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Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 0:46

AT LAST A CLEW.

A Woman Who Saw the London Fiend
Enter a Room with His Last Victim.

Swarms of Detectives Start Upon the Scent.
Reason of Sir Charles Warren's Resignation.

LONDON, Nov. 13. - The home secretary will do all in his power to catch the murderer, but it is evident from the meagre developments that the police cannot do much till another atrocious murder gives them a fresh opportunity.
The inquest today developed nothing new, except the following description of the man who went to Mrs. Kelly's room, and which was given by Mary Cox, an old woman of disreputable life. She said:
"On Thursday night at 11:45 I saw Mary Kelly very much intoxicated in Dorset street. There was with her a short, stout man, shabbily dressed, who went with her up the street. He had a long dark coat, and had a pot of ale in his hand. He had a round felt hat, and wore a full moustache, very red in color, and had a blotchy face. He had a clean-shaven chin. He went with Mary Kelly into her room, and I said, "Good night, Mary." Thereupon the man turned round and banged the door."
This is the best thing in the way of a clew which has been given as yet, and a swarm of detectives have been sent to work on it. A dozen men have been arrested on suspicion, but there was not the slightest ground for holding any one of them.

IN A SACKVILLE SCRAPE.

It Was a Magazine Article that Caused Sir Charles Warren's Resignation.

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NEW YORK, Nov. 13. - A Herald cablegram from London says:
Sir Charles Warren has copied Lord Sackville, and, in consequence, shares his fate. John Murray invited the commissioner to use his pen, and he produced an article on the police in Murray's Magazine, defending himself. The matter came up in Parliament, and his superior, the home secretary, snubbed him, saying: "Sir Charles was ignorant of a rule in the department that no attache should write of his office without permission."
This was tantamount to stating that Sir Charles was inattentive, so he resigned. He and Lord Sackville will therefore soon meet and compare notes.
I called upon Sir Charles in consequence. He is a handsome military man, looking little over 40 and considerably bronzed. He wears a moustache suggestive of silence, and his features are regular and handsome. Instead of the military martinet which he is represented to be in some quarters, I found a gentleman of courteous man and amiable disposition, with much dignity. His manner had more of the suavity of the diplomatist than the rough-and-ready style of a military man.
"Can you give any details about your announced resignation?"
"Well, not much. You must understand that until the government has appointed some one in my place I can say little. However, there is one thing I wish to be understood; that is that Mr. Matthews is speaking for the government, but he is not doing so for me. I, the commissioner, will, when the time comes, have my say. At present I am still commissioner, and responsible for the London police, therefore I may not speak."
"Yet, can you not suggest the reason of your resignation?"
"Not fully; but I will say that a great grievance has been the interference of the home office in the police department."
"Is that of recent date?"
"No. It has been so for two years. The police department had by law been originally placed under control of the chief secretary of state. The charge was next made over to the home secretary. However, this did not make us a department of the home office. I have resisted this latter assumption throughout.
"When it came to orders being written to us by the home office clerks it was a little too much."
"Were you not consulted?"
"Not directly. A curious feature of the whole business was that the government, represented by Mr. Matthews held me personally responsible for all the crime in London, and yet they made communications to my subordinates. It was first Assistant Commissioner Munro, now it is Mr. Anderson."
"Is there any trouble with the police?"
"No, that is all nonsense. No feeling such as has been represented exists. I think you will find that the metropolitan police are more contented now than they have been for years."
"You did not resign on account of the last Whitechapel murder?" Sir Charles adjusted his glasses and smiled.
"No," he resumed, emphatically; "no, I sent in my resignation before the Kelly murder, on the 8th of this month, and immediately after Mr. Matthews' statement in the House of Commons in reference to my article in Murray's Magazine. The resignation was accepted yesterday. That article was perfectly innocuous, and could not do any harm."
"Have you any new information about the Whitechapel murders?"
"No. We are following up slight clews all the time. We received about 1400 letters. Every single idea was investigated. For example, we were asked to drag a canal at a certain spot. We did so, but there was nothing to be found. People talk as if nothing had been done.
"As for the Malay story, it cannot hold. We have had the water police on the alert from the first. Then we have followed up the idea of a murderous cook, and every slaughter-house is under watch for a murderous butcher. In fact, every clew has been closely followed up, and there are some clews and ideas which still occupy our attention, but which it would be impolitic to foreshadow to the public."

BODY FOUND IN THE THAMES.

A Woman Who Either was Murdered or Committed Suicide.

LONDON, Nov. 13. - The body of a well-dressed woman was taken out of the Thames this morning. There were marks on the body which gave rise to a suspicion that the woman had been murdered, but it is possible that she committed suicide, and that the marks were received by contact with objects in the water. The police searched the casual wards of the various police stations in the hope of getting some clew to the murderer, but they were unsuccessful. They arrested one man who had a bowie knife in his possession, but there is no reason to believe that we was instrumental in the woman's death, and he will probably be discharged.

Source: The Boston Daily Globe, Tuesday November 13, 1888, Page 5

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 6:05

THE MURDERS AND SIR CHARLES WARREN.

Once more the public have been horrified by the fiendish murder of a woman in Whitechapel. Within the short space of three months no fewer than six females have been killed and mutilated in this immediate district, besides the unknown woman who was murdered there last Easter. There is every reason to suppose that Mary Jeannette Kelly, who was so brutally hacked to pieces on Friday morning in Miller's-court, Spitalfields, fell a victim to the same monster who murdered Turner, Nicholls, Chapman, Stride, and Eddowes. The only variation in the manner of the crime is that it was committed indoors instead of in the public street; but the fiendish perpetrator escaped with his usual impunity. The ghastly details which accompanied the butchery of poor Kelly even exceed in horror the mutilations committed in Buck's-row and Mitre-square. For weeks past all kinds of special precautions have been taken, both by the police and private individuals, to guard against further outrages at the East End; and yet, in spite of every care, the murderous maniac breaks forth again and carries out his fearful work. No surprise can be felt that the inhabitants of Whitechapel are once more panic stricken, and are calling out for increased police protection.
Sir Charles Warren, as Chief Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, is assailed on all sides, for he has not succeeded in winning the confidence of the general public, or of the men under his command, and now he is being assailed by the publicans. During the last few days a correspondence has been published between the Licensed Victuallers' Protection Society and the Chief Commissioner respecting a recent order to the police, which directs that in all cases where drunken persons are arrested in or near public-houses, the officer making the apprehension is to note and report any facts which may tend to prove where the accused obtained the liquor, with a view to proceedings being taken against the publican concerned. The Protection Society say, "This order suggests a species of espionage over licensed houses which cannot be justified by the result of proceedings before police magistrates," and they lodge "an indignant protest against the cloaked suggestion that the licensed trade, and they only are guilty of the sale of intoxicating liquors to drunken persons." For years "the trade" have suffered severe losses from the wide diffusion of clubs, which Sir Charles Warren, in his annual report, says are "little better than unlicensed public-houses." This is, indeed, insult added to injury. Publicans carry on their business under conditions which are not imposed upon any other traders. Before obtaining a license and during the period they hold it they must show themselves to be respectable persons, and from the necessities of their position they are peculiarly under the supervision of the police. In addition to the posing on them heavy duties and taxes in legislature has prescribed many regulations for the conduct of their business. They are subject to penalties for permitting drunkenness, and are empowered to exclude drunkards from licensed premises. The recognised and representative leaders of the trade would gladly co-operate with Sir Charles Warren in putting down or fining those houses which habitually pander to drunkenness and vice, which bring a slur upon the general body of publicans, but they object to an autocratic order which places the most respectable man at the mercy of any ordinary police officer. They contend that nothing in the Intoxicating Liquors Act of 1872 gives power to the police, as suggested in the order, "to use every effort to obtain evidence tending to inculpate the owner of the nearest licensed house to the place where a drunken person may been arrested." They maintain emphatically that a great part of the drunkenness of the present time can be traced to the bogus clubs owned by men who are under no obligation to show a good character to the magistrates, as is necessary with publicans. It cannot be doubted that the vice of intoxication is most hurtful to the public, socially and individually, but most respectable tavern keepers know that under all circumstances their worst customer is the drunken man, and they are always ready to refuse to supply him or to eject him. But any further espionage on the part of the police is uselessly irritating - is a slur upon the whole trade, and tends to alienate from the force that general public sympathy and support which is most necessary to the efficient carrying out of their proper work. Sir Charles Warren, on the contrary, seems to consider that his duty is to look after the morals of the people, to stamp out popular demonstrations, and generally to drill the population into good behaviour. But this does not lead to the prevention or detection of crime.
It was only a matter of course that Sir Charles Warren's recent article attacking his late colleagues as well as Ministers and ex-Ministers of the Crown should be brought before Parliament. Mr. Matthews managed to muster up sufficient courage to administer a severe snub to the Police Commissioner for a breach of official discipline; but the matter is not to end here. Mr. Conybeare will ask on Monday the exact reason why the late head of the Detective department in the Metropolitan Police resigned his seat, and also whether it is a fact that Sir Charles Warren has now practically the control of that department. In view of the constant recurrence of atrocious murders and the failure of the new detective organisation, Mr. Conybeare will also question the Home Secretary on the propriety of making some change in the arrangements of Scotland-yard. A question of almost identical purport has been put down by Mr. Pickersgill, with the object of finding out who really is at the head of the Criminal Investigation Department, and Mr. Howard Vincent, too, has seized the opportunity of vindicating himself from the indirect attack made upon him by the Chief Commissioner.

FOUND DROWNED.

The body of a young woman was found in the Thames off Wapping stairs yesterday, and was taken to Wapping mortuary. The description of the deceased, who has not yet been identified, is as follows: - Age about 23 years, height 5 ft.; complexion dark; hair, dark brown; eyes, dark hazel; dressed in tight-fitting bodice, and skirt trimmed with fur, two petticoats with fancy white trimmed lace, white flannellette with bright blue stripe.

THE LATEST WHITECHAPEL MURDER.
RESULT OF MEDICAL EXAMINATION.

Dr. Bond, of Westminster hospital; Dr. Gordon Brown, medical officer of the City police; and Dr. Phillips made a further post-mortem examination of the body of Mary Jeannette Kelly yesterday morning, being engaged for several hours at the Shoreditch mortuary. The conclusion arrived at was that the murdered woman had undoubtedly been dead for some hours when first discovered, and that in all probability the crime was committed as early as two or three o'clock in the morning. Among the many conflicting statements which have been published was one relating to the removal of a part of the body of the victim. It was contradicted yesterday, but when evidence comes to be given at the inquest, we have no doubt that the doctors will have a fact to reveal in this direction.
A very singular investigation was in progress yesterday with respect to something missing. It was thought the murderer had burnt the thing in question before leaving the scene of the crime. Accordingly the ashes and other matter in the fireplace of the room in Miller's-court were carefully taken up, sifted, and examined. Dr. Phillips and Dr. Macdonald, M.P., the coroner for the district, visited the house, and subjected the refuse to the closest scrutiny. It is understood, however, that nothing was discovered, leaving it to be assumed, therefore, that the murderer took away a part of his victim's body, though what portion is for the present a secret known only to the doctors.

NO CLUE AT PRESENT.

Down to an early hour this (Sunday) morning the police in the district stated that they were still without a clue. Inspectors Abberline, Nairn, and Moore have charge of the case, and a large force of detectives are actively engaged in investigating the facts and inquiring into the many statements offered to the authorities, the vast majority of which are worse than useless.

PARDON TO ANY ACCOMPLICE.

The following official communication was sent out from Scotland-yard yesterday: -

"Murder. - Pardon. - Whereas, on Nov. 8th or 9th, in Miller's-court, Dorset-street, Spitalfields, Mary Janette Kelly was murdered by some person or persons unknown, the Secretary of State will advise the grant of her Majesty's gracious pardon to any accomplice, not being a person who contrived or actually committed the murder, who shall give such information and evidence as shall lead to the discovery and conviction of the person or persons who committed the murder. - (Signed) CHARLES WARREN, the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis."

THE POPLAR MURDER.

