the man who murdered the woman Nicholls in Hanbury-street.

THE MEETING WITH THE MURDERER.

As already stated, the unhappy woman was last seen in Commercial-street about half-past 11. She was then alone, and was probably making her way home. It is supposed that she met the murderer in Commercial-street, and he probably induced her to take him home without indulging in more drink. At any rate, nothing was seen of the couple in the neighbouring public-houses, nor in the beer-house at the corner of Dorset-street. The pair reached Miller's-court about midnight, but they were not seen to enter the house. The street door was closed, but the woman had a latchkey, and as she must have been fairly sober, she and her companion would have been obliged to enter the house and reach the woman's room without making a noise. A light was seen shining through the window of the room for some time after the couple must have entered it, and one person asserts positively that the woman was heard singing the refrain of a popular song as late as one o'clock this morning, but here, again, there is a conflict of testimony, which the police are even now engaged in endeavouring to reconcile.

DR. FORBES WINSLOW'S OPINION.

Dr. Forbes Winslow has favoured the Central News with the following opinion on this latest murder: - "It is the work of the same homicidal lunatic who has committed the other crimes in Whitechapel. The whole harrowing details point to this conclusion. The way in which the murder was done, and the strange state in which the body was left, is not consistent with sanity. The theory I stated some days ago has come true to the letter. This was to the effect that the murderer was in a "lucid interval," and would recommence directly this state had passed away. It appears that the authorities were forgetting this theory, and that some one had been persuading them that from the fact of so long a time intervening between the murders, therefore he could not be a homicidal maniac. I desire, as personally being orginally responsible for this theory, to flatly deny this, and to state more emphatically than ever that the murderer is one and the same person, and he is lunatic, suffering from homicidal monomania, who, during the lucid intervals, is calm and forgetful of what he has been doing in the mildness of his attack. I also say that unless those in authority take the proper steps as advised and drop the red tapism surrounding a Government office, such crimes will continue to be so perpetrated in our metropolis, to the terror of London. It appears to me it is the burning question of the hour, and of much more vital importance than some subjects that now attract the attention of our community."

LAST WORDS WITH THE MURDERED WOMAN.

Mrs. Prater, who occupies a room in 26, Dorset-street, above that of the deceased, stated tonight that she had a chat with Kelly yesterday morning. Kelly, who was doing some crochet work at the time, said, "I hope it will be a fine day tomorrow, as I want to go to the Lord Mayor's show. She was a very pleasant girl," added Mrs. Prater, "and seemed to be on good terms with everybody. She dressed poorly, as she was, of course, badly off."
The young woman, Harvey, who had slept with the deceased on several occasions, also made a statement. She said she had been on good terms with the deceased, whose education was much superior to that of most persons in her position of life. Harvey took a room in New-court of the same street, but remained friendly with the unfortunate woman, who visited her in New-court. Last night, after drinking together, they parted at half-past seven o'clock, Kelly going off in the direction of Leman-street, which she was in the habit of frequenting; she was perfectly sober at the time. Harvey never saw her alive afterwards. This morning, hearing that a murder had been committed, she said, "I will go and see if it's anyone I know," and to her horror found that it was her friend.

STATEMENT OF THE VICTIM'S PARAMOUR.

Joseph Barnett, an Irishman, at present residing in a common lodging-house in New-street, Bishopsgate, states that he has occupied his present lodgings since Tuesday week. Previous to that he had lived at Miller's-court, Dorset-street, for eight or nine months with the murdered woman, Mary Jane Kelly. They were very happy and comfortable together until an unfortunate came to sleep in their room, to which he strongly objected. Finally, after the woman had been there two or three nights, he quarrelled with his "wife," and left her. The next day, however, he returned, and gave Kelly money. He called several other days, and gave her money when he had it. Last night he visited her between half-past seven and eight, and told her he was sorry he had no money to give her. He saw nothing more of her. He was indoors this morning, when he heard that a woman had been murdered in Dorset-street, but he did not know at first who the victim was. He voluntarily went to the police, who, after questioning him, satisfied themselves that his statements were correct, and therefore released him. Barnett believed Kelly, who was an Irishwoman, was an unfortunate before he made her acquaintance, and she had never had any children. She used occasionally to go to the Elephant and Castle district to visit a friend who, like herself, was an unfortunate.

CLUES TO THE MURDERER.

An important fact has transpired this evening which puts a fresh complexion on the theory of the murder. It appears that the cattle boats bringing live freight to London are in the habit of coming into the Thames on Thursdays or Fridays, and leave again for the continent on Sundays or Mondays. It has already been a matter of comment that the recent revolting crimes have been committed at the week end, and an opinion has been formed among some of the detectives that the murderer is a drover or butcher employed on one of these boats - of which there are many - and that he periodically appears and disappears with one of the steamers. This theory, according to information obtained by a Press Association reporter, is held to be of much importance by those engaged in this investigation, who believe that the murderer does not reside either in the locality, or even in this country at all. It is thought that he may be either a person employed upon one of these boats, or one who is allowed to travel by them, and inquiries have for some time been directed to following up the theory. It is pointed out that at the inquests on the previous victims, the coroners had expressed the opinion that the knowledge of physiology possessed by a butcher would have been sufficient to enable him to find and cut out the parts of the body which in several cases were abstracted. Up to nine o'clock tonight there had been no arrests, and the police appeared to be without a tangible clue. They have been much hampered by the lack of information from the inhabitants of the locality, whose statements are most contradictory. The non-appearance of the bloodhounds today is accounted for by the fact that during the recent trials in Surrey the animals bolted, and, it is understood, have not been recovered. The Whitechapel Vigilance Committee, who have recently relaxed their efforts to find the murderer, have called a meeting for Tuesday evening next, at the Paul's Head Tavern, Crispin-street, Spitalfields, to consider what steps they can take to assist the police in this latter matter.

THE FRIEND DESCRIBED.

A Mrs. Paumier, a young woman who sells roasted chestnuts at the corner of Widegate-street, a narrow thoroughfare about two minutes' walk from the scene of the murder, told a reporter of the Press Association this afternoon a story which appears to afford a clue to the murderer. She said that about 12 o'clock this morning a man dressed like a gentleman came to her and said, "I suppose you have heard about the murder in Dorset-street." She replied that she had, whereupon the man grinned, and said, "I know more about it than you." He then stared into her face and went down Sandy's-row, a narrow thoroughfare which cuts across Widegate-street. When he had got some way off, however, he looked back as if to see whether she was watching him, and then vanished. Mrs. Paumier said the man had a black moustache, was about five feet six inches high, and wore a black silk hat, a black coat, and specked trousers. He also carried a black shiny bag, about a foot in depth and a foot and a half in length. Mrs. Paumier states further that the same man accosted three young unfortunates whom she knows on Thursday night, and they chaffed him, and asked what he had in the bag, and he replied, "Something that the ladies don't like." Mrs. Paumier told her story with every appearance of truthfulness.

