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Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

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Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Fri 29 Oct 2010 - 9:06

THE WHITECHAPEL MURDER.

INQUEST AND VERDICT.

Dr. Macdonald, coroner for North-east Middlesex, held an inquiry at Shoreditch town hall, on Monday, into the cause of death of Mary Jeannette Kelly. Some little difficulty arose at the outset, one of the jurymen objecting to be summoned, as, he contended, the death did not take place in Shoreditch, but in the adjoining parish of Whitechapel. The coroner said he was quite aware what jurisdiction he had. The juror had no business to object on the ground mentioned, and if the objection was persisted in he should know how to act. The jurisdiction was where the body lay. The jury having been sworn, then proceeded to the mortuary at the rear of Shoreditch church to view the body, afterwards visiting the scene of the crime.
Joseph Barnett was the first witness called, and said he was a labourer working by the riverside, and up to Saturday last he lived at 24, New-street, Bishopsgate, having been staying at 21, Portpool-lane since then. He had lived with the deceased, Marie Jeannette Kelly, for a year and eight months, and had seen the body in the mortuary, which he identified. He was quite positive the body was that of the woman he lived with. Kelly was her maiden name. He had lived with her at 13 room in Miller's-court about eight months, and ceased to live with her on October 30, because she insisted on taking in a woman of immoral character. It was not because he was out of work that he ceased to live with her. He last saw her alive about 7:30 on Thursday evening, when they were on friendly terms. She was quite sober at that time and did not have anything to drink with witness. Deceased occasionally got drunk, but generally speaking she was sober when she lived with him. She had told him several times that she was born in Limerick, but removed to Wales when quite young. Witness could not say whether it was at Carnarvon or Carmarthen that she lived, but her father was employed at some ironworks. She also told witness that she had a sister who resided with her aunt and followed a respectable calling. She had six brothers and sisters, one of the former being in the army. She told him she had married a collier named Davis in Wales when she was 16 years of age, and lived with him until he was killed in an explosion a year or two afterwards. After her husband's death she went to Cardiff with a cousin and came to London about four years ago. She lived at a gay house in the West-end for a short time, and then went to France with a gentleman, but did not like it and soon returned to London, living in Ratcliff-highway, near the gasworks, with a man named Morganstone. She afterwards lived with a mason named Joseph Fleming, somewhere in Bethnal-green. Deceased told witness all her history while she lived with him. Witness picked her up in Spitalfields on a Friday night, and made an appointment to meet her the next day, when they agreed to live together, and they had done so ever since. He did not think deceased feared any one in particular, but she used to ask witness to read to her about the murders. She occasionally quarrelled with witness, but not often, and seldom with anybody else.
Thomas Bowyer said he resided at 37, Dorset-street, and acted as servant to Mr. McCarthy, the owner of a chandler's shop at 27, Dorset-street. About 10:45 on Friday morning he was directed by Mr. McCarthy to go to deceased's room for the rent. Witness knew the deceased only as Mary Jane. He knocked at the door, but did not receive an answer. He knocked again, but still no answer was returned, and he then went round the corner where there was a broken pane of glass in the window, and, looking through, saw pieces of flesh. He immediately went and fetched John McCarthy.
John McCarthy said he was a grocer and lodging-house keeper at 27, Dorset-street. On Friday morning about half-past 10 he sent the last witness to No. 13 room in Miller's-court to call for the rent. He returned in about five minutes and told witness that as he could not get an answer to his knock he looked through the window and saw a lot of blood. Witness went to the room and looked through the window and saw the body. When he recovered from the shock the sight gave him he went for the police. He knew the deceased, and, having seen the body, he had no doubt about her identity. At the police-station he saw Inspector Beck, who went back to the house with him. Deceased had lived in that room about 10 months with the man Joe. He did not know whether they were married or not. A short time ago they had row and the windows were broken. Deceased was supposed to pay 4s. 6d. per week for the room, but she was 1l. 9s. in arrear. Everything in the room, including the bed clothing, belonged to witness. He had often seen the deceased the worse for drink, and when she was in liquor she was very noisy; otherwise she was a very quiet woman.
Mary Ann Cox said she resided at the last house at the top of Miller's-court. She was a widow and got her living on the streets. She last saw deceased alive about a quarter to 12 on Thursday night. Deceased was very much intoxicated at that time and was with a short, stout man, shabbily dressed, with a round billycock hat on. He had a can of beer in his hand. He had a blotchy face and a heavy carroty moustache. Witness followed them into the court and said good night to the deceased, who replied, "Good night, I am going to sing." The door was shut and witness heard the deceased singing, "Only a violet I plucked from mother's grave." Witness went to her room and remained there about a quarter of an hour, and then went out. Deceased was still singing at that time. It was raining, and witness returned home at 3:10 a.m., and the light in the deceased's room was then out and there was no noise. Witness could not sleep, and heard a man go out of the court about a quarter past six. It might have been a policeman for all witness knew. The man she saw with the deceased was short and stout. All his clothes were dark and he appeared to be between 35 and 36 years of age. She would know the man again if she saw him.
Elizabeth Prater, a married woman, living apart from her husband, said she occupied No. 20 room, Miller's-court, her room being just over that occupied by the deceased. If deceased moved about in her room much witness could hear her. Witness lay down on her bed on Thursday night or Friday morning about 1:30 with her clothes on, and fell asleep directly. She was disturbed during the night by a kitten in the room. That would be about half-past three or four o'clock. She then distinctly heard in a low tone, and in a woman's voice, a cry of "Oh! murder." The sound appeared to proceed from the court and near where witness was. She did not take much notice of it, however, as they were continually hearing cries of murder in the court. She did not hear it a second time, neither did she hear a sound of falling, and she dropped off to sleep again and did not wake until five o'clock. She then got up and went to the Five Bells public-house and had some rum. She did not see any strangers in the public-house. She was quite sure there was no singing in deceased's room after 1:30 that morning, or she would have heard it.
Caroline Maxwell, of 14, Dorset-street, wife of Henry Maxwell, a lodging-house deputy, said she had known the deceased about four months, and she also knew Joe Barnett. The deceased was a young woman who did not associate much with strangers, and witness had only spoken to her twice. On Friday morning between 8 and 8:30 she saw the deceased at the corner of Miller's-court. She was quite sure it was the deceased, and was certain about the time, because it was the time her husband left off work. It being an unusual thing to see the deceased about so early, witness spoke to her and asked her to have a drink. Deceased refused, saying she was very ill and had just had a half-pint of ale, which she brought up again. Witness left her saying she could pity her feeling. On returning half-an-hour later witness saw the deceased standing outside the Britannia public-house talking to a man. That would be between eight and nine o'clock on Friday morning. She could not give any description of the man deceased was with because they were some distance off. She did not pass them, as she came from the other end of the court. She was quite positive it was the deceased, but could not describe the man. He was not a tall man. Deceased had on a dark skirt, velvet bodice, and maroon shawl.
Sarah Lewis, a laundress, of 24 Great Pearl-street, Spitalfields, said she went to the house of Mrs. Keyler, in Miller's-court, on Friday morning about 2:30, and saw a man standing at the lodging-house door by himself. He was stout, but not very tall, and had on a wideawake hat. Witness did not take any notice of his clothes. She did not hear any noise as she went down the court, but about 3:30, when she was in Mrs. Keyler's house, she heard a woman cry "Murder." As it was not repeated, she did not take any further notice of it. On Wednesday evening, as she was going along Bethnal-green-road with another woman, they were accosted by a man who was carrying a black bag, and who asked one of them to follow him into a court. They became alarmed and refused to do so. He was not a tall man. He had a black moustache, and was very pale. He had on a round hat, a brown overcoat, a black undercoat, and "pepper and salt" trousers. Witness could not say where he went to, but on Friday morning about 2:30 she saw him again, speaking to a woman in Commercial-street, but he was dressed a little differently.
The coroner said he proposed at that stage to take, briefly, the evidence of the doctor. They could not go into all the particulars at that stage.
Dr. George Bagster Phillips said: I reside at 2, Spital-square, and am divisional surgeon to the H division of police. I was called by the police on Friday morning about 11 o'clock and proceeded to Miller's-court, which I entered at 11:15. I went to the room door leading out of the passage running at the side of 26, Dorset-street. There were two windows to the room. I produce a photograph which will enable you to see exactly the position. Two panes in the window nearest to the passage were broken, and finding the door locked I looked through the lower of the broken panes and satisfied myself that the mutilated corpse lying on the bed was not in need of any immediate attention from me. I also came to the conclusion that there was nobody else upon the bed or within view to whom I could render any professional assistance. Having ascertained that probably it was advisable that no entrance should be made into the room at that time, I remained until 1:30, when the door was broken open, by Mr. McCarthy, I believe. I know he was waiting with a pickaxe to break open the door, and I believe he did it. The direction to break open the door was given by Superintendent Arnold. I prevented its being opened before. I may mention that when I arrived in the yard the premises were in charge of Inspector Beck. On the door being forced open it knocked against the table. The table I found close to the left-hand side of the bedstead, and the bedstead was close up against the wooden partition. The mutilated remains of a female were lying two-thirds over towards the edge of the bedstead nearest to the door. She had only her chemise on, or some under linen garment. i am sure the body had been removed subsequent to the injury which caused her death from that side of the bedstead which was nearest to the wooden partition, because of the large quantity of blood under the bedstead and the saturated condition of the palliasse and the sheet at the corner nearest the partition. The blood was produced by the severance of the carotid artery, which was the immediate cause of death. This injury was inflicted while deceased was lying at the right side of the bedstead.
After a short adjournment, Julia Van Teurney, a laundress, of No. 1 room, Miller's-court, was called, and said she knew the deceased and Joseph Barnett. They appeared to live together very quietly, and Joe would not allow the deceased to go on the streets. She occasionally got too much to drink. She told witness that she had another man, named Joe also, of whom she appeared to be very fond. Witness believed this second Joe was a costermonger. She last saw the deceased alive about 10 o'clock on Thursday morning. Witness slept in the court that night, retiring to bed about eight o'clock. She could not sleep, but did not hear any noise in the court during the night. She did not hear the deceased singing.
Maria Harvey, of 3, New-court, Dorset-street, said she knew the deceased, Mary Jane Kelly. Witness slept with the deceased on Monday and Tuesday nights. They were together on Thursday afternoon, and witness was in the deceased's room when Joe Barnett called. Witness left the house on Thursday evening, leaving several articles in the deceased's care, including sheets, an overcoat, and a bonnet. She had not seen any of the articles except the overcoat since. The deceased and witness were great friends, but the deceased never said anything to witness about being afraid of a man.
Inspector Walter Beck, H division, said on Friday morning he was called to the house and ascertained what had occurred. He did not give orders to force the door, but sent for the doctor, and gave orders that no one should be allowed to leave the court. He did not know whether the deceased was known to the police.
Frederick G. Abberline, detective-inspector, Scotland-yard, having charge of this case, said he arrived at Miller's-court about 11:30 on Friday. He did not break open the door, as Inspector Beck told him that the bloodhounds had been sent for and were on the way, and Dr. Phillips said it would be better not to break open the door until the dogs arrived. At 1:30 Superintendent Arnold arrived, and said the order for the dogs had been countermanded, and he gave orders to force the door. Witness had seen the condition of the room through the window. He examined the room after the door had been forced. From the appearance of the grate it was evident a large fire had been kept up. The ashes had since been examined, and it was evident that portions of a woman's clothing had been burnt. It was his opinion that the clothes had been burnt to enable the murderer to see what he was about. There were portions of a woman's skirt and the rim of a hat in the grate. An impression had got abroad that the murderer had taken the key of the room away, but that was not so, as Barnett had stated that the key had been lost some time ago, and when they desired to get into the room they pushed back the bolt through the broken window.
The coroner said that was all the evidence he proposed to take that day. He did not know whether the jury considered they had had enough evidence to enable them to return a verdict. All they had to do was to ascertain the cause of death, leaving the other matters in the hands of the police.
The foreman said the jury considered they had heard enough to guide them to a decision, and they desired to return a verdict of "Wilful murder against some person or persons unknown."

Source: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, November 18, 1888, Page 2


Last edited by Karen on Fri 16 Aug 2013 - 9:54; edited 2 times in total

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Excellent Scholar And Artist

Post by Karen on Thu 11 Nov 2010 - 18:10

THIS DAY'S NEWS.
THE WHITECHAPEL MURDER.

"JACK THE RIPPER'S" EPISTLES.
THREATENING MRS. McCARTHY

"Jack the Ripper's" epistles are again in circulation. Mrs. McCarthy - the wife of the landlord of the house - has been amongst the last recipients of a communication from the mysterious individual whom the public already connect with the authorship of these crimes. In this letter the writer declares that he means "to have another mother and daughter." The writing of the letter resembles that of the letter previously published by the police.
The full text of the letter was as follows: - "Don't alarm yourself. I am going to do another, but this time it will be a mother and daughter."
Another communication from "Jack the Ripper" is of rather a curious character. It was found in Palatine-road, Stoke Newington, and was written in ink on a piece of wood cut in the shape of a cross. It was as follows: - "This is a facsimile knife with which I committed the murder. - JACK THE RIPPER." On the other side was written, "I will visit Stoke Newington next Friday. - JACK THE RIPPER." A recent letter - bearing the same signature - which the Commercial-street police received, was written on ordinary notepaper. It ran: - "Dear Boss, - I am coming to do another on Sunday night in the City-road. Then I will let you know when I will give myself up. It will be Tuesday, about twelve o'clock, at the Kingsland-road Police-station. Goodbye, till Tuesday. - JACK THE RIPPER."

THE ATTACKS ON WOMEN.

The police are still receiving communications from women who complain of having been terrorised by a man answering the description of the man suspected of committing the atrocities. In one case it is averred that while a woman was passing along the footpath by Grove-road and Coburg-road Railway Station, the man seized hold of her round the neck, and only made off when it was seen that her screams had attracted attention. This, however, is only one of the numerous statements received by the police. Many of these statements, however, can only have their foundation in fevered imaginations.

VICTIM'S LIFE IN THE WEST-END.
HER VISITS TO PARIS.

GOOD SCHOLAR AND AN ARTIST.

A representative of the Press Association, who last night made inquiries in Ratcliff-highway and other quarters of the East-end, equally notorious for the advantages they offer to some of the most daring criminals in London, and in which the murdered woman, Mary Janet Kelly, appears to have spent a considerable portion of her life while in the Metropolis - states that, notwithstanding the statements made by several persons as to the deceased being a native of one of the Irish counties, there is every reason to believe that she is Welsh, and that her parents or relatives reside in Cardiff. As far as can be ascertained from statements made by persons with whom she lodged, and companions in whose company she usually spent the evenings when residing in this locality, there is little doubt that she came to London from Cardiff some five or six years ago, leaving in that town those friends whom she has afterwards described as being "well-to-do people."

EXCELLENT SCHOLAR AND ARTIST.

The unfortunate victim is stated to have been an excellent scholar and an artist of no mean degree. It would appear that on her arrival in London she made the acquaintance of a French woman residing in the neighbourhood of Knightsbridge, who, she informed her friends, led her to pursue the degraded life which has now culminated in her untimely end. She made no secret of the fact that while she was with this woman she drove about in a carriage and made several journeys to the French capital, and in fact led a life which is described as that "of a lady."

DRIFTING TO THE EAST-END.

By some means, however, at present not exactly clear, she suddenly drifted into the East-end. Here fortune failed her, and a career which stands out in bold and sad contrast to her earlier experience was commenced. Her experience of the East-end appears to have begun with a woman who resided in one of the thoroughfares off Ratcliff-highway, now known as St. George's-street. This person appears to have received Kelly direct from her West-end home, for she had not been very long with her when, it is stated, that both women went to the French "lady's" residence, and demanded the box, which contained numerous dresses of a costly description. Kelly at last indulged in intoxicants, it is stated, to an extent which made her an unwelcome friend. From St. George's-street she went to lodge with Mrs. Carthy at Breezer's-hill, Pennington-street. This place she left about eighteen months or two years ago, and from that time seems to have left Ratcliff altogether, and taken up her quarters in Dorset-street. No one appears to have known anything definitely about her after she arrived at Commercial-street. There can, however, now be little doubt as to her identity. Those who knew her describe her as being a woman about 25 years of age, 5ft. 7in. in height, rather stout, with blue eyes, fair complexion, and a very good head of hair. She had two false teeth in the upper jaw. She was known to be leading a gay life in the neighbourhood of Aldgate. Mrs. Carthy states that the deceased when she left her place went to live with a man who was apparently in the building trade, and who she (Mrs. Carthy) believed would have married her. She, however, was awakened by Kelly some short time ago at two o'clock in the morning, when she was with a strange man, and asked for a bed for the night. On that occasion Mrs. Carthy asked the deceased if she was not still living with the man who took her from the neighbourhood. She replied in the negative, and explained her position. From this time she was never seen in the neighbourhood.

MYSTERIOUS DISCOVERY AT WOOLWICH.

The body of a child, with head, arms, and legs cut off, was found today locked in a room at 3, Ogleby-street, Woolwich.

THIS DAY'S POLICE.
"JACK-THE-RIPPER" MANIA.

Charles Thomas, a man of 51 years of age, was in Crowndale-road, St. Pancras, yesterday morning. He was followed by a large crowd, and shouting "I'm Jack the Ripper." Finding that Thomas was intoxicated, a constable took him to the station, and charged him with drunkenness, at the Clerkenwell Police-court today. In defence the prisoner said he had no home, and wanted to be locked up. Mr. Bros (to the prisoner): I shall send you to prison for fourteen days, with hard labour, and shall do the same to any other person who is brought before me for calling out "I'm Jack the Ripper."

A WHITECHAPEL STABBING CASE.

Patrick Berry was unable to appear at the Thames Police-court today. William Corbin, who lives at 5, Mountford-street, Whitechapel, explained why. About ten minutes to eleven on Saturday, just after he left his house, he saw Robert Makin quarrelling with three other men. In the midst of the quarrel he struck Berry on the side of the head. Blood at once spurted out, and poured profusely to the pavement. Makin immediately ran away, and endeavoured to get on a tramcar. In this he was prevented. On hearing this story the Magistrate decided to remand Makin. The charge against him was of "cutting and wounding."

AMATEUR DETECTIVES AT WORK.

William Avenell, a chimney-sweep, of Adam and Eve-court, and Frederick William Moore, a carver and gilder, of Carlisle-street, were charged at the Marlborough-street Police-court today, with being disorderly and assaulting Henry Edward Leeke, an oil and colourman, in Berner-street. - The prosecutor - a little man - deposed that about five o'clock on Saturday afternoon he went into a public-house in Berner-street, and there was accosted by several men. The two prisoners followed him out, accused him of being "Jack the Ripper," told him they were detectives in private clothes, and should arrest him. They dragged him through several streets into Newman-street, treating him in a most brutal manner. - Ultimately a friend of the prosecutor interfered, and the prisoners were arrested. - Mr. Hannay remanded the men for a week, to give the prosecutor an opportunity of commencing a civil action, and to enable the police to charge Avenell with the offence of pretending to be a detective.

Source: The Echo, Monday November 12, 1888, Page 4

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Kelly's Welsh Antecedents

Post by Karen on Wed 24 Nov 2010 - 20:20

THIS DAY'S NEWS.
EAST-END ATROCITIES.

EXCITING SCENES LAST NIGHT.
AN AMATEUR DETECTIVE'S ADVENTURE.

ATTEMPT TO LYNCH HIM
THE HOUR OF THE CRIME.
STRANGE AFFAIR ON FISH-STREET-HILL.

Of course, interest in the terrible crimes of the East-end supersedes all other matters - at least in the district of the horrors. There is but one hope affecting the whole community - that the murderer may be brought to speedy justice. Should he be captured, and should he by any accident fall into the hands of the people, his fate will be certain and inevitable. The consternation and fear which at first seemed to almost paralyse the energy of the district, have given place to a revengeful determination.

THE SWEETHEART'S ADVENTURE.

The demeanour of the populace was strikingly evidenced last night on two separate occasions. Wentworth-street, Commercial-street, is a thoroughfare close to Dorset-street. At about a quarter-past nine loud cries of "Murder!" and "Police!" were heard proceeding from George-yard-buildings. Police-sergeant Irving and Police-constable 22 H R. were quickly on the spot, and at once rushed into the buildings, which are a large set of model dwellings. In the meantime the street rapidly filled with persons from the adjoining houses, while some of those who lived in the top storey of the buildings clambered on to the roof in order to intercept any person who might attempt to make his escape by that means. After a little inquiry, however, by the officers, the truth came out. It seems that a Mrs. Humphries, who is nearly blind, lives with her daughter on the second floor of the buildings, and about the time mentioned went to an outhouse for the purpose of emptying some slops. As she went in, a young man, who is courting her daughter, and was on his way to visit her, dipped out of the place past her. Mrs. Humphries at once asked who it was. The young man, who, it is said, stutters very badly, made some unintelligible answer, and the old lady, who, like her neighbours, was taunted with the terror of "Jack the Ripper," at once gave the alarm, which was promptly responded to. The mistake, however, was soon explained, and quiet restored in the vicinity.

A DOCTOR'S NARROW ESCAPE.

The evil fate which may befall those who interest themselves too deeply in the police business of the matter was strikingly exemplified at a late hour of the night in the same neighbourhood. In this case the hero of the exploit is a gentleman, who was at first stated to be a doctor, who had taken on himself to discover the perpetrator of the crime through his own exertions. To use the words of a reporter describing the scene: -

"About ten o'clock last night the idle and inquisitive crowd, who since the ghastly discovery was made have visited Dorset-street and its immediate neighbourhood, had their attention attracted to the extraordinary behaviour of a man who for some short time before had been officiously making inquiries, and generally conducting himself in an unusual manner. Over a pair of good trousers he wore a jersey in place of a coat, and his face was most palpably artificially blacked. His manner led to considerable remark, and at last a cry was raised that he was "Jack the Ripper." In the prevailing state of the public mind in the district this was quite enough to inflame the anger of those in the street, and he was at once roughly seized by two young men - one a discharged soldier. Fortunately for him, there was a large number of policemen about, both in uniform and plain clothes, by whom he was at once surrounded on the first alarm being given. He at first resisted capture, but, happily for himself, soon realised his position, and consented to go quietly to Leman-street Police-station, Meanwhile, the officers who had him in charge had the greatest difficulty in saving their prisoner from the fury of the mob, who amid the wildest excitement made the most desperate endeavours to lynch him. Sticks were raised in a threatening manner, and the man for awhile was in great danger. As it was, he was very roughly handled and considerably bruised by the time he reached the police-station, where he gave his name and address, which are withheld by the police authorities. He stated that he was a medical man, and had disguised himself in the absurd manner above described in order to endeavour by what he thought were detective means to discover and apprehend the perpetrator of the Whitechapel horrors. He also gave such particulars of himself as enabled the police to quickly substantiate their accuracy, and to discharge him after a short detention in the cells."

THE ARRESTS - PURSUING SUSPECTS.