The execution of the prisoner Levi Richard Bartlett for the murder of his wife by beating her brains out with a hammer, will take place on Tuesday at Newgate prison, where he has been confined since his conviction. The prisoner is 66 years of age. It will be remembered that after killing his wife he made a desperate attempt at suicide by cutting his throat. The wound has since healed. It appeared at the trial that the prisoner had been drinking heavily for several days before the murder, but the act seemed to have been committed with a good deal of determination, and the prisoner did make several threats of what he intended to do. The Home Secretary has stated that he sees no reason to interfere with the due course of the law. Since his conviction the condemned man has been visited by two sisters and a brother, who took their last farewell of him yesterday.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper, Sunday November 11, 1888

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 6:09

THE EAST END MURDERS.

This week arrests on suspicion for the Whitechapel murders have been fewer, the one or two persons who excited the attention of the detectives being taken to the station-houses and almost immediately released.
The funeral of Marie Jeanette Kelly took place on Monday at Leytonstone cemetery in the presence of a large number of people. An hour before the remains left the mortuary many hundreds of persons assembled around Shoreditch church, and watched the arrangements. At half-past 12 the coffin was borne from the mortuary, and the cemetery at Leytonstone was reached at two o'clock. The Rev. Father Columban, O.S.F., with two acolytes, and a cross bearer, met the body at the door of the little chapel of St. Patrick, and the coffin was carried at once to a grave in the north-eastern corner. Barnett and the poor women who had accompanied the funeral knelt on the cold clay by the side of the grave, while the service was read by Father Columban. The coffin was incensed, lowered, and then sprinkled with holy water, and the simple ceremony ended. The floral ornaments were afterwards raised to be placed upon the grave, and the filling-up was completed in a few moments, and was watched by a small crowd of people.

Henry Humphreys, 36, a professional billiard player, was charged at Marylebone police-court, on Monday, with behaving in a disorderly manner and using threatening language towards Ann Vaughan, of Malvern-road, Kilburn. - The prosecutrix, a young woman, said she was standing at the junction of Cambridge and Malvern roads about 20 minutes after nine o'clock on Sunday night, waiting for a female cousin to arrive. The prisoner came up to her and said "Good evening, miss," but she took no notice of him and walked towards her cousin, who was approaching her. The prisoner followed and said something about their being nice young women and other foolish talk. The prisoner then uplifted his arm, and afterwards from up his sleeve produced a long dagger with a very sharp, curved point, and drawing her attention to it, said, "This will do for you." She and her cousin screamed at the top of their voices, and the prisoner told them not to do that. He went away, and they went to a policeman and gave information of what had happened. - Police-constable 382 X arrested the prisoner in the Chippenham public-house, and when told the charge he said it was only a stupid joke. The prisoner was in drink, but knew what he was about. He had been into a shop and sharpened the knife on the counter. - Mr. De Rutzen said this sort of thing must be stopped. He remanded him for a week, and at present refused bail.

The man Benalius, 32, a Swede, who was arrested last week for entering a house in Buxton-street, Mile-end, was brought up on remand, at Worship-street police-court, on Friday. The prisoner entered the parlour of a house, where a Mrs. Jones was sitting alone, and frightened her very much by his peculiar manner. The man had once before been arrested, it was stated, as a suspect, after the Berner-street murder. The police had made inquiries about him, and the secretary of the City branch of the Charity Organisation society said that they were about to send the prisoner back to America. - Mr. Bushby said, if the police were satisfied, the prisoner would now be discharged. He had only himself to thank for being locked up.

CUTTING A WOMAN'S THROAT IN SPITALFIELDS.

Considerable excitement was occasioned in London on Wednesday by a report that another woman had been murdered and mutilated in a lodging-house in George-street, Spitalfields. Although it was soon discovered that there had been no murder, it was ascertained that an attempt had been made to cut a woman's throat. The victim of this last occurrence fortunately was but slightly injured, and was at once able to give the police a description of her assailant. Her name is Annie Farmer, and she is a woman about 40 years of age, who lately resided with her husband, a tradesman, in Featherstone-street, City-road, but, on account of her dissolute habits, was separated from him. On Tuesday night the woman had no money, and, being unable to obtain any, walked the streets until about half-past seven on Wednesday morning. At that time she got into conversation, in Commercial-street, with a man, whom she describes as about 36 years of age, about 5ft. 6in. in height, with a dark moustache, and wearing a shabby black diagonal suit and hard felt hat. He treated her to several drinks, until she became partially intoxicated. At his suggestion they went to the common lodging-house, 19, George-street, and paid the deputy 8d. for a bed. That was about eight o'clock, and nothing was heard to cause alarm or arouse any suspicion until half-past nine, when screams were heard proceeding from the room that was occupied by the man and Farmer. Some men who were in the kitchen of the house at the time rushed upstairs and met the woman coming down. She was partially undressed, and was bleeding profusely from a wound in the throat. She was asked what was the matter and simply said "He's done it," at the same time pointing to the door leading into the street. The men rushed outside, but saw no one, except a man in charge of a horse and cart. He was asked if he had noticed any person running away, and said he had seen a man, who he thought had a scar at the back of the neck, run down George-street and turn into Thrawl-street, but not thinking much of the occurrence, had not taken particular notice of the man and had made no attempt to detain him. By this time a considerable number of people had assembled, and these ran into Thrawl-street and searched the courts leading out of that thoroughfare, but without any success. While this was being done the police were communicated with and quickly arrived on the scene. In the meantime the deputy of the lodging-house wrapped a piece of rag over the woman's wound, and, seeing that it did not appear to be dangerous, got her to dress herself. Dr. George Bagster Phillips, divisional surgeon of the H division, together with his assistant, quickly arrived, and the former gentleman stitched up the wound. Seeing that it was not a dangerous one, and in order to get the woman away from the crowd of inmates, who pressed round, he suggested that she should be removed to the Commercial-street police-station, and that was quickly done on the ambulance.
The description of Farmer's assailant as circulated by the police is as follows: - "Wanted, for attempted murder on the 21st inst., a man aged 36 years; height 5ft. 6in., complexion dark, no whiskers; dark moustache. Dress: Black jacket, vest, and trousers, round black felt hat; respectable appearance; can be identified."
Up to Friday the man had not been captured. The authorities then stated that the wound to Farmer's throat was not made with a sharp instrument; also, that a quarrel arose between the pair respecting money, as, when the woman was at the station, some coins were found concealed in her mouth. The authorities appear to be satisfied that the man has no connection with the recent murders, and expect that he will shortly surrender himself into their hands.
A man named Philip Harris, who lodges at the house where the murder was attempted, and saw the woman come downstairs with her throat cut, says: - I saw what was the matter, and several of us rushed out of the house and pursued the man, who, we were told, had gone up Thrawl-street. We saw him running before us, but when we got to the corner of Brick-lane we lost sight of him. He was about 5ft. 6in. in height, and had a thick black moustache. I noticed that he had on an overcoat with a cape on it, but I did not see anything in his hand.

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, November 25, 1888, Page 2

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 6:11

THE WHITECHAPEL MURDER.

MR. WINKLER said he should like to ask the Clerk a question concerning the burial of the body of the woman Kelly, who had just been murdered, which had been removed to the Shoreditch mortuary from Spitalfields. What he wanted to know was whether there was any liability or expense attaching to the rate-payers of Shoreditch.
The CLERK said the relieving officers of the parish, if they were applied to, could refuse to bury the body. The only other authority then would be the Sanitary Authority, which was the Vestry. This matter seemed to him to be a quibble more than anything else. Unless the friends of the deceased were in a position to pay, he took it that the Coroner would requisition the Sanitary Authority to undertake the burial of the corpse.
Mr. ALABASTER stated that Mr. Wilton assured the relatives of the woman that the body should not be buried by the parish.
Mr. WINKLER said he only wished to know if there was any liability attaching to the Board as representing the rate-payers.

Source: The Mercury, Saturday November 17, 1888, Page 6

Note: So, Mr. Wilton assured the relatives of Mary Jane Kelly (or whoever the victim was) that the body should not be buried by the parish? That means that Mary Jane's relatives were located and contacted, so why have we been told repeatedly, that her relatives were never found. I feel that the Ripper case has caused two diametrically opposed factions to "hide/conceal" the truth, viz:

a.) Those who do not want the facts known. (Something to hide?)
b.) Those who wish to conceal the facts in order to preserve them for later release to the public (when safe so to do.)

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 6:27

England
Corresp. Particul. Journal de Geneve
London, November 9
(Translated from French)

This time the culprit, we can say the mysterious madman, operated at home rather than in open air. In a squalid house on the ground floor in Miller's Court in Dorset Street, there lived a young woman named Marie Jeanne Kelly nicknamed because she has lived with a handyman of the name she gave as her husband. This woman clearly lived on the street, and Kelly, out of disgust, had abandoned her there ten to fifteen days ago. Thursday night they saw the young woman Mary Jane, half drunk in a tavern in the counties, about eleven o'clock. On Friday morning, the owner, a grocer and seed merchant, named M'Carthy, stated that she owed 30 shillings of rent, which would represent at least two months in arrears, sent his boy to the store around 10:30 am, and asked him to go for some rent money. The boy knocked at the door but got no response and believing that the door was closed, he took advantage of a broken window to draw aside the curtain of the window overlooking the courtyard, and he returned, pale and trembling, he told his boss that his tenant had been murdered. M'Carthy came to see himself, and through this window without shutters, he could see the corpse of the unfortunate lying on her bed, the room filled with blood and furniture covered with shreds of flesh. Ten minutes after the police were alerted and ran in force, they surrounded the whole block of ruins with a cordon of police, and inspectors and doctors entered the room. A true while with an old bed, a table and two chairs. On the bed, dead, her throat was cut to the spine, like the other victims, but this time it was evident that having had more time at his disposal and more security, the murderer had abandoned his rage and bloody hatchet was literally the corpse of his victim. The nose and both ears of the poor woman were cut off, and we remember with a real thrill of horror in the letters signed Jack the murderer, the removal of the ears of the next victim was announced. Both breasts had been cut with a skill that would have done credit to a preparer of anatomy. The chest and abdomen had been opened, the heart lying on the hard ground, the liver was placed sideways on one leg, entrails scattered on the floor and the uterus, like a detached piece of anatomy was on the table. The face and legs had also been slashed in a horrible way. The doctors themselves have been cruelly impressed by this incredible spectacle. The reconstruction of the crime is obvious. Mary Jane, leaving the tavern where she was seen alone between half past eleven and midnight to meet the assassin, who persuaded her to take him home. Mary Jane had a master key or allen key and returned without being heard. Following the deposition of two neighbors, at one o'clock in the morning they heard her in her room humming the refrain of a popular song, "Sweet Violet," after midnight and it was found that there was light in her room. After that, nothing until the time of the discovery of the corpse, on Friday at ten-thirty in the morning. There was a light in the unhappy woman's room for at least 40 to 50 minutes, which proves that the appearance of the assassin was nothing terrifying or likely to excite the suspicions of the unfortunate who sang to him . As I said above, the window was not covered and the view outside was protected only by one of those thin muslin rags so that when there's light inside, one can see all of outside. The opposite window of the other houses are not more than ten feet, but tenants had not seen anything except the light. So not reporting the shadow of the murderer. By the provision of places, I just visited with a police inspector, it seems a gaslight street must cast a dim light in the room of the crime, and it probably had that glow when the murderer had proceeded with his bloody work. No they can not say with precision, physicians believe that the crime was committed between 1:30 am and 3 am. His work ended, the murderer left, shutting the door and carrying the key in his pocket, but without leaving a trace behind him. It was noted that these crimes always happen late in the week, and since then we no longer find any suspicious individual, there has reached an established theory as follows: On Thursday or Friday arrives in the port of London vessels that trade cattle, and the boats leave on Saturday or Sunday, generally 48 hours of their arrival date. On these vessels, they often kill the cattle for one reason or another, naturally employing butchers, and we think it's one of those individuals who committed the crimes and therefore departing in that vessel, and disappearing without a trace .... until the next tragedy. That's a guess as possible, but nothing more. As it is increasingly evident that these crimes do not have any ordinary motive, theft or revenge, it seems that the theory of eminent psychiatrist Dr. Forbes is much more likely. It would therefore be in the presence of one of these maniacs who have a terrible temporary insanity for blood. I wanted to take this advice from a doctor friend of mine and I'm really frightened of his conversation. According to him, this madness would manifest itself in particular circumstances, under the influence of a nervous breakdown. More access will be longer, there was more chance for the murderer's work to be done. The anatomical massacre that marks the latest crime seems already an indication that the bloody madness of the time persisted much longer than for previous crimes because with hardware it took at least 30 to 40 minutes for the murderer destroying everything female. If he had operated on the highway, he would certainly have been caught in the act. The famous detectives bloodhounds that were on the trail of the murderer have not been used, for the simple reason that during the last lesson we gave them, they escaped and they have not been recovered. The police did not find the murderer and the Whitechapel district is experiencing a panic that is impossible to imagine.