THE VICTIM A WELSH WOMAN.

One of the three young women she named, Sarah Roney, a girl about 20 years of age, states that she was with two other girls last night in Brushfield-street, which is near Dorset-street, when a man, wearing a tall hat and a black coat, and carrying a black bag, came up to her and said, "Will you come with me?" She told him she would not, and asked him what he had in the bag, and he said, "Something the ladies don't like." He then walked away. Another unfortunate states that she knew the deceased two years ago; she was then living at Cooley's lodging-house in Thrall-street, Spitalfields. She was on the streets, and while living there met with her paramour Barnett. She then went to live with him at Dorset street. Kelly was a Welsh woman, and could speak Welsh fluently.
Whitechapel on Sunday presented a marked contrast to its appearance on the occasion of the previous murders. The repetition of these terrible crimes has made the inhabitants apparently callous, so rapidly has horror followed upon horror in the neighbourhood. As a matter of fact, the murderer has again completely vanished, leaving not the slightest clue behind. The police search in the room where the tragedy was enacted, as well as in the adjoining houses, has been without the slightest practical result, although it was most thorough in its character. It may be stated that, although Dorset-street is only a very short thoroughfare, no less than 1,500 men sleep every night in the common lodging houses with which it abounds. In Miller's-court a sort of panic has occurred, and Mr. McCarthy, the landlord of the houses, states that the result of the alarm engendered by the murder has already been the loss of four tenants, who, presumably, are too frightened to remain in the immediate vicinity of the scene of so terrible a tragedy.

AN EXCITING SCENE.

A scene of great excitement took place at Bishopsgate, where a supposed "Jack the Ripper" was glad enough to seek the shelter of the police-station. He was said to be a Somerset House clerk who had a holiday to celebrate the Lord Mayor's Show and the Prince of Wales's birthday. So he went down to Dorset-street, where he was so indiscreet as to ask in an anxious manner whether the bloodhounds had come yet. The crowd of sensation hunters and amateur detectives who hang around Dorset-street suspect everybody they see, and mistaking his deep interest for fear, they followed him up Commercial-street. He soon saw he was being dogged, and quickened his pace. They quickened theirs, and the chase became obvious to every one in the street. The consequence was that in a few minutes the young man found a still gathering crowd was marching in his track, so he began to run, and the crowd became instantly a howling mob, which pursued him along Bishopsgate, where he gave himself into the custody of a policeman, and was taken for safety into the police-station.

A REMARKABLE PROPHECY.

Last Wednesday's issue of London and Brighton contains the following: - On Sunday the new moon came in. If "Jack the Ripper" is a lunatic, and if there is any truth in the theory of susceptibility of lunatics to lunar influence, we ought to hear from him in the course of a few days.

THE DECEASED'S LIFE IN CARDIFF AND CARMARTHENSHIRE.

Joseph Barnett, the man who lived with the deceased woman Kelly as her husband until last week, has made the following full statement to a Central News reporter: - "I first met the deceased last Easter twelvemonth, and lived with her from that time until last Tuesday week. I was in decent work in Billingsgate Market when I first met her, and we lived along quite comfortably. She was then twenty-two years of age, fresh-looking, and well behaved, though she had been walking the streets for some three years previously. She told me that her maiden name was Marie Jeannette Kelly, and that she was born in Limerick. Her parents, who were fairly well off, removed when she was a child to Wales, and they lived in Carmarthenshire. When she was but little over sixteen years of age she married a collier, but I do not remember his name. He was killed in an explosion in the mine, and then Marie went to Cardiff with her cousin, living as a prostitute. Thence she went to France, but remained only a short time. Afterwards she lived in a fashionable house of ill-fame in the West End of London, but drifted from the West End to the East End, where she took lodgings in Pennington-street. Her father came from Wales, and tried to find her there, but, hearing from her companions that he was looking for her, Marie kept out of the way. A brother in the 2nd Battalion Scots Guards came to see her once, but beyond that she saw none of her relations, nor did she correspond with them. When she was in Pennington-street a man named Morganstone lived with her, and subsequently a man named Joseph Fleming passed as her husband. She lived with me first of all in George-street; then in Paternoster-court, Dorset-street, but we were ejected from our lodgings there because we went on a "drunk," and did not pay our rent. We took lodgings afterwards in Brick-lane, and finally, about four months ago, in Miller's-court, where the murder occurred. We lived comfortably until Marie allowed a prostitute named Julia to sleep in the same room. I objected, and, as Mrs. Harvey afterwards came and stayed there, I left her, and went and took lodgings elsewhere. I told her I would come back if she would go and live somewhere else. I used to call there nearly every day, and if I had any money I used to give her some. I last saw her alive at half-past seven on Thursday night. I stopped about a quarter of an hour, and told her I had no money. Next day I heard there had been a murder in Miller's-court, and on my way there I met my sister's brother-in-law, and he told me it was Marie. I went to the court, and there saw the police-inspector, and told him who I was, and where I had been the previous night. They kept me about four hours, examined my clothes for bloodstains, and finally, finding the account of myself to be correct, let me go free. Marie never went on the streets when she lived with me. She would never have gone wrong again, and I should never have left, if it had not been for the prostitutes stopping in the house. She only let them in the house because she was good-hearted, and did not like to refuse them shelter on cold, bitter nights."

A PARDON OFFERED.

The following notification has been issued: -

"MURDER - PARDON.

"Whereas, on Nov. 8th or 9th, in Miller's-court, Miller-street, Spitalfields, Mary Jane Kelly was murdered by some person or persons unknown, the Secretary of State will advise the grant of her Majesty's gracious pardon to any accomplice, not being the person who contrived or actually committed the murder, who shall give such evidence as shall lead to the discovery and conviction of the person or persons who committed the murder. - Signed,  CHARLES WARREN."

A REMARKABLE ARREST.

Late on Saturday it was found that a man had been charged at the Commercial-street police-station. He was accused by a young respectable-looking man, who at the time the charge was being taken was seated with the inspector at a table in the charge-room. This young fellow, it seems, had watched the accused with a woman from Bishopsgate-street, and having his suspicions aroused, he followed the pair. The accused evidently noticed he was being watched, so hurriedly left the woman and jumped on an omnibus. The young man followed him to Shoreditch, where he gave him into custody. The prisoner, who was also present in the charge-room, was seated on a bench, leaning his head against the wall. He was evidently, by his appearance, the worse for drink. He was respectably dressed, and was of gentlemanly appearance. His clothes were dark, and he had a round billycock hat lying by his side. He is a thick-set man, has a round face, and a dark moustache and whiskers.