These are only two of the adventures which took place in the neighbourhood. Several arrests were made during yesterday and last night, to these but little importance is attached. In one case the prisoner was apprehended in Dorset-street. It took place at about three o'clock yesterday morning. Two young men had their attention drawn to two loiterers. The two men separated, and one of them was followed by the two youths into Houndsditch. They carefully observed his appearance, which was that of a foreigner. He was about 5ft. 8in. in height, had a long pointed moustache, was dressed in a long black overcoat, and wore also a cloth deer-stalker hat. When near Bishopsgate-street the young men spoke to a policeman, who at once stopped the stranger and took him to Bishopsgate-street Police-station. Here he was searched, and it was then found that he was carrying a sort of pocket medical chest, containing several small bottles of chloroform. In rather imperfect English he explained that he lived in Pimlico, where he was well known. After this preliminary examination he was taken to Commercial-street Police-station, in which district the murder was committed. He was detained on suspicion, but subsequently was taken to Marlborough-street for the purpose of facilitation his identification.
Another man was also detained during the day at Commercial-street Station on account of his suspicious movements. A man named Peter Maguire says that about eleven o'clock on Saturday night he was drinking at the public-house kept by Mrs. Fiddymont, in Brushfield-street, which is known as the "Clean House," when he noticed a man talking very earnestly to a young woman. He asked her to accompany him up a neighbouring court, but she refused, and afterwards left the bar. Maguire followed the man, who, noticing this, commenced running. He ran into Spitalfields Market, Maguire following all the while. The man then stopped, went up a court, and took off a pair of gloves he was wearing and put on another pair. By a roundabout route he proceeded into Shoreditch and got into a bus, which Maguire still followed. A policeman was asked by Maguire to stop this bus, but it is said he refused, and Maguire continued his pursuit until he met another constable, who at once stopped the vehicle. The man was inside, huddled up in a corner. Maguire explained his suspicions, and the man was taken to Commercial-street Station, where he was detained pending inquiries. These are only two evidences - and there are many others - that in the present state of public excitement in the Whitechapel district the safety - or at any rate the liberty - of no man who acts in the least degree incautiously is safe.

A STRANGE PERSONAGE ON FISH-STREET-HILL.

Perhaps on the most singular episodes in connection with the arrests was that which resulted in the arrest and detention of a strange man at Bishopsgate-street Police-station. Some men were drinking at a beer-house in Fish-street-hill. One of them began conversing about the Whitechapel murder, and a man named Brown, living at 9, Dorset-street, thought he detected a blood mark on the coat of the stranger. On the latter's attention being called to it he said the mark was merely paint, but Brown took out a pocket-knife, and, rubbing the dried stain with the blade, pronounced it to be blood. The coat being loose, similar stains were seen on the man's shirt, and he then admitted that they were blood stains. Leaving the house at once, Brown followed, and when the suspicious stranger had got opposite to Bishopsgate Police-station Brown gave him into the custody of an officer who was on duty there. The prisoner gave the name of George Compton. On being brought before the inspector on duty he excitedly protested against being arrested in the public street, alleging that in the present state of public feeling he might have been lynched. The man had been arrested at Shadwell on Saturday by a police-constable, who considered his behaviour suspicous, but he had been discharged, and had come on to the City. It transpired that before he left the Fish-street-hill beerhouse he had, so Brown alleged, made contradictory statements respecting his place of residence, and the locality in which he worked. Compton does not bear any personal resemblance to the published description of the man who is supposed to be the murderer.

LATEST DETAILS.
ARREST THIS MORNING IN DORSET-STREET.

Who Mary Janet Kelly's murderer is is still an unsolved mystery. The man arrested last night, and taken to the Commercial-street Police-station was in too exuberant a condition at the time of his capture to give any intelligible account of himself. Afterwards his statement was fully inquired into, and at half-past eight o'clock this morning he took his departure, unobserved and somewhat crest-fallen. Neither at Leman-street nor at the City police-stations was there any person detained at nine o'clock this morning. However, the police at the Commercial-street Station had a man in custody. He was arrested at three o'clock in the morning, in Dorset-street, at the scene of the murder. The man, who does not answer the description of the supposed murderer, was acting in a manner that was deemed suspicious, and on his refusing to satisfy the officers as to his recent movements he was conveyed to the station.

THE OFFER OF PARDON.

It is asserted that the Home Secretary's offer of a pardon to any accomplice was mainly at the instigation of Dr. G.B. Phillips, the Divisional Surgeon of the H Division, who pointed out to the authorities at the Home Office the desirability of such a step being taken. By "accomplice" is meant - the police take care to explain - any person who may know of the murderer's design, but who yet is afraid of surrendering him to justice from fear of implicating himself as an accessory before or after the commission of the crimes. Inspectors Abberline, Reid, and Beck are aided in their efforts to secure the miscreant by a large staff of detectives from Scotland-yard, whose exertions, it is thought, would be materially aided if those having information as to men absent from their homes in the neighbourhood during last Thursday night would communicate it to the police.

THE DOCTOR'S JOKE.

The doctor - whose misadventure is now the subject of so much amusing comment - when at the station gave the name of Holt, with an address at Willesden. He stated that he was connected with St. George's Hospital. He told an officer that he had spent several nights in the East-end, in various disguises as an amateur detective, but never contemplated or estimated the risk he was running. He treated the manner as a huge joke, but complained of the results of the pinning of his arms - which was accomplished before his arrest, and it stated to have been the work of the well-known pugilist Bendoff, who assisted to take the man to the station.

THE BLOODHOUNDS.

The non-appearance of the bloodhounds is still a subject of much comment locally. The Press Association says: -

"It is stated that an officer was waiting at Leman-street Police-station for six or seven hours on Friday for the hounds which had been telegraphed for. There are reasons to believe that Sir Charles Warren was at this time out of town, and in his absence no one knew where the animals were, or how they could be obtained. It is understood that the Government have not yet decided to bear the cost of employing the hounds, and that, therefore, the expense would have to be borne by some private individual."

KELLY'S WELSH ANTECEDENTS.

The statements of the man Barnett connecting the murdered woman Kelly with South Wales have had the effect of creating considerable additional excitement in that part of the country. Up to the present, however, the investigations by local Press representatives have not resulted in the discovery of Kelly's parents or other relatives. It appears from inquiries made at Carmarthen and Swansea, that after leaving the former place for the latter, Kelly, who was then only 17 years of age, entered the service of a Mrs. Rees, who stands committed to the next Assizes on a charge of procuring abortion, and who is the daughter of a medical man formerly resident at Carmarthen. From Swansea Kelly, so it is said, went to Cardiff, but no trace of her in that town can be discovered.

Source: The Echo, Monday November 12, 1888, Page 3

To be continued on next post............

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Kelly Inquest

Post by Karen on Thu 25 Nov 2010 - 1:36

THE INQUEST.
EXCITEMENT IN THE NEIGHBOURHOOD.

CORONER AND THE JURYMEN.
THE VERDICT.

At no inquest held in Whitechapel upon any of the victims of the East-end murderer has there been so much public interest shown, for from fully an hour before the announced time of holding the inquiry little knots of spectators, many unconnected with the case, gathered in front of the Shoreditch Town-hall, where the proceedings were opened by Dr. Macdonald, touching the death of Mary Janet Kelly. Inspector Abberline arrived at ten minutes after ten o'clock, accompanied by four witnesses. The deceased lay in a shell at the mortuary of Shoreditch Parish Church - but a minute's walk from the Coroner's Court. Though the spectacle was sufficiently hideous, the poor creature's remains had been placed together so scientifically and with such care that the sight was far less repulsive than was the case when the discovery so shocked the feelings of those who first entered the small room at 26, Dorset-street.
Nothing of any importance was discovered in the ashes at the deceased's house. A small portion only of the remains is missing, while it is noticeable as a special incident in the barbarous murder that the organ hitherto taken away at the mutilations was found in the room, although it had been cut out of the body. Dr. Macdonald, with his deputy, Mr. Hodgkinson, arrived a few minutes before eleven, but the inquiry was not opened until some little time after, when the Court was mainly occupied by the Jury and newspaper representatives.

THE CORONERS' DISPUTE - JURORS' OPINION.

Only a few of the public could be admitted, in consequence of the want of space, the larger hall in the building not being placed at the Coroners' disposal, for some reason not explained. The dispute between Dr. Macdonald and Mr. Wynne Baxter as to the district in which the murder occurred has not yet been settled; and, should the body be re-conveyed into the Whitechapel district for the purposes of burial, Mr. Wynne Baxter has decided - so it is rumoured - to "seize" it for the purpose of holding a second inquiry.
A little scene occurred between the Coroner and two or three Jurors when they were about to be sworn. "It is in Mr. Baxter's district," said one, "and I do not see why we should be called here. The murder was in Whitechapel." "It was not in Whitechapel," explained Dr. Macdonald's officer. "Do you think we don't know what we are doing? "Do you think we are doing what is wrong," exclaimed Dr. Macdonald, with energy, adding, "The Jury have no business to object. They cannot object. (Sternly.) If they persist in objecting I know what to do with them. I know (he repeated) how to deal with them." "It was in Mr. Baxter's district," somewhat plaintively argued a Juror, unabashed by the Coroner's sternness. "It happened in my district," replied Dr. Macdonald, "and I may tell you," he said "that the jurisdiction is where the body is lying, and not where the death occurred." Thus ended the scene. The Jurors were sworn, and then proceeded to the mortuary, and afterwards to the room where the murder occurred, in order, as the Coroner put it, "to save time."
Mr. Superintendent Arnold, of the H Division, and Inspector Abberline and Inspector Nairn represented the police. The Jurymen were absent nearly an hour. When they returned it was noted that one had not been sworn. He was called upon to retire.
The Coroner explained that he thought it right to mention that there was no foundation whatever for the reports that there had been any controversy between himself and Mr. Baxter as to the jurisdiction.

BARNETT IDENTIFIES THE BODY.

Joseph Barnett, a labourer, deposed - From last Saturday I have lived in Lewis-street, Bishopsgate. Before then I lived at my sister's in Portwell-lane, Gray's-inn-road. I lived with the deceased a year and eight months. The deceased's name was Marie Jeannette Kelly. I have seen the body, and identify it as that of the deceased. I identify her (he added) by the hair and eyes. I could only identify her by that, but I am certain it is the same woman. I had lived with her for eight months in Miller's-court.
When did you separate from her? - On the Tuesday week before the murder, because she had a person (an unfortunate) whom she took in out of compassion. I objected to that.
Was that the only reason? - Yes. Being out of work I had nothing to do with it. It was between the hours of five and six on the Tuesday that I left her.

HIS LAST VISIT TO HER.

When did you last see her alive? - Between half-past seven or a quarter to eight on the night she was supposed to have been murdered. I went to call on her to see for her welfare.
How long did you stay there? - For a quarter of an hour, till a quarter to eight. We were on friendly terms, but when we parted I told her I had no work and no money, for which I was sorry.
Did you have a drink with her? - No. She was quite sober. I always found her to be of sober habits.
Did she get drunk occasionally? - She has been drunk several times in my presence.
Was there anybody else there on the Thursday evening? - Yes; a female who lives in the same court. On several occasions I had conversation with the deceased as to her friends. She said she was born in Limerick, and went from there to Wales. It was about four years ago when she came to London. Her father's name, she told me, was John Kelly. He was ganger at an ironworks in Wales - in Carnarvonshire. She told me she had a sister, who was respectable, and fond of her. She had six or seven brothers - one in the Army and the others at home. I never saw any of the brothers.

SHE WAS A MARRIED WOMAN.

Did she tell you she was married? - Yes, but very young, in Carnarvon. She was married to a collier. I think his name was Davis or Davies. According to my own ability (added the witness) I think it was Davies. Davies met his death in an explosion.
She married very young? - At 16 she told me. After her husband's death she went to Cardiff to meet a cousin; but whether she met the cousin I can't say. Then she commenced a bad life with her cousin. After leaving Cardiff she came to London and went to a gay house in the West-end. A gentleman then asked her if she would like to go to France - so she told me. She went to France, but did not remain long. Then, when returning to London, she went to live at Ratcliff-highway. There she lived with a man named Morganstone, opposite Stepney gasworks. I have never seen him. Then she went to Pennington-street. The man with whom she then lived was Joseph Fleming. She told me she was very fond of him. He lived at Bethnal-green-road.
When did you pick up with her? - At Spitalfields, in Commercial-street. From the first night we had a drink together, and I made arrangements to see her on the following day - a Saturday. The "arrangement" was that we two should remain together. I took lodgings in a place at George-street, Commercial-street - not far from where the George-yard murder was committed.

EXPRESSED FEAR OF NO ONE.

Have you heard she was afraid of any one? - When I brought the evening papers home I used to read them to her - about the murders - every time I bought them.
But did she express fear of any one? - No; but one moment we would row together, and then be on the best of terms.
The Coroner - You have given your evidence very well indeed.
Barnett - Thank you, Sir.
The Coroner said that Dr. Phillips had sent a note to know whether his attendance was required that day. He (the Coroner) thought it would be as well to have a statement as to the cause of death from Dr. Phillips, and the other medical evidence could be given afterwards.
The Jury concurred.

BOWYER'S TERRIBLE DISCOVERY.

Thomas Bowyer said - I live at 37, Dorset-street, Spitalfields. I am a servant to Mr. McCarthy, the owner of the chandler's shop.
What is your occupation? - I serve in the shop. At a quarter to eleven on Friday morning I was ordered by Mr. McCarthy to go to "Mary Jane's" room - No. 13. I never knew the woman to go by any other name than "Mary Jane." I went to get the rent. I knocked at the door, and got no answer.
What then? - I knocked again and again, but got no answer. I then went just round the corner, and there I saw that one of the small windows was broken - the one by the waterspout. A curtain covered the two windows. I just pulled the curtain on one side and looked in.
And what did you see? - I saw two lumps of flesh lying on the table. (Sensation.)
Where was the table? - Close against the bed, in front of it. The second time I looked I saw the body of someone lying on the bed.
Yes? - And blood on the floor. I at once went very quietly back to my master, Mr. John McCarthy. I told him what I had seen.
Yes? - He said, "Good God, you don't mean to say that, Harry?" We both then went down to the police-station, but before doing so, went to the window.
Did anybody in the neighbourhood know of this when you went to Mr. McCarthy? - Not a soul. Only Mr. McCarthy and myself were in the shop then. I know Joe Barnett, the last witness. I only saw the deceased under the influence of drink once.
By the Jury - I last saw the deceased alive on Wednesday afternoon, in the court.

THE POLICE COMMUNICATED WITH.

Mr. John McCarthy, who was next called, said - I am a grocer and lodging-house keeper. About half-past ten or a quarter to eleven I sent my man Bowyer to call for the rent. He came back at five minutes after and said, "Guv'nor, I knocked at the door and could not make anyone answer. I looked through the window and saw a lot of blood." I went out with him and looked through the window. I saw the woman dead on the bed. For a moment I could not say anything. At last I said to him, "Harry, don't tell anyone. Fetch the police." I followed Bowyer and went to the Commercial-street Station. I saw Inspector Beck. At first I inquired for Inspector Reid or Inspector Abberline. Inspector Beck came with me at once.
How long has the deceased lived in this room? - Ten months - she and Barnett. I did not know whether they were married. They lived on very comfortable terms.
Was the property in the room yours? - Yes.
What rent were you paid for the room? - 4s. 6d. a week. She was 29s. in arrear.
Have you seen her the worse for drink? - Very often.
Reeling about? - No. She was a very quiet woman, but when she was in drink she got noisy and sang, but not helpless.

WHEN KELLY WAS LAST SEEN.

Mary Anne Cox deposed - I live at No. 5 room, Miller's-court - the last house at the top of the court.
What name did you know the deceased by? - Mary Jane. I last saw her alive on Thursday night at a quarter to twelve. She was then very much intoxicated. That was in the court.
Anyone with her? - Yes; a short, stout man, shabbily dressed.
Did he have an overcoat on? - No; a longish coat - dark coat - and he had a pot of ale in his hand.
What sort of hat? - One of the hard hats - billycock.
Long hair? - I did not notice. He had a blotchy face and a carrotty moustache; nothing on his chin. I followed them up the court and saw them go into her room.
Did he have anything else in his hand? - No, nothing but the pot of beer. I wished the deceased "Good night!" and she said, "Good night!" I'm going to have a song." I heard her singing.
What was the song? - I heard her singing "A violet I plucked from my mother's grave." I warmed my hands at one o'clock - it was raining hard - and went out again. I returned again at two, when there was a light in the deceased's room. I did not sleep a wink during the night, and must have heard anything in the court - no noise of "Murder!" or screams. I heard several men going out of the court early to go to Spitalfields Market. There is one man living in the court who goes to Spitalfields Market. That was at a quarter-past six that I heard him. I did not hear anything of the murder until the police came to me on Friday morning. It might have been a policeman that I heard.

THE MAN WITH KELLY.

What would you say was the age of the man you saw with her? - About thirty-seven. He had dark clothes on. He had a moustache, but very small whiskers. He walked very quietly up the court, as if he had light boots on.
Down on the heel, perhaps? - He made no noise as he walked.
By the Jury - The light was in the deceased's room; but the blind was down when I passed up the court at one o'clock. I should know the man again.

A CRY OF "MURDER!"

Elizabeth Prater, wife of a boot machinist, deposed, "I live at No. 20 Room in Miller's-court. Deceased lived in the room below me.
When did you leave your room on Thursday? - About five o'clock in the evening, and returned to it about one o'clock on Friday morning. I waited about. No one came up to talk to me. I talked to Mr. McCarthy, as his shop was open at half-past one. I did not see any light in deceased's room when I went upstairs. There might or might not have been a glimmer, but I did not see it.
Could you hear her moving about in her room? - Oh, yes, Sir. If there had been any noise I should have heard it. I went to bed at about half-past one, and went to sleep directly.
What was the next thing? - A black kitten, of which I was very fond, came to my bed, and rubbed itself against my face.
It disturbed you? - Yes, it tried to get into the bed, and awoke me. That must have been about half-past four, as I heard the clock chiming. I pushed the kitten away.
Yes? - And, just as I pushed the kitten away I heard, "Oh! Murder!" It was as if it was a nightmare. It was just "Oh! oh! (in a faint, gasping way) - Murder!"
Where did the sound seem to come from? - Up the court, somewhere. I did not hear it a second time. I did not take any notice of it. Then I went to sleep.
You did not hear any singing? - None whatever. If there had been any at half-past one I should have heard it.

KELLY SEEN ON FRIDAY MORNING.

Caroline Maxwell, of 14, Dorset-street, wife of a lodging-house deputy, said she knew the deceased only as "Mary Jane." Witness also knew Joe Barnett.
Do you know how she got her living? - I believe she was an unfortunate girl. I never saw her with anyone, and only spoke to her twice. Witness said she saw the deceased at the corner of Miller's-court from eight to half-past eight on Friday morning. I came out from the lodging-house opposite, and am certain of the time, as I was taking some plates and other things for my husband to take care of for the lodgers.
You are positive that the time was from eight to half-past eight o'clock? - Yes; I spoke to her, and she said, "Oh, Carry, I do feel so bad. I have just had a pint of beer, and have thrown it up." She was standing on the pavement just outside the court. I left her then, and on returning from my husband I saw her outside the Britannia public-house, talking to a man. That was about a quarter to nine.
You are sure it was the deceased you saw? - Quite certain. I could not give any description of the man. He was a little taller than myself (the witness was about 5ft.) - and stout. He had dark clothes.
By Inspector Abberline - The man and the deceased were about twenty-five yards from witness when she saw them.
By the Foreman of the Jury - Had the man she saw had a silk hat on she thought she would have noticed it.

MAN SEEN IN THE COURT.

Sarah Lewis, of 24, Great Pearl-street, Spitalfields, stated that she worked at a laundry. On Friday morning witness was at No. 2 Room, Miller's-court, at half-past two o'clock. She went to call on a woman she knew - Mrs. Keyler. It was the first house - right opposite decease's. It was half-past two by Spitalfields' Church clock. She saw a man standing at the entrance to the court. He was not talking to any one.
Was he tall? - Not very - a stout-looking man. I do not know whether he had dark clothes on. He seemed as if waiting for some one. Further on I saw another man and woman. I sat on the chair in Mrs. Keyler's room and went to sleep. I woke at about half-past three. I heard Spitalfields clock strike.
What made you wake up? - Because I could not sleep. I sat awake from then until a little before four o'clock, when I heard a female voice. It was a scream. I did not leave until half-past five.
Why? - Because the police would not let me leave the court.

A SUSPICIOUS "GENTLEMAN."

Had you seen anyone of suspicious appearance lately? - On Wednesday evening I and a female friend were going along the Bethnal-green-road, when a "gentleman" passed us. He wanted us to follow him - "either of us," he said. He told us he would treat us. He asked me to follow him up an entry, and I refused. He then put a bag on the pavement, and said, "Do you think I have got anything in it." He was a short, stout man, with a pale face, and small black moustache. He was about 40.
Was it a large bag? - Not very large. He had a high, round, felt hat. He had a long, brownish overcoat, and a short, black one underneath it. His trousers were "pepper and salt." I ran away and left him. On Friday morning last, when going to Miller's-court, about half-past two, I met the same man with a female.
Where? - In Commercial-street, close by Mr. Ringer's public-house.
The Britannia? -
Inspector Abberline - Yes.
Witness (proceeding) said the man had the black bag then, and the "pepper and salt" trousers, but no overcoat. Witness looked back at the man, who seemed to know her. She had not seen him since. She should know him if she saw him.

DR. PHILLIPS' EVIDENCE.

Dr. George Bagster Phillips was next called.
He deposed: - I am divisional surgeon of police, H division. I was called by the police on Friday morning, about eleven o'clock. On proceeding to Miller's-court I found a room, the door of which led to a passage running out of 26, Dorset-street, having two windows, two of the panes were broken, and finding the door locked I looked through the lower of the broken panes, and satisfied myself that the mutilated corpse lying on the bed was not in need of any immediate attention from me. I also came to the conclusion that there was nobody else upon the bed, or within view, to whom I could render any professional assistance. Having ascertained that probably it was advisable that no entrance should be made into the room at that time, I remained until about 1:30, when the door was broken open.
By whom? - Mr. McCarthy, I believe. I believe directions to do so were given by Superintendent Arnold. When I arrived in the yard the premises were in charge of Inspector Beck. On the door being opened it knocked against the table. The table was close to the left-hand side of the bedstead. The mutilated remains of a female were lying two-thirds over towards the edge of the bedstead nearest to the door of entry. She had only her nightdress upon her, and from my subsequent examination I am sure the body had been removed subsequent to the injury which caused her death from that side of the bedstead which was nearest to the wooden partition in the room. The large quantity of blood under the bedstead, the saturated condition of the palliasse, pillow, and sheet at the top corner of the bedstead leads me to the conclusion that the severance of the right carotid artery, which was the immediate cause of her death, was inflicted while the deceased was lying at the right side of the bedstead, and her head and neck in the top right-hand corner.
The Coroner said that the other portion of Dr. Phillips' evidence would be given at the adjourned inquiry.
Julia Van Turney, of No. 1 Room, Miller's-court, said she had known the deceased, and also Joe Barnett. They lived comfortably together, but the deceased was frequently drunk.

"FOND OF ANOTHER MAN."

Did she tell you she was fond of another man? - Yes.
Did she tell you his name? - No. But it's a funny thing, his name's Joe, deceased said. I think he was a costermonger, but she did not tell me where he lived.
Did you sleep in the court on Thursday night? - Yes. I went to bed about eight o'clock, but couldn't rest all night. I might have dozed off. I did not hear any noises in the court - no screams of murder, and no singing. I don't think for a moment she could have sung, or I should have heard it. She used to sing Irish songs, as she was an Irishwoman.
Maria Harvey, living at 3, New-court, Dorset-street, said she slept with the deceased for two nights - Monday and Tuesday. She last saw the deceased at five minutes to seven o'clock on Thursday evening.

WHAT HARVEY LEFT IN DECEASED'S ROOM.

What do you do for a living? - I am a laundry-woman. When I left the deceased I put my bonnet in her room, and said, "Well, Mary Jane, I won't see you any more this evening. I'll leave my bonnet in your room." The next thing I heard of her was that she was murdered. I also left in the room two dirty shirts, a little boy's jacket, and a black overcoat. I have not seen anything since, except the black overcoat.
Inspector Walter Beck, of the H Division, stated - I was the first person called to see the deceased. I could not say whether the deceased was well known to the police. I did not know her myself.

ABOUT THE BLOODHOUNDS.

Inspector George Abberline, of Scotland-yard, said he appeared on the scene at half-past eleven on Friday morning. Witness heard that bloodhounds had been sent for, and were on the way, and Dr. Phillips said that if the door was not forced there would be a better chance for the hounds. Later on the order for the hounds was countermanded, and Superintendent Arnold then gave instructions for the room to be forced. Witness took an inventory of the things in the room. There had been a large fire kept up, so great as to burn off the spout of a kettle. The ashes had been carefully examined, and it was shown that portions of clothing had been burnt. There was part of the charred rim of a woman's hat.