Source: Journal de Geneve, November 13, 1888, Page 2

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Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 6:31

CABLE NEWS.

Threatening Letters Sent to Sir Charles Russell and Chief Justice Hannen.
In Consequence of Their Connection With the Proceedings of the Parnell Commission.
All Doubts Set at Rest as to the Fate of the Steamers Ruger and Nantez.

London's Mystery.

LONDON, Nov. 13. - The latest Whitechapel murder is still the leading topic of discussion and all of the old theories as to the identity of the murderer are revived. The face of the woman Kelly, when her body was found, resembled a bloody ball. The nose, ears and cheeks were missing, but the eyes had not been touched. Surgeons stitched the face together as best they could, but it was found almost impossible to identify the woman from such of the features as were intact or sewn together.

Source: The Daily Colonist, Victoria, British Columbia, Wednesday, November 14, 1888

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 6:36

WHITECHAPEL AGAIN.
The Fiend of the London Slums at Work.
HIS LATEST DEVILISH ATROCITY.
Sickening Mutilation of His Victim, Who Belongs to the Same Class as the Others - The Crime Shrouded in the Usual Mystery and Committed Indoors This Time and *a Few Yards* from a Police Station - Horrible Details.

LONDON, Nov. 10. - A murder which took place in Spitalfields, Whitechapel district, yesterday morning, is undeniably a continuation of the series which was for a while interrupted for want of opportunity or inclination. In this case the murderer worked leisurely, as is made evident by the fact that the killing was done in a room fronting on the street, on the ground floor, and within *a few yards* of a temporary police station, whence officers issued hourly to patrol the district. The house the murder was committed in is situated in Miller's Court. The first door at the end and on the right of the passage opens into a tiny, damp room on a level with the pavement. The landlord of this and neighboring rooms is John McCarthy, who keeps a little shop in Dorset street on the side of the passage. About a year ago he rented it to a woman who looked about 30. She was popular among the females of the neighborhood, shared her beer generously, and went under the title of Mary Jane McCarthy. Her landlord knew that she had another name, Kelly, but her friends had not heard of it. Kelly and Mary Jane had been married in the manner which is considered satisfactory in Whitechapel. They had not gone to the expense of a license, but published the fact of their matrimony by living in one small room and sharing their joy and sorrow and drunkenness together.
Mary Jane took up her residence in the little room in Miller's Court when Kelly went away. Since then her life has been that of all the women about her. Thursday night she went out as usual, and was seen at various low beer shops in Commercial street. In those resorts she was known, not as Mary Jane, her home name, but as "Fair Emma," a title bestowed in complimentary allusion to her appearance. At last, just before midnight, she went home with some man who appears to have dissuaded her from making a good night visit, as was her custom, at a drinking place nearest her room. No description whatever can be obtained of this man. Right opposite the passage leading to Mary Jane's room there is a big and very pretentious lodging house, where the charge is fourpence. Some people congregated about the door at midnight are sure they saw a man and woman, the latter being Mary Jane, stop to laugh at a poster which offers 100 pounds reward for the Whitechapel murderer. The man must have enjoyed the joke, for he himself was the Whitechapel murderer, beyond all doubt.
At 10 o'clock yesterday morning three horrified policemen, who had first looked in through Mary Jane's window and then drank big glasses of brandy to steady themselves, were breaking in her door with a pickax. The Whitechapel murderer had done his work with more horrible thoroughness than ever before. The miserable woman's body was literally scattered all over her little room. Almost every conceivable mutilation had been practiced on the body. The woman's nose was cut off and the face gashed, she had been completely disemboweled, as had all the murderer's former victims, and all the intestines had been placed upon a little table, which, with a chair and the bed, constituted all the furniture in the room. Both the woman's breasts had been removed, and placed also on the table. Large portions of the thighs had been cut away, and the head was almost completely severed from the body. One leg also was almost completely cut off. The mutilation was so frightful that more than an hour was spent by the doctors in endeavoring to reconstruct the woman's body from the pieces so as to place it in a coffin and have it photographed.
The poor woman's fragments, put together as skilfully as possible, are lying in the Houndsditch mortuary in a scratched and dirty shell of a coffin often used before.
The mortuary is in a graveyard back of gloomy old Houndsditch church, and not a pleasant spot late at night. While the body was being carried from the scene of the murder thousands crowded as near as the police would allow and gazed with lifted caps and pitying faces at the latest victim.
Gen. Sir Charles Warren was early on the scene and told a reporter that all the precaution in the world could not prevent the work of such murderers. The sole chance remaining to the police, he said, was to catch them redhanded and their change of tactics increased the difficulty. In the open air, where the killing had been hitherto, the chance of their apprehension was slight, but in the case of an indoor murder, such as the last, the hope of arresting the perpetrator was almost barren of fruition. This latest murder will undoubtedly cause large number of arrests on suspicion, but that the monster will be brought to bay is a matter of extreme doubt since he has left no clues not worked over by the officers investigating the previous cases.
The most annoying feature of the case is that the arrest of a number of innocent persons on suspicion will have to be repeated. The opinion of Archibald Forbes and Mr. Winslow that the assassin is a homicidal maniac is confirmed by the latest murder, and the prediction has become general that another murder will soon follow.

Source: The Evening Gazette, Saturday, November 10, 1888

* 5 Yards = 15 feet

Note: Just where, praytell, is the mortuary photo of Mary Jane Kelly that was taken of her reconstructed remains inside of a shell or coffin? Does anyone know the whereabouts of this photo?

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 6:38

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 21:19

ANOTHER WHITECHAPEL MURDER.

There has been another terrible crime in the East End (says the London Echo of 9th November) a crime surrounded by all the horror associated with the recent tragedies in the same district. In this case a woman's body, terribly mutilated, has been found in Miller's Court, Dorset Street, Commercial Street, and that under circumstances whose mystery is as deep as that connected with the previous crimes. That there has been a murder - and that of a particularly revolting character - there seems to be no doubt. Already the public suspicion declares that its author is the same fiend whose identity is concealed by so mysterious a cloud. This suspicion is sharpened by the fact that the scene of his last terrible exploit - presuming it to be his exploit, and that the crime was committed where the body was found - is only a few minutes' walk from Hanbury Street and Osborn Street. The details of this crime are very revolting in their horror. "Why, sir," said a man who saw the body to an Echo representative, "anything more horrifying than the sight in the room where we found the body could not be conceived." Our reporter writes: - Whitechapel is panic-stricken. A murder as horrible in its details as any yet committed in the East End, and resembling the recent atrocities perpetrated there, was discovered this morning shortly before 11 o'clock in a room at a place known as Miller's Court, a turning out of Dorset Street, Commercial Street. So reticent are the police in the matter, and such are the extraordinary precautions taken by the police to preserve whatever clue may be left, that the yards adjacent are blocked by the authorities, and only those persons having any business in the immediate vicinity are allowed to enter the purlieus of the spot where the tragedy has occured. The court where the murder has taken place is an alley, the house where the body was found being overlooked by a mews - No. 25 Dorset Street. Inspector Abberline, Inspector Beck, Detective-Sergeants Thicke and White, together with other officers sent specially over from Scotland Yard, are now searching all the houses within a stone's throw of No. 25 Dorset Street. At every street corner excited groups of people are conversing about this, the latest East End mystery. Mrs. Hewitt, who lives at the Mews at No. 25 Dorset Street, said she first heard of the murder at 11 o'clock this morning, when upon looking out of her window she saw the place surrounded by about fifty police. Mrs. Hewitt heard no screams last night. The woman is not yet definitely identified. The detectives engaged in the case assert that they believe it is only the work of a few hours before the miscreant will be brought to justice. Dr. G.B. Phillips, the Divisional Surgeon of Police, was quickly summoned when the discovery was made. At his direction no one has been allowed to interfere with the position in which the body was found. All that the police at present know of the woman's name is that she was "Mary Jane." She was of the same type as the other victims. The question is being asked in the neighbourhood as to why the bloodhounds have not been made use of on the present occasion. The opportunity was surely a good one to prove their utility or otherwise. In spite of the extraordinary precautions taken by the police authorities to keep secret the facts connected with the dreadful mutilation, the facts connected with the crime are oozing out, and from special inquiries made at Whitechapel by an Echo reporter this afternoon, it appears that the poor girl had rented one room at the house for about fifteen months. The premises were not used strictly as a lodging-house - for it was unregistered, it is believed - but were let to separate tenants, who paid small weekly sums for each room. The house belongs to Mr. M'Carthy, who keeps a chandler's shop in Dorset street, and also owns some common lodging-houses in the district, notably one in which "Pearly Poll," Mog Sullivan, and other women - incidentally mentioned in the inquiries relating to the atrocities - were accustomed to live. The young woman found murdered this morning was about 23 years of age, and was only known to Mr. M'Carthy as Mary Jane. In this wretched locality, where the commonages - even the ordinary decencies - of life are unrecognised in the "moral" code of the wretched women who lead a life of shame, their very surnames are often unknown to their associates, and even their Christian names are not known to them. The murder is one of the most horrible character, worse than any of the preceding. The woman was found lying on a bed, the one arm extended, and the other across her breast, which was ripped open, and the breasts cut off. The flesh on her legs was cut down in strips, the thighs being almost bare to the bone. Her face was also mutilated beyond recognition, and her ears were cut off. Lately the deceased woman had been living with a man supposed by Mr. M'Carthy to be her husband. He recently left her. It is conjectured that meeting the murderer last night, he decoyed her to the house, and then perpetrated the crime in the stillness of the night. No sound was heard, or any cries of distress.

Source: The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld) Saturday 29 December 1888, Page 1183

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 22:59

ANOTHER TERRIBLE CRIME.
WOMAN CUT TO PIECES.

BODY FOUND THIS MORNING.
EXCITEMENT IN WHITECHAPEL.

EXTRAORDINARY POLICE PRECAUTIONS.
HIDEOUS MUTILATION OF BODY AND FACE.

WHERE ARE THE BLOODHOUNDS?

There has been another terrible crime in the East End - a crime surrounded by all the horror associated with the recent tragedies in the same district, and intensified by a loathsomeness of detail impossible almost to be conceived. In this case, a woman's body - terribly mutilated - has been found in Miller's-court, Dorset-street, Commercial-street, and that under circumstances whose mystery is as deep as that connected with the previous crimes. That there has been a murder - and that of a hideously revolting character - there cannot be any doubt. Already the public suspicion declared that its author is the same fiend whose identity is concealed by so mysterious a cloud. This suspicion is sharpened by the fact that the scene of his last terrible exploit - presuming it to be his exploit, and that the crime was committed where the body was found - is only a few minutes' walk from Hanbury-street and Osborn-street. The details of this crime are very revolting in their horror. "Why, Sir," said a man who saw the body to an Echo representative, "anything more horrifying than the sight in the room where we found the body could not be conceived." This fellow only portrayed in a minor degree the surroundings of this last terrorising crime.

WHERE THE CRIME WAS COMMITTED.

Our reporter writes: Whitechapel is panic-stricken. A murder as horrible in its details as any yet committed in the East-end, and resembling the recent atrocities perpetrated there, was discovered this morning shortly before eleven o'clock in a room at a place known as Miller's-court, a turning out of Dorset-street, Commercial-street. So reticent are the police in the matter, and such are the extraordinary precautions taken by the police to preserve whatever clue may be left, that the roads adjacent are blocked by the authorities, and only those persons having any business in the immediate vicinity are allowed to enter the purlieus of the spot where the tragedy has occurred. The court where the murder has taken place is an alley, the house where the body was found being overlooked by a mews - No. 25, Dorset-street. Inspector Abberline, Inspector Beck, Detective-sergeants Thicke and White, together with other officers sent specially over from Scotland-yard, are now searching all the houses within a stone's throw of No. 25, Dorset-street. At every street corner excited groups of people are conversing about this, the latest East-end mystery.

THE VICTIM UNKNOWN.