A CLUE.

On Saturday afternoon a gentleman engaged in business in the vicinity of the murder gave what is the only approach to a possible clue that has yet been brought to light. He states that he was walking through Mitre-square at about ten minutes past ten on Friday morning, when a tall, well-dressed man carrying a parcel under his arm and rushing along in a very excited manner, ran plump into him. The man's face was covered with blood-splashes, and his collar and shirt were also bloodstained. The gentleman did not at the time know anything of the murder.

A MAN WITH A BLOOD-STAINED COAT.

While the police have been working zealously in hope of making some discovery of value, the public themselves appear to feel that some of the responsibility was shared by them. This was seen by an incident which occurred on Sunday, and which resulted in the arrest and detention of a strange man at Bishopsgate-street police-station. Some men were drinking at a beerhouse in Fish-street Hill. One of them began conversing about the Whitechapel murder, and a man, named Brown, living at 9, Dorset-street, thought he detected bloodmarks on the coat of the stranger. On the latter's attention being called to it, he said it was merely paint, but Brown said it was blood. The coat being loose, similar stains were seen on the man's shirt, and he then admitted that they were blood stains. Brown followed him from the house, and when opposite Bishopsgate police-station gave him into custody. Prisoner gave the name of George Compton, and, on being brought before the inspector on duty, he excitedly protested against being arrested in the street, alleging that in the present state of public feeling he might have been lynched. The same man had been arrested at Shadwell, on Saturday, by a police-constable who considered his behaviour suspicious, but he had been discharged. It transpired that before he left the Fish-street Hill beerhouse he had, so Brown alleged, made contradictory statements respecting his place of residence, and the locality in which he worked. Compton does not bear any resemblance to the published description of the man who is supposed to be the murderer.

To be continued........................


Last edited by Karen on Tue 20 Aug 2013 - 18:01; edited 1 time in total

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Fri 16 Aug 2013 - 13:55

ANOTHER IMPORTANT ARREST.

Considerable importance is attached to the arrest which was effected at an early hour on Sunday through the exertions of two young men living in the neighbourhood of Dorset-street. Like many others in the neighbourhood, they appear to have transformed themselves into amateur detectives, and have been perambulating the streets on the look-out for suspicious persons. About three o'clock this morning their attention was drawn to two men in Dorset-street who were loitering about. The two men separated, and one of them was followed by the two youths into Houndsditch.
They carefully observed his appearance, which was that of a foreigner, about five feet eight inches in height, and having a long pointed moustache. He was dressed in a long black overcoat and deerstalker hat. When near Bishopsgate-street the young men spoke to a policeman, who at once stopped the stranger and took him to Bishopsgate-street police-station. There he was searched, and it was found he was carrying a sort of pocket medicine chest containing several

SMALL BOTTLES OF CHLOROFORM.

In rather imperfect English he explained that he lived in Pimlico, where he was well known. After this preliminary examination he was taken to Commercial-street police station, in which district the murder was committed. He was detained on suspicion, but subsequently was taken to Marlborough-street police station for the purpose of facilitating his identification.

AN EXTRAORDINARY STORY.

A man was on Sunday in custody at Commercial-street station, whither he was taken on account of suspicious movements. A man named Peter Maguire says that about 11 on Saturday night he was drinking in a public-house kept by Mrs. Fiddymont, in Brushfield-street, when he noticed a man talking very earnestly to a young woman. He asked her to accompany him up a neighbouring court, but she refused, and afterwards left the bar. Maguire followed the man, who, noticing this, commenced running. He ran into Spitalfields Market, Maguire following. The man then stopped, went up a court, took off a pair of gloves he was wearing, and put on another pair. By a roundabout route he arrived at Shoreditch, and got into a 'bus, which Maguire also followed. A policeman was asked by Maguire to stop this 'bus, but, it is said, he refused, and Maguire continued in pursuit until he met another constable, who at once stopped the vehicle. The man was inside, huddled up in a corner. Maguire explained his suspicions, and the man was taken to Commercial-street Police-station, where he was detained pending inquiries.

ENQUIRIES AT CARDIFF.

With respect to the statement connecting the murdered woman with Cardiff, enquiries were on Saturday made of the police of that borough. They know nothing of the woman Kelly, and have no record showing that she ever lived in the town.

AN IMPORTANT CLUE.

The police on Monday received information which not only establishes a clue to the perpetrator of the Dorset-street murder, but places the authorities in possession of an accurate description of the person seen in the company of the murdered woman shortly before her death. This, while it agrees with that given of the person seen with the deceased by others, is much fuller in detail than any that has yet been in the possession of the police, and the importance which they attach to it may be estimated from the fact that immediately it was taken, a special messenger was sent with it to the headquarters of the H Division, where Detectives Abberline, Nairn, and Moore set about an immediate investigation.
It appears that a man, apparently of the labouring class, with military appearance, who knew the deceased woman, has this evening lodged with the police a detailed account of the occurrence of an incident which attracted his attention on the morning of the murder, and although his story has been sifted, and the narrator cross-examined, he adheres to it rigidly. For this reason the police believe the clue to be a new and important one. The informant stated that on the morning of the 9th he saw the deceased woman, Mary Jeanette Kelly, in Commercial-street, Spitalfields, in the vicinity of where the murder was committed, in the company of a man of respectable appearance. This man was about five feet six inches in height, and 34 or 35 years of age, with dark complexion and dark moustache, curled upwards at the ends. He wore a long dark coat, trimmed with astrachan, and a white collar, with a black necktie, in which was affixed a horseshoe pin. He wore a pair of dark gaiters with light buttons over button boots, and displayed from his waistcoat a massive gold chain. The highly respectable appearance of the man was in such contrast to the appearance of the woman that few could have failed to notice them at that hour of the morning.

EXCITEMENT AT CARDIFF.

Some excitement was created in a hairdresser's shop at Roath on Sunday by a stranger, who was carrying a black bag, declaring that he could easily but a woman's throat without any blood getting upon his clothes. The man suddenly left the shop, and a rumour gained ground that he was "Jack the Ripper." The police made some enquiries, but they attach no importance to the incident.

THE VICTIM'S CONNECTION WITH SWANSEA.

The Swansea police do not credit the rumour that Kelly ever resided at Swansea. It was not till about three years ago that Mrs. Rees, in whose service Kelly is alleged to have been while at Swansea, came to live in the town. If the statements made by Joseph Barnett as to Kelly's career are true, she would most likely have left Wales before this time. The local police here know nothing of her.

STARTLING STORY FROM LUCERNE.