WHY THE FIRE WAS KEPT UP.

The Coroner - Can you form any reason why that was done?
Inspector Abberline - My own impression is that the clothing was burnt to give the murderer light to enable him to carry on his work. There was only part of a small candle in the room. I may say that the key of the door has been missing for some time.
The Coroner left it to the Jury to say whether they would like to adjourn, or whether they had not heard sufficient evidence to return their verdict.

VERDICT.

The Foreman then consulted with the Jurymen, who almost immediately returned a verdict of "Wilful murder against some person or persons unknown."

RESIGNATION OF SIR CHARLES WARREN.

The Press Association says: - The report is current at Scotland-yard, today, that Sir Charles Warren has sent in his resignation. No official confirmation or denial can be obtained.

In a later despatch, the Press Association says the fact of Sir Charles Warren's resignation is officially confirmed this afternoon.

In the House of Commons, the Home Secretary announced that Sir C. Warren had tendered his resignation, which had been accepted.

Source: The Echo, Monday November 12, 1888, Page 3

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 5 Jun 2011 - 1:08

"JACK, THE RIPPER."

Another Abandoned Woman Murdered and Horribly Mutilated in London Slums.

LONDON, Nov. 9. - The body of a woman has been found murdered and mutilated in a house on Dorset street, near Hanbury street. The murder was committed in the woman's own room, and the body was cut up in a horrible manner. This is undoubtedly a repetition of the series of woman murders in Whitechapel. Bloodhounds have been brought to the spot and are working on the trail of the murderer. The victim was like the rest of the Whitechapel victims - an abandoned woman. She had a husband who was a porter but she lived with him only at times. Her name is believed to be Lizzie Fisher. As she entered the house where she lodged by means of a latchkey probably no one saw the man who accompanied her, hence it is doubtful if the murderer will ever be identified. A man might easily have left the house at any time between the hours of one and six without attracting any special attention. Physicians who viewed the corpse reserve their statements for the inquest which will follow. Three bloodhounds, which are owned by private citizens, have been placed on the scent, but they are useless. The appearance of the remains is frightful, and the mutilation even greater than the previous cases. The head was severed from the body and placed between one of the arms. The ears and the nose were cut off, the body disembowelled, and the flesh torn from the thighs. The womb and other organs are missing. The forehead and cheeks are completely skinned, and one hand pushed into the stomach.

THE MURDERED WOMAN

told a companion last evening that she was without money and would commit suicide if she did not obtain a supply. It has been learned that a man respectably dressed accosted the victim and offered her money. They went to her lodgings, on the second floor of the Dorset street house. No noise was heard through the night, and nothing was known of the murder until the landlady went to the room early this morning to ask for her rent. The first thing she saw on entering the room was the woman's breasts and viscera lying on a table. Dorset street is short and narrow, and is situated close to Mitre square and Hanbury street.
In the House of Commons today Mr. Coneybeare asked whether it was true that another woman had been murdered in London. Gen. Warren, the chief of the metropolitan police, ought to be superseded by an officer accustomed to investigate crime.
The question was greeted by cries of "Oh, oh."
The speaker called "Order, order," and said that notice must be given of the question in the usual way.
Mr. Coneybeare replied "I have given private notice."
The Speaker: "The notice must be made in writing."
Mr. Cunningham Graham then asked whether Gen. Warren had already resigned, to which Mr. Smith, the government leader, answered "No."

Source: Manitoba Daily Free Press, Saturday November 10, 1888, Page 1

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 12 Jun 2011 - 19:26

THE WHITECHAPEL MURDERS.
A SAD STORY OF DEGRADATION.

(Received November 15th, 11:55 a.m.)

LONDON, November 14.

It has now been ascertained that the last victim of the Whitechapel tragedies was respectably connected, and was formerly in the service of a gentleman in the West End for some time. She descended lower and lower, till at length she became an outcast, and drifted into the slums of the East End.

Source: Auckland Star, Volume XIX, Issue 270, 15 November 1888, Page 5

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Mrs. Maxwell's Statement To Newspaper

Post by Karen on Tue 14 Jun 2011 - 0:18

From The Montreal Witness, of November 14, 1888:

AT WORK AGAIN.
THE LAST ATROCIOUS MURDER BY THE WHITECHAPEL FIEND.

HIS UNFORTUNATE VICTIM IDENTIFIED.

LONDON, Nov. 9.

The name of the unfortunate woman found murdered and mutilated in her own room on Dorset street this morning is Mary Jane Lawrence. She was married to or lived with a man named Lawrence who had abandoned her. The murderer remains undiscovered, as in the other cases.

LONDON, Nov. 9. - The appearance of the remains of the murdered woman was frightful, and the mutilation was even greater than in the previous cases. The head had been severed and placed beneath one of the arms. The ears and nose had been cut off. The body had been disembowelled and the flesh was torn from the thighs. The womb and other organs were missing. The skin had been torn off the forehead and cheeks, and one hand had been pushed into the stomach. The victim, like all the others, was a prostitute. She was married, and her husband was a porter. They had lived together at spasmodic intervals. Her name is believed to have been Lizzie Fisher, but to most of the habitues of the haunts she visited she was known as "Mary Jane." She had a room in the house where she was murdered. She carried a latch key and no one knows at what hour she entered the house last night, and probably no one saw the man who accompanied her. Therefore, it is hardly likely that he will ever be identified. He might easily have left the house at any time between one and six o'clock this morning without attracting attention. The doctors who have examined the remains refuse to make any statement until the inquest is held. Three bloodhounds belonging to private citizens were taken to the place where the body was and placed on the scent of the murderer, but they were unable to keep it for any great distance and all hope of running the assassin down with their assistance has been abandoned.

THE VILE ASSASSIN STILL UNDISCOVERED.

LONDON, Nov. - The unfortunate woman who was so shockingly murdered in a house on Dorset street last night told a companion last evening that she was without money and unless she obtained a supply would commit suicide. It has been learned that a man respectably dressed accosted the victim and offered her money. They went to her lodgings on the second floor of the Dorset street house. No noise was heard during the night, and nothing was known of the murder until the landlady went to the room early this morning to ask for her rent. The first thing she saw on entering the room were the woman's breasts and viscera lying on a table. Dorset street is short and narrow and is situated close to Mitre square and Hanbury street. It is a very curious coincidence that six weeks elapsed between the last horror but one and the murder of the two women on September 29, and tomorrow the same period of time will have passed since then. This strengthens the theory that the murders are committed by a man who has periodical fits of dangerous madness.

QUESTIONS IN THE HOUSE.

In the House of Commons today, Mr. Coneybeare (Radical) asked the question whether, if it was true that another woman had been murdered in London, General Warren, the chief of the Metropolitan police, ought not to be superseded by an officer accustomed to investigate crime? The question was greeted by cries of "Oh! Oh!"
The speaker called "Order! Order!" and said that notice must be given of the question in the usual way.
Mr. Coneybeare replied: "I have given private notice."
The Speaker - "The notice must be made in writing."
Mr. Cunningham Graham then asked whether General Warren had already resigned, to which Mr. Smith, the Government leader, replied "No."

FURTHER THEORIES REGARDING THE MURDERER.

LONDON, Nov. 10. - The arrests made by the police late last night amount to naught. The mystery is as deep as ever. Gen. Sir Charles Warren confesses his utter helplessness in the case tonight by publishing a promise of pardon to any accomplices who may consent to turn informer against the principal murderer. This is all the more absurd since every detail of the nine murders of the same type go to show that the assassin had no accomplice. His latest escapade, however, proves that he is a shrewd man, and not above changing his tactics. Knowing that the streets are closely watched, he lures his victims to their rooms. So long as he follows out this plan there is no limit to his opportunities for crime, and he will probably not be caught unless by some blunder of his own.
An important fact has been pointed out today which starts a new and quite probable theory as to the murders. It appears that the cattle boats bringing live freight to London, usually come into the Thames on Thursdays and Fridays and leave again for the Continent on Sundays and Mondays. It has already been a matter of comment that the revolting crimes have all been committed at the end of the week, and an opinion has been formed by some detectives that the murderer is a drover or butcher

EMPLOYED ON ONE OF THESE BOATS,

of which there are many, and that he periodically appears and disappears with one of the steamers. This theory is held to be of much importance by those engaged in the investigation, who believe that the murderer does not reside either in Whitechapel or even in this country at all. It is thought that he may be either a person employed upon one of these boats, or one who is allowed to travel by them, and inquiries have some time since been directed towards the following up of this theory.
At the inquests of the previous victims the Coroner expressed the opinion that the knowledge of anatomy possessed by a butcher would have been sufficient to enable him to find and cut out the parts of the body in which all cases have been abstracted.
A similar theory is that the man is a Malay cook on one of the steamers running to the Mediterranean ports, but so far, it is all theory.
There are no facts except that the woman has been murdered and that the murderer is still free. A man's pilot coat has been found in the murdered woman's room, but whether it belonged to one of her paramours or to the murderer has not been ascertained. By some, however, it is looked upon as being a strong corroboration of the sailor theory.
The doctors who made the post-mortem examination authorize the statement that this time no portion of the body has been taken away by the murderer.

THE LAST PERSON WHO SAW HER.

Almost everybody in the neighbourhood of the murder had some story to tell today. But that of Mrs. Maxwell, the wife of the lodging-house keeper in Dorset street, opposite the court where Mary Kelly lived, seems to be the most reliable, and goes to show that the murder was committed after 9 a.m. Her statement was as follows:

"I assist my husband in taking care of the lodging-house. We divide the watches in staying up all night. On Friday morning, as I was going home, carrying my lantern with me, I saw the woman Kelly standing at the entrance of the court. It was then about half-past eight, and as it was unusual for her to be seen about at that hour, I said to her, "Hallo! What are you doing up so early?" She replied, "I'm very bad this morning. I have had the horrors. I have been drinking so much lately." I said to her, "Why don't you go and have a half-pint of beer? It will put you right." She replied, "I've just had one, but it's done me no good." I didn't know then that she had separated from the man with whom she had been living, and I thought he had been beating her. I then went out to do some errands, and on my return saw Mrs. Kelly standing outside the public house talking to a man. That was the last I saw of her. It must have been nine o'clock. The body was discovered about one hour afterwards."

Source: Montreal Weekly Witness, Wednesday November 14, 1888, Page 1

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Mon 20 Jun 2011 - 9:03

(Via C.P.R. Telegraph.)

ANOTHER WHITECHAPEL HORROR.
BLOODHOUNDS ON THE TRAIL OF THE FIEND.

LONDON, Nov. 9 - The body of a woman was found at eleven o'clock this morning murdered and mutilated in a house on Dorset street, near Hanbury street. The murder was committed in the woman's own room and the body was cut up in a horrible manner. This is undoubtedly a repetition of the series of woman murders in Whitechapel. Bloodhounds have been brought to the spot and are working on the trail of the murderer.

Source: The Montreal Daily Witness, Friday November 9, 1888, Page 1

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Mon 20 Jun 2011 - 9:07

TELEGRAPHIC NEWS.
CABLE.

THE WHITECHAPEL HORROR.
THE VILE ASSASSIN STILL UNDISCOVERED.

LONDON, Nov. 9. - The unfortunate woman who was so shockingly murdered in a house on Dorset street last night told a companion last evening that she was without money and unless she obtained a supply would commit suicide. It has been learned that a man respectably dressed accosted the victim and offered her money. They went to her lodgings on the second floor of the Dorset street house. No noise was heard during the night, and nothing was known of the murder until the landlady went to the room early this morning to ask for her rent. The first thing she saw on entering the room were the woman's breasts and viscera lying on a table. Dorset street is short and narrow and is situated close to Mitre square and Hanbury street. It is a very curious coincidence that six weeks elapsed between the last horror but one and the murder of the two women on September 29, and tomorrow the same period of time will have passed since then. This strengthens the theory that the murders are committed by a man who has periodical fits of dangerous madness.
In the House of Commons today, Mr. Coneybeare (Radical) asked the question whether, if it was true that another woman had been murdered in London, General Warren, the chief of the Metropolitan police, ought not to be superseded by an officer accustomed to investigate crime? The question was greeted by cries of "Oh! Oh!"
The speaker called "Order! Order!" and said that notice must be given of the question in the usual way.
Mr. Coneybeare replied "I have given private notice."
The Speaker: - "The notice must be made in writing."
Mr. Cunningham Graham then asked whether General Warren had already resigned, to which Mr. Smith, the Government leader, replied "No."

THE VICTIM'S LAST HOURS.

LONDON, Nov. 10 - Dr. Gabe, of Mecklenburg square, who viewed the body of Mary Jane Kelly, alias Fisher, yesterday morning, said that in his experience in dissecting rooms never had he seen such ghastliness. At one o'clock in the morning Mary Jane had been heard by a fellow lodger crooning a drunken song, perhaps to the murderer. From that hour till half-past ten o'clock when the body was found is all a hideous blank. Before the post-mortem examination a photographer was set to work in the court and house. The state of the atmosphere was unfortunately not favourable to good results. The photographer, however, succeeded in securing several negatives. The post-mortem examination lasted two hours, and was of the most thorough character. Every indication as to the manner in which the murderer conducted his awful work was carefully noted, as well as the position of every organ and larger pieces of flesh. The surgeons' report will be of an exhaustive character, but it will not be made public until they give the evidence at the coroner's inquest.

THE SAME MAN'S WORK.

Dr. Forbes Winslow says the murder is the work of the same homicidal lunatic who committed the other crimes in Whitechapel. The harrowing details point to this conclusion.

Source: Montreal Daily Witness, Saturday November 10, 1888, Page 1

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Mon 20 Jun 2011 - 9:15

THE WHITECHAPEL MURDERS.
GENERAL WARREN'S OFFER.

LONDON, Nov. 10 - General Warren, Chief of the Metropolitan police, has issued a proclamation offering a free pardon to any accomplice of the Whitechapel murderer that he may have had, provided he will give information which will lead to the murderer's apprehension. The woman whose mutilated body was found in the Dorset street house yesterday was a native of Limerick, Ireland. She migrated to Wales, where she married a collier who was subsequently killed by an explosion. After that she drifted to London.

Source: The Montreal Daily Witness, Monday November 12, 1888, Page 1

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Mon 20 Jun 2011 - 9:22

THE LONDON HORRORS.
STILL ANOTHER WOMAN FOUND DEAD.

LONDON, Nov. 13 - Popular excitement over the last Whitechapel murder received an additional impetus by the finding of a woman's body floating in the Thames. The body was well dressed and the police are uncertain whether to account for the woman's death by murder or suicide. There is absolutely no clue. The wards adjacent to the place where the body was found have been searched by the police and one rough looking fellow carrying a large bowie knife has been arrested. He will probably be discharged, however, as there is no proof against him.

Source: The Montreal Daily Witness, Tuesday November 13, 1888, Page 1

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 0:25

ANOTHER WHITECHAPEL MURDER.

During the early hours of yesterday morning another murder of a most revolting and fiendish character took place in Spitalfields. This is the seventh which has occurred in this immediate neighbourhood, and the character of the mutilations leaves very little doubt that the murderer in this instance is the same person who has committed the previous ones, with which the public are fully acquainted.
The scene of this last crime is at No. 26 Dorset Street, Spitalfields, which is about 200 yards distant from 35 Hanbury Street, where the unfortunate woman, Mary Ann Nicholls, was so foully murdered. Although the victim, whose name is Mary Ann (or Mary Jane) Kelly, resides at the above number, the entrance to the room she occupied is up a narrow court, in which are some half-a-dozen houses, and which is known as Miller's Court; it is entirely separated from the other portion of the house, and has an entrance leading into the court. The room is known by the title of No. 13. The house is rented by John M'Carthy, who keeps a small general shop at No. 27 Dorset Street, and the whole of the rooms are let out to tenants of a very poor class.
As an instance of the poverty of the neighbourhood, it may be mentioned that nearly the whole of the houses in this street are common lodging-houses, and the one opposite where the murder was enacted has accommodation for some 300 men, and is fully occupied every night. About 12 months ago Kelly, who was about 24 years of age, and who was considered a good-looking woman, of fair and fresh complexion, came to Mr. M'Carthy, with a man named Joseph Kelly, who she stated was her husband, and who was a porter employed at Spitalfields Market. They rented a room on the ground floor, the same in which the poor woman was murdered, at a rental of 4s a week.
It had been noticed that the deceased woman was somewhat addicted to drink, but Mr. M'Carthy denied having any knowledge that she had been leading a loose or immoral life. That this was so, however, there can be no doubt, for about a fortnight ago she had a quarrel with Kelly, and after blows had been exchanged, the man left the house, or rather room, and did not return. It has since been ascertained that he went to live at Buller's common lodging-house in Bishopsgate Street.
Since then the woman has supported herself as best as she could, and the police have ascertained that she has been walking the streets. None of those living at the court or at 26 Dorset Street, saw anything of the unfortunate creature after about 8 o'clock on Thursday evening, but she was seen in Commercial-street, shortly before the closing of the public house, and then had the appearance of being the worse for drink. About 1 o'clock yesterday morning a person living in the court opposite to the room occupied by the woman heard her singing the song "Sweet Violets," but this person is unable to say whether any one else was with her at that time. Nothing more was seen or heard of her until her dead body was found.
At a quarter to 11 yesterday morning, as the woman was 35s (thirty-five shillings) in arrears with her rent, Mr. M'Carthy said to a man employed by him in his shop, John Bowyer, "Go to No. 13 (meaning the room occupied by Kelly) and try and get some rent." Bowyer did as he was directed, and on knocking at the door was unable to obtain an answer. He then turned the handle of the door, and found it was locked. On looking through the keyhole he found the key was missing. The left-hand side of the room faced the court, and in it were two large windows. Bowyer, knowing that when the man Kelly and the dead woman had their quarrel a pane of glass in one of the windows was broken, went round the side in question.
He put his hand through the aperture and pulled aside the muslin curtain which covered it. On his looking into the room a shocking sight presented itself. He could see the woman lying on the bed entirely naked, covered with blood and apparently dead. Without waiting to make a closer examination he ran to his employer and told him he believed the woman Kelly had been murdered. M'Carthy at once went and looked through the broken window, and, satisfying himself that something was wrong, despatched Bowyer to the Commercial Street Police station, at the same time enjoining him not to tell any of the neighbours what he had discovered. Inspector Back H Division, who was in charge of the station at the time, accompanied Bowyer back, and on finding that a murder had been committed at once sent for assistance. Dr. Phillips, the divisional surgeon of police, and Superintendent Arnold were also sent for. During this time the door had not been touched. On the arrival of the Superintendent Arnold he caused a telegram to be sent direct to Sir Charles Warren, informing him what had happened.
Mr. Arnold, having satisfied himself that the woman was dead, ordered one of the windows to be entirely removed. A horrible and sickening sight then presented itself. The poor woman lay on her back on the bed, entirely naked. Her throat was cut from ear to ear, right down to the spinal column. The ears and nose had been cut clean off. The breasts had also been cleanly cut off and placed on a table which was by the side of the bed. The stomach and abdomen had been ripped open, while the face was slashed about, so that the features of the poor creature were beyond all recognition. The kidneys and heart had also been removed from the body, and placed on the table by the side of the breasts. The liver had likewise been removed, and laid on the right thigh. The lower portion of the body and the uterus had been cut out, and these appeared to be missing. The thighs had been cut. A more horrible or sickening sight could not be imagined. The clothes of the woman were lying by the side of the bed, as though they had been taken off and laid down in the ordinary manner.
While this examination was being made a photographer, who, in the meantime, had been sent for, arrived and took photographs of the body, the organs, the room, and its contents. Superintendent Arnold then had the door of the room forced. It was a very poorly furnished apartment, about 12 ft. square, there being only an old bedstead, two old tables and a chair in it. The bedclothes had been turned down, and this was probably done by the murderer after he had cut his victim's throat. There was no appearance of a struggle having taken place, and, although a careful search of the room was made, no knife or instrument of any kind was found.
Dr. Phillips, on his arrival, carefully examined the body of the dead woman, and later on made a second examination in company with Dr. Bond, from Westminster, Dr. Gordon Brown, from the City, Dr. Duke from Spitalfields, and Dr. Phillips' assistant. Mr. Anderson, the new Commissioner of Police, Detective Inspectors Reid and Abberline (Scotland Yard), Chief Inspector West, H Division, and other officers were quickly on the spot. After the examination of the body it was placed in a shell, which was put into a van and conveyed to the Shoreditch mortuary to await an inquest.
From enquiries made among persons living in the houses adjoining the court, and also those residing in rooms in No. 26 it appears clear that no noise of any kind was heard. No suspicious or strange-looking man was seen to enter or leave the murdered woman's room, and up to the present time the occurrence is enveloped in as much mystery as were the previous murders. The man Kelly was quickly found, and his statement ascertained to be correct. After the examination the windows were boarded up, and the door padlocked by direction of the police, who have considerable difficulty in keeping the street clear of persons. Dr. M'Donald, coroner in whose district the murder has happened has fixed Monday morning for the opening of the inquest, which will be held at Shoreditch Town-hall. It was reported that bloodhounds would be laid on to endeavour to trace the murderer, but for some reason this project was not carried out, and, of course, after the streets had become thronged with people that would have had no practical result. The street being principally composed of common lodging houses, persons are walking along it during all hours of the night, so that little notice is taken of any ordinarily attired men, the murderer, therefore, had a good chance of getting away unobserved.
With regard to Kelly's movements just before the murder, a report says that she was seen as usual in the neighbourhood about 10 o'clock on Thursday evening in company with a man of whom, however, no description can be obtained. She was last seen, as far as can be ascertained, in Commercial-street about half-past 11. She was then alone, and was probably making her way home. It is supposed that she met the murderer in Commercial Street, and he probably induced her to take him home without indulging in more drink.
At any rate, nothing more was seen of the couple in the neighbouring public houses, nor in the beerhouse at the corner of Dorset Street. The pair reached Miller's Court about midnight, but they were not seen to enter the house. The street door was closed, but the woman had a latchkey, and, as she must have been fairly sober, she and her companion would have been able to enter the house and enter the woman's room without making a noise. A light was seen shining through the window of the room for some time after the couple must have entered it, and one person asserts positively that the woman was heard singing the refrain of a popular song as late as 1 o'clock yesterday morning, but here again there is a conflict of testimony which the police are now engaged in endeavouring to reconcile.
The same reports, describing the removal of the mutilated body, says at 10 minutes to 4 o'clock a one-horse carrier's cart, with the ordinary tarpaulin cover was driven into Dorset Street, and halted opposite Millers-court. From the cart was taken a long shell or coffin, dirty and scratched with constant use. This was taken into the death chamber, and there the remains were temporarily coffined. The news that the body was about to be removed caused a great rush of people from the courts running out of Dorset Street, and there was a determined effort to break the police cordon at the Commercial Street end.
The crowd, which pressed round the van, was of the humblest class, but the demeanour of the poor people was all that could be described. Ragged caps were doffed and slatternly-looking women shed tears as the shell, covered with a ragged-looking cloth, was placed in the van. The remains were taken to the Shoreditch Mortuary, where they will remain until they have been viewed by the coroner's jury.
Mr. John M'Carthy, the owner of the houses in Millers-court, who keeps a chandler's shop in Dorset Street, has made the following statement as to the murdered woman:

The victim of this terrible murder was about 23 or 24 years of age, and lived with a coal porter named Kelly, passing as his wife. They, however, quarreled sometime back and separated. A woman named Harvey slept with her several nights since Kelly separated from her, but she was not with her last night. The deceased's christian name was Mary Jane, and since her murder I have discovered that she walked the streets in the neighbourhood of Aldgate. Her habits were irregular, and she often came home at night the worse for drink. Her mother lives in Ireland, but in what county I do not know. Deceased used to receive letters from her occasionally. The unfortunate woman had not paid her rent for several weeks; in fact she owed 30s altogether, so this morning I sent my man to ask if she could pay the money. He knocked at the door, but received no answer. Thinking this very strange he looked in at the window, and to his horror he saw the body of Kelly lying on the bed covered with blood. He immediately came back to me, and told me what he had seen. I was, of course, as horrified as he was, and I went with him to the house and looked in at the window. The sight I saw was more ghastly even than I had prepared myself for. On the bed lay the body as my man had told me, while the table was covered with what seemed to me to be lumps of flesh. I said to my man, "Go at once to the police station and fetch some one here." He went off at once and brought back Inspector Back who looked through the window as we had done. He then despatched a telegram to superintendent Arnold, but before Superintendent Arnold arrived, Inspector Abberline came and gave orders that no one should be allowed to enter or leave the court. The Inspector waited a little while and then sent a telegram to Sir Charles Warren to bring the bloodhounds, so as to trace the murderer if possible. So soon as Superintendent Arnold arrived he gave instructions for the door to be burst open. I at once forced the door with a pickaxe, and we entered the room. The sight we saw I cannot drive away from my mind. It looked more like the work of a devil than of a man. The poor woman's body was lying on the bed, undressed. She had been completely disemboweled, and her entrails had been taken out and placed on the table. It was those that I had seen when I looked through the window and took to be lumps of flesh. The woman's nose had been cut off, and her face gashed beyond recognition. Both her breasts too had been cut clean away and placed by the side of her liver and other entrails on the table. I had heard a great deal about the Whitechapel murders, but I declare to god I had never expected to see such a sight as this. The body was, of course, covered with blood, and so was the bed. The whole scene is more than I can describe. I hope I may never see such a sight again. It is most extraordinary that nothing should have been heard by the neighbours, as there are people passing backwards and forwards at all hours of the night, but no one heard so much as a scream. I heard the woman Kelly singing "Sweet Violets" at 1 o'clock this morning. So up to that time, at all events, she was alive and well. So far as I can ascertain no one saw her take a man into the house with her last night.
A correspondent who last night saw the room in which the murder was committed, says it was a tenement by itself, having formerly been the back parlour of No. 26, Dorset Street. A partition had been erected, cutting it off from the house, and the entrance door opened into Miller's Court. The two windows also faced the court, and, as the body could be seen from the court yesterday morning, it is evident that, unless the murderer perpetrated his crime with the light turned out, any person passing by could have witnessed the deed. The lock of the door was a spring one, and the murderer apparently took the key away with him when he left, as it cannot be found. The more the facts are investigated, the more apparent becomes the cool daring of the murderer. There are six houses in the court besides the tenement occupied by the deceased. The door of Kelly's room is just on the right-hand side on entering from the street, and other houses -- three on either side -- are higher up the passage.
The young woman Harvey, who had slept with the deceased on several occasions has made a statement to the effect that she had been on good terms with the deceased, whose education was much superior to that of most persons in her position in life. Harvey, however, took a room in New Court, off the same street, but remained friendly with the unfortunate woman, who visited her in the New Court on Thursday night. After drinking together they parted at half past 7 o'clock, Kelly going off in the direction of Leman Street which she was in the habit of frequenting. She was perfectly sober at the time. Harvey never saw her alive afterwards. Joseph Barnett, an Irishman, at present residing in a common lodging house in New Street, Bishopsgate, informed a reporter last evening that he had occupied his present lodgings since Tuesday week. Previously to that he had lived in Miller's Court, Dorset Street for eight or nine months with the murdered woman Mary Jane Kelly. They were very happy and comfortable together until another woman came to sleep in the room, to which he strongly objected. Finally, after the woman had been there two or three nights he quarreled with the woman whom he called his wife and left her.
The next day, however, he returned and gave Kelly money. He called several other days and gave her money when he had it. On Thursday night he visited her between half past 7 and 8 and told her he was sorry he had no money to give her. He saw nothing more of her. She used occasionally to go to the Elephant and Castle district to visit a friend who was in the same position as herself.
Another account gives the following details:

Kelly had a little boy, aged about 6 or 7 years living with her, and latterly she had been in narrow straits, so much so that she is reported to have stated to a companion that she would make away with herself, as she could not bear to see her boy starving. There are conflicting statements as to when the woman was last seen alive, but that upon which most reliance appears to be placed is that of a young woman, an associate of the deceased, who states that at about half-past 10 o'clock on Thursday night she met the murdered woman at the corner of Dorset Street, who said to her that she had no money and, if she could not get any, would never go out any more but would do away with herself. Soon afterwards they parted, and a man, who is described as respectably dressed, came up, and spoke to the murdered woman Kelly and offered her some money. The man then accompanied the woman to her lodgings, which are on the second floor, and the little boy was removed from the room and taken to a neighbour's house. Nothing more was seen of the woman until yesterday morning, when it is stated that the little boy was sent back into the house, and the report goes, he was sent out subsequently on an errand by the man who was in the house with his mother.
There is no direct confirmation of this statement. A tailor named Lewis says he saw Kelly come out about 8 o'clock yesterday morning and go back. Another statement is to the effect that Kelly was seen in a public-house known as the Ringers at the corner of Dorset Street and Commercial Street, about 10 o'clock yesterday morning, and that she met there her lover, Barnet and had a glass of beer with him. This statement is also not substantiated. A somewhat important fact has been pointed out, which puts a fresh complexion on the theory of the murders. It appears that cattle boats bringing in live freight to London are in the habit of coming into the Thames on Thursdays or Fridays, and leave for the continent on Sundays or Mondays. It has already been a matter of comment that the recent revolting crimes have been committed at the week's end, and an opinion has been formed among some of the detectives that the murderer is a drover or butcher employed on one of these boats -- of which there are many -- and that he periodically appears and disappears with one of the steamers. This theory is held to be of much importance by those engaged in this investigation, who believe that the murderer does not reside either in the locality or even in the country at all. It is thought that he may be either a person employed upon one of these boats or one who is allowed to travel by them, and inquiries have been directed to follow up the theory. It is pointed out that at the inquests on the previous victims the coroners have expressed the opinion that the knowledge of anatomy possessed by a butcher would have been sufficient to enable him to find and cut out the parts of the body which in several cases were abstracted.
The Whitechapel Vigilance Committee who have recently relaxed their efforts to find the murderer, have called a meeting for Tuesday evening next, at the Paul's Head Tavern, Crispin-street, Spitalfields, to consider what steps they can take to assist the police.
A Mrs. Paumier, a young woman who sells roasted chestnuts at the corner of Widegate Street, a narrow thoroughfare about two minutes' walk from the scene of the murder, told a reporter yesterday afternoon a story which appears to afford a clue to the murderer. She said that about 12 o'clock that morning a man dressed like a gentleman came up to her and said, "I suppose you have heard about the murder in Dorset Street." She replied that she had, whereupon the man grinned and said, "I know more about it than you." He then stared into her face and went down Sandy's Row, another narrow thoroughfare which cuts across Widegate Street. Whence he had got some way off, however, he vanished. Mrs. Paumier said the man had a black moustache was about 5ft. 6in., high, and wore a black silk hat, a black coat, and speckled trousers. He also carried a black shiny bag about a foot in depth and a foot and a half in length. Mrs. Paumier stated further that the same man accosted three young women, whom she knew, on Thursday night, and they chaffed him and asked him what he had in the bag, and he replied, "Something that the ladies don't like." One of the three young women she named, Sarah Roney, a girl about 20 years of age, states that she was with two other girls on Thursday night in Brushfield-street which is near Dorset Street, when a man wearing a tall hat and a black coat, and carrying a black bag, came up to her and said, "Will you come with me?" She told him that she would not, and asked him what he had in the bag, and he said, "Something the ladies don't like." He then walked away.
A further report received late last night says: -
"Not the slightest doubt appears to be entertained in official headquarters that this fresh crime is by the same hand which committed the others. There is also, it is to be noted, a striking similarity of the month in which the crime has been committed, for while two of the most atrocious of the other murders in the same district were committed on the 7th of the month of September and August, this was committed on the 8th -- approximately the same period in the month. This would seem to indicate that the murderer was absent from the scene of these horrors for fixed periods, and that his return was always about the same. The late storms might account for the crime on this occasion being a day later, the suggestion, of course, being that the murderer journeys across the sea on some of the short passages.
"Last night nothing further was known at Scotland Yard. In fact, all the enquiries centre in the east of London, whither have been sent some of the keenest investigators of the country. The murders, so cunningly continued, are carried out with a completeness which altogether baffles investigators. Not a trace is left of the murderer, and there is no purpose in the crime to afford the slightest clue, such as would be afforded in other crimes almost without exception. All that the police can hope is that some accidental circumstance will lead to a trace which may be followed to a successful conclusion."

The latest account states upon what professes to be indisputable authority that no portion of the woman's body was taken away by the murderer. As already stated, the post-mortem examination was of the most exhaustive character, and surgeons did not quit their work until every organ had been accounted for and placed as closely as possible in its natural position.
A man's pilot coat has been found in the murdered woman's room, but whether it belonged to one of her paramours or to the murderer has not been ascertained. Late yesterday evening a man was arrested near Dorset Street on suspicion of being concerned in the murder. He was taken to Commercial Street police-station, followed by a howling mob, and is still detained there. Another man, respectably dressed, wearing a slouch hat and carrying a black bag was arrested and taken to Leman Street station. The bag was examined, but its contents were perfectly harmless, and the man was at once released.

Source: The London Times, November 10, 1888

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 0:26

THE WHITECHAPEL MURDER.
INQUEST AND VERDICT.

THE ASSASSIN STILL AT LARGE.

The inquest on the body of Mary Jeanette Kelly, who was murdered in Miller's Court, Dorset-street, was opened at the Shoreditch Town Hall, before Dr. Macdonald, coroner, yesterday. The room in which the court was held was small, and very few persons were able to obtain admission.
Joseph Barnett, now lodging with his sister near Gray's Inn Road, said he had lived with the deceased for a year and eight months. She told him that her name was Mary Jeanette Kelly. He had seen the body, and had identified it by the ears and eyes. He had lived with her in No. 13 room, Miller's Court, for eight months. He separated from her on the 30th of last month because she took an "unfortunate" woman into the room. His being out of work had nothing to do with it. He last saw her alive on the night on which it was supposed she was murdered. He saw her between half-past seven and a quarter to eight. He called upon her, and stayed with her a quarter of an hour. He told her that he had no work and could not give her any money, for which he was very sorry. She was quite sober. He had always found her of sober habits. She told him that she was born in Limerick, and went to Wales when she was very young. She came to London about four years ago. She said her father's name was John Kelly, and he was employed at an ironworks. She said she had been married when 16 years of age to a collier named Davies, who was subsequently killed in an explosion. She afterwards went to Cardiff, and was for eight months in an infirmary there. Later she came to London and was in a "gay" house at the West End. A man asked her to live with him in France, and she went to that country, but did not remain there long. She subsequently lived in Ratcliffe Highway, and near the Commercial Gasworks, with a man named Morganstone. She also lived in Pennington-street, where she was visited by a man named Joseph Fleming. He first made her acquaintance in Commercial-street, Spitalfields. He took a place in George-street, where they first lived together. She was anxious to know what was in the papers about the recent murders, but she never expressed any fears of anyone.
Thomas Boyer said that he was employed at Mr. M'Carthy's shop, 27, Dorset-street. At a quarter to eleven on Friday morning he was ordered to go to Kelly's room. He knocked at the door, and got no answer. He went round the corner, and saw one of the small windows broken near the waterspout. There was a curtain at the window. He put his hand through the broken pane and pulled the curtain on one side. He saw a body lying on the bed and blood on the floor. He went back to his master's shop, and he told him what he had seen. They went together to the house, looked through the window, and then proceeded to the police station.
John M'Carthy said he was a grocer and lodging-house keeper in Dorset-street. At about a quarter to eleven o'clock he sent the last witness to Kelly for rent. He came back and said he had knocked at the door, and getting no answer, looked through the window and saw blood. Witness went and looked himself, and saw the body of the woman. She had lived in the room ten months. He did not concern himself as to whether Kelly and Barnett were married or not. They sometimes quarreled, but not seriously. The rent was 4s. 6d. per week, and the deceased was 29s. in arrears. She was frequently the worse for drink. She was a very quiet woman when sober, but got excited when she was in drink.
Mary Ann Cox, a widow, living in No. 5 room, Miller's Court, said she had known Kelly between eight and nine months. She last saw her alive at a quarter to twelve in Miller's Court on Thursday night, when she was very intoxicated. She was then with a short, stout man, very shabbily dressed. He wore a long dark overcoat and a billycock hat, and he had a pot of ale in his hand. He had a blotched face, and a small carrotty moustache. The man slammed the door in witness's face; Kelly bade her good night and said she was going to hear a song. Afterwards she heard her sing "The violet I plucked from mother's grave." She again passed the room, and there was a light there at two o'clock. She heard no noise or cries of "murder." She heard some men go to work early in the morning. The man she saw with Kelly was apparently about 35 years of age.
By the Jury: She could not see what was going on in the room as the blinds were down. She would know the man who was with the woman if she saw him again.
By the Coroner: She would have heard a cry of "murder" had there been one.
Elizabeth Prater, wife of a boot machinist, living in No. 20 room, Miller's Court, said that Kelly lived in the room below hers. Witness left her room at five o'clock on the Thursday evening and returned about one o'clock on Friday morning. She waited about the stairs for 20 minutes. There might have been a light in the room or there might not, but she did not take any notice. She used to hear Kelly walking about her room. Witness went to bed about half-past one. She was awakened between half-past three and four and she heard someone say, "Oh, murder," in a sort of faintish voice. She had often heard cries of "murder" near the court, and therefore she didn't take particular notice in this case. She did not hear the cry a second time, nor did she hear beds and tables being pulled about. Witness didn't hear any singing in the woman's room at half-past one o'clock.
Caroline Maxwell, deposed that she lived with her husband at 14, Dorset-street. She had known Kelly for about four months. She had spoken to her only twice. Witness saw her at the corner of the court in which she lived on Friday morning between 8 and 8:30. She spoke to Kelly and said, "Why, Mary, what brings you out?" and the woman replied, "Oh, Carry, I have felt so bad." She was standing against the wall on the pavement. Witness asked her to have a drink, but she refused, stating that she had just had one. On returning from getting her husband's breakfast she saw Kelly standing outside the Britannia public-house about 8:45 in company with a man. She could not give any description of the man. He was stout and had dark clothes on.
Sarah Lewis, of 24, Great Pearl-street, a laundress, said she was at No. 2 room, Miller's Court, at half-past two o'clock on Friday morning. She saw a man, apparently stout, standing at the entrance to the court. Later she saw another man and a woman near the court. She afterwards went up to No. 2 room and fell asleep in a chair. She soon awoke, however, and sat in the chair till four o'clock, when she heard a female voice scream "Murder!" loudly. On Wednesday last witness was going along Bethnal Green Road, in company with another woman, when a man spoke to them and asked them to follow him. He had a shining leather bag with him, which he put on the pavement and said, "Do you think I have anything in that?" They afterwards ran away, as they were afraid of him. He had a black moustache and a very pale face. On Friday morning, at half-past two, as witness was going to Miller's Court, she met the same man with a woman near the Britannia public-house in Commercial-street. He was a short man, apparently about 40 years of age. He had a high round felt hat and a brownish coat. On both occasions he carried a bag.
Dr. Phillips, divisional surgeon, was the next witness. He deposed that he was called by the police on Friday morning at about eleven o'clock, and went to 6, Miller's Court. He saw a room the door of which led into a passage running out of 26, Dorset-street. The room had two windows, and two of the panes of the windows were broken. Finding the door locked he looked through the broken panes and satisfied himself that the mutilated corpse lying on the bed was not in need of any immediate attention from him. He learned that there was no one else in the room to whom he could render any professional assistance. Having ascertained that probably it was advisable that no entrance should be made into the room at that time, he remained until half-past one o'clock, when the door was broken open. The direction to break it open was given by Superintendent Arnold. Miller's Court was in charge of Inspector Beck when he first arrived. On the door being opened it knocked against a table which he found close to the left hand side of the bed. The mutilated remains of a female were lying two thirds over towards the edge of the bedstead nearest to the door. She had only some under-linen garments upon her, and from subsequent examination he was sure the body had been removed subsequent to the injury which caused her death from that side of the bedstead which was nearest to a wooden partition. The severance of the right carotid artery, which was the immediate cause of death, was inflicted while the woman was lying on the right side of the bedstead, with her head and neck in the top right hand corner.
Inspector Abberline, of the Scotland Yard detective force, said that he appeared on the scene at 11:30 on Friday morning. He heard that the bloodhounds had been sent for, and were coming. Dr. Phillips therefore gave instructions that the door of the room was not to be opened. Later on Superintendent Arnold arrived, and stated that the orders for the hounds had been countermanded. The door was then forced open. There was evidence that a large fire had been kept up in the grate of the room, and that some clothes had been burnt. He believed that this was done to enable the murderer to see what he was doing.
The jury returned a verdict of wilful murder against some person or persons unknown.

A reporter of the Pall Mall Gazette, describing the preliminaries of the inquest, says: - Quite a crowd had gathered around the hall, and followed us quietly to the gloomy gate of the Shoreditch Church. The little rusty iron wicket was guarded by a policeman, who held it open as we passed into the melancholy churchyard, with an acre of grey, soot-covered gravestones, and sorrowful grass and weeds. The path ran alongside the church, and as we turned sharp round to the left there was a little brick mortuary, a red oasis in the desert of tombstones and soft, dank soil. The door was open, and disclosed a cool and lofty apartment, lighted by a couple of windows placed high up, which shed a good light on the fearful spectacle upon which we were all gazing. There in a coarse wooden shell lay the body of the Ripper's latest victim. Only her face was visible; the trunk was concealed by the dirty grey cloth, which had probably served to cover many a corpse. The face resembled one of those horrible wax anatomical specimens which may be seen in surgical shops. The eyes were the only vestiges of humanity; the rest was so scored and slashed that it was impossible to say where the flesh began and the cuts ended. And yet it was by no means a horrible sight. I have seen bodies in the Paris morgue which looked far more repulsive. The jury being quite satisfied we marched through the churchyard again, and pushed our way through the crowd which followed us up the Commercial Road, and into Dorset-street. Here another crowd held possession of the field, frowsy women, with babies in their arms, drunken men recovering from their orgies, and a whole regiment of children, all open-mouthed and commenting on the jury. The entrance to the court was held by a couple of policemen, and it was so narrow that we could only pass up in single file. It was only about three yards long, and then we were at the door which is numbered 13. The two windows which look into the little court were boarded up, and had apparently been newly whitewashed. From the windows above a girl looked down upon us quite composedly, and several pots of beer were brought in during our stay to comfort the denizens of the court. At last the key was procured, and the room was surveyed in batches. The inspector, holding a candle stuck in a bottle, stood at the head of the filthy, blood-stained bed, and repeated the horrible details with appalling minuteness. The little table was still on the left of the bedstead, which occupied the larger portion of the room. A farthing dip in a bottle did not serve to illuminate the fearful gloom, but I was able to see what a wretched hole the poor murdered woman called "home." The only attempts at decoration were a couple of engravings, one, "The Fisherman's Widow," stuck over the mantel-piece; while in the corner was an open cupboard, containing a few bits of pottery, some ginger-beer bottles, and a bit of bread on a plate. The rent was 4s. a week. In 20 minutes the jury filed out again and marched back, still accompanied by a curious crowd, to the Town Hall, and began their simple labours under the direction of Dr. Macdonald, the member for the Scotch crofters.

DESCRIPTION OF THE SUPPOSED MURDERER.

It appears that a man, apparently of the labouring class, with a military appearance, who knew Kelly, last evening lodged with the police a detailed account of an incident which attracted his attention on the morning of the murder. His story has been sifted and the narrator cross-examined, and he adheres to it firmly. For this reason the police believe the clue to be a new and important one. The informant stated that on the morning of the 9th he saw Kelly in Commercial-street, Spitalfields, in the vicinity of where the murder was committed, in the company of a man of respectable appearance. The man was about 5ft. 6in. in height, and 34 or 35 years of age, dark complexion, and dark moustache, curled upwards at ends. He wore a long dark coat trimmed with astrachan, a white collar with black necktie, in which was affixed a horse shoe pin. He wore dark gaiters with light buttons over button boots, and displayed from his waistcoat a massive gold chain. The "highly respectable appearance" of the man was in such contrast to the appearance of the woman that few could have failed to notice them at that hour of the morning. This description, which agrees with that given of the person seen with Kelly by others, is much fuller in detail than has yet been in the possession of the police, and much importance is attached to it.

Source: The Guardian, November 13, 1888, Page 8

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 0:28

The London newspaper columns are filled with details of the seventh woman murder committed in the East End this past Friday. The Daily Telegraph shows a map of the streets with all of the designated locations where the seven women murders were committed.
The new victim is a hapless 24 years old, named Mary Jane Kelly, who inhabited only one small room in Dorset-street. It was in that room, on her bed, that she fell under the knife, and the state of mutilation, when they found the corpse, does not lend itself to description. Of the offender - again there is no trace. But his tenacity was evidenced by the fact that, after his blood thirsty whim had been vented, he shut the door to the room and took the key away.
The room, which Mary Jane lived, is on the ground floor of a closed corridor leading into Miller's-Court, which is a cul de sac or blind alley. Here there are living more women, who now and then receive men. On Friday morning a resident who lived in a room above the woman - who lived separately from her husband - heard her singing "Sweet Violets." At eleven o'clock
the body was found by John Bowyer, a retired soldier, who went to pick up the rent for John McCarthy. Mary Jane was 29 shillings in arrears, which now had to be paid. Bowyer
knocked and looked, and when he received no response, he looked pushed aside the blinds and saw the horribly mutilated corpse. McCarthy was immediately warned and the police.
The body was photographed and examined by a physician. Dorset Street is located in the immediate vicinity of Hanbury-street, Mitre-square, and Berner-street, in which streets the last three murders were committed. Moreover, Goulston-street, where the blood-stained apron of one of the victims was found, is not two hundred paces from the house, where Mary Jane lived.
The police are thus firmly held in the belief that all the crimes were committed by the same hand. The bloodhounds were not used for the simple reason that the dogs, have been lost for some time since. It appeared that the dogs at the last experiment in Surrey with their handlers managed to run away. To conjectures about the suspected killer are not a defect. A detective engaged in the case state that all of the Whitechapel murders have been committed in the later part of the week. The suspicion is therefore
raised, that the murderer is located onboard one of the vessels that
always arrive in London in the latter part of the week, and leave the country at the beginning of the following week.

Source: Wijksche Courant, jaargang 1888, Page 318

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 0:29

WHITECHAPEL MURDER.
A CLUE AT LAST!

DESCRIPTION OF THE SUSPECTED MURDERER.

The police are embarassed with two definite descriptions of the man suspected of the murder. The second description induced some particularly-sanguine journalist to declare that it "not only establishes a clue to the perpetrator of the Dorset-street murder, but places the authorities in possession of an accurate and full description of a person who was seen in company with the murdered woman during the night on which she met her death." A man, apparently of the labouring class, but of a military appearance, who knew the deceased, last night lodged with the police a long and detailed statement of an incident which attracted his attention on the day in question. The following is a summary of the statement, and it may be said that, notwithstanding examination and re-examination by the police, the man's story could not be shaken, and so circumstantial and straightforward were his assertions that the police at first believed they had - to again quote the journalist - "at length been placed in possession of facts which would open up a new line of investigation, and probably enable them to track the criminal." The importance which they then attached to it has since suffered diminution. That will be seen by the result of more recent inquiries.

A MAN OF MILITARY APPEARANCE.