Mrs. Hewitt, who lives at the Mews at No. 25, Dorset-street, said she first heard of the murder at eleven o'clock this morning, when upon looking out of her window, she saw the place surrounded by about fifty police. Mrs. Hewitt heard no screams last night. The woman is not yet definitely identified. The detectives engaged in the case assert that they believe it is only the work of a few hours before the miscreant will be brought to justice. Dr. G.B. Phillips, the Divisional Surgeon of Police, was quickly summoned when the discovery was made. At his direction no one has been allowed to interfere with the position in which the body was found. All that the police at present know of the woman's name is that she was "Mary Jane." She was of the same type as the other victims.
The question is being asked in the neighbourhood as to why the bloodhounds have not been made use of on the present occasion. The opportunity was surely a good one to prove their utility or otherwise.

A LODGER IN THE HOUSE.

In spite of the extraordinary precautions taken by the police authorities to keep secret the facts connected with the dreadful mutilation, details connected with the crime are oozing out, and, from special inquiries made at Whitechapel by an Echo reporter this afternoon, it appears that the poor girl had rented one room at the house for about fifteen months. The premises were not used strictly as a lodging-house - for it was unregistered, it is believed - but were let to separate tenants, who paid small weekly sums for each room. The house belongs to Mr. McCarthy, who keeps a chandler's shop in Dorset-street, and also owns some common lodging-houses in the district, notably one in which "Pearly Poll," Mog Sullivan, and other women - incidentally mentioned in the inquiries relating to the atrocities - were accustomed to live.
The young woman found murdered this morning was about 23 years of age, and was only known to Mr. McCarthy as Mary Jane. In this wretched locality, where the common usages - even the ordinary decencies - of life are unrecognised in the "moral"code of the wretched women who lead a life of shame, their very surnames are often unknown to their associates, and even their Christian names are not known to them.

TERRIBLE AND REVOLTING SIGHT.

The murder is one of the most horrible character, worse than any of the preceding. The woman was found lying either in the second floor front room or in the passage leading to it, the one arm extended, and the other lying across her breast, which was ripped open, and the breasts cut off. The flesh on her legs was cut down in strips, the thighs being almost bare to the bone. Her head had been - so one informant declares - severed from the body. When the police entered the room, it was lying on the floor. The face was also mutilated beyond recognition, and her ears were cut off. To increase the horrible picture which the head presented, the lips had - so one story goes - been cut away.
To still further aggravate the demoniacal character of the deed, the poor creature was not only disembowelled, but the uterus and other parts were found by the doctors to be missing - just as in the terrible outrages which preceded it.
Lately the deceased woman had been living with a man supposed by Mr. McCarthy to be her husband. He recently left her. It is conjectured that meeting the murderer last night, he decoyed her to the house, and then perpetrated the crime in the stillness of the night. No sound was heard, or any cries of distress.

HOW THE BODY WAS DISCOVERED.

From later information obtained by an Echo reporter this afternoon, it seems that it was shortly after ten o'clock when a man in Mr. McCarthy's employ went to the house for the purpose of collecting the rent from the girl. The front door was fastened, and repeated knocks were not answered. The man then went to the window, which was unfastened, pushed aside the curtains, and saw the body of the deceased. He at once ran back to Mr. McCarthy, and the police were informed. Then information was conveyed to the Commercial-street and Leman-street police-stations, and Sir Charles Warren was at once informed of the dreadful occurrence. Mr. Superintendent Arnold, Inspector Abberline, Inspector Beck, Inspector Reid, Detective-sergeants Thicke and Stephen White, at once gave instructions for a thorough search to be made, not only in the house where the murder was committed, but also of the houses adjacent.

WHO THE VICTIM WAS.

The news of the tragedy spread like wildfire, and soon every street was blocked near the locality - Wentworth-street, Middlesex-street, and White's-row - where excited groups of bystanders living in the immediate vicinity could not for sometime form the faintest conjecture as to who the victim was, for the police gave peremptory instructions to everyone not to allude to the circumstances in the faintest way. Dr. Phillips was especially emphatic in his desire that the investigations should not be made known. At the especial wish of Sir Charles Warren, Mr. Thomas Bond, surgeon of Westminster, accompanied by another medical man, who assisted at the post-mortem examination of the remains at Whitehall, paid a visit to the scene. Though accustomed to many sad sights, the medical men themselves were appalled at the barbarities of the crime. The doctors formed an almost unanimous decision that the murderer possessed some anatomical knowledge either of human beings or animals. There is little doubt amongst the authorities now but that the monster who is the perpetrator of these crimes is a homicidal maniac of the worst and most dangerous form, and it is feared by the officials engaged in the case that murders of the same character will continue to be committed until the miscreant is actually captured at his diabolical work.

THE TERROR IN THE DISTRICT.

Another of our reporters writes: - The terrible murder which was committed in Whitechapel this morning has had the effect of throwing the population of Whitechapel and Aldgate into a state of panic. As our reporter made his way the pathways were lined with crowds of people. The editions of the evening papers were being eagerly bought up, and the details of the fearful event discussed. Lord Mayor's Show Day is generally a "draw" for the East-end pageant lovers, and by all those who can afford it it is observed as a holiday. But the news of the tragedy enacted this morning had driven all thoughts of the Lord Mayor's Show out of the minds of the people. One subject alone possessed their thoughts - the sudden renewal of the ghastly exploits of the murderous maniac who has made Whitechapel his hunting-ground.

THE LOCALITY DESCRIBED.

Dorset-street is a narrow street running out of Commercial-street, between Whitechapel and Shoreditch. The street is half composed of warehouses and half of lodging-houses. Opposite the house in which the murder was committed stands the Commercial-street chambers for men - a big substantial building, which should accommodate many men of a night. The other side of the Chambers is the warehouse of Messrs. Bayne and Wright, milk contractors. The house in which the murder was committed stands up a narrow court which at the further end terminates in a cul-de-sac. Up to the present the police refuse the Press any information. Two stalwart constables guard the entrance to the court. The members of the Press are even denied admittance to the court. There are about eight houses in the court. The houses are chiefly tenanted by the poorer class of Irish people. The landlord of Carter's-court keeps a chandler's shop in Dorset-street. By the side of his shop is the court, where stands the house where the murder was committed.

A FRIEND OF THE VICTIM'S - HIS STORY.

A friend of the murdered woman's spoke as follows to our reporter: - "I have known the murdered woman for some considerable time. She was an unfortunate, and given to drink. Her age would be somewhere about 26, and she had led her present life for about seven years. I have known her to frequent the common lodging-houses of the locality. I believe she has been in custody a good many times for drunkenness. I cannot say that she had been for any length of time with any one particular man, but I have heard that she lived with a man. She was always rather shabbily dressed, but against this she was clean in her personal habits. She was on fairly good terms with the other people in the street and her fellow-unfortunates in Dorset-street, who number, I should say, about fifty."

CALLING FOR THE RENT - HORRIBLE SCENE.

The victim, Mary Jane Kelly, between 26 and 28 years of age, was seen between eight and half-past this morning going for milk. After half-past eight no sound was heard from the room in the house in which she lived. The house is situated in Carter's-court. The lad who went up to the woman's room to collect the rent, knocked, and was greeted by no answer. Pushing the door open a horrible sight met his gaze. The woman's body was found lying on the bed. The room was a small one. Horrible to relate the head was absolutely severed from the body. In the words of our reporter's informant, "The head was loose, the arm was cut off the body, and laid on the woman's bosom. The flesh was cut from the face." So terrible is the disfigurement that it is impossible to recognise the woman. Only in outward shape does she bear any resemblance to a human being.

THE GHOUL'S FURTHER WORK.

But the chapter of horrors is as yet hardly begun. Her abdomen was slit across in an upward direction from left to right, the wound, it is said, extending from near the left groin to above the right ilium - to use a technical phrase. Another horror. The skin was peeled off the body in strips, just as was done to her face. The entrails were also disturbed, a portion being placed between her feet. A search has been made for the missing other portions. The ghoul, in stripping the skin and flesh from the woman's body, had, when his frantic desire for cruelty was satiated, placed the pieces of flesh and strips of skin on a table standing near the bed.

ANNIE CHAPMAN A FRIEND OF HERS.

The murdered woman is said to have been a woman of extremely quarrelsome tendencies. She was, it is hardly necessary to say, extremely poor. She belonged, morally, and in every other respect, to the class to which Annie Chapman belonged. Singular to relate, the murdered woman, Annie Chapman, was a friend of this very Mary Jane Kelly.

CHILD SENT OUT TO BUY SWEETS.

Mary Ann Kelly was seen about the streets at one o'clock this morning. The murdered woman had one child, a little boy of between six and seven. The little fellow lived with his mother. This poor child was sent out this morning, when the mother returned to the room with the assassin. The gossip of the neighbourhood, or rather of the very court in which the house is situated, is to the effect that the man who is suspected of having committed the murder sent the child out to buy sweets. When the child returned from buying his sweets and playing he found the place in commotion, for his mother had been discovered lifeless and bleeding, and the murderer had fled.
There is no trace whatever of the murderer. Not so much as a scrap of paper, a bag, or a knife is left to allow a possible clue.

ANOTHER ACCOUNT.

The Press Association says: - At half-past ten this morning the dead body of a woman, with her head almost severed from her body, was found in an untenanted outhouse or shed in Dorset-court, Dorset-street, Commercial-street, Spitalfields. It had evidently been there for some hours, but several scavengers who were in the court at nine o'clock this morning declare that the body was not there then. They might, however, have been mistaken as the place is very dark. An alarm was immediately raised, and an inspector of police and a number of constables were soon on the spot. It is remarkable that Dorset-court is exactly opposite the house in Dorset-street, in which the unfortunate woman, Annie Chapman, used to lodge. The discovery created the greatest excitement in the neighbourhood, and crowds quickly gathered at the scene.

THE VICTIM - OF GENTEEL APPEARANCE.

The Press Association, in a later account, says: - The victim was a woman of the unfortunate class, like the victims of the previous murders. She was a young woman who had occupied a room in a house in Dorset-court, and when found dead, about half-past ten, she was lying in the passage, with her head in the room. No details of the injuries can at present be obtained, but there are rumours that the body is terribly mutilated. Bloodhounds were sent for by the police immediately they heard of the crime. The murdered woman was about 21 years of age, and the neighbours say that she was of genteel appearance, but they do not know her name or anything about her, except that recently she lived with a man from whom she is now separated. This man was sent for, and at once identified the body.

HOW THE CRIME WAS DISCOVERED.

The crime was first discovered by a young man named McCarthy, who went to the house this morning with his mother to collect the rent. On opening the front door he saw a body lying in the passage, and he immediately closed the door again and drew his mother away, saying, "Mother, there is another murder." An alarm was soon raised, and the police at once took possession of the house, and refused admission to all except officials.
Morris Lewis, a tailor, states that he was playing "pitch and toss" in the court at nine o'clock this morning, and an hour before that he had seen the woman leave the house, and return with some milk. There is no evidence as to who was in the house with her.

WOMAN SEEN THIS MORNING.

The Press Association, in a still later account, says the divisional surgeon arrived at the scene of the murder at five minutes to two o'clock, accompanied by Mr. Dukes, another doctor, and they at once proceeded to view the body. The streets in the vicinity of the crime are crowded with people eagerly discussing the latest horror, the women of a certain class being simply terror stricken that another of their number had been killed in such a brutal manner. It is confidently stated that the deceased was seen after ten o'clock this morning in company with a paramour, when they were both drinking at the public-house at the corner of Dorset-street. Her name is Mary Jane Kelly, and the man she lived with sells oranges in the streets. After speaking to her in the public-house, he left there for the purpose of vending oranges, and he states that he did not see her again until her corpse was discovered.

THE HORRIBLE MUTILATIONS.

The mutilations of the body reveal such a shocking state of things (says the Press Association reporter) as has probably never been equalled in the annals of crime. The head was not lying apart from the body, but was hanging by a mere thread. Both ears and the nose were cut off. All the flesh was stripped completely off the thighs, and the woman was not only disembowelled, but the womb and other parts are missing similar to the previous murders in this locality.
Dr. Bond, of Westminster Hospital, is now (wrote this reporter at 2:40) in the room with the other doctors; and the body is now being photographed. A post-mortem examination will afterwards be made in the same room. Dr. J.R. Gabe, of Mecklenburgh-square, has seen the body; but, in reply to questions put to him by the Press Association representative, he declines to give any details. He merely says that he has seen a great deal in dissecting-rooms, but that he never in his life saw such a horrible sight as the murdered woman presents.