A Lucerne journal reports the history of a series of crimes, which startled Paris about sixteen years ago, and which, it is thought, may possibly throw some light upon the horrible tragedies in the East End of London. Shortly after the war of 1872 the Paris police arrested a daring and ferocious assassin who had confined his operations almost exclusively to the women of the demi-monde. He was a Russian, named Nicholas Wassili, born at Tiraspol in 1847. He had studied at the university of Odessa, and was exceedingly well educated. An enquiry revealed the fact that his mind had fallen a prey to religious fanaticism, and that he was not responsible for his actions. He was confined in a lunatic asylum, from which, however, he was liberated last January as cured. Of his subsequent movements nothing definite is known, but he is just as likely to have come to London as anywhere else.

The Central News says: - In view of certain statements to the effect that portions of the body of the Miller-court victim were taken away by the murderer, we think it necessary to re-affirm that at the post-mortem examination every organ was fully accounted for and replaced, as far as possible, in its natural position. We are further enabled to add upon authority that the uterus had been cut out by the murderer, but it was found lying in a corner of the bed, the murderer having apparently no desire to take it away, or having forgotten, in his final hurry, to do so.

CONNECTION WITH SOUTH WALES.

Our Llanelly correspondent learns that there is no ascertainable foundation for the statement circulated in some quarters that the unfortunate victim of the murder was a native of Llanelly.
It will be remembered that at the inquest on Monday it was stated by Kelly's paramour that she was at one time an inmate of the Cardiff Infirmary. By the courtesy of the authorities at the Infirmary, our representative was enabled to look through the list of inmates at that institution from 1881 to 1885 inclusive. No such names as Mary Janet Kelly or Mary Janet Davies appears during those five years, and it is evident that if the unfortunate woman ever entered the infirmary it was under an assumed name. It is natural that she would not bear in Cardiff either her maiden or her married name, and it is consequently almost impossible to find any clue to her history in the town. The police point out that if she did reside there at all, it would not probably be in the position of an "unfortunate" on the streets. The fact that she went to the West End of London from Cardiff argues that she would not occupy so precarious a position.

THE BISHOP OF ST. DAVID'S OPINION.

Speaking at a Church extension meeting, at Swansea on Tuesday night, the Bishop of St. David's said: - What horrible revelations there have been lately in the greatest city in the world, or in one part of it! I don't believe these terrible stories reported to us represent the state of mind or heart of any appreciable number of people. Probably they are the work of a maniac, or, if not, of a fanatic - a maniac after all. Still they have revealed something terrible about the state of things in one particular part of London; but is there any great town absolutely free from the evils of life? Cannot we
strengthen our hands by increasing the number of workers on the part of the Church, and so striving to check in some way those terrible evils which are revealed?

ANOTHER FOOL'S LETTER.

Another letter, signed "Jack the Ripper," of which the following is a copy, has been received by post by the Metropolitan police: - "Dear Boss, - I am now in the Queen's Park Estate, in the Third Avenue. I am out of red ink at present, but it won't matter for once. I intend doing another here next Tuesday night about 10 o'clock. I will give you a chance now to catch me; I shall have check trousers on, and black coat and vest, so look out. I have done one not yet found out, so keep your eyes open. - Yours, JACK THE RIPPER." The police are receiving a very large number of letters on the subject of the murder.

ON THE MURDERER'S TRACK.

The Central News has interviewed a man named George Hutchinson, formerly a groom, and now a labourer, who was acquainted with the murdered woman Kelly. He saw Kelly about two o'clock last Friday morning at the corner of Thrawl-street, Commercial-street. He noticed a man accost her, and the pair walked to Miller-court, followed by Hutchinson, who stared right in the man's face. Hutchinson heard Kelly say she had lost her handkerchief, whereupon her companion took a red handkerchief from his pocket and gave it to the woman. They went into Miller-court together, and some time afterwards Hutchinson also went up the court, and stayed there a couple of minutes. Seeing no light in Kelly's room he returned to Dorset-street. He remained about the place three quarters of an hour, and then went home. Hutchinson says the man was about five feet six in height, aged about thirty-five, pale complexion, dark hair, curly dark moustache, wearing a dark long overcoat, trimmed on collar and cuffs with astrachan, wore a dark short coat beneath, a high waistcoat, check trousers, white collar with horse-shoe pin, hard felt hat, button boots. He had a considerable amount of jewellery on his person. This description exactly tallies with one already furnished the police, who are now confident they are on the track of the murderer. It has transpired that on Tuesday night the police made a careful inspection of all the casual wards, and at one of these places near Holborn a man was arrested who had a knife of formidable proportions in his possession. His account of himself was a very confused one, and he was arrested. On Tuesday morning, however, he was discharged. At Clerkenwell police-court, on Tuesday, John Brinkley was charged with being drunk and causing a crowd to assemble in Goswell-road on Monday evening by wearing a woman's skirt, shawl, and hat over his ordinary clothes. He was drunk, and said he was going to find "Jack the Ripper." The magistrate sentenced him to 14 days' hard labour. - John Avery was also charged with being drunk. He seized a hussar in York-road last night, and saying he was "Jack the Ripper" and would show him how he committed murders, scratched his nose. - Prisoner said he was respectably
connected, but the magistrate inflicted a similar sentence.

THE MURDERER SUPPOSED TO BE AN AMERICAN.

Several arrests have been made since Wednesday night in connection with the East End murders. Each caused enormous local excitement, and the suspect was followed to the police-station by an excited crowd. In only one case, however, was the prisoner detained more than an hour or two. The relatives of the murdered woman Kelly, who were expected in London on Wednesday, have not yet arrived, and the funeral has been again postponed. The police were busily occupied all day in endeavouring to obtain a clue to the identity and movements of the man with whom the woman Kelly was last seen, a detailed description of whom we have already published. Various statements have been volunteered to them on the subject, but up to Wednesday evening their search had not resulted in any definite information. An arrest was made in Old-Kent road that evening, but the man, whose movements had excited suspicion, does not answer to the description of the prisoner who is wanted. Attention was drawn to him by his leaving a shiny black bag at the Thomas A Becket public-house. The police were communicated with, and on the bag being examined it was found to contain a very sharp dagger, a clasp knife, two pairs of very long and curious-looking scissors, and two life-preservers. Meanwhile, the man had gone to a pawnbroker's, and on emerging from the shop was taken into custody in order that inquiries might be made. A city policeman in plain clothes, while walking along Commercial-road on Wednesday, was accused of being "Jack the Ripper," and was with difficulty rescued from a mob of several hundred persons.
Mr. Packer, the fruiterer who sold some grapes to the man supposed to have committed the former murders, states that on Tuesday evening two men came to his shop, one of whom stated he was sure he knew the murderer, who was a cousin of his own. This cousin had been in America, and returned seven or eight months ago. He came to see witness, and they took some walks. Seeing some prostitutes, he said, "Do you know how we used to serve them where I came from? We used to cut their throats and rip 'em up. I could do it in no time. We Jack Rippers killed lots of women, and I am going to be a London "Jack Ripper." The man said he took little notice of the remarks, but as the murders followed he felt he ought not to remain silent. The cousin constantly used the word "boss" in the style of the letters received. These facts were communicated by a reporter to the Home Secretary and to Sir William Fraser, who instituted inquiries. The supposed murderer is believed to be engaged on the Thames, and search is being made.