This man states that on the morning of the 9th instant he saw the deceased woman, Mary Janet Kelly, in Commercial-street, Spitalfields (the vicinity in which the murder was committed), in company with a man of respectable appearance. The man was about 5 feet 6 inches in height, and 34 or 35 years of age, with dark complexion and dark moustache curled up at the ends. He was wearing a long dark coat trimmed with astrachan, a white collar with a black neck-tie, in which was affixed a horseshoe pin. He wore a pair of dark gaiters with light buttons, over button boots, and displayed from his waistcoat a massive gold chain. The highly-respectable appearance of this individual was in such great contrast to that of the woman that few people could have failed to remark them at that hour of the morning. This description, which substantiated that given by others of the person seen in company with the deceased on the morning she was killed, was much fuller in detail than that hitherto in the possession of the police, and the importance they attached to this man's story may be imagined when it is mentioned that it was forwarded to the headquarters of the H Division as soon as completed by a special detective. Detectives Abberline, Nairn, and Moore were present when this message arrived, and an investigation was immediately set on foot.

KELLY'S COMPANION AT MIDNIGHT.

However, it is well in the face of this statement to recall the evidence given at the inquest by Mary Anne Cox, a dweller in Miller's-court. She described the man whom she saw entering the court with the woman on Thursday midnight - a period earlier than that mentioned by the informant whose statement at first attracted such attention. Kelly was at midnight in a drunken condition, and her companion was carrying a pot of beer. Cox followed behind the pair, and saw them enter Kelly's room. The man turned round as he entered and closed the door, and Cox must have had a good view of him then, if not previously. The man was, it was at first presumed, the murderer. At least, there was at that time no suggestion that the murdered woman took more than one man to her room that night, and as Cox was quite sober at the time, the description she gave of him was naturally considered of the greatest importance.

SHORT, STOUT, SHABBY MAN.

This description, however, materially differs from the other given to the police. Cox stated in the most positive manner that the man was short and stout, shabbily dressed, wore a round black billycock hat, and had a blotchy face, and a full carrotty moustache, with a clean-shaven chin. The first care of the police on receiving this statement on Friday was to compare it with the descriptions given by various people and at various times of men supposed to have been seen in company of the murderer's previous victims. Unfortunately the accounts do not tally in a number of important particulars; in fact, they are very much more consistent with the descriptions they afterwards received. The Berner-street suspect was described as a very dark man. The Hanbury-street victim was seen in company with a dark foreign-looking man, and a similar description was given of a suspected individual at the time of the Buck's-row murder. It is, however, noteworthy that there were two descriptions given of the suspected Mitre-square and Hanbury-street murderers which agree in some respect with that furnished by the witness Cox of the man seen in Kelly's company on Thursday night. About ten minutes before the body of Catherine Eddowes was found in Mitre-square, a man about thirty years of age, of fair complexion, and with a fair moustache, was said to have been seen talking to her in the covered passage leading to the square. On the morning of the Hanbury-street murder a suspicious-looking man entered a public-house in the neighbourhood. He was of shabby genteel appearance, and had a sandy moustache. The first of these descriptions was given by two persons who were in the orange market, and closely observed the man. The City police have been making inquiries for this man for weeks past, but without success, and they do not believe that he is the individual described by Cox. The Metropolitan police, however, have been induced to attach more significance to Cox's statement. The descriptions of the dark foreign-looking man mentioned in connection with the previous crimes are, however, as we say, in the description of the man seen with the victim on the morning of the 9th.

THE BEER-CAN MISSING.

The statement that the man who accompanied Kelly home was carrying a pot of beer is considered somewhat extraordinary. The can or pot which contained the liquor was not found in the room, and a careful examination of the fireplace and ashes showed that it had not been melted down, as was at first considered probable. If, therefore, the beer was actually taken into the house as described the man must have taken it away with him. This would seem to show that the man, if he were the murderer, feared the can might form a link in a possible chain of evidence against him, and by consequence that he, and not the woman, entered the tavern and bought and paid for the liquor. As far as inquiries have gone, no man answering the description given by Cox entered any tavern in the immediate neighbourhood and took away beer. There is a beershop at the corner of Dorset-street, but, according to information furnished within a few hours of the discovery of the murder, the woman Kelly did not have any drink in the house on the previous night.

THE HOUR OF THE CRIME.

Up till yesterday there was some doubt as to the time at which the murder was committed. Absurd reports had been published to the effect that Kelly was seen making purchases in the neighbouring shops as late as eight and even nine o'clock on the Friday morning, and statements of this character were persisted in long after it had been ascertained beyond doubt that the woman must have been dead hours previously. Dr. Phillips' evidence, together with that of Mary Anne Cox, Elizabeth Prater, and others, proves that the murder was committed shortly after three o'clock - a fact which brings into startling relief the murderer's coolness, caution, and tenacity of purpose. The woman's drunken merriment lasted until shortly after one o'clock, by which time doubtless the liquor taken in had been consumed. The couple must have sat up talking for half-an-hour or more before they retired for the night, because it is now known that the light was not extinguished until about two o'clock. The murderer must have restrained his fiendish impulse for nearly another hour, probably waiting until all fear of the return of late revellers and others had passed. Long before the murderer finally seized his knife his victim must have been in a deep sleep, from which she was awakened by the murderer's rough hands, but only for the one moment in which she was able to utter the pitiful cry of "Murder," heard by several dwellers in the noisome court.

PORTION OF THE BODY IS MISSING.

The medical testimony adduced at the inquest was limited to that which was absolutely required to enable the Jury to find respecting the cause of death. A morning contemporary is, however, enabled to state, on what it declares to be good authority, that, notwithstanding all that has been said to the contrary, a portion of the body organs were missing. The police, and with them the divisional surgeon, have arrived at the conclusion that it is in the interest of justice not to disclose the details of the professional inquiry.

WHY THE BLOODHOUNDS WERE NOT USED.

This is the reason why the bloodhounds were not used. At Sir Charles Warren's request Mr. Brough, bloodhound breeder, of Scarborough, brought his two dogs, Burgho and Barnaby, to London. Arrangements were made for the immediate conveyance of the animals to the spot in the event of another murder occurring, and in order to facilitate matters Mr. Brough left the hounds in the care of a friend of his, Mr. Taunton, of Doughty-street, who was entrusted with their custody pending the conclusion of the negotiations for the ultimate purchase of the dogs. Sir Charles Warren, however, would not, so it is said, give any definite assurance on this point, and Mr. Brough insisted on resuming possession of the animals. One of them, Burgho, was sent to a show at Brighton, the other remaining in Mr. Taunton's custody. About a fortnight ago this gentleman received a telegram from Leman-street Police-station, asking him to bring the dog to assist in discovering the perpetrators of a burglary in Commercial-street. The police then admitted that subsequent to the burglary they had been all over the premises, and Mr. Taunton pointed out to them that it was absurd to expect that the bloodhounds could accomplish anything under such conditions. The owner of the dogs, on learning these facts, telegraphed insisting that Barnaby should be returned to him, he having no guarantee of compensation in case of the animal suffering maltreatment. Thus as a fact there has been no trained bloodhound in the Metropolis during the past fortnight.

NO PERSONS IN CUSTODY LAST NIGHT.

It was stated late last night that the persons taken in custody on the previous day had been liberated. Of course the police have been persistently troubled with suspicions, with the use of threats, with "Jack the Ripper" hoaxes, until - if every informant's advice were acted upon - they would have sufficient prisoners to fill Pentonville.

LATEST DETAILS.
A CONFESSION AT ISLINGTON.

THE SENSATIONAL STORY.
POLICE OPINION OF IT.

About midnight a man was arrested in Islington, charged on his own confession with being concerned in the Whitechapel murder. He was conveyed to the King's-cross-road Police-station. These are the circumstances of his arrest: He went up to a trooper of the 11th Hussars while he, with others, were standing outside the Victoria Hotel, Pentonville-road, and taking him round the neck, said that he would show him how he committed the murders at Whitechapel. He added that he had left his black bag at home. He then scratched the soldier's face. Police-constable Seymour, 208 G, was called, and the man was charged on his own confession with committing the murders. He was removed to the King's-cross-road Police-station, and there detained. This morning he was told of the statement he had made and asked whether it was true. He at once denied knowing anything whatever about the murders or being near Whitechapel on the days of the murders. It being found that he could not have had anything to do with the crime, he was simply charged with drunkenness, and, on this charge, will be taken before the Magistrate.
From latest inquiries it appears that a very reduced importance seems to be now - in the light of later investigation - attached to a statement made by a person last night that he saw a man with the deceased on the night of the murder. Of course, such a statement should have been made at the inquest, where the evidence, taken on oath, could have been compared with the supposed description of the murderer given by the witnesses. Why, ask the authorities, did not the informant come forward before? As many as fifty-three persons have, in all, made statements as to "suspicious men," each of whom was thought to be Mary Janet Kelly's assassin. The most remarkable thing in regard to the latest statement is, that no one else can be found to say that a man of the description given was seen with the deceased, while, of course, there is the direct testimony of the witnesses at the inquest, that the person seen with the deceased at midnight was of quite a different appearance.

THE BEER CAN INCIDENT.

The beer can incident is being inquired into. Though there is no reason to doubt the accuracy of Mary Anne Cox's testimony - it was this witness who saw the man carrying a beer can while accompanying the deceased to her home at midnight - it is a remarkable thing that the can was not discovered in the room. It is not now believed for a moment that the murderer took it away with him. The only other explanation is this: - In the lowest parts of the East-end, as in other districts of ill-repute, it is the practice of women of the unfortunate class to take beer home with them at night, and then place the cans outside their doors. These are collected by potmen in the morning. Inquiries are now being made by Inspector Moore, Inspector Beck, and Detective-sergeant Thicke as to whether any potman in the district collected a can from outside Kelly's room.

CROWDS IN DORSET-STREET.

Dorset-street, Whitechapel, says an Echo reporter, writing late this afternoon, is like a fair. From "Mr. Ringer's public-house" (alluded to at the inquest yesterday), which is at one corner, in sight of Spitalfields Church, to the other end of this narrow and notorious thoroughfare, are dense crowds of men and women discussing the miscreant's hideous work, and commenting, in their mixed Whitechapel-Yiddish dialect, on the "full confession" which has partly been responsible for this afternoon's extraordinary activity in the region of Miller's-court. The "full confession," it need scarcely be added, relates to the publication of the Islington drunkard's assertion that he is the author of the crimes. But the newsboys make it a pretext for pushing business, and as the cry of "Full confession of the Whitechapel murderer" is again and again echoed by the gamins, truth for the moment is but too successfully distorted. Then, in the midst of all this excited crowd, through which a strong man has to push his way with some force, an opening is suddenly made in the throng - not for a policeman or a man in authority, but for a centenarian Jewess, 107 years of age, known as the "Grandmother of many in Brick-lane," who, smitten with the one all-absorbing desire in the East-end, has been led by a relative to see the site of the crime. Up to the present no additional clue has been obtained, and at the Leman-street and Commercial-street Police-stations no person was detained at a late hour this afternoon.

A MADMAN IN COURT.

"DIRECTED TO CATCH THE MURDERER."

A very painful scene occurred in the Marylebone Court today, on the hearing of a charge against Philip Gad Cornish, 23, a schoolmaster, of Ratling Hope School, Pontesbury, near Shrewsbury, Salop, who was said to be a lunatic wandering at large and not under proper control. Before being brought into the Court, the poor fellow was heard shouting and kicking violently at the door. When brought into Court by two officers, both his hands were tightly pressing the top of his head, his eyes were glaring wildly, and he generally presented a very distressing appearance. Police-constable 192 F said he found the man in Praed-street, about five o'clock on Monday, behaving in such a way as to convince him that he was not of sound mind. So he arrested him. There was a companion with Cornish, and from the two he learned that they had come to London to catch the Whitechapel murderer. The officer's evidence was frequently interrupted by the violent behaviour of Cornish, who shouted at the top of his voice, and threw himself about, and stamped with his foot, demanding that the witness - who was, he said, the son of Perdition - should be made to tell the truth. The younger man, who had accompanied the prisoner, said he was a blacksmith. On Monday morning Cornish asked him to accompany him from Ratling Hope to London, as he had been appointed to come up and catch the author of the Whitechapel murders, and for which he was to receive a large sum of money. He thought it was all right, so he left his work and accompanied Cornish, and they arrived in London in the afternoon. He thought Cornish was all right when they started, but he saw a change come over him while on the journey. Mr. De Rutzen ordered that the poor fellow should be taken to the workhouse in a cab.

Source: The Echo, Tuesday November 13, 1888, Page 3

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 0:31

The latest achievement of the mysterious murderer whom the Whitechapel population have christened "Jack the Ripper" differs in no material respect from its predecessors, save that the mutilations are ghastlier and more brutal than ever. How the crime was committed without any of the neighbours hearing a sound or the assassin leaving a clue is again most puzzling. Miller's Court is a regular rookery, frequented day and night by scores of poor folk, and the room in which the crime was committed can be early inspected from without. The murderer must, it seems, have had a light to do his ghastly work by, and at any moment was liable to be dropped on. He can indeed only have escaped by a miracle. A house-to-house search of the district has revealed nothing, and the police are at present distinctly of opinion that the murderer does not live in Whitechapel. Cattle boats with drovers, who are also butchers on board, arrive from the Continent at the end of each week in great numbers, and leave again on Monday or Tuesday at latest. All the Whitechapel murders have been committed at the end of the week, viz., between Friday and Sunday, and a favorite theory with many now is that "Jack" will be found to be a drover. One thing at any rate seems clear. The man cannot be personally objectionable or repulsing. Mary Jeanette Kelly was a smart good-looking girl, and would not have invited any man to her rooms unless he were fairly presentable. After the crime he seems as on previous occasions to have vanished into thin air literally reeking with blood. Even a long ulster would hardly cover all signs, as his hands must have been badly stained if not clotted. The numerous arrests have as far proved quite abortive.

Source: The South Australian Advertiser, Wednesday 2 January 1889, page 5

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 0:32

THE LONDON MURDERS.
[From our own Correspondent.]

THE BODY OF THE LAST VICTIM FRIGHTFULLY MUTILATED.
OPEN VERDICT AT THE INQUEST.

MORE LETTERS FROM "JACK THE RIPPER."

LONDON, Nov. 12.
[BY SUBMARINE CABLE.]

The inquest has been concluded on the body of the last victim of the Whitechapel murderer. The woman, as in the previous cases, was a member of the unfortunate class. The evidence at the inquest disclosed nothing with reference to the perpetrator of the crimes. It simply consisted of the testimony of persons who first saw the body, as well as the medical evidence having reference to its mutilation, which was of a most extraordinary character. The jury returned an open verdict.
The other murders were committed in the street, but the last occurred in the woman's lodgings. Not only were the features mutilated, but certain organs were extracted. The police and others have received letters signed by "Jack the Ripper," admitting that the murders were committed by him. He threatens further crimes shortly.
The Right Hon. H.C. Matthews (Home Secretary) has expressed in the House of Commons his refusal on behalf of the Government to offer a reward for the conviction of the murderer.
The greatest excitement prevails, especially in the neighbourhood of Whitechapel, and the keenest curiosity is excited as to how it is that the murderer eludes capture.

Source: The South Australian Advertiser, Wednesday 14 November 1888, page 4

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 0:33

The Horrible Murders in Whitechapel.

In the midst of the popular demonstration connected with the Lord Mayor's Show on Nov. 9, the tens of thousands of persons who had assembled along the line of route from the city to the West End to watch the civic pageant pass were startled and horrified by the hoarse cries of the street newspaper hawkers announcing the perpetration of another terrible murder in Whitechapel. The news received speedy confirmation, and even the meagre particulars immediately obtainable left no doubt that this, the latest of the series of crimes which has for months kept the East of London in a state of fear almost amounting to panic, exceeded in its cold-blooded, fiendish atrocity any that have preceded it. In the details of the murder itself there is, unhappily, little that can be described as novel, being the same mournful story of want, immorality, and inhuman crime. But in one most important circumstance this murder differs in a startling manner from all that had gone before it. It was committed, not in the open air, but in a house into which the murderer had been taken by his too-willing victim.
The scene of the murder is Miller Court, Dorset-street, Commercial-street, a district composed of big warehouses, squalid streets, and, in a striking degree, of registered lodging-houses. Dorset-street is a fairly wide thoroughfare, and at night, owing to the lamps in the windows and over the doors of the numerous lodging-houses, it may be described as well-lighted and brilliant. The murder was committed at 2 Miller Court, it is thought some time after midnight. The murdered woman was not particularly well known, even to her neighbours, and, as is customary amongst people of her class, she had several nicknames, including "Mary Jane," and "Fair Emma;" but the name by which she was known to her landlord, and which has been proved to be correct, was Mary Jane Kelly. She had been married for some years, or at any rate had lived regularly with a man named Kelly. But it is known that she went on the streets, irregularly at first, but after separating from her husband, chiefly on account of her drunken habits and quarrelsome disposition, she took to prostitution as a regular means of living. Almost the only friend she is known to have had was a woman named Harvey, who used to sleep with her occasionally. Kelly went out as usual the previous evening, and was seen in the neighbourhood about ten o'clock, in company with a man, of whom, however, no definite description can be obtained. She was last seen, as far as can be ascertained, in Commercial-street about half-past eleven. She was then alone, and was probably making her way home. It is supposed that she met the murderer in Commercial-street, and he probably induced her to take him home, without indulging in more drink; at any rate, nothing was seen of the couple in the neighbouring public-houses nor in the beer-house at the corner of Dorset-street. The pair reached Miller Court about midnight, but they were not seen to enter the house. The street door was closed, but the woman had a latchkey, and as she must have been fairly sober she and her companion would have been able to enter the house and reach the woman's room without making a noise. A light was seen shining through the window of the room for some time after the couple must have entered it, and one person asserts positively that the woman was heard singing the refrain of a popular song as late as one o'clock; but here again there is a conflict of testimony, which the police are even now engaged in endeavouring to reconcile.
That which follows is beyond doubt. About ten o'clock a Mr. M'Carthy, the landlord, sent a man who works for him to the house, with orders to see Kelly and obtain from her some money on account of the rent, with which she was largely in arrears. The man went and knocked at the door, but received no answer. He had assumed the woman would be up, because not infrequently she would make purchases in M'Carthy's shop before that hour. He listened, but heard no sound, and then, becoming alarmed, tried the door. It was quite fast and seemed to have been locked from the outside. Determined to find out what was wrong, the man went to the window, commanding a view of the whole room, with the intention of entering if necessary. One glance into the room, however, was sufficient. He saw on the bed the body of a woman dead, and mutilated in a ghastly manner. He rushed affrighted out of the court into M'Carthy's shop, begging him, for God's sake, to come and look. M'Carthy, hardly less horrified, returned to the house with his man, and both looked into the room. The place seemed like a shambles. Blood was everywhere, and pieces of flesh were scattered about the floor, while on the little table, in full view of the windows, was a hideous heap of flesh and intestines. The sight in truth, was enough to unnerve strong men. The pieces of flesh which had been dimly seen through the grimy window proved inexpressibly more ghastly at a close view. The throat had been cut with such ferociousness and appalling thoroughness that the head was almost severed from the trunk. The body, which was almost naked, had been ripped up and literally disembowelled. Comparatively little that was new was elicited by the coroner's inquiry. The principal evidence was that of Mary Ann Cox, who described a man she had seen entering the court with the deceased. It is stated that the police attach weight to her description, and will circulate same in the usual manner. The account of the man and his attire agrees with some of those statements previously given, and disagrees with others. The Berner-street suspect was described as a very dark man. The Hanbury-street victim was seen in company with a dark foreign-looking man, and a similar description was given of a suspected individual at the time of Buck's-row murder. It is noteworthy, however, that there were two descriptions given of the suspected Mitre Square and Hanbury-street murderers, which agree in some respects with that furnished by the witness Cox of the man seen in Kelly's company on November 8. After hearing the medical evidence, the jury returned a verdict of wilful murder against some person or persons unknown.

Source: Clarence and Richmond Examiner and New England Advertiser, Tuesday 1 January 1889

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 0:34

LATEST CABLE NEWS.
[From the Melbourne Daily Telegraph.]

THE LONDON HORRORS.
INQUEST ON THE SPITALFIELDS VICTIM.

London, November 12.

An inquest has been held on the body of the woman who was recently brutally murdered and mutilated at Spitalfields. It transpired that the wretched victim was born at Limerick, and for some time lived in Wales, where her husband met his death in a colliery. She was subsequently taken by a "gentleman" to France, but parted with her paramour, and returning to England took up her residence in the "gay" quarter of the West-End of London. From thence she drifted to the East-End, where she met her fate. No clue was afforded by the proceedings at the inquest to the identity of her murderer.

London, November 13.

The police authorities have in their possession accurate details describing the supposed Whitechapel murderer. He is spoken of as a "swellish" individual.

Source: South Australian Register, Friday 16 November 1888, page 5

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 0:37

THE LATEST LONDON HORROR.

The Whitechapel Butcher Finds Another Victim - Shocking Mutilation of the Wretched Woman - Crowning Crime of a Most Atrocious Series.

Dorset street is one of the narrowest, dirtiest little alleys of all those that go to make up the labyrinth known as the east end of London. To get there a cabman has to ask questions, a rare thing, while his passenger on the journey loses all idea of location, and wonders whether the cab horse's head or tail is pointing towards the north. Until the 9th only a very few out of every million of Londoners knew that Dorset street in the east end existed. But they know it now, and with all other Englishmen will talk about it for weeks. The 9th was lord mayor's show, and all interest was taken from that senseless pageant by ragged boys struggling through the crowds with bundles of newspapers, and yelling that another horrible Whitechapel murder had occurred in Dorset street. You have read about these Whitechapel murders, and know how the frightful cutting up of some wretched woman is a happening which the average Britisher has come to look for as one of the regular incidents of metropolitan life. It has got to such a point that these murders can almost be written up after the methodical fashion which characterizes the minutes of some school board meeting. Each time a miserable creature belonging to the most degraded class of women is mutilated in an inconceivably horrid fashion, the murderer has disappeared, the police do nothing but observe secrecy - a secrecy easily melted with a half crown, by the way - the general public theorize as to whether the murderer is mad or sane, short or tall, English or foreign, etc., the Whitechapel women shiver in bunches, wondering whose turn will come next, and, after a while, the terror in the east end and the curiosity in the west end subside together, until a fresh murder comes to renew them. This last Whitechapel murder was not committed in Dorset street, properly speaking. There opens from it an arched passage, low and narrow. A big man walking through it would bend his head and turn sideways to keep his shoulders from rubbing against the dirty bricks. At the end of the passage there is a high court, not 10 feet broad and 30 long, thickly whitewashed all around for sanitary reasons, to a height of 10 feet.

THAT IS MILLER COURT.