Source: The Echo, Friday November 9, 1888, Page 3

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Mon 24 Oct 2011 - 0:45

The murder victim found in Dorset Street, London was traced by a historian. The victim was the 28 year old Mary Jane, actually Lizzie Fisher. It was 10 o'clock at night when she went out on the street and says that one night with her husband had spent. They found her in her bed, with neck cut and a horribly mutilated body, one arm was cut off, the abdomen was opened and the intestines were torn out. Mary Jane was married and had a son 10 years old, her husband is the caretaker of Spitalfields Market. Immediately after the discovery of the corpse of the woman maimed in the same cruel way as the other Whitechapel victims, the police bloodhounds were called to detect the murderer.

Title: Buitenland
Publication: Nieuwsblad Heusden en Altena, Page 2
Date: 14 November 1888

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Mon 24 Oct 2011 - 0:48

"JACK, THE RIPPER."

The Whitechapel Fiend Breaks Out Again and Adds the Eighth Victim to His List - The Mutilation in the Last Case Horrible Beyond Description - The Police Still Mystified.

THE BUTCHERY BEGUN AGAIN.

LONDON, Nov. 9. - Another horrible murder has taken place in the East End. A woman's body, hacked and cut into pieces, was found this morning in Dorset-street. The body was found at eleven o'clock this morning. The police are endeavouring to track the murderer with blood hounds. The body was mutilated in a manner similar to the bodies of the women previously murdered.
The victim of the Spitalfields murder was, like the rest of the Whitechapel victims, an abandoned woman. She had a husband who was a porter, but she lived with him only at times. Her name is believed to be Lizzie Fisher, and she was nicknamed "Mary Jane." As she entered the house where she lodged, by means of a latch-key probably no one saw the man who accompanied her. Hence it is doubtful is the murderer is ever identified. The man might easily have left the house at any time between the hours of one and six without attracting any special attention. The physicians who viewed the corpse reserved their statements for the inquest which will follow. Three bloodhounds, which are owned by a private citizen, have been placed on the scene, but they are useless.
The appearance of the remains was frightful and the mutilation was even greater than in the previous cases. The head had been severed from the body and placed beneath one of the arms. The ears and nose had been cut off. The body was disemboweled and the flesh was torn from the thighs. The uterus and other organs are missing. The forehead and cheeks had been completely skinned and one hand was pushed into the stomach.

THE POLICE MYSTIFIED.

LONDON, Nov. 10. - The murder which took place in Spitalfields White's district yesterday morning is undeniably a continuation of the series which was for a while interrupted for want of opportunity or inclination. In this case the murderer worked leisurely, as is made evident by the fact that the killing was done in a room fronting on the street, on the ground floor and within a few yards of a temporary police station, whence officers issued hourly to patrol the district. Although the metropolitan police system is not yet discredited, the bloodhound theory is entirely thrown out, since the murder was not discovered until ten o'clock in the morning while the streets were teeming with people and traffic was going on uninterruptedly. General Sir Charles Warren was early on the scene, and told a reporter that all the precaution in the world could not prevent the work of such murderers. The sole chance remaining to the police, he said, was to catch them red-handed, and their change of tactics increased the difficulty. In the open air, where the killing has been done hitherto, the chance of their apprehension was slight, but in the case of an indoor murder, such as the last, the hope of arresting the perpetrator was almost barren of fruition. This latest murder will undoubtedly cause a large number of arrests on suspicion, but that the monster will be brought to bay is a matter of extreme doubt, since he has left no clues not worked over by the officers investigating the previous cases. The most annoying feature of the case is that the arrest of a number of innocent persons on suspicion will have to be repeated. The opinion of Archibald Forbes and Mr. Winslow that the assassin is a homicidal maniac is confirmed by the latest murder, and the prediction has become general that another murder will soon follow. The brutality of the mutilation to which the last body was subjected surpassed all the others. In the room to which the corpse was taken chunks of flesh and portions of the viscera were strewn upon the floor, and the dissecting table and the stomach of one surgeon gave way at the spectacle.

A PERTINENT INQUIRY.

LONDON, Nov. 10. - In the House of Commons last night Mr. Conybeare, member for Camborne, asked whether, in view of the latest Whitechapel murder, Sir Charles Warren ought not to be superseded as Chief Commissioner of Police by a man accustomed to investigate crime. The speaker gave the member notice that the question must be submitted in writing.

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Mon 24 Oct 2011 - 0:52

The English press published details of the horrible murder of the last woman killed in Whitechapel, the pen refuses to reproduce. The victim is a woman almost unknown, living alone, after having done so for some time, after living with a certain Kelly, and was inscribed with the name of Mary Jane Kelly, which was really his last name. On Thursday she left home as usual, and at ten o'clock at night the neighbors aw her in the company of an unknown subject. At midnight, she returned home. Mary had a latchkey, so she could open the door, and went back into her room with her companion, making no noise and doing nothing to call attention. At one o'clock in the morning someone saw light in her room and heard her singing the chorus of a well-known song. At ten o'clock the next morning Mary's creditors knocked at the door to inquire about the payment of rent. As there was no reply he looked in a window overlooking the court of the unfortunate woman. What he saw from there was horrible. Currie to make a report to the police, and open the door forcibly. He offered to show all of the following: The floor strewn with pieces of the body of Mary, the head only attached to the trunk by a piece of skin, the stomach ripped open and the entrails and major organs placed here and there, on the chairs or the floor, and on the table both breasts symmetrically placed next to each other. The murderer is still not there, because the detainees have so far failed to prove his innocence.

Source: La Iberia, Madrid, 15 November, 1888

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Mon 24 Oct 2011 - 0:57

It is not quite easy to understand why the poor mutilated creature from Miller's-court, Spitalfields, was brought to the Shoreditch Mortuary. The local public was a little taken aback at the throngs which surrounded the churchyard on Saturday, and the Shoreditch jury grumbled at being taken off to Spitalfields to view the scene of the murder; though the coroner seems to have silenced all complainings with very definite threats of the possible exercise of his powers. But the deplorable appearance of some of the witnesses who came to the Town Hall on Monday was a terrible indication of the depths to which vice and depravity reduce their victims. There must be something radically wrong in the conditions of life which allow the existence in our midst of a state of things worse than obtains amongst barbarians.

THE SPITALFIELDS VICTIM. - The body of the unfortunate woman Kelly still lies at the Shoreditch Mortuary, but Mr. H. Wilton has undertaken to be responsible for the interment, which will take place on Monday next.

Source: The Hackney Express and Shoreditch Observer, November 17, 1888, Page 2

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Mon 24 Oct 2011 - 7:21

TOPIC OF THE WEEK.

The latest East-end murder has aroused the greatest excitement in London, not only among the populace, but in the ranks of the police. Several persons have been arrested and released, and there is apparently little prospect of the discovery of the murderer. The inquest on Mary Janet Kelly, the victim, has closed, like its predecessors, without throwing any useful light on the crime. Light of a certain sort there is, but it is so confused and shifting as to be almost worse than useless. We have at least three descriptions of an individual who may be the man wanted, but it is extremely difficult to obtain reliable evidence as to the supposed murderer.

Source: The Home and Colonial Mail

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Thu 26 Jan 2012 - 22:37

OFF THE SCENT.
STILL UNABLE TO TRACK THE WHITECHAPEL FIEND - ONE OF "JACK THE RIPPER'S" THREATS PARTLY CARRIED OUT.

A London special of Saturday says:
Nothing more has become known about the murder or the murderer than what was sent to the Herald last night. Neighbors have been fancifully garrulous, absurdly ineffectual arrests have been made and sensational journals have printed a number of absurd, groundless rumors.
It is still said "the police are reticent." Quite so, and for the best of all reasons - they know nothing. Sir Charles Warren has issued a proclamation offering a pardon to any accomplice, as if so secretive a murderer possessed accomplices. A story is afloat that the victim was seen outside in the morning shortly before the shocking discovery, but medical evidence shows that this was impossible, as from post mortem signs she had been dead some hours.
The hoaxer, "Jack the Ripper," is again at his postal methods.

A POSSIBLE ROMANCE.

The victim is discovered to be a Limerick woman, whose parents, humble people, moved to Wales, where she married a collier named Davies, who is now dead. Then she lived at Cardiff and "went to the bad."
There is perhaps a romance about her origin, as the post-mortem examination disclosed great delicacy of skin, features and hair, and her name, Marie Jeannette, is very uncommon in lower class nomenclature.

HORRIBLE REGULARITY.

The regularity with which each murder has occurred in a first or a last week of a month leads to the idea that the perpetrator may be called away from the city during each second and third week. This fact has today revived the Herald story of the revengeful Malay who sails on a coast vessel. Another queer coincidence is that the murders have occurred on holidays. The second, that of Emma Smith, was on Easter Monday night, that of Martha Turner was on August 7, Bank Holiday night, and this last was on Lord Mayor's Day, city holiday.

SUPERSTITION AND IGNORANCE.

It was discovered today that the wonderfully large superstitious class in Whitechapel and the adjacent regions of Bevis Marks, Bethnal Green and Spitalfields are already beginning to talk about supernatural agencies. It is difficult for Americans unfamiliar with those localities to appreciate the brutal looks and almost savage ignorance and degraded surroundings of the wretched herds of humanity living there.

WHAT A CRIMINAL THINKS.

Among the host of theories propounded in connection with the series of Whitechapel horrors is one emanating from an ex-convict and recently published in a London paper. Although the conclusions drawn are not, in themselves, novel they seem taken together to possess an element of probability.
Ex-convict says: - "It appears to me that the murderer must have the three following qualifications for the successful perpetration of his crimes:
- (1) Cause for deadly vengeance against the unfortunates of the streets; (2) an intimate knowledge of Whitechapel, and equal familiarity with the snail-like alacrity of the London police; with (3) some experience of a dissecting room. I would suggest to Sir Charles Warren that he should obtain from Sir Edmund Du Cane the names of such convicts as have been liberated, say, during the last six months, who have been employed as infirmary orderlies in the respective prisons from whence discharged. Also the additional information, where such ex-prisoners hailed from before sentence, and whether prostitutes were associated with the police in their original detection or conviction.

VENGEANCE ON WOMEN.

"I believe the murderer to be a man who has suffered a long term of penal servitude for some crime that was brought home to him through the betrayal of one of those unfortunates who "pal in" with burglars and other such criminals while spending the "swag" of a successful "bust." I have worked and conversed with hundreds of such men in more than one convict prison, and I cannot help remembering the ferocity with which they invariable spoke of the moll who put them away, and how they would "do" for her whenever they were "chucked up." Desperate as these men are when outside of prison, many of them, especially the "old fakes," are models of good behavior while undergoing penal servitude, as they seek thereby to qualify for the most coveted of prison "billets" - infirmary orderly.

A STARTLING CONFIRMATION.

It will be remembered that about the time of the last murder a letter and postcard signed "Jack the Ripper" were addressed to the Central News and were generally regarded as the ghastly product of some horror-loving joker.
Whether the letter be a mere bogus effusion or the actual work of the murderer it is worthy of note that the writer says: "The next job I do I shall clip the lady's ears off and send to the police officers just for jolly, wouldn't you?" and that in the case of Mary Jane Kelly, murdered on Friday night, the ears and nose were severed from the head.

Source: The News and Observer, Raleigh, North Carolina, Tuesday Morning, November 13, 1888

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Wed 29 Feb 2012 - 9:39

The Woman Murder.

LONDON, Nov. 13. - At the inquest on the body of the Kelly woman yesterday a witness testified that he saw the murderer enter the house with the woman shortly before the killing. He noticed that the man's face had a curiously blotched appearance, similar to that of a sufferer from the secondary manifestation of a loathsome disease.

FIEND FEATURES.
A Witness Describes the Kind of Man Engaged in the Woman Murders.

The Blotched Face Man Not the Individual - Anarchy in the Chickasaw Nation.
Governor Guy Gathers His Forces For a Fight With Byrd - Attempted Murder of a Sweetheart.