To be continued..................................

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sat 17 Aug 2013 - 22:51

THE INQUEST.

On Monday Dr. Mcdonald, M.P. (coroner for North-east Middlesex), opened the inquest, at Shoreditch Town-hall, on the body of Marie Jeanette Kelly, murdered in Miller's-court, Dorset-street, Spitalfields, during Thursday night or Friday morning.
The jury, having been sworn, proceeded to view the body, and afterwards visited the scene of the murder. On their return evidence was taken. The crowd was much smaller than at the inquests on the previous victims. Mr. Vanderhaut represented the Whitechapel vigilance committee, Inspector Abberline was present on behalf of the police.
The coroner complained of the unfounded statements in the press as to alleged communications between himself and Mr. Wynne Baxter with regard to jurisdiction.

Joseph Barnett, labourer, deposed: I identify the body of the deceased as that of a young woman with whom I have lived for eight months, I separated from her on the 30th of last month. I left her because she brought a prostitute to live in our room. I saw deceased last between half-past seven and a quarter to eight Thursday night. We were on friendly terms. Before leaving I said I had no money. Deceased was sober.
Did she tell you where she was born? - Yes, hundreds of times. She said she was born in Limerick, and went to Wales when quite young. Then she told me her father was named John Kelly, and was a "gaffer" at some ironworks. I don't know whether she said Carnarvonshire or Carmarthenshire.
Did she tell you anything about her other relatives, sisters, or others? - Yes, she told me about her sister, who was respectable, and lived with her aunt, following her occupation. That was going from place to place selling things. But I never saw any of her relatives. [Witness spoke with a stutter, and evidently laboured under great emotion. A curious effect was produced by the witness beginning every answer by repeated the last word of every question asked.] She said there were six of them at home and one was in the army. I have never seen or spoken to them.
Did she say she had been married? - Yes; but she was very young at the time. The marriage took place in Wales. She told me that she was married to a collier in Wales, and his name was Davis or Davies.
Did she tell you how long she lived with him? - Until he met his death in an explosion. She did not tell me the exact time she lived with him, but it might have been a year or two. She said she married Davies at the age of 16.
She told you that she came to London about four years ago? - Yes, she did.
Was that directly after the husband's death? - After her husband's death she went to Cardiff with a cousin.
Did she live long in Cardiff? - Yes, from two to eight months, and she was in the infirmary there.
What was she doing in Cardiff? - She was carrying on with her cousin in a bad life. As I told her, it was her downfall.
When did she come to London? - She lived in a house at the West-end - a gay house - with a madam.
How long did she live there? - As far as she described it to me, a few weeks. Then some gentleman asked her to go to France, and she went, but, as she described it to me, she didn't like it, and came back in about a week or two's time. She returned and lived at Ratcliffe Highway, then at Pennington-street. I first met her in Commercial-street, and arranged to live with her. At deceased's request I read to her the newspaper reports of the previous Whitechapel murders. I did not hear her express fear of any person.
The jury expressed a wish that Dr. Phillips, police surgeon, not present, should attend, so that some medical evidence might be taken.

Thomas Bowyer, Dorset-street, Spitalfields, said: On Friday morning I went to the house of the deceased to collect rent for Mr. McCarthy. I knocked, but got no answer. I found the window broken.
Inspector Ledger now put in a plan of the premises.
Bowyer resumed: I put the curtain aside. Looking in, I saw two lumps of flesh on the table. Looking a second time, I saw the body on the bed and a pool of blood on the floor. I reported the discovery to the police.
John McCarthy, grocer and lodging-house keeper, Dorset-street, deposed: I sent the last witness to Miller's-court, for rent. Within five minutes he came back, saying he had seen blood in number thirteen room of Miller's-court. I went and saw the body. I could say nothing for a little time, but when I recovered I accompanied my man to the police-station, and an inspector came with me to the house. I do not know that Barnett and deceased had any serious quarrel. I let the room at 4s. 6d. a week. Deceased was 29s. in arrear. I often saw the deceased the worse for drink. When drunk
she became noisy, and sang.

Mary Ann Cox deposed: I live at 5, Miller's-court, opposite deceased. About midnight on Thursday I saw deceased in Dorset-street. She was very much the worse for drink. I saw her go up the court with a short, stout man shabbily dressed. He carried a pot of ale, and wore a black coat and hat, had a clean shaven chin, sandy whiskers and moustache. Deceased wished me "Good night," and went in her room. I heard her singing a song - "A Violet I plucked from Mother's Grave." I afterwards went out of my room. Coming back at 1 o'clock, she was still singing. I again went out. Coming back I saw that the light in the deceased's room had been put out. All was silent. I heard footsteps in the court about six o'clock. I did not sleep after going to bed. If there had been a cry of "Murder!" during the night, I must have heard it.

Elizabeth Prater, Miller's-court, said: I live in the same house, and went into my own room at one o'clock on Friday morning. I then saw a glimmer in the deceased's room. I woke about four, and heard a suppressed cry, "Oh! murder!" appearing to come from the court. Did not take any particular notice, as we frequently hear such cries.
Caroline Maxwell, wife of a lodging house deputy in Dorset-street, was next sworn.
The Coroner cautioned her to be careful, as her evidence differed from other statements made.
Mrs. Maxwell then deposed: I saw the deceased at the corner of Miller's-court shortly after 8 o'clock on Friday morning. Deceased told me she felt ill and vomited. I went with my husband's breakfast. On my return I saw deceased speaking with a man outside the Britannia public-house. Cannot give a particular description of the man. He wore dark clothes and a sort of plaid coat. Deceased wore a dark skirt with velvet body, a shawl, no hat. The man was short and stout.

Sarah Lewis, Great Powell-street, stated: I visited a friend at Miller's-court on Friday morning. At half-past two o'clock I saw a man standing on the pavement. He was short and stout, wore a wide-awake hat, and stopped my friend, Mrs. Keyler. I fell asleep in the chair. I awoke at half-past three, and sat awake till a little before four. I heard a female voice scream "Murder!" loudly. I thought the sound came from the direction of the deceased's house. I did not take much notice. Such cries are often heard. At eight o'clock on Wednesday night, when with a female friend, I was accosted in
Bethnal-green-road by a gentleman who carried a bag. He invited one of us to accompany him. Disliking his appearance, we left him. The bag was about nine inches long. The man had a pale face, dark moustache, wore dark clothes, an overcoat, and a high felt hat. On Friday morning, when coming to Miller's-court, at half-past two, I met that man with a female in Commercial-street. As I went into Miller's-court they stood at the corner of Dorset street.