Misery is written all over the place, the worst kind of London misery, such as those who have lived their lives in America can have no idea of. The first door at the end and on the right of the passage, opens into a tiny damp room, on a level with the pavement. The landlord of this and neighboring rooms is a John McCarthy, who keeps a little shop in Dorset street on the side of the passage. About a year ago he rented it to a woman who looked about 30. She was popular among the females of the neighborhood, shared her beer generously, as I have been tearfully informed, and went under the title of Mary Jane. McCarthy, her landlord, knew that she had another name, Kelley, but her friends had not heard of it. It seems there had been a Mr. Kelley, but whom Mary Jane had married in the manner which is considered satisfactory in Whitechapel. They had not gone to the expense of a license, but published the fact of the matrimony by living in one small room and sharing their joy and sorrow and drunkenness together.
Mary Jane took up her residence in the little room in Miller court when Kelley went away. Since then her life has been that of all the women about her, her drunkenness and the number of strange men brought to her little room being gangs by which her sisters in wretchedness measured her prosperity. On the night of the 8th she went out as usual, and was seen at various times up to 11:30 drinking at various low beer shops in Commercial street. In those resorts she was known, not as Mary Jane, her home name, but as "Fair Emma," a title bestowed in complimentary allusion to her appearance. At last, just before midnight, she went home with some man, who appears to have dissuaded her from making a goodnight visit, as was her custom, at a drinking place nearest her room. No description whatever can be obtained of this man. Right opposite the passage leading to Mary Jane's room there is a big and very pretentious lodging house, where the charge is fourpence. Some gentlemen congregated about the door at midnight are sure they saw a man and woman, the latter being Mary Jane, stop to laugh at a poster on one side of the passage which offers 100 pounds reward for the Whitechapel murderer. The man

MUST HAVE ENJOYED THE JOKE,

for he himself was the Whitechapel murderer beyond all doubt. The picture from real life of a murderer reading an advertised reward for his capture with the woman he is about to butcher is not a usual one. A great deal of speculating will be done as to whether he was a cold-blooded monster, trembling at his own danger as he read, or a madman, defiant of everything, and with difficulty restraining his impulse to kill at once. The men who saw him can only say that he did not look remarkable.
At 10 o'clock on the morning, of the 9th, just as the lord mayor was climbing into his golden carriage, three horrified policemen, who had first looked in through Mary Jane's window and then drunk big glasses of brandy to steady themselves, were breaking in the door with a pickaxe. The Whitechapel murderer had done his work with more horrible thoroughness than ever before. The miserable woman's body was literally scattered all over her little room. A description of such butchery is unpleasant to write, but is necessary, to understand London's state of terror and to form an opinion as to this wonderful murderer. Almost every conceivable mutilation had been practiced on the body. McCarthy, the shop keeper and landlord, had seen the body first. He had gone, as he had daily for a long time past, to ask for several weeks' arrears of rent, amounting in all to 30 shillings. Though not an imaginative man, McCarthy at once expressed the conviction that a devil, and not a man, had been at work. This, by the way, is a new theory in regard to the murderer's identity. The woman's nose was cut off, and her face gashed. She had been completely disemboweled, as had all the murderer's former victims, and all the intestines had been placed upon a little table, which, with a chair and the bed, constituted all the furniture in the room. Both the woman's breasts had been removed and placed also on the table. Large portions of the thighs had been cut away, and the head was almost completely severed from the body. One leg, also, was almost completely cut off. The mutilation was so frightful that more than an hour was spent by the doctors in endeavoring to reconstruct the woman's body from the pieces, so as to place it in a coffin and

HAVE IT PHOTOGRAPHED.

That night at midnight Dorset street and all the neighborhood were swarming with a degraded Whitechapel throng. Those with any money were getting drunk very fast. The drunkenness of the poor in London is amazing. Many sober women and all the drunken ones were crying from terror, while the men lounged about, singing or fighting and chaffing the women, according to their ideas of humor. Gallantry is not rampant among these Whitechapel men. The police were, and are, doing nothing of importance. The poor woman's fragments, put together as skilfully as possible, are lying in the Houndsditch mortuary, in a scratched and dirty shell of a coffin, often used before. The mortuary is in a graveyard back of gloomy old Houndsditch church and not a pleasant spot late at night. While the body was being carried from the scene of the murder, thousands crowded as near as the police would allow, and gazed with lifted caps and pitying faces at the latest victim. The police have done nothing but push the crowd about and be officious, and this to such an extent that even those whose duty led them to the place found it necessary to place frequent softening half-crowns in the policemen's palms.
The most interesting individual in Miller court was a woman who had intimately known the dead woman. "Mary Jane's pal" she called herself. Her room is directly opposite the murdered woman's, and it's agitated proprietor stood in the doorway, urging a young girl with straggling whips of red hair, who had started for beer, not to be gone a minute. She assured me that she would be glad to talk to me while Kate was away, just to forget the horrors. This woman spoke well of the dead. Her name was Mary, and she had not always been on peaceful terms with the murdered Mary Jane, but they were good friends, though quarrelsome. Mary Jane was pretty before she was cut up, Mary said, and she was only 24, not 30, as she looked, but she would fight, and did not care what sort of place she lived in. I was invited to inspect Mary's room as evidence of the fact that her taste was superior to the murdered Mary Jane's. It was

ABOUT AS BIG AS A HORSE CAR.

Sleeping and cooking were both done in it. On a clothesline stretched across it a night dress was drying, and there was a bed one foot above the floor, a stool and a nondescript piece of furniture to hold things. The thinnest kitten I ever saw sat on the bedpost. It had been scalded, and had a leather collar around its neck. There was milk in a saucer on the floor, showing that vile air and worse drainage had brought the kitten down in flesh without the help of hunger. When the girl with the red hair came back the woman who had been a friend of Mary Jane drank in a few minutes the quart of beer, relating at the same time many incidents in the lives of herself and her dear dead friend. At last, with a flood of drunken tears, she declared that she would never dare go out on the streets to earn a living again, but observed, somewhat inconsistently, that lightning never struck twice in the same place, meaning that the murderer would never come back to Miller court. She made the red-haired girl swear an oath to stay all night, snatched the amazed thin kitten convulsively to her breast, and went to sleep on the bed with her head the wrong way up. Those who think they have a working plan for reforming society should take a careful look through Whitechapel and see the things they have got to reform. The girl with red hair did not think it wonderful that no one had heard any sound of the murder. Some one was always drunk and yelling in Miller court, and she rightly guessed that a woman being beaten would make as much noise as one being cut up, so that the murderer would not be noticed. For her part, she was sure to imagine murder in every direction now. She had a strong mind, however, had not had any of the beer, and did not cry. She knew positively that Mary Jane was alive at one o'clock for at that hour she had heard her singing Sweet Violets to whoever was in the room. This fact and the name of the tune have been solemnly entered on the police account of the case.

IT IS USELESS TO THEORIZE

any further concerning the murderer. He has once more proved himself a man of wonderfully cool nerve or most utter recklessness. His cunning is displayed in having waited for the public terror to diminish, and until the demands of the lord mayor's day should have called a great number of police from the murderer-haunted district. London is already wondering when the next killing will take place.
Dr. Forbes Winslow, a recognized authority on questions of mania, has expressed to your correspondent the following opinion in regard to this fresh murder, which is of interest, in view of his professional reputation:
"It is said to be the work of the same homicidal lunatic who has committed other crimes in Whitechapel. The whole harrowing details point at this conclusion. The way in which the murder was done, and the strange state in which the body was left, are not consistent with sanity. I stated some days ago that the murderer was then in a lucid interval, and would recommence directly this state had passed away. It appears that the authorities were forgetting this theory, and that some one had been persuading them that from the fact of so long a time intervening between the murders, therefore he could not be a homicidal maniac. I desire flatly to deny this, and state more emphatically than ever that the murderer is one and the same person, and he is a lunatic suffering from homicidal monomania, who during lucid intervals is calm and forgetful of what he has been doing in the madness of his attack."

Source: The Capital, November 17, 1888, Page 3

A Sketch In Miller's Court, Whitechapel, London

[img][/img]

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 0:38

THE TERRIBLE CRIME.
THE SEVENTH VICTIM.

MURDERER'S LAST DIABOLICAL WORK.
WHY BLOODHOUNDS WERE NOT USED.

A MYSTERIOUS STRANGER.
A MAN ARRESTED ON SUSPICION.

THE MURDERED WOMAN'S HABITS.

More repellant than either that have preceded, infinitely more hideous in its details, the terrible crime - committed while London was decking itself in flags and garlands of flowers - has sent a thrill of shuddering horror through the Metropolis. "Another horrible murder and mutilation in Whitechapel!" This was the dreary raven-cry of the newsboys yesterday roared through every street in the City as its First Magistrate was moving in stately pomp to pay homage to the shrine of Justice. The newsboys did not exaggerate this time. Their words were no aggravation of the fiendish act perpetrated - there is only too much reason to suppose - by the miscreant who has so long laughed at Justice, and has dealt blow after blow with the malignity and the mysterious impunity of a fiend. The murder discovered yesterday morning differs from those that have preceded it only in having apparently been carried out with the entire deliberation permitted by the seclusion of a private room, and therefore with more ghastly completeness than before. Otherwise it is the same as the others - only more demoniacal and hideous in its incidents.

THE SCENE OF THE TRAGEDY.

This latest tragedy has taken place in the same unfortunate locality, Dorset-street, lying almost under the shadow of Spitalfields Church. Hanbury-street, the scene of one of the previous murders, lies just a short distance off the opposite side of Commercial-street, and this site will be found to be, roughly speaking, about midway between Hanbury-street and Mitre-square, on the other side of Bishopsgate-street. It is a short street, composed largely of common lodging-houses, in one of which Annie Chapman, a previous victim, and a friend of the last murdered creature, used sometimes to lodge. About half way down this street on the right hand side is Miller's-court, the entrance to which is a narrow arched passage, and within a few yards of which, by the way, last night there loomed grimly through the murky air a partly torn-down bill announcing a reward of 100 pounds for the discovery of the murderer on the last occasion. There are six two-roomed houses in Miller's-court, all of them owned by a grocer whose shop in Dorset-street forms one corner of the entrance to the court. Mr. McCarthy, the proprietor of this shop, has no hesitation in avowing his knowledge that all his six houses were tenanted by women of a certain class. They were let out in separate rooms "furnished," that is to say, there is in each of them a bed and a table, and, perhaps, one or two odds and ends, all of the roughest and most trumpery description, since, if the things had any appreciable value in the market they would be certain to disappear.

THE VICTIM - IN ARREARS WITH HER RENT.

For these rooms rents are supposed to be paid daily, but of course they will sometimes get a good deal in arrear. This was the case with one of the tenants, who had occupied a ground-floor room on the right-hand side of the court for about twelve months. Her name was understood to be Mary Jane Kelly - a young woman of 24, tall, slim, fair, of fresh complexion, and attractive appearance - and she was believed to be the daughter of a man occupying a responsible position in some ironworks in the neighbourhood of Carmarthen. She was about 24 years of age, and till last Tuesday week she had been living with a man named Joseph Barnet, variously described as a fruit hawker in the streets and a labourer in Billingsgate Market. This man, it is said, had been a soldier, and had cohabited with Kelly till a week or ten days ago, when a quarrel took place and the man left her. Yesterday morning she was as much as 14s. in arrear with her rent, and the landlord sent one of his men - an old pensioner, by name Joseph Bowyer - at about eleven o'clock to see what he could get. The door was fastened, not that it had been locked from the inside; but, having a catch-lock, the person who had gone out last had merely slammed the door behind him, and it thus become fastened.

A HORRIFYING SPECTACLE.

Having failed to open the door, he passed round the angle of the house and pulled the blind of the window, one of the panes being broken. Then he noticed blood upon the glass, and it immediately occurred to him that another murder had been committed. He fetched M'Carthy, who, looking through the window, saw upon the bed, which was against the wall, the body of a woman, without clothing, and terribly mutilated. The police at Commercial-street and at Leman-street, both stations being within five minutes' walk, were instantly informed, and in response to the summons Inspector Beck arrived. This officer despatched a message for Inspector Abberline and Inspector Reid, both of the Detective Department. Nothing, however, was done until the arrival of Mr. T. Arnold, the Superintendent of the H Division of Metropolitan Police, who, shortly after eleven o'clock, gave orders for the door of the room to be broken open. The last person to have left the place must have closed the door behind him, taking with him the key from the spring lock, as it is missing.

THE MURDERER'S FIENDISH WORK.

A horrifying spectacle presented itself to the officer's gaze, exceeding in ghastliness anything the imagination can picture. The body was so horribly hacked and gashed that, but for the long hair, it was scarcely possible to say with any certainty that it was the body of a woman lying entirely naked on the wretched bed, with legs outspread and drawn up to the trunk. The fiendish assailant was not content with taking the life of his victim by almost severing the head from the body, but he had exercised an infernal ingenuity in despoiling the corpse of its human resemblance. The ears and nose had been cut off, and the flesh cut from one cheek. The flesh had been stripped off leaving the skeleton, the cheeks and forehead of the severed head presenting a most revolting appearance. In addition to this, one breast had been removed, the flesh roughly torn from the thigh, and the abdomen ripped as in previous cases, several of the organs having been removed from the trunk and laid on the table beside the bed. It was stated in some of the evening papers that the particular organ missing in two previous murders was also found to have been abstracted in this case also. That, however, is not the case. Small portions of the body are missing, but that, it is somewhat enigmatically stated, can be accounted for. In addition to the various mutilations thus described, one arm was almost severed from the trunk, and there were miscellaneous cuts and slashes about the person of the unfortunate woman, as though her assailant, having exhausted his ingenuity in systematic destruction, had given a few random parting strokes before pocketing his weapon and going out into the night.

WHEN WAS THE DEED COMMITTED?

The last expression, however, suggests the question as to when the deed could have been done. Strictly speaking, the only answer to this is that nobody knows. The only things that seem tolerably certain are that at half-past ten on Thursday night she was alive, and that at eleven o'clock yesterday morning she was found most foully murdered. In the meantime, at as late as one o'clock yesterday morning, the poor creature was heard by her neighbours singing "Sweet Violets." This was the only noise heard, and it was not then suspected that she was accompanied by a man. When examined all that could be said about the body was that death had apparently taken place some hours previously. The deceased was well known to those living round about, and one woman, who had shared her room with her, and only removed into an adjacent court on Thursday, parted with her on Thursday night at half-past ten o'clock at the corner of Dorset-street. Kelly informed her that she had no money, and said that if she could not get any she would never go out any more, but would do away with herself. Soon after they parted, and a man, who is described as respectably dressed, then - so it is said - came up and spoke to the murdered woman Kelly and offered her some money. The man accompanied the woman to her lodgings, which are on the second floor. The unfortunate creature had, it is said, a son living with her - a little fellow of between six or seven years, upon whom she appeared to have lavished a considerable amount of affection. "Ah," she once exclaimed, "I could not bear to see the boy starving. I would rather die." This little fellow was now, it is said, sent to a neighbour's house. This is all that, up to last night, was known as to her companionship with this mysterious man. At about the same time - probably prior to it, as she met the associate we have alluded to - she was seen and spoken to by another woman of the same unhappy class, with whom, too, the deceased till quite recently seems to have shared her food just as with the other friend, a woman named Harvey, she had shared her room. Another statement was made last evening by a woman, who asserted that the deceased had been seen by her alive and well, and in company with a man, at the Ringers public-house, at the corner of Dorset-street, at half-past ten yesterday morning. It seems certain, however, that this statement was either due to a mistake, or was one of those mischievous inventions which add so immensely to the labours and worries of the police.

ENSHROUDED IN MYSTERY.

It may be regarded as practically certain that the poor woman's life was taken - as in the previous cases - during the night, and the frightful hacking of the body was rendered practicable by the fact that the deed was done in a private room in an obscure court. As in each of the other cases, not a sound was heard, and the presumption is that the mode of procedure had been just as before. The victim and the assassin had probably gone to the room together, and without the slightest warning, and without giving a moment's opportunity for a single cry of help, the throat had been cut. Then the wretch fell to his hideous work of destruction, and made off at his leisure. "Is it not astounding that he could have gone in and out without being observed by somebody in the court?" was a question put to an intelligent labouring man, a denizen of the neighbourhood "Not a bit," was the reply, "and you would understand it if you knew the place and the kind of people. Men go in and out there, and nobody thinks anything about them or takes any notice of 'em. It's everybody for themselves there." Whatever may be the truth of the matter, it seemed last night to be enshrouded in just as great a mystery as all the preceding ones, and the anxiety and despondency of the police of the district were very evident.

BODY AT THE MORTUARY.

At four o'clock in the afternoon the body was removed from Dorset-street to Shoreditch Mortuary, which stands at the back of Shoreditch Church. The mutilated remains were placed in a coarse coffin, which had apparently been used on many previous occasions for the conveyance of the dead, and which was partially covered with a coarse canvas cloth. The straps of the coffin were sealed. The coffin was conveyed in a one-horse ordinary furniture van, and was escorted by several constables under Sergeant Betham. A large crowd followed. At the mortuary another throng was waiting to see the coffin transferred to the building. The photographer who had been called in to photograph the room and the body removed his camera from the premises at half-past four, and shortly afterwards a detective officer carried from the house a pail, with which he left in a four-wheel cab. The pail was covered with a newspaper, and was stated to contain portions of the woman's body. It was taken to the house of Dr. Phillips, 2, Spital-square. The windows of the room where the crime was committed were then boarded up and a padlock put on the door.

THE BLOODHOUNDS MISSING.

On the first discovery of the murder the authorities at Scotland-yard wired that the officers would be sent, and accordingly, by the imperative orders of the divisional surgeon, all pedestrians were rigorously forbidden to approach anywhere near the house in which the body lay, and cordons of police barred the way even into the street from which Miller's-court opens. These precautions against destroying any scent that might possibly prove efficacious in tracking the criminal were maintained till a second telegram from headquarters was received stating that the dogs were not to be sent, and the police cordon was then withdrawn from the outer street, though the excited public were still excluded from the court. The non-appearance of the bloodhounds was afterwards accounted for. During the recent trials in Surrey the animals bolted, and, it is understood, have not been recovered.

IMPORTANT FACT - IS IT A CLUE?

What is believed to be an important fact transpired last evening, which, if true, puts a fresh complexion on the theory of the murders. It appears that the cattle boats bringing live freights to London are in the habit of coming into the Thames on Thursdays or Fridays, and leave again for the Continent on Sundays or Mondays. It has already been a matter of comment that the recent revolting crimes have been committed at the end of the week, and an opinion has been formed among some of the detectives that the murderer is a drover or butcher employed on one of these boats, of which there are many, and that he periodically appears and disappears with one of the steamers. This theory is held to be of much importance by those engaged in this investigation, who believe that the murderer does not reside in the locality, or even in this country at all. It is pointed out that at the inquests on the previous victims, the Coroners had expressed the opinion that the knowledge of physiology possessed by a butcher would have been sufficient to enable him to find and cut out the parts of the body which in several cases were abstracted.
The miscreant left no trace whatever behind him, and the pilot coat, which was found in the room and which it was hoped at first might have belonged to him, now transpires to have belonged to a man residing in the same court. He is not in any way suspected - on the contrary - his innocence is firmly established in the minds of the police.

A FAINT CRY OF "MURDER."

As we say, it is stated that no sound - sufficient at least to arouse suspicion - was heard proceeding from the room occupied by the murdered woman. Some residents in the court, however, declare that about a quarter to two they heard a faint cry of murder, which would seem to fix with tolerable exactitude the time at which the crime was committed; but against this must be set the statement of a woman residing at 26, Dorset-street, a house the back rooms of which abut upon the court, according to which a cry of "Murder!" was heard at three o'clock. It is characteristic of the locality that no one thought anything of the incident, which, indeed, is of too common occurrence to cause interest or alarm. A man engaged as a market porter, and living at 8, Miller's-court, stated that, although his rooms face the scene of the murder, he heard nothing of it until he went out in the morning at half-past ten to get some milk, and was stopped by the police.

THE MAN KELLY LIVED WITH.

Several statements have been made to the police. It is unnecessary to reproduce all of them - they throw but little light on the diabolical crime which has aroused so intense a feeling in East London. Joseph Barrett, an Irishman at present residing in a common lodging-house in New-street, Bishopsgate, informed a reporter last evening that he had occupied his present lodgings since Tuesday week. Previous to that he had lived in Miller's-court, Dorset-street, for eight or nine months with the murdered woman, Mary Jane Kelly. They were very happy and comfortable together until an "unfortunate" came to sleep in their room, to which he strongly objected. Finally, after the woman had been there two or three nights, he quarrelled with his "wife" and left her. The next day, however, he returned and gave Kelly money. He called several other days, and gave her money when he had it. On Thursday night he visited her between half-past seven and eight, and told her he was sorry he had no money to give her. He saw nothing more of her. He was indoors yesterday morning, when he heard that a woman had been murdered in Dorset-street, but he did not know at first who the victim was. He voluntarily went to the police, who after questioning him satisfied themselves that his statements were correct, and therefore released him. Barrett believed that Kelly, who was an Irishwoman, was an "unfortunate" before he made her acquaintance. She used occasionally to go to the Elephant and Castle district, to see a friend, who, like herself, was an "unfortunate."

A MYSTERIOUS STRANGER.

A Mrs. Paumier, a young woman who sells roasted chestnuts at the corner of Widegate-street, a narrow thoroughfare about two minutes' walk from the scene of the murder, states that, about twelve o'clock at noon yesterday, a man, dressed like a gentleman, came to her, and said, "I suppose you have heard about the murder in Dorset-street." She replied that she had, whereupon the man laughed, and said, "I know more about it than you." He then stared into her face, and went down Sandy's-row, another narrow thoroughfare which cuts across Widegate-street. When he had got some way off he looked back, as if to see whether she was watching him, and then disappeared. Mrs. Paumier says the man had a black moustache, was about five feet six inches in height, and wore a black silk hat, a black coat, and speckled trousers. He also carried a black shiny bag about a foot in depth and foot and a half in length. Mrs. Paumier stated that the same man accosted three young women in the street on Thursday night, and they chaffed him and asked him what he had in the bag, and he replied, "Something that the ladies don't like." This, of course, gives an increased importance to the statement. One of the three young women in question, Sarah Roney by name - a girl about twenty years of age - states that she was with two other girls on Thursday night in Brushfield-street, which is near Dorset-street, when a man, wearing a tall hat and a black coat, and carrying a black bag, came up to her, and said, "Will you come with me?" She told him she would not, and asked him what he had in the bag, and he said, "Something the ladies don't like." He then walked away.

LAST NIGHT IN DORSET-STREET.

THE CROWD AT MILLER'S-COURT.

At eleven o'clock last night Dorset-street looked its dingiest and gloomiest. There was, of course, a crowd before the entrance to McCarthy's-court - or, as it is popularly known, Miller's-court - in which stands the house where the unfortunate woman was murdered. The body had been taken away in the afternoon to the mortuary, which is attaining the celebrity almost of the Paris Morgue; but the crowd still hung opposite the entrance to the court discussing the murder and the murderer. Over the way, the occupants of the Commercial-street-chambers were looking out upon the crowd, their noses glued to the window panes. Sheer dazed stupidity (says an Echo reporter) seems to be the attitude of the East-enders before this most mysterious of modern mysteries. In the crowd last night the keynote struck seemed to be that of resignation to the inevitable "Jack the Ripper." It would appear to have been accepted as a concomitant of East-end life. The firm opinion is that he will never be caught. He is regarded almost as one of the terrible conditions which go to the making up of existence in the East-end. The women are waxing superstitious. One old lady last night averred that he was the Devil, or, if not Satan himself, one of the demons, nor could she be reasoned out of this mental attitude.

IN THE PUBLIC-HOUSE.

Hard by the scene of the murder stands a public-house, which was a place of resort visited by the murdered woman. The landlord - evidently a respectable man - suspects a fellow who was wont to call there. The man in question was a big, burly-looking fellow, with a black moustache. He had been seen in the company of the deceased woman, and the landlord told the Echo reporter as a significant fact that the man, although a regular customer to some extent, had not visited the house at all yesterday. This may be a clue, but it looks a very shadowy one. The man appeared to follow the calling of a butcher. We shall probably see from this a revival of the old suggestion that the murderer is a slaughter-man.

IN A DORSET-STREET "DOSS-HOUSE."