LONDON, Nov. 14. - The hopes of the police of catching the Whitechapel murderer, which had almost entirely died out, were raised to the acme of buoyancy yesterday in consequence of the testimony at the Kelly inquest of George Hutchinson, a groom, who had known the victim for several years and who saw a well dressed man with Jewish cast of countenance accost her on the street at two o'clock on the morning of the murder and the circumstance of his acquaintance induced him to follow the pair as they walked together. He looked straight into the man's face as he turned to accompany the woman and followed them to Miller court out of mere curiosity. He had no thought of the previous murders and certainly no suspicion that the man contemplated violence, since his conspicuous manifestations of affection for his companion as they walked along formed a large part of the incentive to keep them in sight. After the couple entered the house Hutchinson heard sounds of merriment in the room and remained at the entrance to the court for fully three-quarters of an hour. About three o'clock the sounds ceased and he walked into the court, but finding that the light in the room had been extinguished went home. During the hour occupied in standing at the entrance to or promenading the court he did not see a policeman.
There is every reason to believe Hutchinson's statement, and the police place great reliance upon his description of the man, believing it will enable them to run him down. The witness who testified previously of having seen the woman enter the house with a man with a blotched face was evidently mistaken as to the night as *his* descriptions of her companion is totally unlike that of Hutchinson's in every particular. The bulk of the evidence taken fixes the time of the murder at between 3:30 and four o'clock. It transpired yesterday that in addition to the face mutilation of the murdered woman the uterus was wholly and skilfully removed and laid in a corner of the bed.

N.B. This article mentions two male witnesses who saw Mary Jane Kelly enter her room with a gentleman, but does not imply that it was the witness Hutchinson who was discredited, but the "other man" whose testimony was unlike that of Hutchinson's. It was this other unknown male witness who was incorrect about the night in question. This discredited "other man" could have been the man whom Sarah Lewis saw. So, in essence, what we have here are three witnesses who were in Miller's court that night, at least, George Hutchinson, an unknown man (not Hutchinson) and Mary Ann Cox (who was also not discredited.) Who was this unknown man?

Source: The Atchison Daily Globe, Wednesday November 14, 1888, Issue 3413; Column E

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 4 Mar 2012 - 12:10

No one as yet seems to have discovered a motive for the horrible Whitechapel murders, but a circumstance connected with the murder of Mary Jane, the latest victim, furnishes a plausible clew. She was heard singing "Sweet Violets."

Source: Democrat, November 22, 1888

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Mon 5 Mar 2012 - 17:11

BAFFLED.
London Detectives at Their Wits' End.

Whitechapel Fiend Still at Large.
Characteristics That Mark His Conduct.

No Motive Hit Upon As Yet.
Save That His Victim Sang "Sweet Violets,"

After Which No Further Sound Was Heard.
Pardon Offered Any Accomplice Turning State's Evidence.

LONDON, Nov. 10. - The excitement here this morning over the lengthening series of Whitechapel atrocities is more intense than ever. The papers are having enormous sales, though they contain little besides speculation and rumors. Beyond the broad facts of this ninth atrocity, the police are endeavoring to keep everything secret.
The one question in everybody's mind is, Can the murderer of Mary Jane McCarthy or Kelly be found?
This is the problem before the London police, and the impression prevails that it will be answered negatively. But if so public indignation is likely to culminate in an overturning of the present police authorities.
Yet the Whitechapel monster left more tracks behind him in this than in any other previous butchery. He was seen by several persons.
As he was entering the small court which led to the dirty room where the crime was committed, both the man and Mary Jane stopped and laughed at a large poster which offers 100 pounds reward for the Whitechapel murderer. A number of people who live in a lodging-house across the way noted the incident, and give this description of the man: About 30 years old, 5 feet 6 inches tall; wore speckled trousers and a black coat and respectable in appearance.
A Mrs. Paumier, who sells walnuts in Sandy's row, gives a similar description of a man who talked with her about the murder at 11 o'clock yesterday. He bought no walnuts, but lingered around the locality for some time. In his left hand he carried a black bag. He accosted several girls in the neighborhood, and when asked by them what he carried in the bag, replied in a sarcastic tone:

"Something the Ladies Don't Like."

"Fair Emma," as she was known to the denizens of Commercial street, was between 26 and 30 years of age. Her small boy has recently been living with some friendly neighbors. Thursday night, soon after midnight, she came into Dorset street, accompanied by a man. They turned out of the street into Miller's court. Once in the woman's room, persons in the house heard her singing "Sweet Violets" in a drunken voice. No sound was detected from the room thereafter until the horribly mutilated body was discovered yesterday by the landlord, who called to collect his rent.
Yet here are definite facts for the police to work upon. It is Sir Charles Warren's opportunity to demonstrate the efficiency or inefficiency of himself and his subordinates.
The bloodhounds put upon the murderer's track proved a failure. The police are baffled and helpless as before. The keenest detectives in the force, who have been on the watch since the last murder, are unable to find a clew or even form a theory.
As on previous occasions, in the absence of any indications, a drag-net has been thrown over the metropolis, and all the men who can be spared are searching every railway station, public house, evil resort and hole and corner, not only in the East End, but throughout the city.
There is no doubt that this and the eight other butcheries which preceded it were perpetrated by one and the same man, who decoys or suffers himself to appear to be decoyed into a safe place; that the murder is instantaneous, no warning being given the victim, nor chance to cry for help, no time to struggle for life; that

The Mutilation of the Remains

is accomplished at such leisure as the murderer may have, and it is noted that the ingenuity of his fiendish devices is in proportion to the time in each case which he probably had at his disposal: that he leaves no mark behind except upon the bodies of his victims; that even the money and jewelry have been untouched, and that he enters and leaves a house without making a noise or attracting the slightest attention, as in the last case, when people were up or awake all night in the building and heard nothing remarkable.
He waits, watches his chances, secures his prey, seizes the opportunity, applies the knife probably at the instant when the unresisting victim is most off her guard, finishes the awful work and vanishes into the void of London.
The only defence made by Sir Chas. Warren of the police for their failure to discover that assassin is that both parties conspire, as it were, to prevent detection by shrouding their movements in darkness and secrecy.
The people of London are exasperated beyond measure at the repetition of these atrocities. Demands for the offer of a large reward are again made upon Home Secretary Matthews.
The panic in Whitechapel and Spitalfields is revived. The outcasts who formerly thronged the streets cower in their lodgings in a state of abject terror. Their traffic has been stopped as if a pestilence were abroad.
Not a woman could be seen on the streets last night in the infected quarters. The police have again been doubled. Every doubtful house is under espionage, and every suspicious stranger is closely watched.
General Warren, chief of the metropolitan police, has issued a proclamation offering a free pardon to any accomplice the Whitechapel murderer may have, provided he will give information which will lead to the murderer's apprehension. It is learned that the woman whose mutilated body was found in the Dorset street house yesterday was a native of Limerick, Ire. She migrated to Wales, where she married a collier, who was subsequently killed by an explosion. After that she drifted to London.

Source: The Boston Daily Globe, Saturday Evening, November 10, 1888

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Mon 5 Mar 2012 - 17:21

The London Fiend at It Again.

The fiend who has kept London in horror for so long, has added another woman to the list of his victims on Thursday night of last week. About one o'clock Friday the body of a woman, cut to pieces, was discovered in a house in Dorset street, Spitalfields, near Water square and Hanbury street, the scene of former murders. The remains were mutilated in the same horrible manner as were those of the women murdered in Whitechapel. The head had been severed and placed beneath one of the arms. The ears and nose had been cut off. The body had been disemboweled. The uterus and other organs were missing, and the breasts cut off. The victim, like all the others, was a prostitute. She was married and went under the name of Mary Jane McCarthy. In the low gin shops of Whitechapel she went under the name of Fair Emma. She was out drinking at various resorts on Thursday night. Just before midnight she was seen going home with some man. Some persons saw the two stop still and laugh at a poster on the wall, offering 100 pounds reward for the Whitechapel murderer. Yesterday morning the police found the poor victim's body in her room as described above. A woman who was an intimate friend of the deceased woman says that Mary Jane was surely alive at one o'clock, for at that hour she heard her singing "Sweet Violets" to whoever was in her room.

Source: The Ledger, Friday November 16, 1888

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Tue 6 Mar 2012 - 7:04

THE MURDER OF MARY KELLY IN WHITECHAPEL.

[img][/img]
(Is this a sketch of Mary Kelly?)

How deeply the commission of yet another murderous outrage on an unfortunate woman in Whitechapel has stirred the heart of London can hardly be imagined by those living at any distance from the Metropolis. The stillness of the Home Office, the discipline of Great Scotland-yard, and the routine life of every town household have been ruffled by this ghastly assassination, one more in the series of sanguinary outrages in Whitechapel which have shocked humanity. The morning of Lord Mayor's Day was chosen for the perpetration of this hideous crime. While London was decking itself in flags and garlands of flowers, and preparing for a day of festivity, in which thousands of the poor were charitably invited by Lord Mayor Whitehead to join, almost in the midst of the preparation a deed was being done of which one can think only with shuddering horror. The tragedy took place very near the sites of the former Whitechapel murders.

DORSET-STREET,

lying almost under the shadow of Spitalfields Church, is a short street, composed largely of common lodging-houses, in one of which Annie Chapman, a previous victim, used sometimes to lodge. About halfway down this street on the right hand side is

MILLER'S-COURT,

the entrance to which is a narrow arched passage, and within a few yards of which, by the way, there loomed grimly through the murky air a partly torn-down bill announcing a reward of 100 pounds for the discovery of the murderer on the last occasion. There are six two-roomed houses in Miller's-court, all of them owned by

[img][/img]

MR. J. M'CARTHY,

a grocer, whose shop in Dorset-street forms one corner of the entrance to the court. The houses are let out in separate rooms "furnished" - that is to say, there are in each of them a bed and a table, and, perhaps, one or two odds and ends. For these rooms rents are supposed to be paid daily, but of course they will sometimes get a good deal in arrear. This was the case with one of the tenants, who had occupied a ground-floor room on the right-hand side of the court for about twelve months. This was the poor young woman, Mary Kelly, the victim of the murderer familiarly called "Jack the Ripper."

HOW THE MURDER WAS DISCOVERED.

It appears that by the Ninth of November, Mary Kelly, described as a comely, fair young woman, of the "unfortunate" class, was as much as fourteen shillings in arrear with her rent, and the landlord sent one of his men about eleven o'clock in the morning to see what he could get. The door was fastened, not that it had been locked from the inside, but having a catch-lock the person who had gone out last had merely slammed the door behind him, and it had thus become fastened. The man, failing to get any answer by knocking, went to the window, which had been broken and patched by rags for some time past, and on pushing the rags aside was startled by the sight of blood.

[img][/img]

HARRY BOWYER, "INDIAN HARRY"

(who is also sketched by one of our Artists), ran back in some alarm to the shop, and told Mr. M'Carthy, his employer, what he had seen, and the two returned. It soon became evident to them that another murder had been committed, and they instantly ran for the police. Officers were at once on the spot, and a communication was made to Dr. Phillips, of Spital-square, the divisional surgeon, who arrived within ten minutes or so of the discovery of the affair - at about a quarter-past eleven, that is to say. It is understood that one of the first steps taken was to dispatch a telegram to Scotland-yard giving information of the occurrence, and intimating that everything had been left absolutely untouched, in order to facilitate the employment of bloodhounds if it were thought expedient to try them. For some reason the hounds were not employed.

DR. PHILIPS,

had by this time been joined by other medical gentlemen, including Dr. Dukes and Dr. Bond, of Westminster Hospital. The spectacle that was presented on the door being thrown open was ghastly in the extreme. The body of Mary Kelly was so horribly hacked and gashed that, but for the long hair, it was scarcely possible to say with any certainty that it was the body of a woman lying entirely naked on the wretched bed, with legs outspread and drawn up to the trunk. The ears and nose had been slashed off, the flesh cut from one cheek, and the throat cut through to the bone. In addition to this, one breast had been removed, the flesh roughly torn from the thigh, and the abdomen ripped as in previous cases, several of the organs having been removed from the trunk and laid on the table beside the bed. In addition to the various mutilations thus described there were miscellaneous cuts and slashes about the person of the unfortunate young woman, as though her fiendish assailant, having exhausted his ingenuity in systematic destruction, had given a few random parting strokes before pocketing his weapon and going out into the night. The police safe-guarded Miller's-court. Two men were stationed at the head of the court to keep out all persons, but in the road - in Dorset-street, that is - for some days there was a shifting throng of people largely composed of the roughest of women and labouring men.

MRS. PAUMIER'S SUSPICIONS.

[img][/img]

Mrs. Paumier, who sells roasted chestnuts, as limned, at the corner of Widegate-street, a thoroughfare about two minutes' walk from the scene of the murder, stated that about twelve o'clock that (Friday) morning a man dressed like a gentleman came to her and said: -
"I suppose you have heard about the murder in Dorset-street?"
She replied that she had. Whereupon the man grinned, and said,
"I know more about it than you."
He then stared into her face and went down Sandy's-row, another narrow thoroughfare which cuts across Widegate-street. When he had got some way off, however, he looked back, as if to see whether she was watching him, and then vanished. Mrs. Paumier said the man had a black moustache, was about 5 ft. 6 in. high, and wore a black silk hat, a black coat, and speckled trousers. He also carried a black shiny bag, about a foot in depth and a foot and a half in length. Mrs. Paumier stated further that she saw the same man accost three young girls whom she knows on the previous night, and they chaffed him, and asked him what he had in the bag, and he replied, "Something that the ladies don't like!"

[img][/img]

MOTHER RINGER'S,

at the corner of Dorset-street, is a public-house owned by "Mother Ringer," who is said to do a great deal of good in the neighbourhood. This is one of the houses where Mary Kelly was seen drinking in company with a man shortly before the murder is supposed to have been committed. The poor woman's landlord, M'Carthy, is reported to have said that at eleven o'clock on the Thursday night she was seen in the Britannia public-house, at the corner of this thoroughfare, with a young man with a dark moustache. She was then intoxicated. The young man appeared to be very respectable and well dressed.

LIFE OF MARY KELLY.

A sadl- chequered career was that of poor Mary Jeannette Kelly; and its tragic termination gives forcible significance to the Scriptural adage, "The wages of sin are Death." Joseph Barnett, the man who lived for some months with Mary Kelly as her husband, says: -
"I first met the deceased last Easter twelve-month, and lived with her from that time until last Tuesday fortnight. I was in decent work in Billingsgate Market when I first met her, and we lived along quite comfortably. She was twenty-two years of age, fresh looking, and well behaved, though she had been walking the streets some three years previously. She told me that her maiden name was Marie Jeannette Kelly, and that she was born in Limerick. Her parents, who were fairly well off, removed when she was a child to Wales, and they lived in Carmarthenshire. When she was but little over sixteen years of age she married a collier, but I do not remember his name. He was killed in an explosion in the mine, and then Marie went to Cardiff with her cousin, living an immoral life. Thence she went to France, but remained only a short time. Afterwards she lived in a fashionable house of ill-fame in the West-End of London, but drifted from the West-End to the East-End, where she took lodgings in Pennington-street.

"Her father came from Wales and tried to find her there, but, hearing from her companions that he was looking for her, Marie kept out of the way. A brother in the 2nd Battalion Scots Guards came to see her once, but beyond that she saw none of her relations, nor did she correspond with them. When she was in Pennington-street a man named Morganstone lived with her, and a man named Fleming passed as her husband. She lived with me, first of all, in George-street, then in Paternoster-court, Dorset-street; but we were ejected from our lodgings there because we went on a "drunk," and did not pay our rent. We took lodgings afterwards in Brick-lane; and, finally, about four months ago, in Miller's-court, where the murder occurred. We lived comfortably until Marie allowed a prostitute named Julia to sleep in the same room. I objected; and as Mrs. Harvey afterwards came and stayed there, I left her, and took lodgings elsewhere. I told her that I would come back if she would go and live somewhere else. I used to call her there nearly every day, and if I had any money I used to give her some."

"I last saw her alive at 7:30 on Thursday night [last week.]. I stopped about a quarter of an hour, and told her I had no money. Next day I heard there had been a murder in Miller's-court, and on my way there I met my sister's brother-in-law, and he told me it was Marie. I went to the court, and there saw the police-inspector, and told him who I was, and where I had been the previous night. They kept me about four hours, examined my clothes for bloodstains, and finally, finding the account of myself to be correct, let me go free. Marie never went on the streets when she lived with me. She would never have gone wrong again, and I should never have left, if it had not been for the prostitutes stopping in the house. She only let them in the house because she was good-hearted, and did not like to refuse then shelter on cold, bitter nights."
From another source it appears that the collier whom deceased married was named Davies.

Lizzie Albrook, a young woman of twenty, who resides in Miller's-court, and works at a lodging-house in Dorset-street, also made the following statement: - I knew Mary Jane Kelly very well, as we were near neighbours. The last time I saw her was on Thursday night, about eight o'clock, when I left her in her room with Joe Barnett, who had been living with her. About the last thing she said was, "Whatever you do don't you do wrong and turn out as I have." She had often spoken to me in this way, and warned me against going on the streets as she had done. She told me, too, she was heartily sick of the life she was leading, and wished she had money enough to go back to Ireland, where her people lived. I don't believe she would have gone out as she did if she had not been obliged to do so in order to keep herself from starvation.

STORY AT THE INQUEST.

Dr. Macdonald, Coroner for North-East Middlesex, opened an inquest at Shoreditch last Monday on the body of Mary Kelly. Joseph Barnet, fish-porter, identified the deceased, and gave an account of the life which she had led, in accordance with the foregoing narrative of her career. Bowyer repeated the evidence we have also summarised as to his discovery of the murder, and was corroborated by Mr. M'Carthy, Mary Kelly's landlord.
Mary Anne Cox gave evidence which was in certain particulars rather touching: -

Mary Anne Cox: I live at No. 5 room in Miller's-court. I am a widow, and get my living on the streets or as best I can. I have known the deceased for about eight months as "Mary Jane." I las saw her alive on Thursday night at about midnight in Dorset-street. She was very much intoxicated. She was in the court in company with a short stout man, shabbily dressed. He had on a long dark coat, and carried a pot of ale in his hand. He wore a black billycock hat, had a blotchy face, and a full carrotty moustache. His chin was shaven. I saw them both go into the house, and Mary Jane banged the door. I said "Good night" to her, and she turned round to me and said "Good night. I am going to have a song." I went into my room, and as I did so I heard her singing, "A violet I plucked from my mother's grave when a boy." I remained a quarter of an hour in my room, and then went out and returned about one o'clock. The deceased was singing then. I came in to warm my hands, as it was raining heavily, and went out again. I returned for the second time about three, and then all was quiet. I laid on the bed in my clothes, but did not sleep. I heard nothing during the night. In the morning about a quarter past six I heard a man go out of the court, but I do not know who he was. I should think the age of the man I saw with the deceased was about five or six and thirty. He made no noise as he walked up the court, perhaps because his boots were so dilapidated.
By the Jury: - I should know the man again if I saw him. There was no noise during the night, and if there had been a cry of " Murder" I should certainly have heard it.

Another neighbour, Elizabeth Prater, deposed to hearing a suppressed cry of "Oh, murder!" about half-past three or a quarter to four on the Friday morning, but, this being no unusual exclamation in that region, she did not take particular notice. Caroline Maxwell, on the other hand, swore that she twice saw the deceased between eight and nine on the Friday morning, on the last occasion talking with a man. Sarah Lewis said she was dozing in a friend's house in Miller's-court, when, about four o'clock on the Friday morning, she heard a female loudly calling "Murder!" but as there was only one scream she took no notice. After other evidence, including that of the divisional surgeon, the jury returned a verdict of "Wilful murder against some person or persons unknown."

THE MAN WITH THE ASTRACHAN-TRIMMED COAT.

On Monday evening the police received an important piece of information. A man, apparently of the labouring class, with a military appearance, who knew the deceased, stated that on the morning of the 9th inst., he saw her in Commercial-street, Spitalfields (near where the murder was committed), in company with a man of respectable appearance. He was about 5ft. 6in. in height, about thirty-four or thirty-five years of age, with dark complexion and dark moustache turned up at the ends. He was wearing a long, dark coat, trimmed with astrachan, a white collar with black necktie, in which was affixed a horse-shoe pin. He wore a pair of dark gaiters with light buttons, over button boots, and displayed from his waistcoat a massive gold chain. His appearance contrasted so markedly with that of the woman that few people could have failed to remark them at that hour of the morning. The description is confirmed by a man named George Hutchinson, who knew Mary Kelly, and who saw her enter Miller's-court with this well-dressed man between two and three a.m. on Nov. 9. (this states that there were two men who saw "astrachan-man.")

100 POUND REWARD.

The Scotland-yard authorities have issued the following proclamation: -

"Murder. - Pardon. - Whereas, on November 8th or 9th, in Miller's-court, Dorset-street, Spitalfields, Mary Janet Kelly was murdered by some person or persons unknown, the Secretary of State will advise the grant of her Majesty's gracious pardon to any accomplice not being a person who contrived or actually committed the murder, who shall give such information and evidence as shall lead to the discovery and conviction of the person or persons who committed the murder. - (Signed) CHARLES WARREN, the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis. Metropolitan Police Office, 4, Whitehall-place, Nov. 10, 1888."

Source: The Penny Illustrated Paper and Illustrated Times, Saturday November 17, 1888; Page 310, Issue 1433

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Tue 6 Mar 2012 - 9:03

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Source: The Penny Illustrated Paper and Illustrated Times, Saturday November 24, 1888, Page 328, Issue 1434

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Tue 6 Mar 2012 - 9:30

POVERTY AND VICE IN EAST LONDON.

Our Artist's Illustration of poor Mary Kelly at the door of her ill-fated lodging in Miller's-court, Dorset-street, and of children-waifs hungering for a meal in an adjacent thoroughfare, will remind the public forcibly of the terrible conditions of life in the East-End and in every other squalid quarter of London. We have warrant for the hope that Lord Mayor Whitehead will do all in his power to mitigate the appalling sum total of wretchedness in the Metropolis, as his Lordship benevolently began his civic reign with a colossal feast to the poor. We know that many gentlewomen nobly labour to aid their erring sisters, and to reduce human suffering by the active exercise of open-handed charity. All honour to them for thus sacrificing their leisure in town as H.R.H. Princess Christian mercifully does in Windsor.

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BARONESS BURDETT-COUTTS continues to be first and foremost in doing good in London in every imaginable way. Could a tithe of the generous actions performed by this true Lady Bountiful be known, the love of the populace for Lady Burdett-Coutts would be immensely enhanced. As it is, many of her high-souled charities are given in secret. "To encourage the others," however, it may be mentioned that Lady Burdett-Coutts is a warm and munificent supporter of the Ragged School Union for feeding and clothing poor children, and that anyone wishing to join her Ladyship in helping forward this good work may send postal notes for that philanthropic purpose to the Secretary of the Ragged School Union, Exeter Hall, London. In the poverty-stricken districts of South London a large-hearted committee labours each winter to feed the hungry children of "The Mint"; and those who would take part in this charitable mission may with confidence send their subscriptions - the millionaire's cheque or the widow's mite - to the moving spirit of the Charity, Mrs. E.M. Burgwin, Head Mistress, Orange-street Board School, Southwark. Coming to

THE HALFPENNY DINNERS,

which proved so tempting to the group of East-End waifs our Artist came across outside the "Home of Industry," at 60, Commercial-street, Whitechapel, we earnestly hope that those of our readers who can spare from their store will do so, to assist the benevolent persons organising these cheap and sadly necessary feasts for the poorest of the poor in the East-End. The subjoined appeal may be responded to with full trust that the funds will be judiciously expended: -

Sir, - Will you kindly allow us to appeal for funds to supply dinners at a halfpenny to our children at this school? We have never begged before, having charged a penny, in order to be self-supporting; but now work is slack and families are large, and we must do it at a cheaper rate.
The Christ Church (Oxford) Mission will allow us the use of all the necessary apparatus, and willing workers are prepared to supply dinners to 100 or more children daily.
Our school consists of the very poorest dock labourers' children, to whom dry bread, dripping and bread, jam and bread, with the invariable "cup of tea," prove quite inadequate nourishment.
A large or small subscription will be most thankfully received by Hon. and Rev. T.G. Adderley, 216, East India Dock-road, E., or by any of the head teachers of our school.

- Yours, &c.,
DELIA SWAINE, Head Mistress,
Brunswick-road Board School, Poplar, Nov. 17

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Wed 7 Mar 2012 - 18:53

The linked dullness long drawn out of the Parnell Commission, the Commons' neglect of their obvious duty of rigorously examining Estimates in Parliament - these and other positions are eclipsed for the moment by the recent murder which has been added to the crimes attributed to the fiend called "Jack the Ripper." The squalid nature of the out-of-the-way Whitechapel nook where Mary Kelly was done to death in the early hours of Lord Mayor's Day is brought home to us by our Artist, who also depicts grimy Dorset-street and Miller's-court and is also enabled to show the entrance of the poor woman's wretched apartment. The character of the people who herd in this murder-laden quarter of town is indicated by our look at the Poor of East London.

Source: The Penny Illustrated Paper, Saturday November 17, 1888

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Tue 10 Apr 2012 - 12:11

DEAD MARY JANE.
That Murder Fiend Adds a Seventh Crime to His Record.

IN THE DEATH CHAMBER.
And Still the London Police Are Unequal to the Occasion.

PANIC IN WHITECHAPEL.
What New York Experts Have to Say About the New Horror.

[Copyright, 1888.]
A FIEND UNHUNG.

THE WHITECHAPEL MURDERER ADDS ANOTHER CHAPTER TO HIS DREADFUL RECORD.
[BY THE COMMERCIAL CABLE TO THE HERALD.]

The HERALD'S European edition publishes today the following from the HERALD'S London Bureau, No. 391 Strand, dated November 9, 1888:

The festivities in honor of the Prince of Wales' birthday and the installation of the new Lord Mayor were tragically interrupted today.
While the halls of Sandringham were filled with joyous echoes and the Lord Mayor was parading the streets of London, the police were gaping aghast around some wretched shambles, in which lay the mutilated body of another victim of the Whitechapel fiend.

WHERE IT HAPPENED.

I visited the scene of the crime at noon today.
It lies within a quarter of a mile of the places in which most of the preceding six murders were committed by the fiend, where Hanbury street and Prince's street run together at a point not unlike the corner of Seventh avenue and Broadway at Forty-third street.
The murder was committed in a stable yard, having much the same position relatively to Hanbury and Prince's street as the centre of Thirty-fifth street would have to Broadway and Seventh avenue.
All the recent so-called Whitechapel tragedies have occurred within gunshot distance of this spot.
Strong bodies of police patrolled the neighborhood, literally "locking the stable door" after the horse was stolen.
"Why were they not about last night and the night before and every night since the last murder?" was the common cry of the excited crowds, whom a cordon of constables were keeping back from the wretched little cul-de-sac in which had lived poor Mary Jane Kelly, alias Fisher, alias Ginger.

TARDY ZEAL.

Not even the reporters were allowed within the police line. It was determined this time to keep the clews from being effaced, tampered with or distorted. Besides, bloodhounds were to be employed, and scent must not be obliterated.
As on previous occasions, all kinds of conflicting and contradictory stories were afloat.

A GHASTLY SIGHT.

Dr. Gabe, of Mecklenburg square, a medical official, was fresh from the horrible sight in the squalid apartment immediately off the wretched court, in which the only furniture was an oil stove, two ricketty chairs and a tumble down.
At the head of this bedstead was a piece of looking glass such as one buys in Petticoat lane for half a penny.
The Doctor said that in his experience in dissecting rooms never had he seen such ghastliness.
The corpse lay, as he saw it, nearly naked on a blood stained woollen mattress. The victim's hair was tossed upward on a pillow and matted with gore, as if the murderer had first wiped his hands.
The nose and ears were sliced away. The throat was cut from left to right, so that the vertebrae alone prevented a headsmanlike severance.
Below the neck the trunk suggested a sheep's carcass in a slaughter house.
Ribs and backbone were exposed and the stomach, entrails, heart and liver had been cut out and carefully placed beside the mutilated trunk.
As in the previous cases, certain portions of the body were missing. The flesh on each side of a cut on the median line was carefully folded back.
An inch or two away, from the hips to the ankles, the flesh was shredded more or less, with apparent savageness of purpose.
"It must have been the work of a full half hour," said the Doctor.
The body was just beginning to stiffen when it was discovered.

THAT DREADFUL NIGHT.

At one in the morning "Mary Jane," as they called her, had been heard by a fellow lodger crooning a drunken song - perhaps to the murderer. From that hour till half-past ten this morning all is still a hideous blank.
Then a young man, who is a neighbor, knocked at the door. It was apparently locked. The murderer, sly to the last or with method in madness, had taken the key. But there was a side window with a pane broken in a quarrel she had had a week ago with a man with whom she had cohabited. She parted from him some time past, but this morning the man appeared.
He had little to tell but the common tale of a miserable woman's life.
The murderer might easily have left the house at any time between one and six o'clock this morning without attracting attention. The doctors who have examined the remains refuse to make any statement until the inquest is held.

BLOODHOUNDS FAIL.

Three bloodhounds belonging to private citizens were taken to the place where the body lies and placed on the scent of the murderer, but they were unable to keep it for any great distance, and all hopes of running the assassin down with their assistance will have to be abandoned.

PHOTOGRAPHERS AT WORK.

Before the post-mortem examination a photographer was set to work in the Court and house. The state of the atmosphere was unfortunately not favorable to good results. The photographer, however, succeeded in securing several negatives.
The post-mortem examination lasted two hours and was of the most thorough character. Every indication as to the manner in which the murderer conducted his awful work was carefully noted, as well as the position of every organ and the larger pieces of flesh.
The surgeons' report will be of an exhaustive character, but it will not be made public until they give their evidence at the Coroner's inquest.
At ten minutes to four o'clock a one horse carrier's cart with a tarpaulin covering was driven into Dorset street and halted opposite Miller's court, the victim's home. From the court was taken a long coffin, scratched with constant use, which was borne into the death chamber. There it remains.

AN UGLY RUSH.

The news that the body was to be removed caused a rush of people and a determined effort to break the police cordon. The crowd was of the very humblest class. Ragged caps were doffed, and slatternly looking women shed tears as the shell, covered with a ragged looking cloth, was placed in a van.
The remains were taken to Shoreditch Mortuary to remain there until viewed by the Coroner's jury. The inquest will open on Monday morning.
John McCarthy, the landlord of the place in which Mary Jane lived, gives this interview: -
"When I looked through the window the sight I saw was more ghastly even than I had prepared myself for. On the bed lay the body, while the table was covered with lumps of flesh. Soon Superintendent Arnold arrived, and instructions to burst the door open were given.
"I at once forced it with a pickaxe and we entered. The sight looked like the work of a devil. The poor woman had been completely disembowelled. Her entrails were cut out and placed on a table. It was these I had taken to be lumps of flesh.
"The woman's nose had been cut off, and her face was gashed and mutilated, so that she was quite beyond recognition. Both her breasts, too, had been cut clean away and placed by her side. Her liver and other organs were on the table.

HORROR STRUCK.

"I had heard a great deal about the Whitechapel murders, but I had never expected to see such a sight.
"The body was covered with blood and so was the bed. The whole scene is more than I can describe. I hope I may never see such a sight again."

SILENT WORK.

It is most extraordinary that nothing was heard by the neighbors, as there are people passing backward and forward at all hours of the night in the vicinity. But no one heard so much as a scream.
A woman tells me she heard the victim singing "Sweet Violets" at one o'clock this morning. So up to that time, at all events, she was alive and well.
So far as I can ascertain, no one saw her take a man into the house with her last night.
Dr. Forbes Winslow says the murder is the work of the same homicidal lunatic who committed the other crimes in Whitechapel. Harrowing details point to this conclusion. The clearly mad way in which the murder was committed and the strange state in which the body was left is not consistent with sanity. The theory I stated some time ago has come true to the letter. This theory suggested that the murderer was in a lucid interval, and would recommence directly this state passed away.
It appears the authorities were forgetting this theory, and that some one had been persuading them that, from the fact so long an interval had elapsed between the murders, therefore he could not be a homicidal maniac.
"I desire, being personally and originally responsible for this theory, to flatly deny this and state more emphatically than ever that the murderer is one and the same person and a lunatic suffering from homicidal monomania, who during his lucid intervals is calm and forgetful of what he has been doing in madness.
"I think that unless those in authority take proper steps as advised and drop the red tapism surrounding the government offices such crimes will continue to be so permitted in our metropolis to the terror of London. It appears to me it is the burning question of the hour."

NO CLEW.

I may add that no possible clew exists. Arrests of innocent persons are being made, as before, and the oddest and most improbable stories are being started by reporters in sensational papers. The police are said to be reticent.
The man with whom the victim has been recently living could not really recognize her, but, of course, the surroundings, clothes, &c., identify her.
She leaves a natural son, aged ten, who was absent with a neighbor last night and knows nothing of the occurrence.

IN THE GLOOM.

I visited the place again after dark tonight. The streets had become empty and silent.
I then visited the West End, filled with illuminations in honor of the Prince's birthday.
Pall Mall, St. James', Piccadilly, were bright with gas and filled with merriment. A strange contrast!
I met an American tourist homeward bound tonight.
"After this," said he, "I shall never grumble at any error of our New York police. It may not be perfect, but in acumen and for the security of our life its Mulberry street heads deserve our respect."

WHAT THE PRESS SAYS.

LONDON, Nov. 10, 1888. - All the morning papers contain long accounts of the new tragedy, each much contradicting the other. They also have long editorials.
The Standard is friendly to the police, and observes: -

"There is nothing wonderful in the fact that one particular individual escape, if he be clever enough to observe every necessary precaution, or that the police should be baffled in their inquiries where they have no basis to start from and no link whatever to connect any of the murdered women with any known character in the district."

The Times draws this moral: -

"But there is more profitable occupation than vague and windy abuse of people who cannot create evidence. Deep searching of hearts, humiliation of spirit and sorrowful reflection over the causes which make these unspeakable atrocities possible would be more seemly than cheap declamation about the shortcomings of the police."

No newspaper has any suggestions or surmises to offer, but there is a unanimous agreement that the seven murders are by one hand and that Dr. Forbes Winslow gives the key to the mystery.

IN THE COMMONS.
ASKING A QUESTION ABOUT THE WHITECHAPEL TRAGEDY.

LONDON, Nov. 9, 1888. - In the House of Commons today Mr. Conybeare asked whether if it was true that another woman had been murdered in London. General Warren, the Chief of the Metropolitan Police, ought to be superseded by an officer accustomed to investigate crime.
The question was greeted by cries of "Oh, oh!" The Speaker called "Order, order!" and said that notice must be given of the question in the usual way.
Mr. Conybeare replied, "I have given private notice."
The Speaker - The notice must be made in writing.
Mr. Cunninghame-Graham then asked whether General Warren had already resigned, to which Mr. Smith, the government leader, replied no.

WHAT MURRAY AND BYRNES SAY.
IF THE CRIMES WERE COMMITTED HERE THE MURDERER WOULD BE TRACED.

The announcement that a ninth victim was disposed of without detection by the Whitechapel fiend in London was widely discussed in police circles yesterday. Superintendent Murray said he was surprised at the inability of the London police to trace the fiend. Such a continuous string of murders could not possibly occur in any city in this country he said.
"Have you any opinion to venture?" I asked.
"I do not care to criticise the action of the London authorities," he answered, "because I am not aware of what measures they have adopted to track this murderer or fiend as he is justly termed. It would seem to me, however, that some means could be resorted to by which his movements would be traced.

Inspector Byrnes said in response to my inquiry: -

"One should look for a motive, of course, and finding none, should study the peculiarity of the crime and the methods adopted by the operator. It would seem no sane man could deliberately butcher women, no matter how depraved he may be, in such a brutal manner. Knowing this much, then we have to look in a quarter where such a character could hide. To the expert detective with true magnetism and cleverness such a hiding place must suggest itself. Watch this place or a hundred such places if it took a thousand policemen in citizens' clothes.
"But as this question is across the water, far removed from us, it is not for me to worry about," continued the Inspector. "All I will say, however, is that such a continuous wholesale slaughter could never take place in this city without having the fiend delivered up to justice."
"What do you think of the bloodhound chase?" I asked.
"I should hardly think it would avail in a city," he replied. "The tracks of the man are evidently crossed and recrossed a hundred times before the animals are set to work, and this would obliterate all traces of the fugitive.
"But why should not the police watch these depraved characters who are selected as victims?" added the Inspector. "It would not be a difficult task, I should think, and it would certainly lead to something. Of course, after a murder vigilance is the watchword, but evidently the watch is relaxed after the excitement is over. Well, I'm glad the fellow is not in this city, but if he were I think I'd trace him to his lair if it kept me and my men without sleep for weeks."

[COPYRIGHT, 1888.]

Source: New York Herald, Saturday November 10, 1888, Page 5

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