Dr. George Baxter Phillips deposed: I am surgeon to the H Division, Metropolitan Police. I cannot give the whole of my evidence today. On Friday morning about eleven o'clock I proceeded to Miller's-court. In a room there I found the mutilated remains of a woman lying two-thirds over towards the edge of the bed nearest the door. Subsequent to the injury which had caused death the body had been removed from the opposite side of the bed, which was nearest the wooden partition. The presence of a quantity of blood on and under the bed leads me to the conclusion that the severance of the carotid artery, which was the immediate cause of death, was inflicted while deceased was lying at the right side of the bedstead, and her head and neck in the right hand corner.
That is as far as I propose to carry my evidence today.
The coroner said he proposed to continue taking evidence for another hour.
The jury expressed a wish to adjourn for some time.
The coroner replied that he would resume in a quarter of an hour.
On resuming Julia Venturney said: I am a charwoman, and live at Miller's-court. Deceased told me that she liked another man other than Joe Barnett, and he often came to see her. I was at home during Thursday night. Had there been any noises I should have heard them.

Ad Murder    2

Maria Harvey, a laundress, said: I have slept with the deceased on many occasions, and never heard her express fear of anyone.
Inspector Beck, H Division, said: I accompanied Dr. Phillips to the house. I did not know that deceased was known to the police.

Inspector Abberline, Scotland Yard, deposed: I went to Miller's-court at 11:30 on Friday. When there I received an intimation that bloodhounds were on the way. I waited till 1:30 on Friday, when Superintendent Arnold arrived, and said the order for bloodhounds had been countermanded. The door was then forced. In the grate were the traces of a woman's clothing having been burnt. My opinion is that they were burnt to give sufficient light for the murderer to do his work.

The Coroner said this concluded the evidence offered that day. The question was whether the jury had not already heard sufficient testimony to enable them to determine the cause of death. His own opinion was, they might conclude, and leave the case to the police.

THE VERDICT.

The jury, after a moment's consultation, returned a verdict of "Wilful murder against some person or persons unknown."


ANOTHER LONDON MYSTERY.
Sensational Disclosures Anticipated.

It transpired on Tuesday that a waterman recovered from the Thames at Wapping last Friday the well-dressed body of a woman. Subsequent enquiries have elicited the fact that the deceased was Frances Annie Hancock, who had been missing since October 21, on which day she was seen walking in the Strand with a tall, fair man. She was then wearing a gold necklace, which was missing when the body was found. It appears she lived at Brixton, and was supported by a man unknown - believed to be possessed of means. At the coroner's inquest, evidence of identification was taken, and owing to the mysterious nature of the case, and apprehension that deceased may have suffered death by foul means, the coroner adjourned the inquiry for a post-mortem examination to be made, and to give the police further opportunity for inquiry into the facts of the case. It is stated the deceased formerly had relations with a gentleman of distinction, and that sensational disclosures may be anticipated.

Source: Cardiff Times, 17 November 1888, Page 6

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Tue 20 Aug 2013 - 18:02


***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sat 14 Sep 2013 - 2:22

Funeral of the Victim.

The funeral of Marie Jeannette Kelly, the victim of the latest Spitalfields murder, took place on Monday at Leytonstone Cemetery, Essex, in the presence of a large number of people. An hour before the remains left Shoreditch mortuary many hundreds of onlookers assembled in the vicinity, and watched while the final arrangements were being made. The coffin was placed upon an open hearse drawn by two horses, and was followed by two mourning carriages, containing the man, Joseph Barnett, who had lived with the deceased and several of the unfortunate woman's associates, who gave evidence at the inquest. The coffin bore the following inscription: "Marie Jeannette Kelly, died Nov. 9, 1888, aged 25 years," and on it were placed two crowns and a cross made of heartsease and white flowers. The whole of the funeral expenses were borne by Mr. Wilton, sexton of St. Leonard's Church, Shoreditch, who for many years has shown practical sympathy for the poorer classes.
A blank wall of the house in Newnham-street, Whitechapel, in which Albert Bachert, who gave a description of the supposed Whitechapel murderer, lives, was found on Monday to have the following words chalked up: - "Dear Boss, - I am still about; look out. - Yours, Jack the Ripper." They were afterwards partly obliterated to avoid attracting a crowd.

ANOTHER EXTRAORDINARY OUTRAGE.
A Young Woman Chloroformed and Maltreated.

It is stated that the Kensington police are investigating a case of chloroforming a young woman in one of the West End squares. The young woman, who is a domestic servant, is named Amelia Ponting. She was spoken to by a gentleman at Notting-hill-gate Station, who accompanied her to Pembridge-square, after offering her refreshment. On arriving at the square - a rather solitary quarter - the girl, who is only 18, became alarmed, and endeavoured to leave her companion, whereupon he placed a handkerchief over her mouth and chloroformed her. She was afterwards found to be in such a condition as to make it necessary to remove her to the nearest hospital. The hospital authorities decline to give any information as to the condition of the patient, stating that the case is in the hands of the police.

EXHIBITION OF ANATOMICAL MODELS.

The metropolitan police on Tuesday visited certain shops in London where anatomical models and drawings are exhibited, and requested their removal, on the ground that they encouraged the morbid feelings excited by the recent murders.

Source: Cardiff Times, 24 November 1888, Page 5

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Mary Kelly

Post by Wally on Sat 14 Sep 2013 - 12:16

That wasn't Marie Jeanette Kelly in the room at Millers Court. Kelly had Blue eyes, not hazel !

Wally
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sat 14 Sep 2013 - 20:05

Agreed! Mary Jane Kelly was not murdered in Miller's Court - it was Winifred May Collis or Davies. In essence, there was no Mary Jane Kelly - there was only Mary Jane O'Brien and Winifred May Davies. Mary's tombstone says "Otherwise Davies," so it was Winifred.

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Wally on Sun 15 Sep 2013 - 7:40

Hi Karen,
            According to Walter Dew in his memoirs, the lady on the bed had 'hazel eyes' as he stated that he would never forget the pain and anguish in her hazel eyes staring at him (or words to that effect). Whereas her ex landlady commented that 'Kelly' had Beautiful 'blue eyes'. Could it be possible that the dead/mutilated body in millers court was that of the young unfortunate she had befriended and shared a meal with on the day prior to the early morning murder. Also Dew recalled that three credible witnesses had seen and spoken to 'Kelly' hours after the alleged murder of her. A bit weird really.