One of our reporters last night had the temerity to visit one of those fearsome establishments known in the neighbourhood as "doss houses." Having paid the required sum of fourpence, he was ushered into the kitchen of the establishment, not, however, without certain glances of angry suspicion being levelled at him by the Deputy. The room was a fairly large one. A big, bright fire was burning in the grate, and at the rough wooden tables lining the walls the habitues of the house were having their supper. One very frowsy-looking fellow was eating a beefsteak, which threw its grateful fragrance round the room, whilst at the same table another, and obviously less fortunate "dosser," was munching a chunk of bread, and drinking tea of a colour which suggested that there was more water in the brew than tea. Other men were supping, some eating frugally enough off bread and cheese, the remainder contenting themselves with less humble fare. Our reporter got into conversation with the men. It was shocking to note the light cynical fashion in which they treated the murders. They might begin a sentence sympathetically enough, but it almost invariably ended in a laugh of brutal indifference, or even worse. Did anyone know her? A rough-looking fellow, engaged in cutting his victuals on the rude table, queried on this, "Did anyone not know her?" - a remark which hugely tickled his companions. Poor Mary Jane Kelly was a figure, it appears, in street brawls, sudden and quick in quarrel, and - for a woman - handy with her fists. The rough fellows laughed and grieved in turns over her, although the terrible cynicism beforehand mentioned always entered in his conversation. An elderly man who wore a coat and waistcoat, but no shirt underneath, averred in pessimistic tones that it was better for Mary Ann Kelly to have been done to death. "Wot was her life?" he muttered, spreading out his thin and not too clean hands to the fire. "Starvation three days a week, and then, when she got money, drink for the other three days. I knowed her. I guv her the money for her doss three weeks ago cos she had'nt none. Yes, matey, and that at two in the mornin'," he said, turning to our reporter whose intent hearing may possibly have suggested incredulity. "Mary Jane was a good soul." This testimony was freely offered. "She would spend her money lavishly when she had any, and when she hadn't any, why - " The sentence was left unfinished. Our reporter soon left. Even as he stepped out into the darkness visible of Dorset-street from the glow-light of the lodging-house kitchen, the men laughed loudly and their laughter was carried up the street. The terrible event of the morning had little, if any, saddening effect on these men. Even within a stone's throw of the scene of the tragedy they were laughing and cracking jokes as if the shadow of death were not then brooding over the miserable street. But to give them their due, their reckless merriment was at times dashed with a pitying sigh for poor Mary Jane Kelly.

(For later details see page 8.)

Source: The Echo, Saturday November 10, 1888, Page 4

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 0:40

THE DAY'S NEWS.
THE EAST-END MURDER.

LATEST DETAILS.
TWO ARRESTS.

SCENE IN COMMERCIAL-STREET.
MAN WITH A BLACK BAG.

PARDON TO ACCOMPLICE.

We have received the following official communication from Sir Charles Warren: -

"Murder. Pardon. Whereas, on Nov. 8th or 9th, in Miller's-court, Dorset-street, Spitalfields, Mary Janette Kelly was murdered by some person or persons unknown, the Secretary of State will advise the grant of Her Majesty's gracious pardon to any accomplice, not being a person who contrived or actually committed the murder, who shall give such information and evidence as shall lead to the discovery and concviction of the person or persons who committed the murder. - (Signed) CHARLES WARREN, the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis."

Late last night hundreds of people came surging down Commercial-street round a posse of police who guarded a tall, rather vigorous-looking man, who looked flushed and defiant, and was evidently strongly believed by the mob to be the assassin. It went from mouth to mouth that he had blood on his clothes. The crowd in the wildest excitement rushed down to the station, but of course were excluded. What degree of importance was to be attached to the arrest could not then be known. The man was given into custody by some women as one who had accosted them on the previous night, and whose conduct was suspicious. The prisoner, was, however, released - so the police announce - during today, his statements being verified. The second arrest was made in the small hours of the morning, when a man, apparently a foreigner, was brought to Commercial-street, on suspicion. He was still detained this morning, but no importance is attached to the apprehension, and eventually he, too, was discharged.

THE SCENE DURING THE NIGHT.

A representative of the Press Association, who has been prosecuting inquiries in Spitalfields throughout the night, says: -
With the closing of the local taverns the excitement abated, and the neighbourhood assumed its normal appearance. Between the hours of one and four nothing which may be termed unusual occurred. Women of the unfortunate class paraded the several highways with an unconcernedness which may be termed remarkable, considering the recent hideous crime which had been committed. The drafts of auxiliary detectives which have been requisitioned since the perpetration of the Mitre-square and Berner-street tragedies, from the suburban districts, performed their unenviable duties in the regulation manner; and to a casual pedestrian who may have passed through the district after midnight nothing whatever existed to denote the commission of a crime of a character hitherto unknown in the annals of the police.

WHAT HER COMPANIONS STATE.

The police state that they have adopted every possible precaution to entrap the fiend without success, and now that he has adopted the precaution of dissecting his unfortunate victims in their own houses their ends are completely defeated. Notwithstanding every effort the police assert that they have failed to establish the time at which or about the crime was committed. Many person who have been interviewed, state that the unfortunate woman never left the house at 26, Dorset-street, after she entered it on Thursday midnight, while, on the other hand, numerous persons, who declare that they were companions of the deceased and knew her well, state that she came out of her house at eight o'clock on Friday morning for provisions, and furthermore, that they were drinking with her in the Brittania, a local tavern, at ten o'clock on the same morning as her mutilated body was found at eleven.

CRY OF "MURDER!" HEARD AT 3:30.

Our representative has interview a woman named Kennedy, who was on the night of the murder staying with her parents at a house situated in the court immediately opposite the room in which the body of Mary Kelly was found. This woman's statement, if true - and there is very little reason for doubting its veracity - establishes the time at which the murderer commenced his operations upon his victim. She states that about three o'clock on Friday morning she entered Dorset-street on her way to her parents' house, which is situated immediately opposite that in which the murder was committed. She noticed three persons at the corner of the street near the Britannia public-house. There was a man - a young man, respectable dressed, and with a dark moustache - talking to a woman whom she did not know, and also a female poorly clad and without any headgear. The man and woman appeared to be the worse for liquor, and she heard the man ask, "Are you coming?" whereupon the woman, who appeared to be obstinate, turned in an opposite direction to which the man apparently wished her to go. Mrs. Kennedy went on her way, and nothing unusual occurred until about half an hour later. She states that she did not retire to rest immediately she reached her parents' abode, but sat up, and between half-past three and a quarter to four she heard a cry of "Murder!" in a woman's voice proceed from the direction in which Mary Kelly's room was situated. As the cry was not repeated, she took no further notice of the circumstance until the morning, when she found the police in possession of the place, preventing all egress to the occupants of the small house in the court.

SINGULAR AFFAIR ON WEDNESDAY.

Mrs. Kennedy has supplemented that statement by the following: - On Wednesday evening, about eight o'clock, she and her sister were in the neighbourhood of Bethnal Green-road, when they were accosted by a very suspicious man about 40 years of age. He wore a short jacket, over which he had a long top coat. He had a black moustache, and wore a billycock hat. He invited them to accompany him into a lonely spot. He made several strange remarks, and appeared to be agitated. He was very white in the face, and made every endeavour to prevent them "looking him straight in the face." He carried a black bag. He avoided walking with them, and led the way into a very dark thoroughfare, at the back of the workhouse, inviting them to follow, which they did. He then pushed open a small door in a pair of large gates, and requested one of them to follow him. The women then became suspicious. He acted in a very strange and suspicious manner, and refused to leave his bag in the possession of one of the females. Both women became alarmed at his actions, and escaped, at the same time raising an alarm of "Jack the Ripper!" A gentlemen who was passing is stated to have intercepted the man while the women made their escape. Mrs. Kennedy asserts that the man whom she saw on Friday morning with the woman at the corner of Dorset-street resembled very closely the individual who caused such alarm on the previous night, and that she would recognise him again if confronted with him.
This description of the man suspected of this murder tallies exactly with that in the possession of the police of a man who is believed to have entered the murdered woman's house.

THE THEORY OF THE DOCTORS.

"Whitechapel is today in a state of ferment." So an Echo reporter writes this morning. As was the case yesterday, when the news spread of the tragedy, so this morning, the wildest rumours are current respecting the possible identity of the maniac murderer. That he is a homicidal lunatic, with an abnormal passion and a "love for killing," there is now little doubt in the minds of some of the six medical men who are professionally connected with the case. Dr. G.B. Phillips, the divisional surgeon of the H division, whose reticence is justified by an assurance he gave of secrecy, has copious notes of the results of the post-mortem examination, and with nearly every conclusion at which he has arrived, Dr. Thomas Bond, of Westminster, a well-known expert on crimes of violence, agrees. Dr. Phillips has only vaguely indicated to the local police the result of his investigations, but a report on the question has, it is asserted, been jointly made by him and Dr. Bond, and submitted to Sir Charles Warren. It is believed to be the medical opinion that the woman was killed in her sleep, or while in a partially comatose condition arising from drink.

THE VICTIM'S PREVIOUS ABODES.

From investigations made by our reporter this morning, it appears that Mary Jane Kelly has been a tenant of Mr. McCarthy's for ten months. When she took the room she was accompanied by Barnett, whom she assured the landlord was her husband. Until recently they lived on the most affectionate terms, a statement today confirmed by Annie Gavan, a young woman living in the court, who knew the deceased well; while Elizabeth Smith, also lodging there, remarked, "I have known her a long time. She and Barnett were as happy as possible until she gave way to drink." Prior to lodging in Miller's-court, the murdered woman lived at 35, Dorset-street - a common lodging-house, frequented at the time by Annie Chapman, one of the East-end victims - while her place of abode previous to that was, curiously enough, in Flower and Dean-street. The front room where the crime was committed is the most public in the court, and the whole of the residents had to pass by the window either on their exit to Dorset-street or to get their water supply.

A "JACK THE RIPPER" LETTER.

The police authorities in different parts of the metropolis received complaints during last night from females who belong to the unfortunate class, that they had been accosted and threatened by a man answering the description of the man supposed to be the murderer, but who, on seeing other persons approaching towards him, ran away. In the pillar letter-box at the corner of Northumberland-street and Marylebone-road was a found a letter directed to the police. Its contents were as follows: -

"Dear Boss, - I shall be busy tomorrow night in Marylebone. I have two booked for blood. - Yours, JACK THE RIPPER. Look out about ten o'clock, Marylebone-road."

A man, who is alleged to answer the description of the murderer, is said to have entered a common lodging-house at Whitechapel last night. A conversation on the murder took place, and at once the man left.

THE MYSTERY DEEPENS.

The circumstances connected with the tragedy are more mysterious than ever. Some persons have reiterated the statement already made that the unfortunate woman was seen between eight and nine o'clock yesterday morning. One of her companions, more positive than the rest, declares that she saw Mary Jane Kelly at nine o'clock, and the officers of justice are this afternoon inquiring into the truth or otherwise of the woman's assertion. From the nature of the mutilations and the loss of blood the doctors can only form a very vague idea as to the time when death actually occurred. It, as is asserted, the crime actually took place in daylight, the miscreant could only have completed his work - which, it is calculated, could scarcely have been done in less time than an hour - a few minutes before the ghastly discovery was made. It is stated that there is still some mystery attaching to the pilot-coat found in the dead woman's room.

THE MEDICAL EXAMINATION.

The investigation made by the doctors yesterday was not the final one, mainly because the room was ill-adapted for the purpose of carrying out a complete autopsy. The post-mortem examination-in-chief was only commenced this morning, at the early hour of half-past seven, when Dr. Phillips, Dr. Bond, Dr. Hibbert, and other experts attended. Some portions of the body are missing, and, says an Echo reporter, writing at two o'clock this afternoon, Dr. Phillips and Dr. Bond, accompanied by Inspector Moore, Inspector Abberline, and Inspector Reid, are again paying a visit to Miller's-court, in order to examine the ashes found in the grate, as it is thought small parts of the body may have been burnt.

HUSTLING A "SUSPECT."

A laughable incident - to the crowd - as witnessed by an Echo reporter shortly before twelve o'clock today in Commercial-street. A gentlemanly man, well-dressed, with a silk hat of faultless appearance, paid a visit to Dorset-street in order to see the spot where the murder was committed. Turning into a bye street he was immediately assailed by two roughs, who raised a cry of "Jack the Ripper." The gentleman rushed madly along Commercial-street, followed by a mob. Fortunately, a police constable on duty went to this rescue, and, for the sake of protection, the stranger was taken to Commercial-street Police-station. There an excited crowd gathered in front of the building, and the usual rumours spread amongst them as to the apprehension. The gentleman was a person of some position, in an extensive way of business at Tower-hill. He was immediately released, making his exit at the private entrance to the station at the back of the building.

"INFORMATION" FOR THE POLICE.
A STORY TO A CONSTABLE.

One of the usual and very natural effects of these hideous crimes is that the police, shortly after their committal, are deluged with descriptions of persons supposed to be the murderer, and with reference to individuals whose movements are looked upon as suspicious. During the night and this morning several people have called at Leman-street Police-station and communicated to the police tit-bits of information which they imagine will have some bearing, important or otherwise, upon the movements of the miscreant. "We don't pay much attention to some of these," candidly confessed a young officer this morning to an Echo reporter. "Some of these people only make their statements for the express purpose of getting what they can. For instance, one woman came up to me about five o'clock this morning, "Sergeant," she said, "I've got a little bit of news for you." Of course I asked her what it was in the usual way, and she went on to tell me, with an air of peculiar mystery, that she lived in Mansell-street, just off Aldgate. She had a lodger, a tall, dark foreigner. He was out all Thursday night, but he returned yesterday morning about nine o'clock. He appeared to be "hurried," paid for his room, and left immediately. She had not seen him since, and had no idea as to where he went. He left a small bag behind, and she, anticipating a prize, burst it open during the day, to find it contained - nothing."

ANOTHER LODGER - AND ANOTHER BAG.

This is only one of the numerous cases to which the attention of the police is directed. Here is another. The chief actors in this, too, are a landlady and a lodger. The latter was a medium-sized, well-spoken, and even polite American, and the former a tiny little body, remarkable for her rotundity. She told the Leman-street police, with very singular volubility, how her lodger was in the habit of staying out all night very frequently; how he had not been home for some days; and how she had found two knives in his portmanteau. The police went forthwith to the house of the lady, they instituted inquiries, and in less than an hour learned that the wayward lodger was a slaughterman in a neighbouring butcher's establishment. Thus the police are kept constantly on the alert, unfortunately, however, finding nothing that can lead to a clue.

THE EXCITEMENT IN SPITALFIELDS.

Outside the gloomy passage leading to Miller's-court, this morning, a large and constantly increasing crowd of persons assembled. What their object was it is difficult to say. All they could possibly see were two stalwart constables guarding the entrance to the court, and a dirty aperture, about six yards on the other side of which, and entirely obscured from view, is the house where the murder was committed. The bells of Christ's Church, over the way, were ringing a merry peal during the morning, and various people wended their way to morning service; but the Dorset-street crowd became larger and larger until at length the police found it necessary to compel the stolid spectators to "move on." The latest crime is, of course, the theme of every conversation in the neighbourhood, which is even more excited than when the Mitre-square and Berner-street tragedies occurred.

THE INQUEST.

The inquest on the victim has been fixed for Monday next, at eleven o'clock, at the Shoreditch Town-hall. A curious discussion has taken place as to which Coroner should hold the inquiry. Both Mr. Baxter and Dr. Macdonald were of opinion that the murder occurred in their district, but the latter gentleman will conduct the inquiry.

(For Other Details see Page 4.)

Source: The Echo, Saturday November 10, 1888, Page 3

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 0:41

ANOTHER EAST-END ATROCITY.

MURDER OF A SEVENTH WOMAN.

HORRIBLE MUTILATION OF THE VICTIM.

Early on Friday morning another shocking murder was perpetrated in the East-end of London, the crime being carried out in a most horrible manner. This is the seventh which has occurred, and the character of the mutilations leaves very little doubt that the murderer in this instance is the same person who has committed the previous ones. The scene of this last atrocity is at No. 26, Dorset-street, Spitalfields, about 200 yards distant from 35, Hanbury-street, where the unfortunate woman, Mary Ann Nichols, was murdered. Although the victim, whose name is Mary Ann (or Mary Jane) Kelly, resides at the above number, the entrance to the room she occupied is up a narrow court, in which are some half-a-dozen houses, and which is known as Miller's-court; it is entirely separated from the other portion of the house, and has an entrance leading into the court. The house is rented by John M'Carthy, who keeps a small general shop at No. 27, Dorset-street, and the whole of the rooms are let out to tenants of a very poor class. Nearly the whole of the houses in this street are common lodging-houses, and the one opposite where this murder was enacted has accommodation for some 300 men, and is fully occupied every night. About 12 months ago Kelly, who was about 24 years of age, and who was considered a good-looking young woman, of fair and fresh-coloured complexion, came to Mr. M'Carthy with a man named Joseph Barnett or Kelly, who, she stated, was a porter employed at the Spitalfields Market. They rented a room on the ground floor, the same in which the poor woman was murdered, at a rental of 4s. a week. It had been noticed that the woman was somewhat addicted to drink, but Mr. M'Carthy denied having any knowledge that she had been living a loose or immoral life. About a fortnight ago she had a quarrel with Kelly, and, after blows had been exchanged, the man left the house, or rather room, and did not return. Since then the woman has supported herself as best she could, and the police have ascertained that she has been walking the streets. About 1 o'clock on Friday morning a person living in the court opposite to the room occupied by the murdered woman heard her singing "Sweet Violets," but is unable to say whether anyone else was with her at the time.

A WOMAN'S STATEMENT.

A woman named Kennedy, however, states about 3 o'clock in the morning she entered Dorset-street on her way to her parents' house, which is situated immediately opposite that in which the murder was committed. She noticed three persons at the corner of the street near the Britannia public-house. There was a young man, respectably dressed, and with a dark moustache, talking to a woman whom she did not know, and also a woman poorly clad, without any headgear. The man and woman appeared to be the worse for liquor, and she heard the man ask, "Are you coming?" Whereupon the woman appeared to be obstinate, and turned in an opposite direction to which the man apparently wished her to go. Mrs. Kennedy went on her way, and nothing unusual occurred until about half-an-hour later. She did not retire immediately she reached her parent's house, and between half-past 3 and a quarter to 4 she heard a cry of "Murder," in a woman's voice, proceed from the direction in which Mary Kelly's room was situated. As the cry was not repeated she took no further notice of the circumstance.

A MAN WITH A BLACK BAG.

Mrs. Kennedy supplemented this statement by the following: "On Wednesday evening, about 8 o'clock, I and my sister were in the neighbourhood of Bethnal Green-road, when we were accosted by a very suspicious-looking man about 40 years of age. He was about five feet seven inches high, wore a short jacket, over which he had a long top-coat. He had a black moustache, and wore a billycock hat. He invited us to accompany him into a lonely spot, as he was known about there, and there was a policeman looking at him." She asserts that no policeman was in sight. He made several strange remarks, and appeared to be agitated. He was very white in the face, and made every endeavour to prevent them looking him straight in the face. He carried a black bag. He avoided walking with them, and led the way into a very dark thoroughfare, at the back of the workhouse, inviting them to follow, which they did. He then pushed open a small door in a pair of large gates, and requested one of them to follow him, remarking, "I only want one of you," whereupon the women became suspicious. He acted in a very strange and suspicious manner, and refused to leave his bag in possession of one of the females. Both women became alarmed at his actions, and escaped, at the same time raising an alarm of "Jack the Ripper." A gentleman who was passing is stated to have intercepted the man, while the women made their escape. Mrs. Kennedy asserts that the man whom she saw on Friday morning with the woman at the corner of Dorset-street resembled very closely the individual who caused such alarm on the night in question, and that she would recognise him again if confronted with him. This description of the man suspected of the murder tallies exactly with that in the possession of the police and there is very little doubt that the murderer entered the murdered woman's house late on Thursday night or early on Friday morning.

HOW THE MURDER WAS DISCOVERED.

At a quarter to 11, as the woman was 35s. in arrears with her rent, Mr. M'Carthy said to a man employed by him in his shop, "Go to No. 13 (meaning the room occupied by Kelly) and try and get some rent." The man did as he was directed, and on knocking at the door was unable to obtain an answer. He then tried the handle of the door, and found it was locked. On looking through the keyhole he found the key was missing. Through a broken pane of glass he could see the woman lying on the bed naked, covered with blood, and apparently dead. The police were sent for, and Superintendent Arnold, having satisfied himself that the woman was dead, ordered one of the windows to be entirely removed.

A HORRIBLE AND SICKENING SIGHT

then presented itself. The poor woman lay on her back on the bed, entirely naked. Her throat was cut from ear to ear, right down to the spinal column. The ears and nose had bee cut clean off and placed on a table which was by the side of the bed. The stomach and abdomen had been ripped open, while the face was slashed about, so that the features were beyond all recognition. The kidneys and heart had also been removed from the body, and placed on the table by the side of the breasts. The liver had likewise been removed, and laid on the right thigh. The lower portion of the body and the uterus had been cut out, and the thighs had been cut. A more horrible or sickening sight could not be imagined. The clothes of the woman were lying by the side of the bed, as though they had been taken off and laid down in the ordinary manner. The bedclothes had been turned down, and this was probably done by the murderer after he had cut his victim's throat. There was no appearance of a struggle having taken place, and, although a careful search of the room was made, no knife or instrument of any kind was found. It was reported that bloodhounds would be laid on to endeavour to trace the murderer, but for some reason this project was not carried out, and, of course, after the streets became thronged with people, that would have had no practical result.

A NEW THEORY.

A somewhat important fact has been pointed out, which puts a fresh complexion on the theory of the murders. It appears that the cattle boats bringing live freight to London are in the habit of coming into the Thames on Thursdays or Fridays, and leave again for the Continent on Sundays or Mondays. It has already been a matter of comment that the recent revolting crimes have been committed at the week's end, and an opinion has been formed among some of the detectives that the murderer is a drover or butcher employed on one of these boats - of which there are many - and that he periodically appears and disappears with one of the steamers. This theory is held to be of much importance by those engaged in this investigation, who believe that the murderer does not reside in the locality, or even in this country at all. It is pointed out that, at the inquests on the previous victims, the coroners had expressed the opinion that the knowledge of physiology possessed by a butcher would have been sufficient to enable him tofind and cut out the parts of the body which in several cases were abstracted.

ARRESTS ON SUSPICION.

The police made two fruitless arrests in connection with the murder. One man was accused by some women late on the night of the crime of being the murderer; but he was released after a short detention, his statements being satisfactorily verified. The second arrest was made in the small hours of the morning, when a man, apparently a foreigner, was brought to Commercial-street on suspicion. He was also released. The police continue to receive statements from persons who believe they can throw light upon the mysterious side of the murder, but investigations have proved them valueless. On Friday night there was found in the pillar-box at the corner of Northumberland-street and Marylebone-road a letter directed to the police, and its contents were as follows: - "Dear Boss, - I shall be busy tomorrow night in Marylebone. I have two booked for blood and ----- - Yours, JACK THE RIPPER. Look out about 10 o'clock, Marylebone-road."

FREE PARDON FOR AN ACCOMPLICE.

The following official announcement was issued on Saturday: "Murder. Pardon. - Whereas, on November 8 or 9, in Miller-court, Dorset-street, Spitalfields, Mary Janet Kelly was murdered by some person or persons unknown, the Secretary of State will advise the grant of her Majesty's gracious pardon to any accomplice, not being a person who contrived or actually committed the murder, who shall give such information and evidence as shall lead to the discovery and conviction of the person or persons who committed the murder. - (Signed) CHARLES WARREN, the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis, Metropolitan Police-office, 4, Whitehall-place, S.W., November 10.

AN AMATEUR DETECTIVE MOBBED.

About 10 o'clock on Sunday night a medical man, who had acted as a sort of amateur detective, was roughly handled by the mob, and was conveyed to the Leman-street police-station amid a scene of wild excitement, and the cry was raised that he was "Jack the Ripper." He was of course immediately released.

INQUEST ON THE VICTIM.

On Monday Dr. Macdonald, M.P., the North-East Middlesex coroner, held an inquest on the body.
Chief Inspectors Aberline, Nairn, and Chandler appeared to represent Sir Charles Warren, the Chief Commissioner of Police, while Detective-Inspector Edmund Reid represented the local police. Outside the building a large crowd assembled and the greatest interest was manifested in the proceedings.
The first witness called was Joseph Barnett, labourer. He said he had lived with the deceased about one year and eight months. Her name was Mary Janet Kelly, and her maiden name was Kelly. He had seen the body and identified it by the ears and eyes, which were all that could be seen. They had lived together in room 13, at 9, Miller-court, for about seven or eight months, and he left her last month because she brought a prostitute into the room. It was true that he was out of work at the time, but that had nothing whatever to do with their separation. On the night previous to her murder he saw her at her room, having visited her to see after her welfare. He stayed with her about a quarter of an hour, and they parted on the very best of terms, but did not have any drink together, and both were quite sober. He always found her to be a sober woman, but she had been drunk in his presence. She had told him that she was born at Limerick, and from there she went to Wales. She had not told him how long she was in Wales, but he knew that she had been in London about four years. Her father, John Kelly, was a "gaffer" in an iron-foundry. She told him that she had six brothers living at home and one in the army. She said that she had been married when in Carnarvon to a collier, whose name was either Davids or Davis, and that she lived with her husband until he was killed in an explosion. After her husband's death she went to Cardiff to see her cousin. She remained at Cardiff some time, living a bad life with her cousin. Witness had often told her that he considered her cousin was the cause of her downfall. From Cardiff she came to London, where she lived in the West End as the "madam" of a gay house. A gentleman came to her there, and asked her if she would like to go to France, as she could do well there. She went to France, but did not remain there long, because she said that she did not like it. When she returned from France she came to Ratcliffe Highway, in the East End. From what she said she must have been there some considerable time. He first picked up with her in Commercial-street, Whitechapel. They had a drink together, and he made arrangements to see her on the following day, and they agreed then to remain together. Witness had heard her say that she was frightened to go out. She had never expressed any fear of any particular persons. He lived with her from the time he met her until a fortnight before her death.
Thomas Bowyer, of 37, Dorset-street, Spitalfields, salesman, said that about 11 o'clock on Friday morning last he was requested by his employer, Mr. C. McCarthy, to go to "Mary Jane's" room. That was the name she was known by. He went to collect some rent, the deceased being a little in arrears. He knocked twice, and, getting no answer, went round by the gutter spout and looked in at a broken window. There was a curtain over it, and he put his hand in and pulled up the curtain. He then saw two lumps of flesh lying on the table which was close against the bed. Upon looking a second time he saw the body of a person lying on the bed, and blood on the floor. He at once went back to his master's and told him what he had seen. Both of them then went to the police-station and informed the officials.
James McCarthy was next called, and deposed that he was a grocer and lodging-house keeper. He had known the deceased by the name of Mary Jane Kelly, and he identified her in the mortuary. "How long," asked the coroner, " had the deceased and Joe lived in the room?" "About 18 months," answered the witness. "Did you know they were married, or did you try to find out?" asked the coroner again. "No," replied the witness; "I did not think that was necessary. All the furniture belonged to witness, and the rent was 4s. 6d. per week. The deceased was 29s. in arrears of rent.
Mary Ann Cox stated that she was a widow living at No. 5 room in the same house as the deceased. Witness was an "unfortunate." She last saw the deceased alive just before midnight on Thursday when she was very drunk. She was in the company of a short stout man shabbily dressed. They were going down the court to the deceased's room. He had on a rather long dark coat and had a pot of ale in his hand. He also wore a billycock hat. His face was rather broad, and he had a full, carrotty beard. Witness saw them going into the house, and she said, "Good night, Mary." The deceased said, "Good night, I am going to have a song," and then she banged the door. Witness went into her own room, and heard the deceased singing, "A violet I picked from mother's grave when a boy." Witness went out in about a quarter of an hour, leaving the deceased still singing. When witness came in at 1 o'clock the deceased was still singing. She went out again and returned to her room at 3 o'clock in the morning, but did not sleep a wink during the whole night, and was still awake when a man called for the rent. During the whole night she did not hear any noise of a struggle. She should say the age of the man who was with the deceased was about 35 years.
Mrs. Elizabeth Prater, wife of a boot machinist, who had deserted her for the last five years, lived in a room above that lately occupied by the deceased. She was "out on the streets." When she went to bed on the Thursday evening it was about a quarter-past 1 o'clock but before she retired she barricaded the door with two tables and a chair. She had been having a deal to drink that night, so went to sleep immediately she laid down. Witness had a little black kitten named "Diddles," and at about a quarter past 4 o'clock in the morning it walked on to her face and awakened her. Almost immediately she heard a faint cry of "Oh! murder!" In the neighbourhood it was a common thing to hear a cry of "Murder," so witness took no notice of it. The noise appeared to come from a room under her own. She heard no singing in the house the whole night. She was certain that nobody was singing at 1 o'clock.
Caroline Maxwell, 14, Dorset-street, wife of the lodging-house deputy, deposed that she knew that the deceased got her living by prostitution. She was a young woman who kept herself to herself, and did not mix up with anybody. Witness saw her at the entry of the court at about 8 o'clock on the Friday morning and said, "Why, Mary, what brings you up so early?" She replied, "Oh, I do feel so bad, Carrie." Witness said, "Will you have a drink?" but the deceased replied, "No; I have just had a half-pint of ale and I had to fetch it up." Witness saw that she had been vomiting close by where she stood. Witness then left her and said, "I can pity your feelings." Witness went to Bishopsgate-street to get her husband something, and upon her return she saw the deceased talking to a man outside the Britannia public-house at about a quarter to 9 o'clock. The man was dressed in a black suit, and seemed to be of medium height and stout.
Sarah Lewis, living at 24, Great Pearl-street, a laundress, said that she went to Miller-court on Friday morning at half-past two o'clock. When she went into the court she saw a man standing outside the lodging-house door. He was not very tall, but was stout-looking. He wore a black suit and had a black hat. The man was looking very eagerly up the court as if he was waiting for somebody to come out. She also saw another rather young-looking man. She then went to the house of one of her friends and went to bed there. She did not hear any noise or anybody singing. She woke up about half-past 3 o'clock in the morning because she was sleepless. A little before 4 o'clock she heard a female's voice scream out "Murder!" loudly, and witness thought that it came from the house opposite. It was only one scream. Cries of "Murder!" were so common in Whitechapel that she took no notice of it. On Wednesday night witness was with another woman going down the Bethnal Green-road when they met a man, rather respectably dressed, who stopped witness and asked her to go down a court with him. He carried a large black bag. Witness refused to go with the man, who said, "What are you afraid of? Do you think that I have anything in my bag?" He then went away. The time was about half-past 8 or 9 o'clock at night. He was dressed in black having a long overcoat and short coat underneath. He had pepper and salt trousers and wore a big black billycock hat. On Friday, the day that the deceased was found murdered, at about half-past 2 o'clock in the morning, witness saw the man standing in Commercial-street speaking to a woman.
Dr. George B. Phillips, divisional surgeon of police, stated that he was called by the police on Friday morning last about 11 o'clock and proceeded to Miller-court. He went into a room having two windows looking out into a court. Two of the panes were broken, and, as the door was locked, he looked through one of the broken windows and satisfied himself that the mutilated corpse lying on the bed was not in need of any immediate attention from him. Thinking that it was advisable that no entrance should be made into the room at that time nothing was done until about half-past 1 o'clock, when the door was broken open by Mr. M'Carthy, who was ready with a pickaxe to break it in at any minute. The order for the forcible entry was given by Inspector Arnold. On the door being opened, the body of the woman was found lying on the bed, two-thirds over towards the edge of the bed nearest the door of entry. She was only clad in a linen under-garment, and from his subsequent examination he was sure that the body had been removed, subsequent to the injury that had caused her death, from the side of the bedstead which was touching the wooden partition. The large quantity of blood under the bedstead and the saturated condition of the palliasse, pillows, &c., led witness to the conclusion that it was the severance of the right carotid artery which was the immediate cause of death.
Julia Vauteruie, a German, said that she lived in Miller-court and knew the deceased, who was an unfortunate. The man, "Joe," who was living with her, objected to her going on the streets. The deceased had lived with another man, whom she was very fond of. She had said to witness, "Joe has been a good fellow to me. I shall have to leave him." On the night of the murder witness felt very strange, thinking that she heard noises. The deceased was singing some Irish songs during the night.
Inspector Walter Banks said that he was the first police officer on the scene of the murder. He did not give orders to have the door forced, and he did not know who did.
Inspector Abberline stated that he was in charge of this case. He was requested by Dr. Phillips not to have the door forced. They remained until about 1:30, when Superintendent Arnold arrived, who then gave directions for the forcing of the door. Witness himself looked into the room from the window, and the scene was the same as described by Dr. Phillips. All about the room there was evidence of clothing having been burnt. He should think that the murderer must have put the clothes on the fire so as to have more light in mutilating his victim. - The Coroner left it with the jury, as that was all the evidence that could at present be given, whether there should be an adjournment. - The jury at once returned a verdict of wilful murder against some person or persons unknown.

Source: The Mercury, Saturday November 17, 1888, Page 7

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 0:43

EAST-END ATROCITIES.
SUSPECTED MURDERER FULLY DESCRIBED.

SCENE IN MILLER'S COURT.
A GROOM'S EXTRAORDINARY STORY.

What is said to be a full and accurate description of the man last seen with Kelly is asserted to be in possession of the authorities. That description was given them the other night by George Hutchinson, a groom by trade, but now working as a labourer. The importance of this description lies (so says the morning papers) in the fact that it agrees with that furnished to the police yesterday, but which was considerably discounted because the statement of the informant had not been made at the inquest and in a more official manner. There is not, so it is declared, the slightest reason for doubting Hutchinson's veracity.

ACCOSTED BY KELLY AT 2 A.M.

On Thursday last (said Hutchinson) I had been to Romford, in Essex, and I returned from there about two o'clock on Friday morning, having walked all the way. I came down Whitechapel-road into Commercial-street. As I passed Thrawl-street I passed a man standing at the corner of the street, and as I went towards Flower and Dean-street I met the woman Kelly, whom I knew very well, having been in her company a number of times. She said, "Mr. Hutchinson, can you lend me sixpence?" I said, "I cannot, as I am spent out going down to Romford." She then walked on towards Thrawl-street, saying, "I must go and look for some money." The man who was standing at the corner of Thrawl-street then came towards her and put his hand on her shoulder, and said something to her which I did not hear, and they both burst out laughing. He put his hand again on her shoulder, and they both walked slowly towards me. I walked on to the corner of Fashion-street, near the public-house. As they came by me his arm was still on her shoulder.

LOOKING THE MAN IN THE FACE.

He had a soft felt hat on, and this was drawn down somewhat over his eyes. I put down my head to look him in the face, and he turned and looked at me very sternly, and they walked across the road to Dorset-street. I followed them across, and stood at the corner of Dorset-street. They stood at the corner of Miller's-court for about three minutes. Kelly spoke to the man in a loud voice, saying, "I have lost my handkerchief." He pulled a red handkerchief out of his pocket, and gave it to Kelly, and they both went up the court together. I went to look up the court to see if I could see them, but could not. I stood there for three-quarters of an hour to see if they came down again, but they did not, and so I went away.

HIS DESCRIPTION - LOOKED LIKE A FOREIGNER.

My suspicions were aroused by seeing the man so well dressed; but I had no suspicion that he was the murderer. The man was about 5ft. 6in. in height, and 34 or 35 years of age, with dark complexion and dark moustache turned up at the ends. He was wearing a long dark coat, trimmed with astrachan, a white collar with black necktie, in which was affixed a horseshoe pin. He wore a pair of dark spats, with light buttons, over button boots, and displayed from his waistcoat a massive gold chain. His watch-chain had a big seal with a red stone hanging from it. He had a heavy moustache, curled up, and dark eyes and bushy eyebrows. He had no side whiskers, and his chin was clean shaven. He looked like a foreigner. I went up the court and stayed there a couple of minutes, but did not see any light in the house or hear any noise. I was out last night until three o'clock looking for him. I could swear to the man anywhere. I told one policeman on Sunday morning what I had seen, but did not go to the police-station. I told one of the lodgers here about it yesterday, and he advised me to go to the police-station, which I did last night.

FANCIED HE SAW HIM ON SUNDAY.

The man I saw did not look as though he would attack another one. He carried a small parcel in his hand, about eight inches long, and it had a strap round it. He had it tightly grasped in his left hand. It looked as though it was covered with dark American cloth. He carried in his right hand, which he laid upon the woman's shoulder, a pair of brown kid gloves. One thing I noticed, and that was that he walked very softly. I believe that he lives in the neighbourhood, and I fancied that I saw him in Petticoat-lane on Sunday morning, but I was not certain. I went down to the Shoreditch mortuary today, and recognised the body as being that of the woman Kelly, whom I saw at two o'clock on Friday morning. Kelly did not seem to me to be drunk, but was a little bit "spreeish." I was quite sober, not having had anything to drink all day. After I left the court I walked about all night, as the place where I usually sleep was closed. I came in as soon as it opened in the morning. I am able to fix the time, as it was between ten and five minutes to two o'clock as I came by Whitechapel Church. When I left the corner of Miller's-court the clock struck three o'clock. One policeman went by the Commercial-street end of Dorset-street, while I was standing there, but not one came down Dorset-street. I saw one man go into a lodging-house in Dorset-street, and no one else. I have been looking for the man all day.

Unfortunately for the theories of our morning contemporaries, we learned on inquiry at the Commercial-street Police-station today that the elaborate description given above is virtually the same as that previously published. It is a little fuller, that is all. But it proceeds from the same source. The police do not attach so much importance to this document as some of our contemporaries do; but they think it sufficiently significant to induce them to make it the subject of careful inquiry. Whether it will result in affording a clue to the Whitechapel mystery is more than can be conjectured at present.

OTHER FACTS AND SURMISES.

The funeral expenses connected with the interment of Mary Janet Kelly will be borne by Mr. McCarthy, her landlord. As time goes on fresh facts are elicited respecting the wretched criminal's description, and it is now thought that the witness at the inquest who spoke of the man's "carrotty" moustache was labouring under a mistake in thus describing it. His moustache is thought to be dark. Bowyer, the young man in Mr. McCarthy's employ was out at different times up Miller's-court on the Thursday night for the purpose of getting water from a tap there - the only available supply. Indeed, Bowyer visited that spot as late - or, rather, as early - as three o'clock on the morning of the murder. This early visit to the water-tap is by no means an unfrequent thing, as Mr. McCarthy's shop, which supplies the wants of a very poor and wretched locality, whose denizens are out at all hours, late and early, does not at times close until three o'clock in the morning, while occasionally it is open all night. Early on Friday morning Bowyer saw a man, whose description tallies with that of the supposed murderer. Bowyer has, he says, described this man to Inspector Abberline and Inspector Reid. Bowyer, who is known as "Indian Harry," has travelled a great deal, and formerly lived in India. He said to an Echo reporter this morning. "The murderer couldn't have come to a worse place (for escaping) than this court. There is only this narrow entrance, and if I had known he was there when I went to the water tap at three o'clock, I reckon he wouldn't have got off."
The murdered woman Kelly was a great favourite amongst the class with whom she associated, and led a life described by persons in that quarter as "very respectable and quiet." Like the other women there she had a dread of "Jack the Ripper," and only the day before her death she remarked to Mrs. McCarthy, "That dreadful man! Ain't he a caution! I wonder who he'll have next." Mrs. McCarthy herself gives a slight clue as to a person who was seen in the court early on Friday morning, as one of her customers remarked to her - before the murder was known - "I saw such a funny man up the court this morning." Mrs. McCarthy says she has been so worried by the shocking affair that she cannot now remember the customer who thus spoke to her. The murderer's daring may be imagined from the fact that persons are moving in Dorset-street at all times of the night and early morning, while a registered lodging-house, where a night watchman is constantly on the alert, is immediately opposite the entrance to Miller's-court. Had a cry been raised the miscreant could not possibly have escaped from the exit into the street.

ARRESTS DURING THE NIGHT.

During the night four men were arrested and taken to the Commerical-street Station. They were, however, soon released. About one o'clock some young men had their suspicions aroused by the peculiar behaviour of a man in the vicinity of the Spitalfields Flower-market. He accosted two women, and after conversing with them for a considerable time tried to persuade them to accompany him into one of the small streets adjoining the market. These thoroughfares are in general gloomy and badly lighted, and the women, being suspicious, refused to go with the man. He was followed for some distance by the young men, and ultimately handed over to a policeman, who took him to Commercial-street Police-station. Here the man refused to give an account of himself, or where he lived, on the ground that he did not wish his parents to be alarmed by police inquiries regarding him. Questioned as to his whereabouts on Thursday night and Friday morning last the man gave various explanations, and contradicted himself so frequently that it was considered advisable to detain him until his identity was established. Two other men taken into custody were alleged to bear some resemblance to the recently-published descriptions of the man last seen in the company of the deceased woman Kelly. They were able, however, to give satisfactory accounts of themselves.

ARRESTED IN THE CASUAL WARD.

During the small hours of yesterday morning the police made a thorough search of casual wards and other places of a similar character, but their vigilance was not rewarded by any discovery of importance. The visit served, however, to remind people connected with these places of their duty, and to stimulate their vigilance, with the result that word was sent in the course of the night from the Holborn casual wards, one of those visited, of the very suspicious behaviour of one of the temporary inmates. Constables were at once sent to the place, and arrested a rough-looking fellow who gave the name of Thomas Murphy. He was taken to the police-station at King's-cross-road, where, on being searched, he was found to have in his possession a somewhat formidable-looking knife, with a blade about ten inches long. He was, therefore, detained in custody on suspicion, and the police proceeded to make inquiries into the truth of his statements. The task was rendered very difficult by the confused and contradictory accounts which Murphy gave of himself, and the man was still in custody at a later hour last evening. No further arrests were made yesterday, and Murphy was the only person last night in custody in connection with the murder.

Source: The Echo, Wednesday November 14, 1888, Page 3

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Re: Details Of Kelly's Murder and Inquest

Post by Karen on Sun 23 Oct 2011 - 0:44

ANOTHER PAGE
In the Gory Tale of Whitechapel.

Butchered on Lord Mayor's Day.
"Maniac Murders" Now Number Eight.

Hacking Horrors Never Equalled.
Police Nor Bloodhounds Find a Clew.

Will the Monster Carve His Fated Fifteen?
London's East End a Veritable Inferno.

[Copyright.]

LONDON, Nov. 9. - Another shocking murder of the well-known Whitechapel type was perpetrated this morning within 300 yards of the spot where the woman Chapman was killed last September.
The details of this tragedy are even more revolting than the seven which preceded it. Accurate circumstances of the affair are difficult to discover. The police are as usual placing every obstacle in the way of the investigation of reporters, but all reports go to prove this a murder far surpassing in fiendish atrocity all the terrible crimes with which the east end of London has been familiarized within the past six months.
A woman 26 years old, by name Mary Jane Kelly, has lived for four months in the front room on the second floor of a house, up an alley known as Cartin's court.
This poor woman was in service a short time ago, but since she came to reside in the court she had been recognized by neighbours as a person who, like so many unfortunate members of her sex in the eastern end of the town, has managed to pass a wretched existence by the practice of immorality under the most degrading conditions. Cartin's court faces a small square with a narrow entrance, and is surrounded by squalid lodging-houses with room to let to women of this unfortunate class.
The Kelly woman is described as tall, and not bad looking, dark complexioned, and generally wearing an old black velvet jacket. She was wearing this jacket this morning, when about 8:15 she went down the court, jug in hand, and returned shortly afterwards with milk. After breakfast she was next seen about 10 o'clock, when she went to a neighbouring beer house, and stayed there drinking for half an hour. This was the last seen of her alive.
The woman was behind in rent and had been told by the landlord that she would be put out if she did not pay today. She went on the streets last night to earn money to pay the rent, and it seems to be clearly established that she returned to her room with a man who

Passed the Night With Her.

No one has been found who saw the man go in, but some neighbours heard him talking to the Kelly woman in her room, and heard her singing as though she were drunk.
At 11 o'clock this morning a man named Bowyer, agent for the landlord, went to Miss Kelly's room to collect the rent. When he knocked at the door he received no answer. Removing the curtain drawn across the window of the room and looking through the broken window pane, Mr. Bowyer saw the woman lying on the bed, on her back, stark naked, while marks of blood were visible all over the place. He tried the handle of the door and found it locked, while the key had been removed from the lock. Without going into the room Mr. Bowyer called the police, who promptly proceeded to conceal all the facts in the case.
In less than two hours the doctors had the body in the morgue and were probing it precisely as they did the Mitre-square victim. They refused to give any details of the examination, but Dr. Gove, one of the physicians present, admitted that he had passed much of his life in dissecting rooms, but never saw such a horrible spectacle as the murdered woman. The man who was called in to identify the body gives the following description, which seems to be reliable: -
The head was nearly severed from the shoulders and the face lacerated almost beyond recognition; the breasts both cut off and placed on the table; the heart and liver were between the woman's legs, the uterus was missing, and there seemed to be at least 40 cuts on the body and big pieces of flesh literally stripped off and strewn on the floor.
It is simply too hideous to describe. There were no indications in this case of the hand skilled in the use of a knife. The body is literally hacked to pieces, but there is no doubt at all but that it is the work of the person who has become known throughout the world as the

Whitechapel Murderer.

The mystery in this case is as deep as in the preceding crimes. The fiend got away without leaving the slightest clew. He chose his time well. At the moment when Mr. Bowyer discovered the murdered body that gorgeous annual nuisance which goes by the name of the Lord Mayor's show, blocking the traffic of the great city for hours, was organizing near Mansion House, scarcely a mile away. Nearly 3,000,000 people were packed in the streets between Mansion House and Trafalgar square, with nearly every policeman in the city braced as a barricade along the curb to keep them in order. The rigid police patrol maintained in Whitechapel since the last double murder in October was removed for one day, and in that one day the assassin struck down another victim.
It is scarcely necessary to say much about Mary Kelly. She was a married woman who fell into dissolute ways, and was deserted by her husband. She had a boy 11 years old, who was begging in the streets while the mother was murdered. The woman had as a paramour a man who sells oranges in the streets, and on whom, as he could not be found, suspicion at once reverted. But he turned up all right tonight, and fainted when he was shown the murdered woman's body.
Like the sands that slowly filter through an hour glass when reversed, the great throng on the streets who had been cheering the new Lord Mayor found their way into Whitechapel. When the news of the murder spread about every heart was filled with horror. When was this to end? How long would this fiend in human form carve women to pieces under the noses of the police and mock their feeble efforts to catch him?
The London police are not allowed to club a crowd into submission as are American police, unless an absolute riot is imminent, but the indignation and excitement was great in Whitechapel today. It was necessary for them to use harsh measures. Profiting by former blunders the police called a photographer to take a picture of the room before the body was removed from it. This gives rise to a report that bloody

Handwriting Was on the Wall,

though three or four people who were allowed to enter the room say they did not observe it, but possibly they were too excited to notice details.
A young girl who knew the murdered woman well, says that about 10 last night she met her, and that she had no money. She said she could not get any. She would never go out any more, but would do away with herself. Soon after they parted, and the man, who is described as respectably dressed, came up and spoke to the murdered woman and offered her money. The man then accompanied the woman to her lodgings.
The little boy was removed from the room and taken to a neighbour's house. The boy has been found and corroborates this, but says he cannot remember the man's face.
Another curious circumstance is worth mentioning. The murder was not made known until 12 o'clock. Mrs. Paumier, who seems to be a credible person, sells walnuts in Sandy's row, near the scene of the murder. She states that at 11 o'clock today a respectably-dressed man carrying a black bag came up to her and began talking about the murder. He wanted to know everything about it. He did not buy any walnuts, and, after standing a few minutes, went away. Mrs. Paumier describes him as about 30 years old, 5 feet 6 inches in height. He wore a checked pair of trousers and a black coat.
Several girls in the neighbourhood say the same man accosted them, and they chaffed him. When they asked him what he had in the black bag, he said: "Something that ladies don't like." This is all that is known of him.
If the police have further information they carefully conceal it, but there is no reason to believe that they have.

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Author of: "Epiphany of the Whitechapel Murders"
Author of: "Jack the Ripper: The Satanic Team"
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