Wally
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 15 Sep 2013 - 9:39

Well, truth is stranger than fiction. Both Abberline and Dew stated that the woman in Miller's Court was not Mary Jane, but a friend of hers that she met while working in the West End. The murderers killed the wrong woman that 9th of November, 1888. This must be why they are still quite sore about it and argue endlessly.

If you look at the photo of the murdered woman in Miller's Court found on the left of my forum, you will see that the woman does have hazel eyes and not blue.

Thanks for being observant - we are a dying breed it seems.

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Wally on Sun 15 Sep 2013 - 11:22

Hi again, Karen,
                     I'm a newby to the whole Ripper mysteries, so my apologies if I appear a little naive. I find the Ripper mysteries quite absorbing, addictive and a little frustrating, Ha!
The whole 'Kelly' saga seems to falter in many ways for my uneducated liking. The witness statement by McCarthey (I think his name was) seemed far to concise to be believable. He must have had a damn good photographic memory or he was getting a damn good back handed wage for the cover up. The latter tickles my thoughts more.
Dunno what you think?
Great site by the way.
Tim.

Wally
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 15 Sep 2013 - 19:10

Hi Tim,

Thank you for your compliment about this site - I am happy to provide a place for people to discuss the Ripper murders without being subjected to abuse, ridicule and threats.

As to McCarthy, it may be possible that he knew of the Fenian affairs in Ireland and was keeping Kelly safe in Miller's Court. One reason is that she was 29s. in arrears and yet he still allowed her to stay there. Then, on the night of the murder, she was staying in Providence Row Night Refuge. The next day she was assisted to escape to Canada by Abberline and Sickert.

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Wally on Mon 16 Sep 2013 - 6:52

Blimey ! How on earth did that get found out about Abberline. And why Sickert I wonder? I agree with you that the monies owed for the rent of Millers Court was rather suspicious. In those days they would kill for sixpence. Very strange indeed, but, fascinating. So that settles my mind, Karen. It was afterall  a setup. Thank you for that.

Oh and the (what I call) 'However Brigade' of people who know everything about everything and simply poo poo any suggestion that differs from theirs are a damn nuisance. And yes, like you, I do find them abusive to people and rather arrogant.

Tim

Wally
Guest


Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Mr Hyde on Fri 20 Sep 2013 - 1:36

+1

Spent several days pondering this dilemma.

A number of people wished Kelly gone.

Abberline especially.

Re her arrears....she was 29 years of age and in the rear of the house!

Reckon that's bad (chuckle)....read Abberline's reports on Kate Eddowes' murder.


Last edited by Mr Hyde on Fri 20 Sep 2013 - 1:42; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : Usual!)

Mr Hyde

Posts : 174

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Wally on Sun 22 Sep 2013 - 6:27

I will have a read of that straight away.
 Thanks, Mr Hyde.
Tim.

P.S. Where do I find it? Ha !

Wally

Posts : 43

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Mr Hyde on Sun 22 Sep 2013 - 13:40

I bought a CD with a fair bit on it from USA some years back.

Don't have much time due to chronic ill health,however will see what can be done further down the track.

It was Abberline's handwritten reports on the Mitre Square investigation that got me suspicious of his intentions.

I have absolutely no doubt that he was brought in to ensure "Jack" was not captured.

Mr Hyde

Posts : 174

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Wally on Sun 22 Sep 2013 - 14:35

That's interesting, Mr Hyde. I'm afraid I'm a newby to the Ripper carry on. Is this written report readily available online?

Tim.

Wally

Posts : 43

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Mr Hyde on Sun 22 Sep 2013 - 19:42

Just tried to scroll through the pdf.

I just do not have the time or health right now.

It may not have been Abberline.His superiors did a few reports on Mitre Square.

Abberline did reports on the first two CVs and Kelly.

I could try emailing the 84,585 KB to you,but doubt my connection is reliable enough.

You could try Google.

Good Luck!


Last edited by Mr Hyde on Sun 22 Sep 2013 - 20:02; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : Usual!)

Mr Hyde

Posts : 174

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 22 Sep 2013 - 21:11

Wally,

As to your query regarding Kelly having been sent to Canada by Sickert and Abberline, this information can be found in the book, "The Ripper and the Royals," by Melvyn Fairclough, (Duckworth, 1991).

Walter's son, Joseph gave information to Fairclough about his father, Walter (the artist), as to the Ripper murders and stated that his father, Walter, knew Kelly for years from having known her while she worked in the West End. They apparently hung together in the same circles there.

The Appendices beginning on page 237 list all of Abberline's personal notes on the Ripper case, and Appendix 7, is where you will find "Abberline's account on the five Ripper victims."

On page 226 of Chapter Twelve, entitled "Mary Kelly: The Final Twist," it states:

"Kelly would have little, if anything, to gain by pretending to her aunt that she was living in Canada at a time when she was in fact living somewhere else. Abberline gave no indication that Kelly was deceiving her. We therefore have no reason to believe that in this instance there was any deception on her part.
If Mary Kelly was still alive and in Canada around Christmas time, after her supposed murder, several questions present themselves:
(1) Whose body was found in Miller's Court?
(2) Who provided the means for Kelly to sail to Canada?
(3) Why did Abberline think that Kelly was an agent of the police?
(4) Why was Abberline told not to pursue his investigation further, and by whom?"

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Wally on Mon 23 Sep 2013 - 4:09

Hi Mr Hyde,
I'd love a copy of the pdf if and when you are well enough.
I'll try the Google line though.
Thanks.
Tim.

Wally

Posts : 43

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Wally on Mon 23 Sep 2013 - 4:29

Hi Karen,
I don't really conform to the Royal theory but, I would love to read the Abberline notes. As for Walter Sickert, maybe it was he and Abberline who arranged the escape for Kelly? Just a thought, that's all.
(1) I truly think that the body in Millers Court was that of the young unfortunate that Kelly had befriended and shared a meal with the day before the murder.
(2) Maybe Sickert and/or Abberline funded the escape and she ran away with that joseph chap she was newly fond of (not Barnett).
(3) and (4) I haven't read anything about those two so I have no idea as yet.
Thanks, Karen.
Tim.

Wally

Posts : 43

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Mon 23 Sep 2013 - 10:18

Wally, ask and you shall receive. Here is Appendix 7 in which details of the five victims can be found copied verbatim from Abberline's personal diaries.

Appendix 7: Abberline's account of the five Ripper victims.

The following are the background details of the Ripper's five victims, as discovered by Inspector Abberline, and copied verbatim from his diaries.

Mary Anne NICHOLS
was born August 26th, 1845.

Father - Edward Walker. Tradesman, locksmith - later blacksmith. It was her mother who was married at the age of 12, not Mary. Mary Walker married William Nichols on Jan. 4th, 1864*. William Nichols was a printer by trade, from Oxford. After the wedding, they lived at a lodging house in Bouverie Street for a while and then both moved in with Mary's father at 131, Trafalgar Street, Walworth, (in St. Saviour's District) south of the Thames. At the last address she gave birth to two children, the first was a son, Edward John Nichols - born in Camberwell in 1866. The second and third children were named Percy George; born July 18th, 1868, and Alice Esther born in 1870. In 1874, they moved to 68, Peabody Building, Stamford Street, off Blackfriar's Road. While at the last address gave birth to Eliza Sarah in 1877, and Henry Alfred in 1879. In 1880 she left her husband, and took to drink. From there on, lived in the Lambeth Workhouse from Sept. 6th, 1880 until 31st May, 1881. She stayed briefly with her father. From thereon a life in various workhouses. Ending Oct. 25th, 1887, she was at St. Giles Workhouse, Endell Street. Mary Anne Nichols was also known as Mary Gray. Then she went to the East-End, and there met her death on the night of August 31st, 1888, just a few days after her 46th year.
She was still married to William Nichols. Mother of 5 - was a friend of Emma Smith, who had explained Annie Chapman.

*[Abberline here refutes contemporary reports which stated that Mary Nichols was only 12 when she married. Checking the marriage records at St. Catherine's House, I discovered that Abberline was correct in his assertion that it was her mother who married at that age, and not Mary herself. Abberline was the only person either then or since to make this discovery.]
[Bouverie Street was off Fleet Street - a convenient place for a printer to choose to live having recently arrived in London.]

Annie CHAPMAN
June 1841 - Sept. 8th, 1888.

Annie Chapman - mother Ruth Chapman married George Smith in 1842, Feb. at Paddington. Her father was a private in the life guards at Knightsbridge. The Smiths' children were all well educated. Annie's sister Emily baptised at Holy Trinity Church, Brompton Road. Address then was No. 3 Montpelier Place, Knightsbridge, and then to No. 4, Rutland Terrace, Knightsbridge.
- 1856 they moved to 12, Keppel Terrace, Windsor. Then the third daughter Georgina was born. George Smith stated the birth giving the birth address as 32, Upper Albany Street, Regent's Park. Two years later, in 1858, another daughter Miriam was born, this time at Windsor. Then in 1861 a birth of the only son, Fountain Smith, Middle Row North, Knightsbridge, then back to Windsor, leaving Annie behind in London, taking up respectable employment. After the death of her father the family return to London to 29, Montpelier Place, Knightsbridge. Mother died in 1893. She had called herself Eliza Anne Smith. Annie on May 1st, 1869 married John Chapman at All Saints Church. John a coachman, 2 years younger than Annie, was related to Annie's mother. They lived at No. 1, Brook Mews, Bayswater. Another address was 1873 at 17 South Bruton Mews, Berkeley Square. In 1886 her husband died Dec. 25th. In 1887 went into East-End and so died Sep. 8th, 1888.
Her address in 17, Bruton Mews, was only 3/5 minutes around the corner from 74, Brook Street, Sir William W. Gull.

Elizabeth STRIDE
1846 - Sept. 30th, 1888.

Elizabeth arrived in London 1866 from Sweden as a domestic servant to a gentleman near Hyde Park. Married John Thomas Stride 7th March, 1869. She lived at 67, Gower Street, St. Pancras, and her husband lived at 21 Munster Street, Regents Park. Husband a coffee-room owner in 1870/1, Upper North Street, Poplar. They lived both together at 178 Poplar High Street. 3 years later Elizabeth Stride left her husband, 1875. On 21st March, 1877 she was an inmate at the Poplar Workhouse. Nothing was heard of her until 28th Dec., 1881. She suffered from bronchitis, and was admitted to Whitechapel Hosp. and discharged on the 4th Jan., 1882. She stayed in a Workhouse from then till she moved to 32 Flower & Dean Street. Then on to 35 Dorset Street with a man Michael Kidney. She was aged 42.

Catherine EDDOWES
4th April, 1842 - Sept. 29th, 1888.

Catherine Eddowes was born to George and Catherine Eddowes on the 4th April, 1842 at Gaisley Green, Wolverhampton. Her father was a tin-plate worker. The family moved to London living at 4, Baden Place, Bermondsey, where her brother was born. Over the next 10 or 11 years the family lived in Long Lane, Bermondsey, and the children went to the St. John's Charity School at Potters Field, Tooley Street. In 1851, they lived at 35 West Street, Bermondsey. On Nov. 7th, 1855, Mrs. Eddowes died of phthisis (T.B. of the lungs). She was 42 when she died. Catherine was only 13 years of age. Her brothers and sisters were sent to the workhouse for the best part of 12 years. At the age of 19 Catherine met an army man, Thomas Conway. She bore him 3 children although she never married him, and they parted in 1880. Conway took the two boys and she took the girl, Annie. In 1880 she took up with another man, an Irish porter named John Kelly. They lived in Flower & Dean Street, Whitechapel. Last record of Catherine was when she was admitted to Whitechapel Infirmary, 14th June, 1887, suffering with foot burns. She was known as Kate Conway, and put her religion as R.C. She died age 46, on 29th Sept., 1888.
Not connection with any of the others.
Pawn ticket in the name of M.J. Kelly.

Mary Jane KELLY.
Ref. to Marie Jeanette Kelly. August, 1865 - Nov. 1888.

Through a letter sent to me in Jan. 1889, from Miss Nora O'Brien of Roofer Castle, Limerick, Ireland, when she stated that Marie Jeanette Kelly was her niece, daughter of her brother who was in the army. Officer of the Inniskilling Dragoon Guards. Her real name was Mary Jane O'Brien. Kelly was a name of a distant relative. She had been receiving letters from her in the name of Mary Jane Kelly. But after her letters stopped coming she had found out about the Whitechapel murders. I now know she was never an unfortunate. No record of Workhouse or Infirmary or any other help or assistance. Bellord Domestic Agency helped her to acquire service to a West-end family as a nanny in Cleveland Street. Had made friends with a house parlour-maid - Winifred May Collis, 20, of 27, Cleveland Street off Great Portland Street, who went to stay with Mary Jane Kelly in Dorset Street in Nov., 1888, due to an unwanted pregnancy. Never heard of again.
I discovered -
(1) She was not an unfortunate, and she never lacked money.
(2) She mysteriously appeared from nowhere, then disappeared. I believe she was a P.A.
The aunt received a Christmas card from Kelly, sent from Canada after Kelly's murder.
I was advised not to pursue any more to this investigation.

***************************************
Karen Trenouth
Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
avatar
Karen
Admin

Posts : 4907

View user profile http://victorianripper.niceboard.org

Back to top Go down

Page 3 of 4 Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum